How Not to Be a Hot Mess
The dumpster fire of life rages on, but you got this. Practice six rules to keep you grounded, weather the storm, and actually be a decent person.It may seem like the world is going to hell in a hand basket right now. Whether it's big stuff like politics and climate change, or just the daily spin of paying your bills, getting to work on time, and fending off social media trolls, we can all admit, modern life ain't easy. Here are six really good guiding principles, inspired from the ancient wisdom of Buddhism and mindfulness practice, to keep you anchored and steady amidst the chaos.

How Not to Be a Hot Mess Details

TitleHow Not to Be a Hot Mess
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 21st, 2020
PublisherShambhala
ISBN-139781611807981
Rating
GenreNonfiction

How Not to Be a Hot Mess Review

  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    I am first to admit I don't read nonfiction books very often. But How Not To Be A Hot Mess really struck a psychological cord with me. The world is a hectic and frantic place and centering your kind in the age of instant gratification and technology for example aren't easy. This book teaches you six guiding principles based on Buddhism ancient practices and mindfulness practice to keep one centered in these chaotic times. This book was an easy enjoyable read that really gave me food for thought I am first to admit I don't read nonfiction books very often. But How Not To Be A Hot Mess really struck a psychological cord with me. The world is a hectic and frantic place and centering your kind in the age of instant gratification and technology for example aren't easy. This book teaches you six guiding principles based on Buddhism ancient practices and mindfulness practice to keep one centered in these chaotic times. This book was an easy enjoyable read that really gave me food for thought and made a positive impact on me. Thank you to Shambhala Publications for a copy of this book in exchange for honest review. Five stars for this book from me.
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  • Shelby
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this when I was smack-dab in the middle of a life s*** storm. I was with my stepdad, in his final days of hospice, had just endured a 4 month long one-two punch of head trauma followed by kidney stone surgery and stent which resulted in 4 hospital stays. Can we say rock bottom? Nope, because, apocalypse. (Kidding.)Anyways, Im so glad this found its way to me when it did because it was just what I needed. How Not To Be A Hot Mess, written by husband and wife team Craig and I received a copy of this when I was smack-dab in the middle of a life s*** storm. I was with my stepdad, in his final days of hospice, had just endured a 4 month long one-two punch of head trauma followed by kidney stone surgery and stent which resulted in 4 hospital stays. Can we say rock bottom? Nope, because, apocalypse. (Kidding.)Anyways, I’m so glad this found its way to me when it did because it was just what I needed. How Not To Be A Hot Mess, written by husband and wife team Craig and Devon Hase is a book that is based off of the very simplest and basic practices of Buddhism. It focuses on 6 Buddhist principles, primarily centered around mindfulness as a way to help navigate through life, whether it’s the good days, bad days, days you want to rip someone’s head off, or days you’re just too overwhelmed to lift your head off of your pillow. I think I personally appreciate this book right now because it was so easygoing and light. Reading this was like having a chat with a mellow, yet really wise friend. This is that friend that will be like: “Man, one time I: did this crappy thing/had this crappy attitude/was on the struggle bus with this one thing, but I learned this really cool thing, you should totally try it, I’ll show you how.”Each chapter is filled with personal examples, studies or statistics showing the benefits, and is concluded with a short exercise. An example: if you’re feeling any type of negative emotions, focus on the good. Humans inherently want to do good deeds by nature, but because we’re being inundated with negative all day we don’t SEE the good. I don’t want to give away the entire exercise, but basically if you were to intentionally LOOK and observe for one day, you’d see humans doing good human things. Holding doors open, smiling at strangers, (okay, not right now with quarantine) but what about at home? If you look for it, you’ll find the tiny acts of service. So try that, then DO it. It’s stressful times, my friend. If you’re grouchy, get up and randomly grab a treat for a family member out of the blue, or give them a random hug or compliment. Send a loved one that you can’t be with a text to say you’re thinking of them. These are things that will actually benefit YOU mentally in the end. This was written in a very casual, friendly way, and each thing is explained in a way that’s simple, makes sense, and somehow leaves you feeling inspired and motivated. I think that in this time of general overwhelm and unease this book is being released just when it’s needed. It’s not preachy (although it does address some personal views on politics and other issues,) it doesn’t ask you to become a Buddhist or get into anything super deep.I actually think it’d be a great book for younger adults as well. (with discretion. There is a chapter focused on intimacy.)The general meat and bones of the practices, if observed, could really benefit a lot of humans out there. Giving this one 5 stars. Also, high five to the universe for the alignment in timing with the release. I see what you did there. Thank you so much to Shambhala Publishing and netgalley for the advanced copy for review! As always, all opinions are my own.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    "How not to be a hot mess" is a a guide to living your life as a kind and balanced person, following Buddhist principles with a modern twist. The author goes through six areas to focus on, with heavy storytelling from her own experiences. I did not care for this book and I did not finish it. I couldn't relate to the authors or their experiences and also did not realize the book was heavily focused on Buddhist principles, I thought it was more of a general mindfulness self-help book. Thank you "How not to be a hot mess" is a a guide to living your life as a kind and balanced person, following Buddhist principles with a modern twist. The author goes through six areas to focus on, with heavy storytelling from her own experiences. I did not care for this book and I did not finish it. I couldn't relate to the authors or their experiences and also did not realize the book was heavily focused on Buddhist principles, I thought it was more of a general mindfulness self-help book. Thank you NetGalley for my complimentary copy in return for my honest review.
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  • Kristina | kristinaandthebooks
    January 1, 1970
    If I hadnt agreed to review this book, I would have put in down after reading the introduction because I recognize this is not a book for me. The core of this book is Buddhist teachings and while the authors explicitly state they are not trying to persuade anyone to adopt their belief system, they do exactly that throughout the book. Granted, they dont specially relate everything back to Buddhism, but it is made clear that every principle to improve your life is rooted directly in Buddhism. This If I hadn’t agreed to review this book, I would have put in down after reading the introduction because I recognize this is not a book for me. The core of this book is Buddhist teachings and while the authors explicitly state they are not trying to persuade anyone to adopt their belief system, they do exactly that throughout the book. Granted, they don’t specially relate everything back to Buddhism, but it is made clear that every principle to improve your life is rooted directly in Buddhism. This book focuses largely on mindfulness and meditation, two concepts that have been shown to improve emotional and mental health. Personally, I believe these concepts function much like the placebo effect, but kudos to you if they help you. There’s nothing inherently wrong with the teachings of Buddhism and freedom of religion is a beautiful thing to have in this world. However, as a Bible believing Christian, this mindset is not for me, nor was this book. There was a whole chapter devoted to sex, which I skipped in its entirety because I knew it would not be for me. I do agree with some of the concepts presented, as far as being kind, generous and abstaining from substances, but my approach to life is much different than the overall message of this book. I can see the appeal to those who follow the tenets of Buddhism or subscribe to new age practices like those featured in this book. Objectively, this is not a bad book by any means and the writing is actually quite good. The authors have a great approach to their concepts and I felt like I was having a direct conversation with them throughout my reading experience. I received an ebook of this title from Netgalley, all opinions are my own.
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  • Justin Ralph
    January 1, 1970
    This beautiful, honest, conversational, and to-the-point guide to living a good life in today's hectic and baffling environment is one of the best "semi-Buddhist" books to come out in a long time. Each chapter is like a mini-teaching that takes one of the Buddha's guideposts on living well and applies it to modern life. Devon and Craig are honest and brave in the recounting of their own journeys with these teachings. They have been students of some of the greatest meditation masters of our time This beautiful, honest, conversational, and to-the-point guide to living a good life in today's hectic and baffling environment is one of the best "semi-Buddhist" books to come out in a long time. Each chapter is like a mini-teaching that takes one of the Buddha's guideposts on living well and applies it to modern life. Devon and Craig are honest and brave in the recounting of their own journeys with these teachings. They have been students of some of the greatest meditation masters of our time and have a ton of experiential knowledge and yet manage to humbly present their teachings as if you were sitting in a living room with them casually talking about the dharma. Each chapter presents something special, but I was so struck by the chapters on speaking the truth, being generous, and making sex "good". There are so many easy to apply tidbits of wisdom and compassion here that I started applying the moment I read them. The teachings are presented in such clear terms that they are easily digestible, but they are also profound enough I kept backing up to earlier pages to remind myself of them.I can see myself carrying this hot pink wonder around with me for a long time, and I highly recommend it to anyone looking for a way to leave clearly and well in our challenging times.
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  • Rachel Flichtbeil
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed Devon and Craigs book which takes timeless Buddhist ethical principles originally written for monastics and offers them in an accessible format for young adults in our current, fast paced, tech heavy world. Now, more than ever, we need to contemplate how to be more present, more kind, and more connected. Devon and Craig offer supportive and nonjudgmental guidance to help us do just that. I really enjoyed Devon and Craig’s book which takes timeless Buddhist ethical principles originally written for monastics and offers them in an accessible format for young adults in our current, fast paced, tech heavy world. Now, more than ever, we need to contemplate how to be more present, more kind, and more connected. Devon and Craig offer supportive and nonjudgmental guidance to help us do just that.
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  • Aggie
    January 1, 1970
    Overall pretty good.Some aspects lend themselves better to an audiobook or video format, especially the guided meditations within. A bit hard to do or remember a meditation when you're reading along with it. Plus, there could have been a heavier hand with editing out the overuse of commas. But the voice of the authors was easy to read.
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  • Judi
    January 1, 1970
    Some basic Buddhist precepts to survive life, yourself. Mindfulness. Generosity. Clarity. And a couple other ideas that feed from these - accepting yourself for starters. Short, quick read but useful to gaining/regaining insight about what matters in life. Received as a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Aditi
    January 1, 1970
    A fairly realistic guide to meditation and mindfulness.
  • Alan Eyre
    January 1, 1970
    Had some good bits, but I would have preferred a higher wheat to chaff ratio
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