Ravencaller (The Keepers, #2)
When ancient magic suddenly returns to his land, a warrior priest must protect his world from monsters that were once only legend in the second book of USA Today bestseller David Dalglish's epic fantasy trilogy.Magical creatures are attacking the capital city, seeking to retake what was once theirs, and no one is safe. Ancient cultists have cursed the highest members of the Church, turning them into twisted abominations. The only hope for a cure lies with Adria Eveson. To learn the cure, she must befriend an imprisoned cultist, and guard her heart against his seductive promises and twisted logic. The fate of all races, human and magical, rests in her hands, and in the choices she makes. Should she choose wrong, only one person stands in her way: her brother, the Soulkeeper Devin Eveson.The KeepersSoulkeeperRavencaller For more from David Dalglish, check out: ShadowdanceA Dance of CloaksA Dance of BladesA Dance of MirrorsA Dance of ShadowsA Dance of GhostsA Dance of Chaos SeraphimSkybornFirebornShadowborn

Ravencaller (The Keepers, #2) Details

TitleRavencaller (The Keepers, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 17th, 2020
PublisherOrbit
Rating
GenreFantasy, Epic Fantasy

Ravencaller (The Keepers, #2) Review

  • Petrik
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher—Orbit—in exchange for an honest review.4.5/5 starsThere is no lull moment in Ravencaller, this action-packed sequel brings well-written morally grey characters and bloody macabre into one package.First of all, I’m usually not a fan of sudden cover changes in the middle of a series, but this is, in my opinion, one of those rare cases where the new cover artist did a better job than the previous artist. Don’t get me wrong, I liked the cover art of Soulkeeper, but I LO ARC provided by the publisher—Orbit—in exchange for an honest review.4.5/5 starsThere is no lull moment in Ravencaller, this action-packed sequel brings well-written morally grey characters and bloody macabre into one package.First of all, I’m usually not a fan of sudden cover changes in the middle of a series, but this is, in my opinion, one of those rare cases where the new cover artist did a better job than the previous artist. Don’t get me wrong, I liked the cover art of Soulkeeper, but I LOVE the cover art of Ravencaller that’s done by Paul Scott Canavan; it looked spectacular, and it’s more fitting for the series. Second, look at the Ravencaller in the cover art, it reflects what’s written in the text of this book and—this is very important—it reminded me of Eileen the Crow from one of my favorite games: Bloodborne! Lastly, I know I mentioned last year in my Soulkeeper review that I’m going to read more of Dalglish’s books, especially his Shadowdance series, I’m ashamed to say that I wasn’t able to achieve this yet. After reading Ravencaller, it’s even more evident that I HAVE to read Dalglish’s Shadowdancer series because this sequel was even better than the first book which I already highly praised. “Humans have always been reactionary creatures obsessed with the present, ignorant of the past, and fearful of the future.” Ravencaller is the second book in The Keepers trilogy by David Dalglish. Same as its predecessor, this is another book of high caliber by the author. I can’t say much regarding the details of the plot in order to avoid spoilers except that it takes place shortly after the end of Soulkeeper, and the story deals with the deadly conflicts caused by long-lasting prejudice between human and magical creatures, and the arrival of the Ravencaller as they attempt to hunt Adria Eveson due to her growing power. I think this is an incredible book, although the entire story of the novel takes place in the city of Londheim, Dalglish was able to keep the pacing of the story thoroughly engaging and full of twists and turns. Constricting the story of the book to one location was a great decision, Londheim was supposed to be a place of refuge and safety, but what happened when that single place of supposed solace ended up becoming a place of disaster? Chaos and mayhem ensued. “We fear only what history taught us time and time again. It is not we who war against humanity, onyx one. Humanity wars against us, and our very existence.” Trouble brews non-stop for the characters; from the ravenous epidemic that haunts the night to the horror brought by the invasion of the dragon-sired, there’s no shortage of new danger for the people of Londheim. The second half of the book, in particular, was practically unputdownable for me. The vile deeds of both races—mostly humans—and the politics of the church continually escalate towards a higher level of threats. However, it’s not all death and gore here, resonating themes and character developments played an equally important role in enriching the compelling narrative. The premise of The Keepers allows Dalglish to successfully incorporate the dreadful nature of humanity in the face of the unknown into his storytelling. For example, even if monsters are virtuous, it will be more likely that humans won’t cooperate and will always seek a way to exact their self-righteousness in the name of their own safety and justice. “Is one lapinkin the same as all lapinkin? Is one human the same as all humans? You are not of one mind. Why do you presume us to be?” The themes and the narrative were then effectively extended by the great characterizations and their respective developments. The moral compass of the main characters of this series has become so much more complex and morally grey than before. In a good way, I was stunned by some of the actions of the protagonists of this series. Ravencaller employed more perspective characters to follow, and honestly speaking, seeing the story unfolds from several perspectives of different oppositions helps enlarged the complexity and immersive capability of the plot; Dierk and Evelyn are two new characters with intriguing backgrounds and character developments that I enjoyed reading. Whether I agree or not with the character’s actions, I found myself engrossed by everyone’s POV chapters. I personally think that it’s intriguing that out of all the characters in the series, the characters that ended up being the most kind-hearted are the monsters: Tesmarie, Cannac, and Puffy. (And hey, Puffy—my beloved firekin—has one POV chapter!) Dalglish writes flawed characters with believable motivations that made me question the nature of good and evil; Jacaranda, Dierk, and Adria, in particular, did awful things during their storylines, but I can’t help but feel compelled to find out what will happen next. “The world we live in is not simple…It is not black and white and confined to a flat page scrawled upon by the scholars. You ask about an act committed in a singular moment in time. The context of that moment must be taken into account. Can the Sisters love a person who wields their power into a curse? Absolutely. Might they also hate or condemn a person for the same act? Without question.” I’ve talked about the characters and the themes, but when it comes down to it, Ravencaller is more action-oriented compared to its predecessor. The characterizations already established in Soulkeeper made Dalglish’s action sequences glistened more. So far, I’ve read only two books by Dalglish, and I have to say that the combination of his characterizations and violent action sequences are the recipe that inclines me to keep on reading his books, and hopefully, I will be able to devour Shadowdance series as soon as I can. I heard from my friend, Mihir, that Shadowdance is Dalglish’s best series so far, and that sounds crazy because I loved the ones I’ve read in Soulkeeper and Ravencaller very much already. The actions are brutal, gory, grotesque, and most importantly, the unstoppable whirlwind of power, magic, and steel was gripping. It’s also good to see that Dalglish has significantly decrease his habit to use the word “tremendous” as a magnifier. “The sound of metal hitting metal rang out a steady song. In it she heard lyrics, and they spoke to her impending defeat.” I don’t think I have any issues with my experience of reading Ravencaller. Frankly, if I have to be nitpicky, I would probably settle with saying that the “gigantic dragon” plotline introduced in the first book hasn’t moved forward as much as I hoped. However, it’s not a big deal, and I was entertained completely by every page of this novel. Ravencaller is a pulse-pounding and extensively absorbing sequel. With this book, it’s crystal clear that Dalglish has prepared a lot of set pieces to be knocked down in the final book of the trilogy. Seriously, the final pages of this book prophesize utterly intense confrontations and an explosive final battle to come, and I may have slightly screamed internally when I read the final sentence of the book; the volume of the internal screaming is up to you to imagine. Well done, Dalglish. I look forward to seeing how it all concludes! “This life we live, these choices we make, become everything. Kindness shown to a stranger echoes throughout eternity. The love we feel, and the love we give to another, will linger unchanging in a cosmic memory.” Official release date: 19th March 2020 (UK) and 17th March 2020 (US)You can pre-order the book from: Amazon UK | Amazon US | Book Depository (Free shipping)The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.You can find this and the rest of my reviews at Novel NotionsSpecial thanks to my Patrons on Patreon for giving me extra support towards my passion for reading and reviewing!My Patrons: Alfred, Devin, Hamad, Mike, Miracle, Nicholas.
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  • Holly (Holly Hearts Books)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so stuck between giving this 3 or 4 stars. I really enjoyed it but I kinda feel like all the romance took over the opportunity for the plot to move forward in this sequel. (there’s a pairing for every main character) Yes, there’s a lot of action which is written so well and makes it a page turner but as I finished the book and really thought “what exactly happened storywise until the very end?” I couldn’t really come up with much. I mean, the mountain outside the city (which I’d consider the I’m so stuck between giving this 3 or 4 stars. I really enjoyed it but I kinda feel like all the romance took over the opportunity for the plot to move forward in this sequel. (there’s a pairing for every main character) Yes, there’s a lot of action which is written so well and makes it a page turner but as I finished the book and really thought “what exactly happened storywise until the very end?” I couldn’t really come up with much. I mean, the mountain outside the city (which I’d consider the “antagonist”) just wasn’t a threat anymore. Maybe mentioned once or twice.There is one chapter in the middle that is the BIGGEST tease, switching perspective to a different location of the world, and I wanted more of that so bad.I do want to mention there is a new perspective, Dierk, who I oddly found the most interesting and I looked forward to his chapters every time. If you’ve read this book, that probably doesn’t make me sound like a good person as Dierk is..... strange.. heh.Dalglish does have one heck of an imagination and I’m confident he’ll bring everything crashing together in the next installment for one hell of a show.
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  • Nils | nilsreviewsit
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Lyra of the Beloved Sun, hear my prayer. His body is weak, his legs unsteady, and his burdens beyond what he may bear. Grant him strength to walk in your name. May he stride tall through fields of strife, and care not for the danger, but only for your blessed light.’~Ravencaller by David Dalglish is the second book in The Keepers series. The first book, Soulkeeper, was such a thrilling read, it certainly set the bar high. Was this sequel as good? Well, let’s just say that this series is fast be ‘Lyra of the Beloved Sun, hear my prayer. His body is weak, his legs unsteady, and his burdens beyond what he may bear. Grant him strength to walk in your name. May he stride tall through fields of strife, and care not for the danger, but only for your blessed light.’~Ravencaller by David Dalglish is the second book in The Keepers series. The first book, Soulkeeper, was such a thrilling read, it certainly set the bar high. Was this sequel as good? Well, let’s just say that this series is fast becoming one of my all time favourites! So I think that speaks for itself really.I’m not going to dwell on the state of the world right now, we all know it’s an anxiety filled, frightening, mess. It may be a cliche, but books, especially in the fantasy genre, are undoubtedly a great form of escape for me. Ravencaller proved to be perfect for this, for a short while each day, I was sucked into a surreal fantastical world, and I was blown away.Much in the same fashion as Soulkeeper, Ravencaller entails an abundance of monsters and mayhem. The book is set solely in the city of Londheim, a place where the old magic has returned and along with it, so have the magical creatures. They have awakened to a world that was once their domain but is now ruled by humans, and so, they fight to reclaim all that they feel is rightfully theirs. With cannibals, giant spear wielding lapinkins, bloodthirsty foxkins, man-eating owls, gargoyles, and the Forgotten Children running amok across the city, the survival of the human race lies with our four main protagonists - Devin, Adria, Jacaranda and Tommy.However, their task is never an easy one. A war between the two races, and even between inner factions, is reckoning - there seems to be no time for peace. The Ravencallers, with their dragon-sired magical minions, and the cult of The Forgotten Children, cause much chaos and danger for the citizens of Londheim. Their sight is set on destroying Adria, a newly formed Chainbreaker with extraordinary power. It is clear from the beginning that Dalglish sets a relentless pace, with wall to wall action, and battle sequences that often had my pulse racing, we certainly get an exhilarating ride. The battle magic was truly incredible; from the windleaping lapinkin who would bound into the air and fall upon their enemy impaling them with spears, to the magical martial arts of the avenria Ravencallers, and the sword fighting Onyx fairies, there is much to be dazzled by.~‘Her soul was a shimmering light of memories and emotions. Their souls were black voids upon a colourful canvas. She was a painter wielding a brush. They were madmen holding a torch.’~Yet, whilst Ravencaller remains heavily centred around monster-slaying, somewhat akin to The Witcher series, Dalglish also consistently makes us question the very nature of monsters. Almost every character is morally grey to a certain extent, and the lines between good and evil, right and wrong, hero and villain are always blurred. Who truly are the monsters? Both magical creatures and humans have caused and suffered brutality alike, they have lost much, they both deserve a place in the world, and yet they view each other as the enemy. The Ravencallers kill mercilessly, but humans also kill out of fear and lack of understanding. The Keeping Church and city rulers are corrupt to their core, their sense of superiority, of higher divinity, drives them. Are any of their actions any more justified? Dalglish is an author who allows you to view prejudices from every angle, and he presents to us a narrative which contemplates achieving a balance, in an extremely unbalanced world. There is also an underlying current of hope that runs through the narrative, a hope that there is still some good left in this world, and peace between the various species is worth fighting for. The only question is, at what cost?~‘I am a King of the dryandar,’ Cannac bellowed. The force of his voice was like a fire sweeping through grasslands. ‘I come without guards and subjects into your capital, and yet you accuse me of subterfuge? I seek diplomacy, but you accuse me of aiding those who seek violence and conquest by force? You insult me, humans. Was I wrong to expect better from you?’~In terms of characters, it was a pleasure to be back with many of my familiar favourites, and being introduced to many new characters too. Although there are a few additional POV’s to follow, Dalglish fleshes out each of them, and develops their story arcs in gripping ways. I was particularly impressed by more spotlight shining upon magical creatures such the Onyx fairy Tesmarie, my beloved firekin Puffy, and a humanoid deer, Cannac. All three proved to be wholesome characters, whose genuine ideology of harmony, beautifully cut through the all the grimness. Speaking of grimness, the inclusion of further new characters such as Evelyn and Dierk, brought some great ambiguity to the book, as although both have done vile deeds, Dalglish still manages to evoke empathy for both.As I reached the ending, I felt as though I had been caught in a whirlwind. Dalglish raises the stakes, makes your jaw drop, and leaves you thirsting for more. Or you could say, you are left raving for more of Ravencaller!ARC provided by Orbit in exchange for an honest review. Ravencaller is out now!
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  • Maja Ingrid
    January 1, 1970
    This is the sequel to Soulkeeper, one of my 2019 favourite books. This one had lots to live up to. Did it? Well it took the ladder, threw it out the window and just flew straight up to the roof. It stepped up the game so, so much. It starts shortly after Soulkeeper ended. We get deeper into this new world with magic and magical creatures and monsters, some with good intentions, some with less so. We reunite with old faces and get to meet new ones in Dierk, Evelyn and Cannac for examples. Dierk a This is the sequel to Soulkeeper, one of my 2019 favourite books. This one had lots to live up to. Did it? Well it took the ladder, threw it out the window and just flew straight up to the roof. It stepped up the game so, so much. It starts shortly after Soulkeeper ended. We get deeper into this new world with magic and magical creatures and monsters, some with good intentions, some with less so. We reunite with old faces and get to meet new ones in Dierk, Evelyn and Cannac for examples. Dierk and Evelyn gets their own POV’s and Cannac is shared through Tommy’s. To keep it spoilerfree I’m not going to reveal their parts in the story. I did take quite a liking to Evelyn. The world Dalglish has created is very dark and grim. Some characters are either committing or having to face some real vile stuff. And how much I love the characters! Devin, a priest wielding a sword and gun, super brave and with the biggest, mushiest heart. Puffy, the most precious and brave little fire elemental I’ve met. The faery Tesmarie with her joyfulness and bubbliness. Tommy, the most innocent, purest, awkward and bumbly bean, my son that I will protect with my life. And so many more characters. I love them. It has strong, well written female characters, male characters who are full of bumbly, mushy emotions. They have such great personalities and great relationships with each other. Ones where they support each other and got each others’ backs. Even though some of the characters got romantic feelings and get into relationships the romance is on a low level. But the relationships are healthy and supportive. I just love the relationships between them, be they platonic or romantic. The ending had me in tears. I’m still broken and my heart’s aching. And can I have Voidbreaker already??????
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  • THE BIBLIOPHILE (Rituranjan)
    January 1, 1970
    (E-ARC provided by Little Brown Book Group UK via Netgalley.)Classic fantasy in a new garb, with a healthy dose of grimness thrown in, which explodes in the narrative garnished with action, emotion, and solid characterisation. It's a damn fine example of why the old stories and tropes never get stale. Dalglish excellently renews all the elements in a vigorous manner, dressing them in shades of grey. The magic remains for us to uncover.This is a book that talks about humans and the so-called mons (E-ARC provided by Little Brown Book Group UK via Netgalley.)Classic fantasy in a new garb, with a healthy dose of grimness thrown in, which explodes in the narrative garnished with action, emotion, and solid characterisation. It's a damn fine example of why the old stories and tropes never get stale. Dalglish excellently renews all the elements in a vigorous manner, dressing them in shades of grey. The magic remains for us to uncover.This is a book that talks about humans and the so-called monsters, i.e., "the others" who are feared and hated by civilization. Honestly, Dalglish blurs the distinction in the story. The conflict that ensues out of the fear, the rage, and the hatred makes monsters from both sides. The truth is always twisted. Power, oppression, war, and destruction plagues everyone, the humans as well as the magical beings who claim a place in the world, a peaceful co-existence never works out due to the destructive streak that belies in every individual.The characterisation was excellent. Dalglish was able to bring out the complex personalities of each of the characters. I cried at the death of a particular character who was very dear to me in the story. It wrecked me. I admired the way the author has written about two female characters. Jacaranda here grows out of her shell, despite tge struggle and coming into terms with her new life. Adria is struggling with her newfound power. Devin is still the fighter. All of these characters go through their own internal conflicts, doubts, and fears, unabashed in their emotions. And, that's what makes them so relatable. Tesmarie, oh! Sunshine of my heart. I'll miss you.The world is now in turmoil. The dragons of creation has broken the "chain of being" that governs the universe. The Church also hides its own dirty secrets. Faith in the goddesses have wavered. Children are brutally sacrificed to evoke curses. The motives of the dragons are still not clear, and the magical creatures are hell-bent on destroying civilization for their centuries of imprisonment, and the hatred and fear of humans. The final war is coming. And, Dalglish foreshadows this fact in the story. The action and the bloodshed, the suffering and deaths makes this world grim.The climax was brilliant with explosive magic and action. Humans and magical creatures wade through a stream of blood. But, what I loved more was the ending, the anticipatory thrills generated by it. I cannot wait to see the final confrontation happen between the characters, as well as the dragonsired. This was quite an enjoyable read for me. I escaped into another world, but, at tge same time it reminded me of the real issues that afflict the human world.
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  • The Tattooed Book Geek (Drew).
    January 1, 1970
    As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress...4.5 stars.When I read Soulkeeper, the first book in The Keepers trilogy last year I found it to be a good solid read and a promising start to the trilogy. But, I also had a couple of issues which meant that unlike with some other reviewers it didn’t blow me away and it was a case of ‘I enjoyed‘ rather than ‘I loved‘ the book. For me, Ravencaller fulfils the potential that I felt tha As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress...4.5 stars.When I read Soulkeeper, the first book in The Keepers trilogy last year I found it to be a good solid read and a promising start to the trilogy. But, I also had a couple of issues which meant that unlike with some other reviewers it didn’t blow me away and it was a case of ‘I enjoyed‘ rather than ‘I loved‘ the book. For me, Ravencaller fulfils the potential that I felt that Soulkeeper had. It is an improvement upon its predecessor and it most definitely falls into the ‘I loved it‘ category of books that I have read doing what a great fantasy book should do immersing you in the story and transporting you to the world that the author has created.In Soulkeeper magical creatures long since vanished from the world, faded and forgotten, thought only to be fables, folklore, myths and legends awoke and returned to the Cradle after centuries of slumber and imprisonment.Ravencaller starts not long after the ending of Soulkeeper and takes place solely within the confines of the city of Londheim building upon, broadening the scale and scope, raising the stakes and going deeper into the return of the dragon-sired creatures and what it means for the future of the Cradle.Ravncaller is told through multiple perspectives that encompass both the human side and the side of the returned magical dragon-sired creatures. One issue that I had with Soulkeeper was that I didn’t care about the characters and that is through no fault of Dalglish, his writing or his creations simply, I just didn’t connect with them. In Ravencaller all of that changed and I was hooked finding myself completely invested in the characters, the struggles that they face to survive, the hardships that they endure, the tough choices that they have to make, even the questionable actions that some choose to take and I cared about them and their fate. Some new characters in Dierk, the mayor’s young son and Evelyn and Logarius who are both dragon-sired creatures known as Avenria are introduced and serve to expand the story and fill out the cast alongside the returning characters from Soulkeeper of Devin Eveson, Adria Evenson, Jacaranda, Tommy, Puffy, the little firekin, Tesmarie, the onyx faery and Janus (who only has a very minor role this time around). The characters are flawed and all in some way show change, development and growth throughout the story. Many you will root for and they are likeable, some of the others, not so much, but, even they have reasons for their actions, their feelings and their resentments and there is a depth to be found in them all.As the setting Londheim is a cauldron, simmering and waiting to boil over. It is a dangerous place for all where miracles, prayers and devotions become manifest and at night ravenous cannibals plague the streets and where dragon-sired under the cover of darkness hunt the humans.There is a depth to the story that goes beyond mere monster-slaying whereby the newly returned creatures want to re-establish their way of life and reclaim their lands which they believe that they have as much right to as the humans but, the humans don’t see it that way. A few like Devin, Tommy and Adria have befriended the magical creatures, forming bonds and relationships. However, most of the humans perceive the creatures as less, as not equal to them and they also have a fear of the unknown, of things, like the creatures that they don’t understand and, instead of listening and learning they resort to violence. That sentiment is also true of the creatures and both sides use weapons rather than words looking like they will repeat the mistakes of the past rather than build to a new future. The creatures were slumbering and while humanity has forgotten them, they still remember humanity and the past. They remember the wars between the races, the chaos, the bloodshed and the countless deaths that ultimately saw them imprisoned.Not all humans are humane, some do very bad things and they are more monstrous than the monsters. Likewise, not all monsters are monstrous, not all of the returned magical creatures want to harm humans and some have humane traits that put humankind to shame. Some of the dragon-sired creatures desire a diplomatic solution to the problems caused by their unexpected return. You can’t erase but, you can forgive the dark deeds of past and forge relations in the hope that you can find a solution that allows for a new tomorrow where they can build a land where they are neighbours, trade partners and all races co-exist as equals. While others, those whose animosity, hatred and loss fuel them like the faction known as ‘the Forgotten Children’ who have infiltrated Londheim want war and a land that will drown in the blood of humankind as they seek to reclaim what was once theirs.The writing in Ravencaller flows well and it is descriptive and engaging. At a length of 550 pages, Ravencaller is quite a long book but, the page-count feels like far less. The story is fast-paced, Dalglish doesn’t skimp on the action and it is definitely what you would class as an ‘action-packed’ read. Luckily, Dalglish knows how to write exciting action scenes and exhilarating sequences that get your heart racing as you lose yourself in the thick of the intense fighting. Even though there is an abundance of action there is still plenty of room for characterisation, emotion, intrigue, machinations, story-telling and world-building to be found within the pages of Ravencaller too. Ravencaller is an action-packed mix of magic, monsters and mayhem.
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  • Will
    January 1, 1970
    4.9 / 5 ✪My ninth Dalglish book, Ravencaller might just be my favorite.https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com...Ravencaller is the follow-up to David Dalglish’s Soulkeeper, in which magical creatures and monsters alike have reawakened after centuries spent trapped in a deep, deep sleep. Where in the first book we dealt with the awakening of these creatures, in Ravencaller we deal with the fallout. For the creatures’ sleep was not voluntary. In the times before, humanity and the denizens of the Dr 4.9 / 5 ✪My ninth Dalglish book, Ravencaller might just be my favorite.https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com...Ravencaller is the follow-up to David Dalglish’s Soulkeeper, in which magical creatures and monsters alike have reawakened after centuries spent trapped in a deep, deep sleep. Where in the first book we dealt with the awakening of these creatures, in Ravencaller we deal with the fallout. For the creatures’ sleep was not voluntary. In the times before, humanity and the denizens of the Dragons often clashed, and soon it became clear to one another that each could not exist while the other yet lived. And then something changed. The Dragons were forced under by the Sisters’ power, so that humanity could inherit their world. Imprisoned with them were all of their creations, who so recently awoke.I was a big fan of Soulkeeper last year, but Ravencaller surpassed even my lofty hopes set by its predecessor.Magical creatures now roam the land, preying on anything and everything to sate their bloodlust. Their imprisonment was long, and their tempers have frayed. Humans and animals alike suffer their wrath—but mostly humans. Not only the creatures have returned, however. Human servants of the Dragons, called Ravencallers, have emerged, their newfound powers similar to those granted to the Faith- and Mindkeepers but wielded towards a different goal. To drive these ‘men from the Dragons’ land, rather than save it from them. In addition to the these new malcontents, disease has arrived with the magic itself.Humans awaken hungering for flesh, most often that of their neighbor. Others die, taken by plague or owls, gargoyles and foxes, or other magical predators. One band of creatures quickly overruns the Low Dock, taking it for themselves. Another drives the ‘men from Orismund west of Londheim, demanding past arrangements be honored. An army stands upon the city’s threshold. Another looms in the west. The Sisters’ faithful are pressed back on their heels—with one exception. Adria Eveson.Transformed by Viciss and his creature Janus, she stands at the head of the church’s army. While magic has returned to the people of the land, Adria is something more. Something far more. And to ensure humanity’s survival, she must become far greater than she’d ever hoped. Luckily, Adria has allies. Tesmarie, the ebon faerie; Devin, Soulkeeper and her brother; Tomas, newly awakened sorcerer; Jacaranda, newly awakened soulless; and more. The odds are heavily against them, but the humans may yet triumph in this war. Or, they might yet come to another, less bloody arrangement. But time will tell.Despite a few faults, I loved Ravencaller. More than Soulkeeper. More than any other Dalglish book before it (my personal favorite up til now was probably A Dance of Ghosts). Devin remains my favorite character, but a newbie—Dierk, a Ravencaller—also steals the show. I liked Adria and Tesmarie and others, but Jacaranda’s one-woman revenge mission started to feel a bit worn-out at the halfway point. Nonetheless, I never got to a point in which I was dreading someone’s POV chapter. Not even hers’.The language remains the same as it was in Soulkeeper. If you didn’t like the casual banter, the common names and words before—you probably won’t like it any better now. If you liked it, that probably won’t change. I didn’t mind it, because it’s what Dalglish used in his Shadowdance series. I’m used to it. But it might annoy you. And if it does, then it does.The world-building continues to impress, as the changes the author makes to the world mirror the magic awakening all throughout it. Diseases pop up where none were before. Old tensions reawaken. Old disagreements draw new blood. The creatures’ motivations are their own, just like the humans’. It’s a mistake to think either are united in their ideals, their resentments. But can Devin and his friends keep an all out war from erupting?I really have very little to say about Ravencaller. I loved it—and that pretty much seems sufficient. A classical story with darker elements. Just what I needed at the time. When the world is uncertain, escape into a lovely, well-rendered story.TL;DRIf you enjoyed Soulkeeper, you’ll probably like Ravencaller. I’d be willing to say you’ll probably like it more. Returning are the riveting plot, the lovely world-building, the interesting and immersive world and its creatures. If anything, there’re even more interesting and unique creatures now. There’s mystery, combat and drama. Love and death. War and… well, mostly war. Action and adventure (though we spend less time out of the city than in Book #1). There’re strong male and female leads. Good characters, POVs and chapters. Nothing too difficult to read or too boring to not suffer through. I’d recommend it, but you’ll have to read #1 first. Honestly, it’s a no-brainer.
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  • Traveling Cloak
    January 1, 1970
    In Ravencaller, readers of The Keepers series are given exactly what was promised at the end of Soulkeeper: an expanded world with more monsters, a deeper dive into the plans of the gods, evolved powers by the good guys, and more battles. That was the formula for Book 1 of the series (albeit, on a smaller scale), and if it ain’t broke why fix it?In the second volume of the series, the monsters begin to take over after waking from a centuries-long slumber. There is, of course, much animosity betw In Ravencaller, readers of The Keepers series are given exactly what was promised at the end of Soulkeeper: an expanded world with more monsters, a deeper dive into the plans of the gods, evolved powers by the good guys, and more battles. That was the formula for Book 1 of the series (albeit, on a smaller scale), and if it ain’t broke why fix it?In the second volume of the series, the monsters begin to take over after waking from a centuries-long slumber. There is, of course, much animosity between them and the humans as the monsters retake land that as theirs before The Sisters put them away. Humans obviously do not react well to this and fight to keep their homes.I found it to be really interesting that there was some dissension amongst the Gods (and demi-Gods), as well. The reader learns a lot more about their motives in this story, and not all of them agree on the outcome. This aspect had to be part of the story; otherwise, there would not be any reason for the Gods and monsters not to just run right over the humans. The fact that the biggest reason humanity is able to hold their own is that the Keepers in this story are given elevated powers by the Gods that support them is really important to the story, as it adds depth to the plot. This is a war being fought on two fronts: one between mortals, and the other between immortals, and it gets messy at times. In my opinion, this is the biggest plot point that drives the most interest in the story.The writing in this book is just as good as the first, as well. It is so smooth and flows really well, plus the author’s use of plot devices as a method for moving the story along and as a method for instigating important events in the story continues to be at a pro level, which I find to be really enjoyable in this book. The story evolved along a logical path, and that is a big plus.The only reason I did not give this book the same rating as Book 1 in the series is because the first book was full of big monster reveals. Obviously, the second book could not continue in the same manner, as the story was ready to go to the next level, but Soulkeeper was just so much fun. As I mentioned before, Ravencaller is just as well-written and interesting, and I continue to really like this series a lot. The difference between the two books is that Book 1 did it first, and, naturally, a little bit of that shine wears off in Book 2.Overall, Ravencaller is a worthy follow-up to Soulkeeper in The Keepers series. With similar plot elements and characters and an evolved narrative, the story just keeps getting bigger. I am excited to see what comes next and how the third installment takes this series to an even higher level. I continue to recommend this series to fantasy fans.
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this. It started where Soulkeeper ended and just flowed. That ending what has Adria done.
  • Elijah
    January 1, 1970
    Not only did it live up to the expectations the previous book set, I feel like it far surpassed it! This book had love, betrayal, growth, trauma of different aspects, drama and best of all, heart-racing action! It was fast paced compared to the world building, character development centered first book, but I feel like it only added to the greatness of this story! I feel like this book can easily eclipse 5+ books simply due to the fact that theres a lot more left to explore, as well as sk many qu Not only did it live up to the expectations the previous book set, I feel like it far surpassed it! This book had love, betrayal, growth, trauma of different aspects, drama and best of all, heart-racing action! It was fast paced compared to the world building, character development centered first book, but I feel like it only added to the greatness of this story! I feel like this book can easily eclipse 5+ books simply due to the fact that theres a lot more left to explore, as well as sk many questions that are left unanswered.... Mr Dalglish, I am eagerly awaiting the next installment of the keepers voidbreaker and I can only imagine what's in store for us readers!
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  • Stacy GeekRemixALot
    January 1, 1970
    The sequel to Soulkeeper - and my very first ARC!! I'm friends with the author, so I was able to get an early release copy of the audiobook :DWhile I enjoyed the first book, in this book shit REALLY pops off right away. Magical creatures, new magical powers, competing factions, political intrigue - it felt like everything was building in a very well-paced way that kept me interested and reading at a steady pace throughout.CW for sexual trauma/abuse. But honestly? The main character who's affecte The sequel to Soulkeeper - and my very first ARC!! I'm friends with the author, so I was able to get an early release copy of the audiobook :DWhile I enjoyed the first book, in this book shit REALLY pops off right away. Magical creatures, new magical powers, competing factions, political intrigue - it felt like everything was building in a very well-paced way that kept me interested and reading at a steady pace throughout.CW for sexual trauma/abuse. But honestly? The main character who's affected by that storyline is probably my favorite and she's such a badass that it's very satisfying to read about her reclaiming her power. Ummm also the humans are assholes?? The ending made me say OH NO so many times but also the way the author builds up to that point feels very in keeping with how all of the characters would act, so no "cheap twist".I did have trouble with the narration in a few parts, because some of the voices felt a little much to me, but in general if you're listening slightly sped up (which I usually do but couldn't this time because of the format I received the ARC in) that usually fixes the issue.Can't wait for more!
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  • January 1, 1970
    This is what I've been waiting for. Grimdark has often strayed away from monsters and creatures. Magic is often sparse. Not here.David Dalglish has created an wonderful world full of magic, monsters, dragons, gods and all of them come in shades of grey. Set in a world where magic has only recently returned, the lines between good and evil, right and wrong, and what it means to be human have never been thinner. Ravencaller raises the stakes, exposes more history and tests the characters we met an This is what I've been waiting for. Grimdark has often strayed away from monsters and creatures. Magic is often sparse. Not here.David Dalglish has created an wonderful world full of magic, monsters, dragons, gods and all of them come in shades of grey. Set in a world where magic has only recently returned, the lines between good and evil, right and wrong, and what it means to be human have never been thinner. Ravencaller raises the stakes, exposes more history and tests the characters we met and fell in love with in Soulkeeper to their limits.The Keepers is a series to watch.
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  • Findingjb
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good second installment in what is shaping up to be a pretty exciting/epic story. I almost gave a 4star and there was potential for a 5 star book here. It was lots of fun for sure. But a few things held it back from being “excellent” writing/storytelling.My only complaints to this book:A) is that there’s a bit too much sexual indulging by the author that just isn’t really necessary to the plot and thus doesn’t make the book a richer story. Don’t get me wrong he write the scenes well an This is a good second installment in what is shaping up to be a pretty exciting/epic story. I almost gave a 4star and there was potential for a 5 star book here. It was lots of fun for sure. But a few things held it back from being “excellent” writing/storytelling.My only complaints to this book:A) is that there’s a bit too much sexual indulging by the author that just isn’t really necessary to the plot and thus doesn’t make the book a richer story. Don’t get me wrong he write the scenes well and they do seem to be somewhat in the service of character development but I just felt there could’ve been better ways to do it which leads to...B) **spoiler alert** poor handling of a difficult issue in characters story arc. For Jac- “I can’t have sex with the person I love because of abuse so I’ll go pay a prostitute to have sex with me instead so I can go back after being “unfaithful” and have sex with the person who so patiently and faithfully loved me even in my brokenness”. Ya...Doesn’t really work for me that a prostitute helps heal the wounds but the kind compassion of truly being loved by their committed partner couldn’t? Especially when the partner affirmed being willing to give them all the time they needed? Anyway...rape and abuse are real issues difficult to talk about in life or literature so I acknowledge the challenge faced by the author. But if you’re going to take readers down that road in your story, a healthier understanding of recovery and what actually leads to healing might’ve served the author (and the characters) better.C) Also the logic/reasoning behind the dragons motives and their planned future actions seemed a bit unclear at the end when being discussed with Janus. Almost as if the typical “explanation wrap up” wasn’t actually clear in the authors mind either. BUT, I may just need to read that portion again. Could be me. I’ll admit I was pushing through exhaustion to finish because, (coming back to the positive) this is a really fun and exciting ride of a read.A little less sex writing, a little more plausible healing of the abused character’s wounds, and a little clearer understanding of the dragons motivations, and I just might have given this book 5 stars because it really was a blast. D&D brought to life for sure, as other reviewers have said.
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  • Dan Gaines
    January 1, 1970
    There are two main problems with this story to me. First I do not get connected to the characters. They do not seem relatable in any sort of way and the story is not balanced well im terms of humor. The main character feels like he should be strong but, in a very common fashion in this idiotic modern society, he has to be saved by a woman every two seconds and he is constantly pondering his inadequacy.Which brings me to the second problem, the overabundance of virtue signaling is just a huge tur There are two main problems with this story to me. First I do not get connected to the characters. They do not seem relatable in any sort of way and the story is not balanced well im terms of humor. The main character feels like he should be strong but, in a very common fashion in this idiotic modern society, he has to be saved by a woman every two seconds and he is constantly pondering his inadequacy.Which brings me to the second problem, the overabundance of virtue signaling is just a huge turn off. Look, the Tommy character is gay but has a backstop akin to many person of that persuasion. Awkward and bookish, the Tommy character being gay is pretty believable in terms of character but unlikely given the associated time period this was set in. Still, that was fine and seemed to go with the story. However, we have to constantly have this beautiful female warrior thing written in to every situation and ita just ridiculous. Could these authors actually do some studying? You know research. I have taught martial arts, defensive classes, and been apart of combat sports for many years. I'm just going to say, women don't beat men with any sort of consistency, and trained men never. So can we please keep this for role-playing night with your spouses and keep it out of EVERY SINGLE STORY. It honestly disrupts every social situation within the book and makes it totally unreadable and unrelatable.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    David Dalglish has a great way of carrying you along on a tumultuous ride. Ravencaller is the second book of The Keepers. The ancient magic that returned inThe Soulkeepers shows no sign of disappearing and to be clear more strange mythological creatures are appearing. The moving mountain and the the dragon within still looms over the city of Londheim.Devin a warrior priest, the SoulKeeper of the first book now along with his sister Adria stand against this onslaught of new dangers ranged against David Dalglish has a great way of carrying you along on a tumultuous ride. Ravencaller is the second book of The Keepers. The ancient magic that returned inThe Soulkeepers shows no sign of disappearing and to be clear more strange mythological creatures are appearing. The moving mountain and the the dragon within still looms over the city of Londheim.Devin a warrior priest, the SoulKeeper of the first book now along with his sister Adria stand against this onslaught of new dangers ranged against the city and its inhabitants. They have an assortment of allies both magic users and mythical characters who join with them to fight against the rise of dark magic ranged against them, The sleeping are awake and the awakened magic is something they have never faced before and the magic that can aid them are all unknown quantities.A dark scenario is played out with battles against horrifying monsters where the odds are not good. Imaginative world building with likeable character interaction and of course lots of fighting monsters. Waiting for the next instalment.
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  • Adam Lynch
    January 1, 1970
    I’m always torn by the author’s books. He’s one of those few authors that are very, very adamant about killing their most loved or likeable characters, in just about every book of his I’ve written- sometimes for a reason, sometimes just because he’s vaguely sadistic. This one is no exception. For the life of me, I just... don’t understand this one, and I hope it make sense in Voidcaller. Right now, I’m kind of burnt out from reading it, and not in a good way. I also kind of just don’t understand I’m always torn by the author’s books. He’s one of those few authors that are very, very adamant about killing their most loved or likeable characters, in just about every book of his I’ve written- sometimes for a reason, sometimes just because he’s vaguely sadistic. This one is no exception. For the life of me, I just... don’t understand this one, and I hope it make sense in Voidcaller. Right now, I’m kind of burnt out from reading it, and not in a good way. I also kind of just don’t understand the character responses- they seem so... muted, I guess, about tragedy.Just to be very clear, though: the book itself is fine. I really wanted to give an angry one star, yell “take that, insensitive author man” at my phone screen- but beyond the kind of unexpected emotional responses (or lack thereof, in some cases) it’s a really well done book. I’ll be interested to see how things progress in the future, based on the clusterfuck of activity happening at the end of this one.
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  • D. Adam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    So, we pretty much carry on straight away with this storyline, right back at the moment thd last ended - but I won't say where, for I do not entertain spoilers.Dalglish kept to the same no questions asked, effective writing that says what it needs to and leaves it at that. I always enjoy that about his works. Never purple, always straight to the point. Perfect. The wall to wall action was exhilerating, and the fights well thought out and clear, I hate to steady my heart as our love characters re So, we pretty much carry on straight away with this storyline, right back at the moment thd last ended - but I won't say where, for I do not entertain spoilers.Dalglish kept to the same no questions asked, effective writing that says what it needs to and leaves it at that. I always enjoy that about his works. Never purple, always straight to the point. Perfect. The wall to wall action was exhilerating, and the fights well thought out and clear, I hate to steady my heart as our love characters really were put through the mill... And came out mostly unscathed. Adrian's godliness did save the day - and while I was thankful for that, her godliness did begin to grate on me, however, I believe this was ironed out towards the end of the book - I know it is always difficult with such powers involved in a story.I didn't like this one as much as Soulkeeper, because I didn't find myself caring about Dierk or Evelyn's stories, I just don't think there was time too.All said and done, I would highly recommend the book. It continues to throw all the things you'd want out of a good fantasy at you in droves. Wizards, monsters, the void, magic and swords make this a book that kept me turning the pages. If anything, I was totally immersed at all times when reading this book and my gripes are only because I care so much about the overall story.Go buy it!
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  • Annarella
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent grimdark fantasy, gripping and entertaining.The world building is amazing, the cast of characters well developed and entertaining.The plot is well told and it kept me hooked till the end.It was an exciting read, highly recommended.Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.
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  • Tracy Fox
    January 1, 1970
    A terrific second installment of the series. I was so looking forward to the sequel to Soulkeeper and was not disappointed. The world building and action just drew me in. The characters are solid. Can't wait for the third!
  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    If your looking for a fantasy with a lot of creatures and magic with a crisis every chapter this one is it. Entraining read even if the characters are a bit sophomoric.
  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of action scenes with an unexpected ending!
  • Charlotte Pawson
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in The Keepers series is action packed and keeps you wanting more. Great characters developed in the first book really get into their stride here. You follow the stories of Devin a Soulkeeper and his sister Adria ( Such power, and yet we seem to only destroy) a Priest of the church who’s power grows so much people believe she is now a Goddess. A fight between humans and (monsters) recently revived magical creatures leads to plenty of action and plays on you emotions when you conn The second book in The Keepers series is action packed and keeps you wanting more. Great characters developed in the first book really get into their stride here. You follow the stories of Devin a Soulkeeper and his sister Adria ( Such power, and yet we seem to only destroy) a Priest of the church who’s power grows so much people believe she is now a Goddess. A fight between humans and (monsters) recently revived magical creatures leads to plenty of action and plays on you emotions when you connect with certain characters. I would recommend reading the first book to find the background to our main characters.I was given an arc of this book by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    David Dalglish is one of my favorite authors. He never disappoints and his books always, always have adventure! I can't wait for Voidwalker to come out! I can't believe the ending, left with so many questions!!!
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