A for Anonymous
The illustrated, inside story of the legendary hacktivist group's origins and most daring exploits.A for Anonymous shows how a leaderless band of volunteers successfully used hacktivism to fight for the underdog, embarrass their rich and powerful targets--from Sony and Paypal to the Church of Scientology and Ferguson Police Department--all in the name of freedom of speech and information. Their exploits blurred the distinction between "online" and "reality," and help shape our contemporary world.

A for Anonymous Details

TitleA for Anonymous
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 31st, 2020
PublisherBold Type Books
ISBN-139781568588780
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, History, Science, Technology, Nonfiction

A for Anonymous Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    This was much more interesting than I expected. It details the origins of Anonymous and their major actions throughout the last several years. Yes, I could have looked it up on the internet, but this was more interesting.Received a review copy from Perseus Books and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
    more
  • Alex Enforcer
    January 1, 1970
    Фирменный кушнеровский рассказ о том, как можно создать хорошую идею, быстро извратить её, слегка вернуть исходный облик и при этом увидеть во всём надежду.
    more
  • Toni_B_Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    "A for Anonymous" is a graphic novel that depicts author David Kushner's interview with an unidentified member of the notorious hacking collective. Kushner has covered the group for years, and his reporting on it has appeared in publications including Rolling Stone and the New Yorker. The interview provides an overview of the group's history from its 4chan origins to its hacking of Ferguson, Missouri's computers following the police shooting of Michael Brown.While it doesn't shy away from "A for Anonymous" is a graphic novel that depicts author David Kushner's interview with an unidentified member of the notorious hacking collective. Kushner has covered the group for years, and his reporting on it has appeared in publications including Rolling Stone and the New Yorker. The interview provides an overview of the group's history from its 4chan origins to its hacking of Ferguson, Missouri's computers following the police shooting of Michael Brown.While it doesn't shy away from describing Anonymous' more controversial activities and outright errors--including its misidentification of Brown's killer-- the book does seem to celebrate the populist nature of the group, which the interviewee insists includes people from all walks of life. And it's hard not to cheer when Anonymous takes revenge on the perpetrators of the Steubenville rape case, especially when the criminal justice system ultimately gave them a slap on the wrist for a heinous crime.The artwork here was generally effective throughout, but because hacking is a solitary and not very physical activity, the action can seem to wane. I also found the illustrations of Tom Cruise made him look unsettlingly like a deranged Donny Osmond who'd been on the wrong end of a bar fight.Some reviewers have been left dissatisfied by the fact that much of the information found here can be found in other sources, and Kushner's interview doesn't really shed much additional light on the group. This may be no exposé, but for a reader who doesn't have much familiarity with the group, the book provides an easily-digested summary of its history, and as a high school librarian, I can see it having a distinct appeal to that audience and will likely purchase it.
    more
  • Natalia
    January 1, 1970
    The one thing I will say that I liked about this book was the illustrations and I was also surprised to find out the details about the Steubenville rape case, because I did not follow it that closely when it happened.I requested to read this book because I had heard of the organization before and was interested in seeing what the book would share. Sadly, though the information in the book is stuff that I could have probably found on the internet about the history of Anonymous, there was no The one thing I will say that I liked about this book was the illustrations and I was also surprised to find out the details about the Steubenville rape case, because I did not follow it that closely when it happened.I requested to read this book because I had heard of the organization before and was interested in seeing what the book would share. Sadly, though the information in the book is stuff that I could have probably found on the internet about the history of Anonymous, there was no discussion, regarding whether the things they did and participated in were good or bad. It just felt like the book was reciting facts about the organization and that's it. I don't think anyone would have minded the graphic novel being longer if it had included some concrete information and discussion. You could say it would be a good intro to young people who have never heard about it but not as a true source of information.Thank you Netgalley for the advanced reader copy.
    more
  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    This was pretty interesting! I wasn't too familiar with Anonymous outside of the creepy masks, and I think this did a decent job of providing some backstory. I kinda totally loved the concept of illustrating a traditional interview as a graphic novel, as it helped to provide more context and visuals for various exploits of the group. However, because this was an interview, you don't get much background on the interviewer, and it's hard to connect to the characters as characters. This definitely This was pretty interesting! I wasn't too familiar with Anonymous outside of the creepy masks, and I think this did a decent job of providing some backstory. I kinda totally loved the concept of illustrating a traditional interview as a graphic novel, as it helped to provide more context and visuals for various exploits of the group. However, because this was an interview, you don't get much background on the interviewer, and it's hard to connect to the characters as characters. This definitely also could've been longer. It felt like an abrupt ending and I was expecting more twists to come back or develop the plot. But it really is just like an interview. And because it's an interview with a member from Anonymous, it does feel biased towards the group and ignores a lot of the more negative aspects. This is a good resource on Anonymous from a member's experience and point of view. However, due to its length and bias, it certainly isn't the whole story.
    more
  • Raychel
    January 1, 1970
    Overall, I thought this was a fun graphic novel. I have had little experience with Anonymous, but I will say that I have been inclined to support some of their operations in the past. I was aware of their involvement in regards to Scientology and Steubenville, but I did not know about #opFerguson. I feel like this graphic novel was biased towards Anonymous and there was not much discussion on the negative aspects of their campaigns. It also seemed a bit unfinished. It felt like I was looking for Overall, I thought this was a fun graphic novel. I have had little experience with Anonymous, but I will say that I have been inclined to support some of their operations in the past. I was aware of their involvement in regards to Scientology and Steubenville, but I did not know about #opFerguson. I feel like this graphic novel was biased towards Anonymous and there was not much discussion on the negative aspects of their campaigns. It also seemed a bit unfinished. It felt like I was looking for clues (like how on pages 9 and 10 the journalist threw away the contact information for Mr. X in a garbage can rather than disposing of it in a different way) that never resurfaced. I think the teens in my library would enjoy this, so I am probably going to put in a purchase request for it in my branch.
    more
  • Sarah Z
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. When I requested this book I knew very little about Anonymous but Ive definitely seen them before. I thought this was an interesting read in illustrated format about the history and purpose of the group. It discusses some of their biggest campaigns, with the church of Scientology and Sony. Not only does it chronicle some of its more notorious success stories but also some of its failures, which I think I received an ARC of this from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. When I requested this book I knew very little about Anonymous but I’ve definitely seen them before. I thought this was an interesting read in illustrated format about the history and purpose of the group. It discusses some of their biggest campaigns, with the church of Scientology and Sony. Not only does it chronicle some of its more notorious success stories but also some of its failures, which I think is important for some perspective. I thought it was well done. .
    more
  • Tom
    January 1, 1970
    I am really shocked by this. Thank you NetGalley for giving me the change to read and review this. I wish it was better. This was very disappointing and not worth the time. #AforAnonymous #NetGalley
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    This book was all over the place and light on details, skimming only a handful of "operations" and focusing more on the 4Chan presence and Anon in-group fighting. I'd hoped for more, considering the noble aims and worldwide renown of Anonymous.
  • Ben Truong
    January 1, 1970
    A for Anonymous: How a Mysterious Hacker Collective Transformed the World is a graphic novel written by David Kushner and illustrated by Koren Shadmi. It is a detailed account of the hacker collective Anonymous and its splinter group, LulzSec.Anonymous is a decentralized international hacktivist group that is widely known for its various cyber attacks against several governments, government institutions and government agencies, corporations, and the Church of Scientology.The narrative is A for Anonymous: How a Mysterious Hacker Collective Transformed the World is a graphic novel written by David Kushner and illustrated by Koren Shadmi. It is a detailed account of the hacker collective Anonymous and its splinter group, LulzSec.Anonymous is a decentralized international hacktivist group that is widely known for its various cyber attacks against several governments, government institutions and government agencies, corporations, and the Church of Scientology.The narrative is structured around an interview New Yorker reporter Kushner did with a reclusive hacker known as Commander X, who eagerly chats Kushner through the leaderless resistance group's credos about fighting tyranny and oppression before he outlines the group's history.The roots of the hacker collective was rooted in the early Texas hacktivist collective Cult of the Dead Cow, where Anonymous originated as a crew of online pranksters on the forum 4chan who made their bones causing mischief for the Church of Scientology. Later on, they crafted their brand of darkly ironic ominousness, with Guy Fawkes masks and doom-laden pronouncements.Anonymous sprawled worldwide, targeting broad sorts. Enthusiasm quickly outran judiciousness in many cases, as when Anonymous's intervention into the Ferguson riots resulted in innocent people being doxxed and targeted without pause to verify their presumed connection to the police shooting that kicked off the protests.A for Anonymous: How a Mysterious Hacker Collective Transformed the World is written and constructed moderately well. This short, pungent history of the online protest phenomenon simulates its anarchically idealistic spread, but stops short of nuanced consideration of the big questions about tech vigilantes and ethics that it raises with the last third delves into unquestioned preachiness. Shadmi illustrations are appropriately sharp, bold lines, mixing realistic art and some cartoonish representations.All in all, A for Anonymous: How a Mysterious Hacker Collective Transformed the World is an informative graphic novel about the mysterious hacker collective named Anonymous.
    more
  • Roman Stadtler
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I don't know if they've transformed the world, yet, but they were relevant for a while. I was hoping for not only a history of the hacktivist collective, but some insightful analysis of both their successful and failed actions (the book itself left me feeling like they've had more failures than successes, though the text throughout and ending are strongly, almost sillily pro-Anonymous), but that's not this book. It's not an expose or in-depth analysis of the movement, it's intended Well, I don't know if they've transformed the world, yet, but they were relevant for a while. I was hoping for not only a history of the hacktivist collective, but some insightful analysis of both their successful and failed actions (the book itself left me feeling like they've had more failures than successes, though the text throughout and ending are strongly, almost sillily pro-Anonymous), but that's not this book. It's not an expose or in-depth analysis of the movement, it's intended philosophy, or mistakes made; it's more a kind of dry retelling of the big points of Anonymous history. At the end of it, there's panels of different Anons with the text "We are Anonymous. We are legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us," those last words in a panel showing Anonymous X, our interviewee and narrator, pointing at the reader. Oo, shivers! Except, no, no emotional impact at all. Mainly, 'cause the writing didn't add much to my understanding of Anonymous or their effectiveness. It almost did the opposite, leaving me feeling, that, except in a few notable cases, they caused some annoyances that lasted a short time with little lasting effects, and accidentally hurt some innocent people. I was also curious whatever happened to Anonymous? Are they still around? (I Googled that, because the GN only goes as far as their 2016 Isis attack, and yes, they hacked the UN this past February with a pro-Taiwan action). I like the rebellious idea(ls) of Anonymous, the power to the people aspect, those swanky Guy Fawkes masks, and they must've influenced organized, successful protest movements like Black Lives Matter, the Women's March, the student Climate Marches, but this book barely mentions their part in the evolution of the wider people's protests. A good New Yorker or Atlantic article would provide more depth.
    more
  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    This book was received as an ARC in exchange for an honest review.I wasn't quite sure if this would be something I'd judge or be actually interested in, but it has a sort of charming quality to it. Graphic novels are something that it can be difficult to convey a ton of information, but this doesn't feel lacking by any stretch. It definitely feels closer to "article" than book, you could convey the same amount of information in a two page spread of a magazine if you so desired, but that doesn't This book was received as an ARC in exchange for an honest review.I wasn't quite sure if this would be something I'd judge or be actually interested in, but it has a sort of charming quality to it. Graphic novels are something that it can be difficult to convey a ton of information, but this doesn't feel lacking by any stretch. It definitely feels closer to "article" than book, you could convey the same amount of information in a two page spread of a magazine if you so desired, but that doesn't take away from the quality.The art doesn't detract from the message, which is what I quite enjoy. It's clean, and does the job nicely. I'm not sure how accurate it is to depicting the people who it's supposed to be, but in something like this I don't think that's the most important part of it all. It's about the essence of the thing, rather than the accuracy, and that's what the art is there to convey.This is one that I don't know if I'd recommend it lightly, but I will be recommending it to people. It's one of those things that you're really only going to be interested if you like or know of the topic, and that's really unfortunate because it's a very good outline of how the movement began.
    more
  • Jason S Wrench
    January 1, 1970
    A for Anonymous: How a Mysterious Hacker Collective Transformed the World is a new graphic novel by David Kushner. If you're not familiar with Anonymous, this book provides a really interesting discussion of what the hacker collective is and its origins. For obvious reasons, the book is really based primarily on publicly sourced materials and not in-depth knowledge from within the organization, which admittedly would be almost impossible. If you're interested in hacking culture or just A for Anonymous: How a Mysterious Hacker Collective Transformed the World is a new graphic novel by David Kushner. If you're not familiar with Anonymous, this book provides a really interesting discussion of what the hacker collective is and its origins. For obvious reasons, the book is really based primarily on publicly sourced materials and not in-depth knowledge from within the organization, which admittedly would be almost impossible. If you're interested in hacking culture or just interested in what Anonymous is and their aims are, then I would strongly recommend reading this book. It's a quick read, so it doesn't take too much time to get a really interesting overview.Furthermore, I appreciated the graphic novel approach to explaining Anonymous. There are other books that go into a lot more detail about Anonymous, but I think this one is great for those who just want a really fast introduction and like graphic novels.
    more
  • Andi
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting book on the hacktivist "group" Anonymous. A bit overly methodical in parts, but if you're looking for an introduction to the group and simple graphic novel format, this book is an excellent start. Follows interview arc with Commander X, one of the central figures in Anonymous, as well as the evolution of the group. Includes background and coverage of Anonymous's greatest hits - including its confrontations with the Church of Scientology; Sony; Stuebenville, Ohio; and Ferguson, MO. Interesting book on the hacktivist "group" Anonymous. A bit overly methodical in parts, but if you're looking for an introduction to the group and simple graphic novel format, this book is an excellent start. Follows interview arc with Commander X, one of the central figures in Anonymous, as well as the evolution of the group. Includes background and coverage of Anonymous's greatest hits - including its confrontations with the Church of Scientology; Sony; Stuebenville, Ohio; and Ferguson, MO. Anonymous has always been interesting for the extremely decentralized nature of the "group". Anyone can be Anonymous, and Anonymous can be anywhere. But leaderless resistance is, by nature, uncontrollable. And it is interesting that the book addresses some of Anonymous's misses as well. **I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**
    more
  • Kiko Prompanya
    January 1, 1970
    Hello friends U Need Any Help on hacking for the following try (wisetechhacker @ mail com)i have used him so many times and he never fails me. Thank me later.*Cheating Spouse *University grades changing *Bank accounts hack *Twitters ,skype hack *email accounts hack *Grade Changes hack *Website crashed hack *server crashed hack *Retrieval of lost file/documents *Erase criminal records hack *Databases hack *Sales of Dumps cards of all kinds *Untraceable Ip *Individual computers hack *Websites hack Hello friends U Need Any Help on hacking for the following try (wisetechhacker @ mail com)i have used him so many times and he never fails me. Thank me later.*Cheating Spouse *University grades changing *Bank accounts hack *Twitters ,skype hack *email accounts hack *Grade Changes hack *Website crashed hack *server crashed hack *Retrieval of lost file/documents *Erase criminal records hack *Databases hack *Sales of Dumps cards of all kinds *Untraceable Ip *Individual computers hack *Websites hack *Facebook hack *Control devices remotely hack *Burner Numbers hack *Verified Paypal Accounts hack *Any social media account hack *Android & iPhone Hack *Word Press Blogs hack *Text message interception hack *email interception hackcontact: (wisetechhacker @ gmail com)
    more
  • Courtney Lavallee
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an e-arc in exchange for an honest review.This was a very informative and interesting read. I have always followed stuff done by Anonymous because it intrigues me, how certain things bring people together. I think that while sometimes they may take things to far, they have good intentions. The formatting for the e-arc was a bit difficult to read, however, I did thoroughly enjoy this read!
    more
  • booksforbrit
    January 1, 1970
    This is a graphic novel with how Anonymous came to be. Hackers from all over the world want to make things right and hack systems to do just that. This is informational and true within pages that are drawn out wonderfully.
  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    A for Anonymous is written in a biography like way given the history of the group Anonymous from the beginning up to now. In a very enlightening graphic style the reader is taken on a journey through the headlines of the last decade as it relates to Anonymous. Even having lived through all of the portrayed events I learned parts of the story that the news had never divulged. A great read with amazing artwork to keep the reader engaged.
    more
  • Brandi
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pretty fun read. It details the the origins of Anonymous and their major actions throughout the last several years. Yes, this information can be looked it up on the internet, but this format is a far more interesting way to read about it. The artwork is also extremely enjoyable, it is simple and very clean lined but it really makes an impact and helps deliver the major points of the story. If you like graphic novels/comics and are interested in the origins of the group Anonymous, I This was a pretty fun read. It details the the origins of Anonymous and their major actions throughout the last several years. Yes, this information can be looked it up on the internet, but this format is a far more interesting way to read about it. The artwork is also extremely enjoyable, it is simple and very clean lined but it really makes an impact and helps deliver the major points of the story. If you like graphic novels/comics and are interested in the origins of the group Anonymous, I definitely recommend this book. 3.5 Stars
    more
  • Jess Smiley
    January 1, 1970
    From the Cult of the Dead Cows hacktivist attacks against The Church of Scientology to Ricardo Dominguez Floodnet to 4chan and more, A for Anonymous chronicles the early days of Anonymous and follows its actions, internal disagreements, and legal involvement to the present day. While the interview-style delivery detracts from the main efforts of the book and the placement/use of text and speech bubbles are sometimes problematic, the book as a whole works to convey the idea and purpose of From the Cult of the Dead Cow’s hacktivist attacks against The Church of Scientology to Ricardo Dominguez’ Floodnet to 4chan and more, A for Anonymous chronicles the early days of Anonymous and follows its actions, internal disagreements, and legal involvement to the present day. While the interview-style delivery detracts from the main efforts of the book and the placement/use of text and speech bubbles are sometimes problematic, the book as a whole works to convey the idea and purpose of Anonymous and its role in many important international events. Content advisory: strong profanity.
    more
  • FSSTBlog
    January 1, 1970
    Authors: David Kushner, Koren Shadmi (illustrator)Year: 2020ISBN: 978-1-56858-877-3 (e-book)Publisher: Hatchette Book GroupGoodreads Rating: 5/5Content Warnings: Rape, Pedophilia, racism (Mentioned)Purchased or Received Copy: Received copy from NetgalleyPhoto: Warren WongA For Anonymous follows the actions of Anonymous, a group of hacktivists. David Kushner, the author and a character in the story, interviews a hacker known only as Commander X. Kushner tells Xs story while following the history Authors: David Kushner, Koren Shadmi (illustrator)Year: 2020ISBN: 978-1-56858-877-3 (e-book)Publisher: Hatchette Book GroupGoodreads Rating: 5/5Content Warnings: Rape, Pedophilia, racism (Mentioned)Purchased or Received Copy: Received copy from NetgalleyPhoto: Warren WongA For Anonymous follows the actions of Anonymous, a group of “hacktivists”. David Kushner, the author and a character in the story, interviews a hacker known only as “Commander X”. Kushner tells X’s story while following the history of Anonymous. From an abandoned slaughterhouse in Lubbock, Texas to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri to Libya, Morocco, or Egypt, X describes the actions of Anonymous, or anon.Kushner sets up what seems like a biography of a member of anon, but rather X is something of a mouthpiece so that we get a more authentic perspective. I like it, and there’s just enough information about X to let us sympathize with him without distracting from anon itself. The shifting back and forth between the group and the individual works well, so it isn’t jarring.While I enjoyed Kushner’s writing, my strongest praise is for Koren Shadmi’s illustrations. It’s difficult to make concrete something as abstract as the internet, but I enjoyed how A For Anonymous handled the subject. Online anonymous discussions become an almost matrix-like space. The Guy Fawkes mask associated with Anonymous remains on, denoting both main characters and background extras who identify with the group. Shadmi personifies concepts like 4chan, an anonymous imageboard as a swamp creature, an image that I think describes it perfectly.One thing that I don’t know if I can comment on is how they describe internet history to the uninitiated, as I had the knowledge going in. I knew about Habbo Hotel and 4chan before I started reading the book, so I don’t know how this book would appeal to somebody that doesn’t spend the majority of their day in some way connected to the internet, but I’m curious to see. Still, it seems to be coming from an effort to establish a baseline of context for everyone.As somebody that’s interested in modern activism and how people use technology for political change, groups like Anonymous fascinate me and I was excited for this book going in. I’m happy to say that it lived up to my expectations.
    more
  • Sayo
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is very choppy, not sure if it was the digital file, or if that is intentional. While not overly informative, this is a a fast and enjoyable (enough) read. The illustrations are the best part, the Guy Fawkes masks on people at the grocery store, or in coffee shops was a great representation that 'Anonymous' is everywhere.
    more
Write a review