On the Horizon
From Lois Lowry comes an account of the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. With black-and-white illustrations by Kenard Pak. Lois Lowry looks back at history through a personal lens as she draws from her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan, as well as from historical research, in this work in verse for young readers.On the Horizon tells the story of people whose lives were lost or forever altered by the twin tragedies of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima.  Composed of poems about individual sailors who lost their lives on the Arizona and about the citizens of Hiroshima who experienced unfathomable horror.

On the Horizon Details

TitleOn the Horizon
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherHMH Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780358129400
Rating
GenrePoetry, History, Childrens, Middle Grade, Nonfiction, Historical

On the Horizon Review

  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Is there anything she cant write? This was interesting, informative, and a lovely tribute. Writing this difficult subject in verse makes it approachable and incredibly unique. I slowly savored each section and ruminated over each one. This will be a fantastic tool for teachers as they teach this subject, or for a poetry unit. I absolutely loved this and found it fascinating. My thanks to the publisher for the advance reader in exchange for my honest review. Wow. Is there anything she can’t write? This was interesting, informative, and a lovely tribute. Writing this difficult subject in verse makes it approachable and incredibly unique. I slowly savored each section and ruminated over each one. This will be a fantastic tool for teachers as they teach this subject, or for a poetry unit. I absolutely loved this and found it fascinating. My thanks to the publisher for the advance reader in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Katiria
    January 1, 1970
    *** Full Review To Come Up Soon! ***
  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    I'm grateful to the publisher and Libro.fm for allowing me the opportunity to listen to Lois Lowry read her newest memoir in verse. I am also looking forward to seeing the illustrations soon. Please, whenever possible, support local bookstores. Libro.fm allows one to do just that digitally for audiobooks. If you haven't seen their website, please check it out at libro.fmLowry's poems here are beautiful, absolutely beautiful. They are snapshots from World War Two that honor those we have lost in I'm grateful to the publisher and Libro.fm for allowing me the opportunity to listen to Lois Lowry read her newest memoir in verse. I am also looking forward to seeing the illustrations soon. Please, whenever possible, support local bookstores. Libro.fm allows one to do just that digitally for audiobooks. If you haven't seen their website, please check it out at libro.fmLowry's poems here are beautiful, absolutely beautiful. They are snapshots from World War Two that honor those we have lost in this world, both in America and Japan. They are moments Lois experienced living in Shibuya in Tokyo after the war, including an encounter with illustrator Allen Say, whom she would officially meet many years later. Language, connection, and history are layered here in ways that are simply inspiring. Her afterword may have said it best when she said, "and to honor the past by making silent promises, to our fellow humans, that we will work for a better and more peaceful future."As someone who called Japan home for four years of my life and who often returns to visit family in the summer, this book now has a special place in my heart.
    more
  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect for poetry month, this short but powerful book is an autobiographical tale of Lowrys youngest years in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii right before the bombing. Intense, yet sensitive prose describing both the US and Japanese points of view. Perfect for poetry month, this short but powerful book is an autobiographical tale of Lowry’s youngest years in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii right before the bombing. Intense, yet sensitive prose describing both the US and Japanese points of view.
    more
  • Selah Pike
    January 1, 1970
    I am always astonished by Lowrys talent. I am always astonished by Lowry’s talent.
  • Alex Baugh
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine looking at old family home movies and discovering something in the background that suddenly jolts memory and reflection. Well, that is exactly what happened to Lois Lowry when she had some of her family's old home movies restored and realized as a young child playing on Waikiki beach with her grandmother in 1940, her father's camera had also captured the USS Arizona in the distance heading to its berth in Pearl Harbor:She Was ThereWe never saw the ship.But she was there.She was moving Imagine looking at old family home movies and discovering something in the background that suddenly jolts memory and reflection. Well, that is exactly what happened to Lois Lowry when she had some of her family's old home movies restored and realized as a young child playing on Waikiki beach with her grandmother in 1940, her father's camera had also captured the USS Arizona in the distance heading to its berth in Pearl Harbor:She Was ThereWe never saw the ship.But she was there.She was moving slowlyon the horizon, shrouded in the mistthat separated skies from seaswhile we laughed, unknowing, in the breeze.She carried more than twelve hundred menon deck, or working down below.We didn't look up. We didn't know.It is only as an adult, Lowry says in her Author's Note, while showing the restored films to friends, that the USS Arizona is finally seen. As you probably already know, it sank when Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7, 1941, and most of the sailors onboard were killed - among them, twin brothers, members of the ship's band, two brothers, one a survivor, one not but reunited years later in death.From 1941, Lowry jumps to August 6, 1945 and the bombing of Hiroshima, and again highlighting individuals who were there - among them, a young boy named Koichi Seii, who would later become known as Allen Say, a child pulled from the rubble and reunited with his father, teenage girls running the trams, and a little boy on a red tricycle.Hiroshima:The cloud appeared over the distant hill,blossoming like strange new flowers in spring, opening, growing. But the world was still.When the cloud appeared over the distant hill,silence has fallen. There were no sounds until rain came. Not true rain, but black drops fallingfrom the cloud that appeared over a distant hill,blossoming like strange new flowers in spring.On the Horizon is written in three parts- the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the bombing of Hiroshima, and the Lowry family's life in post-war Japan - and uses a variety of poetic forms. One of the things that she has accomplished is to show the randomness of war - especially who lives and who dies (a randomness we are witnessing again as the Coronavirus chooses its victims). It is perhaps one of the most affecting books I have read about WWII, and I found often myself tearing up as I read. I believe it is because of the way Lowry has brought the distant near. In this slender book of poems, she shows us that sometimes history can feel like one is looking at something far away on a misty horizon, but by giving face and voice to those who were there she brings it to the forefront, and history becomes closer, people become individual human beings. This is a book of poems I believe I will be returning to again and again.Kenard Pak's black and while pencil and digital illustrations are a perfect compliment to each one of the poems.You can find a useful Teacher's Guide HEREThis book is recommended for readers age 10+This book was a EARC gratefully received from NetGalleyThis is one of my favorite poems from On the Horizon. It is called SolaceThe hospital ships had names that spoke of need:ComfortHopeSolaceMercyRefugeThe carried the wounded and ill.That morning, Solace was moored near the Arizona.She sent her launches and stretchers across.The harbor has a film of burning oil.Scorched men were pulled one by one from the flamesand taken to Solace.
    more
  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    I think back to that sunlit dayWhen I was young, and so were they.If I had noticed? If Id known? Would each of us be less alone?Ive traveled many miles since then-around the world, and back again;Ive learned that there will always bethings we miss, that we dont seeon the horizon. Things beyond. And yet there is a lasting bondbetween us, linking each to each:Boys on a ship. Child on a beach.This was extremely poignant and beautiful. I cried almost from start to finish. I really liked The Giver “I think back to that sunlit dayWhen I was young, and so were they.If I had noticed? If I’d known? Would each of us be less alone?I’ve traveled many miles since then-around the world, and back again;I’ve learned that there will always bethings we miss, that we don’t seeon the horizon. Things beyond. And yet there is a lasting bondbetween us, linking each to each:Boys on a ship. Child on a beach.”This was extremely poignant and beautiful. I cried almost from start to finish. I really liked The Giver and other books by Lois Lowry and when I saw she had written something else, I immediately ordered it. I didn’t really know what to expect or what I was going to get and what I found is a beautiful collection of poems about the attack on Pearl Harbor and the bombs being dropped in Japan. She has amazing personal connections to both places. There are so few words and yet a powerful message about the connection of our lives to others. In her own words in the authors note, “to honor the past by making silent promises to our fellow humans that we will work for a better and more peaceful future.” I most definitely recommend this one to anyone and everyone!
    more
  • vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    A book in verse about WWII memories. Lowry wrote this book after seeing the USS Arizona (before the attack on Pearl Harbor) in the background of a family home movie. It's got other stories from WWII from American and Japanese perspectives. I really liked her author's more. I kind of wish I was able to see the illustrations along with the audio. Thanks to Libro FM for an ALC. I recommend to middle grade readers who like historical / WWII stories.
    more
  • Czechgirl
    January 1, 1970
    They say great things come in small packages and this is one of them. Such an interesting true story. I love that author chose to write this book in verse.
  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    I was so lucky to pick up an ARC of this book at a meeting. Promoted for ages 10-12, this is a tragic and emotional read about the lives lost in the attack of Pearl Harbor and reciprocal bombing of Hiroshima. Told in 3 parts through magnificent poems about the young and old lives lost and effected during the events, it is heartbreaking for any age. Lowry is able to interweave her childhood and personal connections into the events, making it even more impactful. It is a short read, but one that I was so lucky to pick up an ARC of this book at a meeting. Promoted for ages 10-12, this is a tragic and emotional read about the lives lost in the attack of Pearl Harbor and reciprocal bombing of Hiroshima. Told in 3 parts through magnificent poems about the young and old lives lost and effected during the events, it is heartbreaking for any age. Lowry is able to interweave her childhood and personal connections into the events, making it even more impactful. It is a short read, but one that can be read slow or over again, picked up and grazed to remember a life and think on the world. Final copy will be illustrated. Highly recommended for anyone ages 10+ to pick-up.
    more
  • Jess Cruz (tingly.spines)
    January 1, 1970
    I saw this ARC on the HMH table at ALA and had to pick up a copy, mainly because Lois Lowry was one of my favorite authors throughout my childhood. And I knew by the way that she handled the issues and topics in Number the Stars with great care, that she would also craft this poetry collection about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima in a delicate but provocative way.Im happy to report that my initial instinct was correct. After so many years, Lois Lowry still manages to write about tragedy in a way I saw this ARC on the HMH table at ALA and had to pick up a copy, mainly because Lois Lowry was one of my favorite authors throughout my childhood. And I knew by the way that she handled the issues and topics in Number the Stars with great care, that she would also craft this poetry collection about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima in a delicate but provocative way.I’m happy to report that my initial instinct was correct. After so many years, Lois Lowry still manages to write about tragedy in a way that is accessible and reverent while still holding your attention captive until the very end. Certain poems made me stop and google “the red tricycle”, “Japanese tram girls”, and “what is Hiroshima like today?”Also, I can’t overstate how touching and deeply personal this collection was. Lois Lowry shares the events of both days, Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, but also how those events shaped her girlhood growing up in Honolulu and then Shibuya. Like many of us who grew up in New York during 9/11, Lowry perfectly captures that moment where a child is woken up from dreamlike innocence into the wakefulness of a large-scale disaster. (I’m only now realizing that I needed this book desperately in 2001 when I was 11 years old, but I’m still so grateful to have read it at 29.) She then talks about feeling gaijin in Japan. She was an outsider and it was too soon to reach out across the divide to make friends with the children in her neighborhood because of what happened in Hiroshima. I’m so fascinated by this series of events that I wish she would write an entire memoir about this time in her life.Until then, I’m giving this collection 5 stars and buying a finished copy for my shelves (and so that I can see Kenard Pak’s final artwork). If anyone tells you that middle grade poetry isn’t insightful, deep, or captivating, push this book into their hands along with a box of Kleenex and have them report back in a couple of hours.
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Lowry, people. An absolutely poignant novel in verse (an exemplar for sure) that includes multiple illustrations (I'm reading a galley copy from Netgalley) incorporated into a story of herself as a child, a Japanese boy, and a third story woven in to connect it all that she shares about in her author's note. It's emotional and informative, sentimental and reverent. She has video of her playing on the beach in Hawaii and in the background, the USS Arizona. Then she meets a boy who was in a town Lowry, people. An absolutely poignant novel in verse (an exemplar for sure) that includes multiple illustrations (I'm reading a galley copy from Netgalley) incorporated into a story of herself as a child, a Japanese boy, and a third story woven in to connect it all that she shares about in her author's note. It's emotional and informative, sentimental and reverent. She has video of her playing on the beach in Hawaii and in the background, the USS Arizona. Then she meets a boy who was in a town riding a bike as the bomb was being dropped on Hiroshima-- they meet as adults. And then when Lowry brings her grandson to the Pearl Harbor memorial, a note from a grandson having never met his grandfather who died at Pearl Harbor. The verse is sparing and heartfelt, introducing real people and real events which is why it's a strong nonfiction verse for a middle grade audience and up. (A quick read for older teens) but it's the years that Lowry has lived that lends itself to a reverential book like this. Stories like this won't age. And I'm here for more memoirs and biographies of the authors we love.
    more
  • Bernadette Kearns
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Libro.fm for the free audio version of this book for educators. I LOVED listening to Lois Lowry read this book because it added a personal, emotional connection from her to the listeners. The poems in this book are stunningly beautiful. In the first two parts, Lowry uses the poems to tell the stories of the men aboard the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor and people from the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima on the days the bombs were dropped. Part 3 contains poems that are mainly short Thank you to Libro.fm for the free audio version of this book for educators. I LOVED listening to Lois Lowry read this book because it added a personal, emotional connection from her to the listeners. The poems in this book are stunningly beautiful. In the first two parts, Lowry uses the poems to tell the stories of the men aboard the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor and people from the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima on the days the bombs were dropped. Part 3 contains poems that are mainly short memoirs of Lowry’s experiences living in Japan after the war. The writing in every poem is gorgeous and both adult and student writers could learn so much from them as mentor texts individually and the book as a whole. There is strong storytelling, vivid word choices, and raw emotions in every poem. I found myself tearing up after listening to many parts. This is a stunning achievement from an author I have long admired. It would be an excellent text for middle/high school Social Studies classes studying WW2, English classes investigating poetry or for anyone who simply enjoys gorgeous writing. Highly recommend!
    more
  • Tamsyn
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to read this poignant look back at Lois Lowrys childhood. Born in Hawaii, she was a 3-year-old living in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese bombed it. Through research, she puts a human face to some of the men who served on the USS Arizona. After the war ends, her father, stationed in Japan, is able to have his family join him. We get snapshots of other young people living in or near Hiroshima as well. Told in verse, this unique experience in her life is capped with Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to read this poignant look back at Lois Lowry’s childhood. Born in Hawaii, she was a 3-year-old living in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese bombed it. Through research, she puts a human face to some of the men who served on the USS Arizona. After the war ends, her father, stationed in Japan, is able to have his family join him. We get snapshots of other young people living in or near Hiroshima as well. Told in verse, this unique experience in her life is capped with an author’s note reflecting on her proximity to these events and her unexpected meeting with a man (Allen Say) who had lived in the adjacent community to hers in Japan when they both received the top awards from ALA in 1994. A book from Lois Lowry is a gift.
    more
  • Linda Wolfe
    January 1, 1970
    I give very few books a rating of 10 (highest rating in my personal system), but this one would be an 11. You cant read this book and not feel the horror and waste of war. A fitting tribute to those who died on the Arizona at Pearl Harbor and those who perished in Hiroshima. The red bicycle and the American brothers will tear at my heart forever. Author, Lois Lowry and Allen Say have visual contact as children in Japan after WWII, but do not actually meet or become friends until they are adults. I give very few books a rating of 10 (highest rating in my personal system), but this one would be an 11. You can’t read this book and not feel the horror and waste of war. A fitting tribute to those who died on the Arizona at Pearl Harbor and those who perished in Hiroshima. The red bicycle and the American brothers will tear at my heart forever. Author, Lois Lowry and Allen Say have visual contact as children in Japan after WWII, but do not actually meet or become friends until they are adults. Spring releases seldom win the gold, but right now, this is my Newbery pick! Pair this book with GRANDFATHER’S JOURNEY by Allen Say.
    more
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I didnt know anything about this book before I started listening to it from Libro.fm (side note: educators, you can get free audiobooks from them every month!), except that it was by Lois Lowry, and shes wonderful. This is a heartbreaking mix of history and personal memoir about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. Its lovely and quick, told in short poems, read by the author. I didn’t know anything about this book before I started listening to it from Libro.fm (side note: educators, you can get free audiobooks from them every month!), except that it was by Lois Lowry, and she’s wonderful. This is a heartbreaking mix of history and personal memoir about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. It’s lovely and quick, told in short poems, read by the author.
    more
  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital ARC from Netgalley.On the Horizon is a look at the tragedies of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, told through the personal lens of Lois Lowry who was born in Hawaii and lived in Japan as a child. Through verse she puts names and faces to a few of the victims of both terrible events. I am awed by Lowry's ability to evoke such a emotion with simple rhythms and phrases. The poetry is beautiful and I can't wait to get a finished copy to see the illustrations.
    more
  • Jody
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Lois Lowry,I have read several of your books (thank you), but this one has gone through me and is in me and I cried.I too have lived in Hawai'i and Japan. I too have visited Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima (and 4/10 Japanese internment camps).I too have wept in front of the blackened tricycle.Jody
    more
  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    ARC #PLA2020This book is lovely and brings forth the stories of individuals that died or survived the attack on Pearl Harbor and the bombing of Hiroshima. It would be a great story to share that goes beyond the data and statistics of Hiroshima and Pearl Harbor. Very accessible for younger audiences. I look forward to seeing the final art of the published version.
    more
  • Susan Morris
    January 1, 1970
    What a hauntingly beautiful book. Lowrys poems telling the story of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, and her connections with them are amazing. I will definitely use this in the future with 5th graders, when we read The Secret Project and Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. I think Ill be buying my own copy of this book. (Library) What a hauntingly beautiful book. Lowry’s poems telling the story of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, and her connections with them are amazing. I will definitely use this in the future with 5th graders, when we read The Secret Project and Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. I think I’ll be buying my own copy of this book. (Library)
    more
  • Natalie Park
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to read an ARC of this book. It was missing some of the final art but the story was very moving and poignant. It had additional meaning for me as my mothers family lived in Honolulu at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The war affected so many people in so many different ways. I was fortunate to read an ARC of this book. It was missing some of the final art but the story was very moving and poignant. It had additional meaning for me as my mother’s family lived in Honolulu at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The war affected so many people in so many different ways.
    more
  • Toni Rose Deanon
    January 1, 1970
    Huge fan of Lois Lowry. Such a great piece.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Very moving.
  • Josie Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    Read by the author. Absolutely stunning. Both informative and poetic.
  • MandM
    January 1, 1970
    Poetry - outstanding collection/reflection of her life in Hawaii at the time of the Pear Harbor attack and in Japan when The Bomb hit. Would be a great resource for teachers and readers 10 and up. Beautifully read by an extremely talented author.
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    Short, but intense and powerful. I would recommend this for all ages.
  • Kristen Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the ARC for educators on Libro.fm. It was a beautiful memoir/tribute to victims of both Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima written in verse. The audiobook is beautiful.
  • Robin_R
    January 1, 1970
    Sad and beautiful, and important!
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Exquisitely written, evocative and wrenching. I read this slowly, over a period of days. Lowry uses the verse format brilliantly and every word is perfectly placed. Deeply moving!
  • Wendy Wallflower
    January 1, 1970
    My review can be found here: https://wallflowerwendy.wordpress.com...
Write a review