When Stars Are Scattered
Heartbreak and hope exist together in this remarkable graphic novel about growing up in a refugee camp, as told by a Somali refugee to the Newbery Honor-winning creator of Roller Girl.Omar and his younger brother, Hassan, have spent most of their lives in Dadaab, a refugee camp in Kenya. Life is hard there: never enough food, achingly dull, and without access to the medical care Omar knows his nonverbal brother needs. So when Omar has the opportunity to go to school, he knows it might be a chance to change their future . . . but it would also mean leaving his brother, the only family member he has left, every day.Heartbreak, hope, and gentle humor exist together in this graphic novel about a childhood spent waiting, and a young man who is able to create a sense of family and home in the most difficult of settings. It's an intimate, important, unforgettable look at the day-to-day life of a refugee, as told to New York Times Bestselling author/artist Victoria Jamieson by Omar Mohamed, the Somali man who lived the story.

When Stars Are Scattered Details

TitleWhen Stars Are Scattered
Author
ReleaseMay 12th, 2020
PublisherListening Library (Audio)
ISBN-139780593162576
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Realistic Fiction

When Stars Are Scattered Review

  • Kim Bongiorno
    January 1, 1970
    I was in my daughter's middle school library when the librarian--who knows me all too well--pointed out that she just had a box of books delivered. Of course I dove in, and this was the first one I knew I had to borrow.This is the true story of Somalian refugee Omar, who had to flee to a Kenyan refugee camp at four years old with his nonverbal little brother. His father had been killed, and he could only hope his mother was alive...somewhere.It's about how he kept going, surrounded by the people I was in my daughter's middle school library when the librarian--who knows me all too well--pointed out that she just had a box of books delivered. Of course I dove in, and this was the first one I knew I had to borrow.This is the true story of Somalian refugee Omar, who had to flee to a Kenyan refugee camp at four years old with his nonverbal little brother. His father had been killed, and he could only hope his mother was alive...somewhere.It's about how he kept going, surrounded by the people in the camp who became a surrogate family, touched by outsiders who visited and inspired him to keep dreaming, facing internal and external obstacles.His story--beautifully turned into a graphic novel by the amazing Victoria Jameison (ROLLER GIRL)--is moving and hopeful, sad and frustrating, and is laced with both gentle humor and unflinching honesty.It is perfectly done for the middle school crowd (ages 9-12) on up, creating a better understanding of people who lived completely differently lives than we did, filling the reader up with empathy, and inspiring them to always keep dreaming while doing the work to catch those dreams.This is the kind of book that stays with you, and I'm so glad it ended up in my hands. (Though since I have to return this copy to my friend, I'm buying my own for my kids.)
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my heart. This book. This is a must-read. Omar Muhammed's graphic novel memoir (written with powerhouse graphic novel author Victoria Jamieson) presents his story of fleeing war-torn Somalia and arriving at a Kenyan refugee camp at age 4 with his little brother. They had no idea if their mother was alive or dead. And they lived in that refugee camp until Omar was 18 years old and was finally resettled to the United States. This is an eye-opening real life story of life in a refugee camp and Oh my heart. This book. This is a must-read. Omar Muhammed's graphic novel memoir (written with powerhouse graphic novel author Victoria Jamieson) presents his story of fleeing war-torn Somalia and arriving at a Kenyan refugee camp at age 4 with his little brother. They had no idea if their mother was alive or dead. And they lived in that refugee camp until Omar was 18 years old and was finally resettled to the United States. This is an eye-opening real life story of life in a refugee camp and of one boy who didn't quit going to school, doing his chores, and putting one foot in front of the other, even when he didn't have high hopes that anything in his life would ever change. Maybe it's me, but I had never really considered that there were people (LOTS of people) actually living long-term in refugee camps. Whole lives. So this book was incredibly eye-opening to me and it deserves a wide audience. It's written with a lot of heart and it's just an unforgettable story.
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  • Bridgette
    January 1, 1970
    This should be required reading for pretty much every human on the planet. There is so much hope in this, along with unimaginable heartbreak. I nearly sobbed at the end of the story and at his author's note. It's perfect for middle grade readers, and everyone beyond that age. A heart-breaking, yet hopeful, look into the story of one refugee and his journey out of the refugee camp.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully illustrated graphic novel about a boy and his brother living in a refugee camp.
  • Sakina (aforestofbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    I have no words. This graphic novel is a real-life account of Omar Mohamed's story as a Somalian refugee. It was eye-opening, heartbreaking, yet filled with so much hope. The pictures we see of Omar and Hassan at the end, and their life after the events of this book, made me almost cry. It's definitely a difficult story to process at times, but I think it's important and necessary for people to become aware of the refugee crisis and what refugees have gone through and are still going through in I have no words. This graphic novel is a real-life account of Omar Mohamed's story as a Somalian refugee. It was eye-opening, heartbreaking, yet filled with so much hope. The pictures we see of Omar and Hassan at the end, and their life after the events of this book, made me almost cry. It's definitely a difficult story to process at times, but I think it's important and necessary for people to become aware of the refugee crisis and what refugees have gone through and are still going through in their journey to find a place to call home.Adding this trigger warning because it was difficult for me to read about: one of the girls that Omar is friends with gets married off at a really young age to an older man instead of being allowed to continue on with school
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Read an ARC rec'd at PLA: This was a really wonderful graphic novel about the refugee experience. Victoria does her amazing as usual job telling the story of Omar Mohamed. Omar is a real person so this graphic novel is his story. It is fiction because some characters were created as an amalgamation of experiences with many people. There are photos and an afterward from Omar Mohamed with more detail and information. You'll want to put this one in your collection.
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I revisited this one on audio and it's a great recording. Since it's a graphic novel and the settings and actions are not usually described in the text, the audiobook utilizes sound effects to bring those across. The camp background sound effects were so realistic that I kept looking around me as I was walking in my neighborhood, expecting to see people behind me, etc. The characters are read by a full cast, some of whom read in an accent (the book is set in Kenya and main characters are I revisited this one on audio and it's a great recording. Since it's a graphic novel and the settings and actions are not usually described in the text, the audiobook utilizes sound effects to bring those across. The camp background sound effects were so realistic that I kept looking around me as I was walking in my neighborhood, expecting to see people behind me, etc. The characters are read by a full cast, some of whom read in an accent (the book is set in Kenya and main characters are Somalian refugees) and some do not, which was a little distracting. The authors' notes are read by the two authors of the book.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by EdelweissOmar and his younger brother live in a refugee camp in Kenya after having to leave Somalia over seven years ago. Their father is dead, and they cannot locate their mother. They have a foster mother, Fatuma, who helps them with food and clothing, and they have a tent in which to sleep. Hassan doesn't speak, and has only ever said the word for mother. When a gentleman comes to the camp and encourage Omar to attend school, he doesn't want to leave his brother, but once he E ARC provided by EdelweissOmar and his younger brother live in a refugee camp in Kenya after having to leave Somalia over seven years ago. Their father is dead, and they cannot locate their mother. They have a foster mother, Fatuma, who helps them with food and clothing, and they have a tent in which to sleep. Hassan doesn't speak, and has only ever said the word for mother. When a gentleman comes to the camp and encourage Omar to attend school, he doesn't want to leave his brother, but once he starts, he hopes that his education will help make things better for him and his brother. Strengths: Jamieson's illustrations are excellent, and Omar's plight well portrayed. Details of living in a camp, having parents be missing, and struggling to find adequate food and clothing are all going to be new to many of my students. Omar not wanting to go to school because of his brother is admirable, and I hope that seeing what a school is like in a refugee camp might help students appreciate how goo they have it in the US. (At least at my school.)Weaknesses: This felt like it ended abruptly, and I would have liked a bit more details all through the story. I wonder if pages were missing from the E ARC, because I didn't see notes about the real life Omar who co-wrote this. What I really think: I will definitely purchase, as I think it is helpful for my students to understand what children go through in other parts of the world. Having this information presented in graphic novel format is a gummy vitamin approach to getting them to discover this.
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  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss. I am sorry that it was only part of this upcoming release, but it was plenty to know that this is not Victoria Jamiesons usual graphic novel. Her Pets on the Loose were goofy fun with little real thinking involved in reading them. Roller Girl and Alls Faire in Middle School were excellent choices for middle school students who want to read books that reflect what they deal with every day. But When Stars are Scattered tackles a much more serious life situationlife Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss. I am sorry that it was only part of this upcoming release, but it was plenty to know that this is not Victoria Jamieson’s usual graphic novel. Her Pets on the Loose were goofy fun with little real thinking involved in reading them. Roller Girl and All’s Faire in Middle School were excellent choices for middle school students who want to read books that reflect what they deal with every day. But When Stars are Scattered tackles a much more serious life situation—life in an African refugee camp. The artwork is clearly Jamieson’s style with her very realistic looking people and places while still clearly being a graphic novel. The storyline follows two brothers living alone in a massive United Nations camp, waiting to be reunited with their missing mom and trying to fill the days with something more meaningful than playing soccer with a ball made from plastic bags. I loved Roller Girl, but only liked what I read of her newest, but my students will read it because it is a graphic novel. I will happily offer it to them knowing that it will give them a bit of insight into a life that I hope none of them ever experiences. The portion I read was free of profanity and sexual content and only makes references to the wars happening in Africa without seeking to educate 4-7th graders about the atrocities occurring there.
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  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    (Read the ARC in the car on the way home from NCTE so I could pass it to a friend on Monday morning.)This book helped me to better understand the refugee camp experience that some of our students come to us with. It's incredible that Omar and his brother survived, and that Omar thrived FIFTEEN YEARS in the camp. For a graphic novel, this is a very text-heavy book, but I hope as I challenge my graphic novel readers to push themselves beyond their favorites/re-reads, they will tackle this (Read the ARC in the car on the way home from NCTE so I could pass it to a friend on Monday morning.)This book helped me to better understand the refugee camp experience that some of our students come to us with. It's incredible that Omar and his brother survived, and that Omar thrived FIFTEEN YEARS in the camp. For a graphic novel, this is a very text-heavy book, but I hope as I challenge my graphic novel readers to push themselves beyond their favorites/re-reads, they will tackle this important window/mirror book.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Crying in the afterword and author's note? Yup. I was fine all of the book and then, and then, you find out about the mom and... waterworks! This is an epic collaborations between a man, Omar Mohamed, who was a Somali refugee living in a refugee camp for the majority of his young life before being relocated to the United States (Arizona) in his very late teens and only after years of struggle, pain, sadness, anger, hunger, with bits of levity, some education, and TLC by a foster mother-- and by Crying in the afterword and author's note? Yup. I was fine all of the book and then, and then, you find out about the mom and... waterworks! This is an epic collaborations between a man, Omar Mohamed, who was a Somali refugee living in a refugee camp for the majority of his young life before being relocated to the United States (Arizona) in his very late teens and only after years of struggle, pain, sadness, anger, hunger, with bits of levity, some education, and TLC by a foster mother-- and by foster mother it means, Omar and his brother, whose seizures and PTSD left him speechless save for one word were placed in a tent next to an older woman who would look after them. She had a big heart and took care but also couldn't do much to quell the pain of their father's murder and their mother's disappearance or murder. The book's three parts are a roller coaster of understanding of a refugee experience and when Jamieson met Mohamed through a church event, he wanted to share his story and she wanted to tell it with him. Thus an epic graphic memoir was born from the capable hands of a story needing to be told and a master graphic storyteller. The color palette, the easy-to-see dialogue and narrative, the movement both between panels and time was what every graphic novel could be with attention to detail and love. It provides perspective and so much empathy for the refugee experience.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel memoir details the journey of Omar Mohamed and his younger brother, Hassan as refugees from the country of Somalia in a settlement camp in Kenya.Fifteen years is detailed in this 3 part book. The first part focuses on showing us Omar as a young child and caretaker of Hassan helping his foster mother, navigating the refugee compound and eventually starting elementary school.The second part details his continuing education and call to be interviewed by the UN. The interviews This graphic novel memoir details the journey of Omar Mohamed and his younger brother, Hassan as refugees from the country of Somalia in a settlement camp in Kenya.Fifteen years is detailed in this 3 part book. The first part focuses on showing us Omar as a young child and caretaker of Hassan helping his foster mother, navigating the refugee compound and eventually starting elementary school.The second part details his continuing education and call to be interviewed by the UN. The interviews unearths the trauma experienced by both from the killing of their father and eventual separation from their mother. The third and final part of the story documents the 4 years of waiting to see if they for settlement in the United States, receiving the news and their journey to America.There are photographs and an Afterwards page, providing reading with a short summary of Omar’s settlement in the United States. Finally, there’s author notes from both Omar and Victoria Jamieson.Jamieson does an exquisite job with the illustrations; this ARC is primarily in black and white but there are sample color artwork on the front and back inside covers.Readers gain true insights into the plight of refugees and the many dangers faced. This is a great book to add to a library collection or gift to others.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel turned full cast audiobook was amazing. Omar and his younger brother Hassan have been at the refugee camp in Kenya ever since they escaped violence in Somalia. Their mother could not come with them so they have a foster guardian who lives in the tent next door. Omar takes care of Hassan who is nonverbal and has inexplicable seizures. One day he is encouraged to go to school. He is nervous about leaving Hassan during the day but school opens up a realm of opportunities for This graphic novel turned full cast audiobook was amazing. Omar and his younger brother Hassan have been at the refugee camp in Kenya ever since they escaped violence in Somalia. Their mother could not come with them so they have a foster guardian who lives in the tent next door. Omar takes care of Hassan who is nonverbal and has inexplicable seizures. One day he is encouraged to go to school. He is nervous about leaving Hassan during the day but school opens up a realm of opportunities for Omar. He makes new friends, learns English and more, and starts dreaming about his future. He and Hassan gain an interview with the UN in hopes of resettlement but how long will the boys, now young men have to endure before hope is found? I laughed, I cried, this was a beautiful story based on real life events. Highly recommend.Thank you to Libro.fm’s Educator Advanced Listening Copy program for a free download of this audiobook.
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough not only to receive an ARC of this at ALA midwinter, but to hear both Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed speak. It's an important and inspiring book detailing the years Omar and his brother Hassan (who is nonverbal, but is compassionate, nurturing, and helpful) spent in a Kenyan refugee cap. It is the authors' hope (and mine!) that the book will bring much-needed attention to the plight of refugees everywhere. I can't wait to see the book in full color, as the ARC is black I was fortunate enough not only to receive an ARC of this at ALA midwinter, but to hear both Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed speak. It's an important and inspiring book detailing the years Omar and his brother Hassan (who is nonverbal, but is compassionate, nurturing, and helpful) spent in a Kenyan refugee cap. It is the authors' hope (and mine!) that the book will bring much-needed attention to the plight of refugees everywhere. I can't wait to see the book in full color, as the ARC is black and white. As much as I enjoyed the black and white version, I can only imagine how much color (which I love) will add to the experience. I was completely drawn in by the gorgeous cover art, as well as the book's perfect title.Once I have this at my middle school library, I'll be booktalking it often . . . when it's not checked out! I may need more than one copy.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    At a time when the leadership in several countries puts us at risk of losing our empathy for the refugee crisis, Omar Mohamed and Victoria Jamieson share the story of Omar and his brother Hassan's life as Somalian refugees in a refugee camp in Kenya, and bring us back to our best selves.This beautifully illustrated, compellingly narrated memoir is a great read for children and adults alike, and a great piece of literature to co-read when introducing young children to what it means to be a At a time when the leadership in several countries puts us at risk of losing our empathy for the refugee crisis, Omar Mohamed and Victoria Jamieson share the story of Omar and his brother Hassan's life as Somalian refugees in a refugee camp in Kenya, and bring us back to our best selves.This beautifully illustrated, compellingly narrated memoir is a great read for children and adults alike, and a great piece of literature to co-read when introducing young children to what it means to be a refugee.
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  • Lesley Burnap
    January 1, 1970
    None of us ask to be born where we are, or how we are. The challenge of life is to make the most out of what youve been given. Read this book in one sitting. Was mesmerized by Omars story. Feeling incredibly blessed and privileged. Thanks to Omar and Victoria for sharing this incredible story. “None of us ask to be born where we are, or how we are. The challenge of life is to make the most out of what you’ve been given.” Read this book in one sitting. Was mesmerized by Omar’s story. Feeling incredibly blessed and privileged. Thanks to Omar and Victoria for sharing this incredible story.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Such a beautiful story that I cant wait to get into the hands of my kiddos that love graphic novels. Its such an important one, for our students that have so much, to read to understand that students in other places have such different life experiences. Highly recommend! Such a beautiful story that I can’t wait to get into the hands of my kiddos that love graphic novels. It’s such an important one, for our students that have so much, to read to understand that students in other places have such different life experiences. Highly recommend!
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  • Meredith Ann
    January 1, 1970
    I usually read MG graphic novels in one sitting. This was a pick up, read a chapter type one. The topic isn't easy. It's an important one for readers to learn about though, especially in today's political climate.
  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful story. With this, A Long Walk to Water, Refugee, and many picture books - I foresee a unit over refugees and their life. I love all of the authors notes in this story and how great they explained their life through words AND pictures. I cant wait to share this story with others. What a beautiful story. With this, A Long Walk to Water, Refugee, and many picture books - I foresee a unit over refugees and their life. I love all of the authors notes in this story and how great they explained their life through words AND pictures. I can’t wait to share this story with others.
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  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this.
  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This graphic novel by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed is a must read. It's the story of Omar and his brother, Hassan, and their life in a refugee camp in Kenya after fleeing from their home in Somalia. Although this story is filled with hardship and disappointment, the hope for a better future runs throughout it, and the focus on education and being prepared for an opportunity when it presents itself is inspiring. I think maybe people don't understand the reality of life for many Wow. This graphic novel by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed is a must read. It's the story of Omar and his brother, Hassan, and their life in a refugee camp in Kenya after fleeing from their home in Somalia. Although this story is filled with hardship and disappointment, the hope for a better future runs throughout it, and the focus on education and being prepared for an opportunity when it presents itself is inspiring. I think maybe people don't understand the reality of life for many refugees before they resettle in countries like Canada or the United States, and I hope a look into that experience fosters compassion, tolerance, and understanding.
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    ❤❤❤❤ so much love. Victoria Jamieson does such great work (cant wait to see Im color), and Omars story...touching, heartbreaking, hopeful, important and super accessible for middle grade. ❤️❤️❤️❤️ so much love. Victoria Jamieson does such great work (can’t wait to see I’m color), and Omar’s story...touching, heartbreaking, hopeful, important and super accessible for middle grade.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    If you ask young people to read only one book this year, make it this one. If you yourself read only one book this year, make it this one. This is the side of the world we dont see, because were not looking. Everyone needs to look and keep looking until we see the humanity and the tragedy and have a good answer for why we let it continue. If you ask young people to read only one book this year, make it this one. If you yourself read only one book this year, make it this one. This is the side of the world we don’t see, because we’re not looking. Everyone needs to look and keep looking until we see the humanity and the tragedy and have a good answer for why we let it continue.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel gives readers an opportunity to step out of their lives and into the shoes of Somali refugees living in a camp in Kenya. I learned an awful lot about what life is like for so many people, people who have spent years in a sort of limbo, not knowing if they will ever be able to return to Somalia but also not truly belonging in Kenya. I was struck at the idea of remaining hopeful in this type of situation, especially learning that there are whole generations of people in these This graphic novel gives readers an opportunity to step out of their lives and into the shoes of Somali refugees living in a camp in Kenya. I learned an awful lot about what life is like for so many people, people who have spent years in a sort of limbo, not knowing if they will ever be able to return to Somalia but also not truly belonging in Kenya. I was struck at the idea of remaining hopeful in this type of situation, especially learning that there are whole generations of people in these camps that were born there and see no easy way to a different future.But hope remains.The graphic novel format of this book will make it accessible to a wide range of readers. I will certainly buy it for our school library when it releases. It has shone some (star)light on this topic for young readers.
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  • Shirley Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this graphic novel for kids. I've read several books by 'lost boys' and others who were forced to become refugees when war tore their villages apart. Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed do a fabulous job of taking Omar's difficult, but ultimately successful, journey and making it real but accessible for kids. Omar was four, and his brother Hassan younger with an intellectual disability, when their father was killed and they were separated from their mother. The story starts as Omar and I loved this graphic novel for kids. I've read several books by 'lost boys' and others who were forced to become refugees when war tore their villages apart. Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed do a fabulous job of taking Omar's difficult, but ultimately successful, journey and making it real but accessible for kids. Omar was four, and his brother Hassan younger with an intellectual disability, when their father was killed and they were separated from their mother. The story starts as Omar and Hassan are Somalians living in a refugee camp in Kenya. The roller coaster of emotions that a refugee feels as they despair in the present, hope for the future, sometimes give up, sometimes stay engaged are beautifully drawn in both word and picture.
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  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher for sharing an ARC with Collaboookation. This book is amazing. The graphic novel format is the perfect way to share this story in all its complexity. Omar has lived in a Kenyan refugee camp with his little brother for almost as long as they can remember - ever since his father was killed and his mom told them to run, that she'd catch up with him. This book illustrates how redundant and boring life in a refugee camp can be; it's a place meant for waiting. But it's also Thank you to the publisher for sharing an ARC with Collaboookation. This book is amazing. The graphic novel format is the perfect way to share this story in all its complexity. Omar has lived in a Kenyan refugee camp with his little brother for almost as long as they can remember - ever since his father was killed and his mom told them to run, that she'd catch up with him. This book illustrates how redundant and boring life in a refugee camp can be; it's a place meant for waiting. But it's also full of community, love, and support. Through the nine years that this book covers, Omar wavers between wanting to be the best he can be for his brother and his mother and giving up- losing all hope of ever leaving the camp. A beautiful testament to the human spirit, and how difficult it can be to brave every day life with its hopes and despair.For anyone who loved Home of the Brave, A Long Walk to Water, or They Called Us Enemy, this book will surely captivate you as well. I'm planning on using it in my graphic novel book club- and plan on moving on to other refugee studies afterward because I know students will be captivated by Omar's plight.
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  • Justin
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal. And particularly poignant in 2020.
  • Sara Magnafichi
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Penguin Kids for providing an ARC of this beautiful graphic novel with #collabookation. Pain, hurt, love, and hope can be found within these pages written by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed. Omar and his brother, who has a disability, find themselves in hard times and become refugees at a camp in Kenya, after they run from Somalia. Omar is presented with the ability to go to school, and he has to figure out what to do. Can he leave his brother day after day alone? Though life in Thank you to Penguin Kids for providing an ARC of this beautiful graphic novel with #collabookation. Pain, hurt, love, and hope can be found within these pages written by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed. Omar and his brother, who has a disability, find themselves in hard times and become refugees at a camp in Kenya, after they run from Somalia. Omar is presented with the ability to go to school, and he has to figure out what to do. Can he leave his brother day after day alone? Though life in the camp is extremely difficult, Omar and his brother find a family who surrounds them with love in both the good times and the bad times. This is an amazing story that will open the door to wonderful conversations through the use of a graphic novel. This book will be available in April of 2020. This is a must read!
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  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from PenguinKids and I am incredibly grateful. Based on the true story of Omar and Hassan, his brother, it shows the devastating struggles faced by refugees in a camp in Kenya, and likely gives us a glimpse into what is being faced in camps all over the world. Written in a graphic novel format, this will ensure that many, many young people will get the opportunity to see and better understand the refugee experience. It was heartbreaking to see the lack of food, I received an ARC of this book from PenguinKids and I am incredibly grateful. Based on the true story of Omar and Hassan, his brother, it shows the devastating struggles faced by refugees in a camp in Kenya, and likely gives us a glimpse into what is being faced in camps all over the world. Written in a graphic novel format, this will ensure that many, many young people will get the opportunity to see and better understand the refugee experience. It was heartbreaking to see the lack of food, water, medicine, education, shelter, care, and safety provided these young boys, and the guilt felt when one family is chosen over others to be relocated, yet underneath it all, there remains hope and love. Beautiful story that inspires compassion that leads to action.
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  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I read it in one tense sitting. Omar's voice is optimistic, kind and intelligent. His care for his disabled brother is touching. His experiences fleeing from the violence in his village/ country then spending years in a refugee camp are unimaginable. Yet Omar brings us there as does Victoria Jamieson's art. I cannot wait to reread this when it releases in full-color. This is a first-purchase; a must-read; a must book talk.
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