Hannah's War
A "mesmerizing" re-imagination of the final months of World War II (Kate Quinn, author of The Alice Network), Hannah's War is an unforgettable love story about an exceptional woman and the dangerous power of her greatest discovery.Berlin, 1938. Groundbreaking physicist Dr. Hannah Weiss is on the verge of the greatest discovery of the 20th century: splitting the atom. She understands that the energy released by her discovery can power entire cities or destroy them. Hannah believes the weapon's creation will secure an end to future wars, but as a Jewish woman living under the harsh rule of the Third Reich, her research is belittled, overlooked, and eventually stolen by her German colleagues. Faced with an impossible choice, Hannah must decide what she is willing to sacrifice in pursuit of science's greatest achievement. New Mexico, 1945. Returning wounded and battered from the liberation of Paris, Major Jack Delaney arrives in the New Mexican desert with a mission: to catch a spy. Someone in the top-secret nuclear lab at Los Alamos has been leaking encoded equations to Hitler's scientists. Chief among Jack's suspects is the brilliant and mysterious Hannah Weiss, an exiled physicist lending her talent to J. Robert Oppenheimer's mission. All signs point to Hannah as the traitor, but over three days of interrogation that separate her lies from the truth, Jack will realize they have more in common than either one bargained for. Hannah's War is a thrilling wartime story of loyalty, truth, and the unforeseeable fallout of a single choice.

Hannah's War Details

TitleHannah's War
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherBack Bay Books
ISBN-139780316537445
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II

Hannah's War Review

  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this historical fiction book is more imaginative than fact based, I still thought it was a worthwhile read. The story revolved around the making of the atomic bomb and essentially which country's scientists were going to be the first ones to successfully pull it off. It was a fascinating read as the story did explore a bit of the science behind it but also what it might have been like to work on a project of this magnitude. It's 1945 and Major Jack Delaney has been sent to a Even though this historical fiction book is more imaginative than fact based, I still thought it was a worthwhile read. The story revolved around the making of the atomic bomb and essentially which country's scientists were going to be the first ones to successfully pull it off. It was a fascinating read as the story did explore a bit of the science behind it but also what it might have been like to work on a project of this magnitude. It's 1945 and Major Jack Delaney has been sent to a top-secret nuclear lab in New Mexico. His mission is to figure out if one of the people working on the atomic bomb is actually a spy and is slipping secrets about the project to the Germans. Dr. Hannah Weiss is a physicist working on J. Robert Oppenheimer's team and Jack suspects she is the traitor. The story switches back and forth between the perspectives of Jack and Hannah and takes place in 1945 in the United States as well as the late 1930s when Hannah was living and working in Germany.Hannah is a fictional character but you could say she was inspired by Dr. Lisa Meitner. Lisa was part of a small team of scientists that helped discover nuclear fission of uranium. Most people feel she did not get nearly enough credit for her contributions, most likely because she was a woman. Major Jack Delaney is also a product of the author's imagination. However, I truly feel like Hannah and Jack served a purpose and the author did a good job in coming up with a story that felt realistic. Hannah in particular was a fascinating character. One of the things I thought the author did really well was showing what it would have been like for a female scientist back then and how she wouldn't have gotten the same level of respect as her male colleagues. The story also brought up many of the things a Jewish person would have faced both living in Germany as well as in the United States. And of course the making of a nuclear weapon and how that brings up ethical issues was also touched on in the book.My main issue with the book is I thought the transitions at times were clunky and led to an uneven reading experience. It's almost like I had to take a moment at the beginning of each chapter to figure out what year it was as well as who was the narrator. I think it would have helped tremendously if the year was noted at the start of each chapter like in so many other books that feature alternating timelines and characters. Given the title, it's not a huge shocker Hannah is the main focus of the story. Paul wasn't a well-developed character until very far into the book when you got to learn more about his life prior to coming to New Mexico. I do wish it hadn't taken so long to feel like he was contributing something worthwhile to the story. Overall, I do recommend reading this one if you enjoy historical fiction about World War 2. I've read at least 100 or so books about WW2 over the years, and I'm impressed the author was able to create a story that felt unique to the genre.I received a free advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Nenia ⚡ Aspiring Evil Overlord ⚡ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestI actually ended up enjoying this a lot more than I thought I did. This is a story told towards the end of WWII, right around the time of the Hiroshima bombing and Hitler taking his own life. Hannah Weiss is a Jewish physicist who, after being exiled in Germany, has come to work with Oppenheimer to develop the Atomic bomb. Beautiful and brilliant, she is often unappreciated for her great work, and to make matters worse, the U.S. gov't is Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestI actually ended up enjoying this a lot more than I thought I did. This is a story told towards the end of WWII, right around the time of the Hiroshima bombing and Hitler taking his own life. Hannah Weiss is a Jewish physicist who, after being exiled in Germany, has come to work with Oppenheimer to develop the Atomic bomb. Beautiful and brilliant, she is often unappreciated for her great work, and to make matters worse, the U.S. gov't is now investigating her, assuming that she's a German spy.Told in two timelines, we learn about Hannah's seemingly doomed love affair with one of her colleagues in Germany, as she and her family live in fear of the growing hatred against Jewish people brewing in their country, and then also in the present as the man who's investigating her, Jack Delaney, plays a sensual game of cat and mouse with his charge, growing more and more attracted to her even as he tries to find out Hannah's secrets without revealing too many of his own (and he has a lot).HANNAH'S WAR falls under a genre that I call "book club bait." It is largely a puff piece that doesn't delve into anything too controversial. Even the feminist themes in this book are "safe": she is a physicist, yes, but she is also feminine and the bulk of the focus is on her relationships with the men in the novel. It's a safe and feel-good book packed with suspense and emotional drama, and even though it's gorgeously written, it doesn't really challenge the status quo.There's nothing wrong with being book club bait-- in fact, I enjoyed this novel and its focus on the arts, as much how it portrayed the struggle of a woman in the sciences-- but I wouldn't go into this book expecting anything controversial, earth-shattering, or challenging. Anyone who likes suspenseful historical fiction with romance will love this, and I think that's a lot of people. It actually reminded me a bit of this book I read recently called THE GLITTERING HOUR, another puff piece that seemed like it would be a wallpaper historical, but ended up pleasantly surprising me.Bonus points for all the references to paintings and literature that had me racing to Google.Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  4 stars
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  • Kate Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Read this one for a cover quote, and loved it. My quote: HANNAH'S WAR is a gripping cat-and-mouse tale of love, war, deception, and espionage you won't be able to put down. As Hitler's star rises in Germany, brilliant physicist Hannah Weiss is on the cusp of cracking critical atomic secrets, but a Jewish female scientist has no place in the new order. When Hannah escapes overseas into the pressure cooker of the American atom bomb project, a suspicious young CIA agent comes to investigate the Read this one for a cover quote, and loved it. My quote: HANNAH'S WAR is a gripping cat-and-mouse tale of love, war, deception, and espionage you won't be able to put down. As Hitler's star rises in Germany, brilliant physicist Hannah Weiss is on the cusp of cracking critical atomic secrets, but a Jewish female scientist has no place in the new order. When Hannah escapes overseas into the pressure cooker of the American atom bomb project, a suspicious young CIA agent comes to investigate the ties that still bind her to Berlin...but who is interrogating whom? Jan Eliasberg elevates a mesmerizing spy thriller with her clear, fierce admiration for the women of the past who refused to be edged out of the world of scientific discovery, and I loved every page.
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating, pacey, and engaging!Hannahs War is an intriguing story that sweeps you away to Los Alamos, New Mexico in the final days of WWII where a female Jewish physicist is on the cusp of making history in a field dominated by men, the race to develop the first nuclear weapon is well and truly underway, and the search and investigation of potential Nazi spies is top priority.The prose is atmospheric and descriptive. The characters are intelligent, passionate, anxious, and driven. And the plot Fascinating, pacey, and engaging!Hannah’s War is an intriguing story that sweeps you away to Los Alamos, New Mexico in the final days of WWII where a female Jewish physicist is on the cusp of making history in a field dominated by men, the race to develop the first nuclear weapon is well and truly underway, and the search and investigation of potential Nazi spies is top priority.The prose is atmospheric and descriptive. The characters are intelligent, passionate, anxious, and driven. And the plot is an entertaining tale about life, love, friendship, survival, tragedy, war, romance, loyalty, subterfuge, and the development of nuclear fusion.Overall, Hannah’s War is a well-written, compelling debut by Eliasberg that incorporates a nice mix of real-life historical figures, insightful information, and plausible fiction in a tale loosely based on the brilliant accomplishments of Dr. Lise Meitner.Thank you to HBG Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Maine Colonial
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free publisher's advance review copy.According to Eliasberg, this novel was inspired by a little-known historical fact: that among the three Nazi-era scientists in Berlin who first discovered the secret of nuclear fission, one was a brilliant Jewish woman named Lise Meitner. According to a New York Times story published on August 7,1945 (the day American forces dropped a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima), Meitner brought this secret to the Allies. Eliasberg wanted to write about Meitner I received a free publisher's advance review copy.According to Eliasberg, this novel was inspired by a little-known historical fact: that among the three Nazi-era scientists in Berlin who first discovered the secret of nuclear fission, one was a brilliant Jewish woman named Lise Meitner. According to a New York Times story published on August 7,1945 (the day American forces dropped a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima), Meitner brought this secret to the Allies. Eliasberg wanted to write about Meitner and about a further mystery: if German scientists were the first to discover nuclear fission, why did the Nazis never develop a nuclear device?Though Meitner is the inspiration for this novel, Eliasberg makes it clear that everything in it is imagined. And certainly if you spend a little time with Meitner’s Wikipedia entry, that is very clear.Eliasberg has Meitner in the US during the war, working at Los Alamos with the team of scientists under J. Robert Oppenheimer who developed the nuclear bomb. (In real life, Meitner lived in Sweden and England after fleeing Germany in 1938, and refused an invitation to work with the Los Alamos team.) The plot is set in motion when intelligence officer Major Jack Delaney is sent to Los Alamos to determine which scientist is sending coded information to a contact in Switzerland; information that may be intended to help German scientists with their nuclear project. Delaney quickly comes to suspect Meitner, and a cat-and-mouse sort of interrogation takes place over a few days. Meitner tells him of her experiences in Berlin, through which we learn her back story, including not only her work, but also her family and love life. Meitner is a sort of Scheherazade with her stories, mesmerizing Delaney against his will, attracting him to her and, at the same time, drawing out secrets that could jeopardize his career.I have mixed feelings about this novel, as I too often do with historical fiction featuring female protagonists. On the one hand, it’s an engaging tale, with good pacing and interesting characters. On the other hand, why do female-centric historical novels always have to be so romance-y? Think of it this way: if Meitner had been a male Jewish scientist who escaped from Nazi Germany and got the secret of nuclear fission to the Allies, what kind of a novel would you expect to read with that character as the launching point? It would be an adventure or espionage-oriented tale, right? Maybe some sex and/or romance would be thrown in, but the primary tone would be the adventure/espionage. I’m annoyed by the implicit assumption that a woman’s story has to be focused on her romantic relationships, while a man’s doesn’t. And especially in this case, because from what I’ve read about Lise Meitner, her life was absolutely nothing like her namesake in this book, but it was compelling just the same.
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  • Rama
    January 1, 1970
    When Smiles Fade This is a fictionalized story of Austrian physicist Lise Meitner who discovered nuclear fission that paved the way for power generators using nuclear fuels. Part of the story is actual, and the rest is created by the author. Hannah Weiss was a professionally battered woman who was treated unfairly in academics because of her gender and Jewish faith in Germany. Deeply hurt by the rising power of the Third Reich and the impact on her life, migrate to United States to work in the When Smiles Fade This is a fictionalized story of Austrian physicist Lise Meitner who discovered nuclear fission that paved the way for power generators using nuclear fuels. Part of the story is actual, and the rest is created by the author. Hannah Weiss was a professionally battered woman who was treated unfairly in academics because of her gender and Jewish faith in Germany. Deeply hurt by the rising power of the Third Reich and the impact on her life, migrate to United States to work in the Manhattan Project. Robert Oppenheimer (Oppie), the director of the project trying to develop atomic bomb at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico becomes her supervisor. Shortly after coming on board, the mission suspects that Hannah is providing highly sensitive information related to atomic bombs to Nazi Germany. An investigation led by Major Jack Delaney believes that she is a traitor; the evidence on hand are some coded post cards she mailed to her colleague in Germany. Over three days of interrogation, Jack discovers Hannah is not only a brilliant scientist but also a mysterious, lonely, somewhat fragile, and sensual woman who can tease a major general of the U.S. Army. Delaney, himself a Jew goes by an Irish name that hides his identity for personal reasons. He fails to understand the harsh environment of antisemitism in her native Austria and Germany. The author cleverly creates situations for Hannah where she manipulates and seduce Jack. Jack begins to believe that Hannah is innocent, and he sees the feminine side of a lonely woman in male dominated profession. Their love does not go far enough, and it does not end in a relationship, but the author cleverly handles this at the end, but the ending will not be the same as many readers would guess.One of the moral questions the author poses is to focus on the unfair treatment of Jews by United States during WWII. If she is so genuine, why would she create a story where Hannah already suffered greatly in her life is subject to further humiliation that tarnishes the image of Lise Meitner? Despite these observations, I like the style of author’s writing and strongly recommend reading chapters, 18, 23, 25, 27, 33, 35, and 38 (chapter #s from proof made from author’s manuscript) that narrates the progression of Jack’s feelings for Hannah. An historical perspective to this book must be in order since the focus of this book is Lise Meitner fictionalized by the author as Hannah Weiss. Albert Einstein first wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt a letter of caution after the publication of Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn paper about nuclear fission that would enable Hitler’s Germany to make an atomic weapon. This ultimately led to the establishment of the Manhattan Project in 1942. Meitner in real life refused an offer to work on the project declaring that she will have nothing to do with a bomb. She was also horrified to learn that it was used on Hiroshima. In fact, she was a leading physicist with Einstein to oppose making atomic weapons.Meitner was a professionally battered woman and was treated unfairly because of her gender and Jewish faith. Otto Hahn alone was awarded the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of nuclear fission. Meitner was deeply hurt, and this injustice by the Nobel Committee has been wildly criticized in the academic world for decades. In 1945, when she was recognized in America for her accomplishments, she dined with President Harry Truman, who at a dinner for the Women’s Press Club honoring Meitner’s accomplishments remarked, “So you’re the little lady who got us into all of this!” Yet despite misleading press reports in Sweden and President Truman’s misperceptions, Meitner never worked on the Manhattan project. She never married and had no children. If major universities in United States had offered her an academic position, she probably would have worked tirelessly to promote physics and science education among women. She would have been a champion to encourage women to study physics.
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  • Mary Lins
    January 1, 1970
    Hannahs War, by Jan Eliasberg, would make a marvelous movie or limited series! Fast-paced, a An Atomic Bomb! The fact that Elisaberg is a highly successful screenwriter/director is apparent from the first page. Hannahs War is quite a ride! (And It comes with a Readers Guide which is always useful for Book Clubs.)On the first page, Hannah is being taken to prison for treason. The central question of the novel that will have the reader wondering to the very end is: was Hannah blinded by love into “Hannah’s War”, by Jan Eliasberg, would make a marvelous movie or limited series! Fast-paced, a An Atomic Bomb! The fact that Elisaberg is a highly successful screenwriter/director is apparent from the first page. “Hannah’s War” is quite a ride! (And It comes with a Reader’s Guide which is always useful for Book Clubs.)On the first page, Hannah is being taken to prison for treason. The central question of the novel that will have the reader wondering to the very end is: was Hannah “blinded by love” into compromising scientific secrets to the Germans? Eliasberg draws comparisons between the development of the Atomic Bomb, and Goethe’s tale of “Faust”. Dr. Faust sold his soul to the Devil; did the Manhattan Project scientists do the same? Was using Fat Man and Little Boy always inevitable? We will never know what FDR would have done, verses what Truman decided to do; it’s an interesting thought exercise and discussion point.Fast-paced, cinema-graphic, “Hannah’s War”, is a novel for those of us who never tire of stories about WWII, especially from a female point of view.
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  • Joni Rodgers
    January 1, 1970
    This meticulously researched, beautifully written novel opened my eyes to a facet of history I'd never even considered. Hannah's story is entertaining, thought-provoking, and full of unexpected twists right to the very last page.
  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    A richly based time in history in which one woman in particular Lise Meitner made a huge discovery related to uranium and nuclear fission. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lise_Me...However, this book deals with another such woman with a few twists.This sets the stage for the rest of this fascinating story in which espionage and romance is woven throughout this explosive and yet passionate historical fictional piece.The main question readers must ask is who in fact is investigating whom?It's 1938 A richly based time in history in which one woman in particular Lise Meitner made a huge discovery related to uranium and nuclear fission. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lise_Me...However, this book deals with another such woman with a few twists.This sets the stage for the rest of this fascinating story in which espionage and romance is woven throughout this explosive and yet passionate historical fictional piece.The main question readers must ask is who in fact is investigating whom?It's 1938 when Hannah our main character is on the verge of the greatest discovery-the splitting of an atom- which can be used for good or evil .She hopes this new discovery will be an end all to future wars but unfortunately as a Jewish woman her efforts become hampered and in fact her discoveries stolen by German colleagues.This leads to the ultimate decision in regards to what she's willing to sacrifice in pursuit of science.As if this wasn't enough we add a young man whose battered and wounded from the liberation of Paris (1945) with one mission: Catch a spy.These two worlds collide in epic fashion resulting in shocking discoveries and heated debates.All avenues lead to a traitor in the works but is Hannah out to harm or help others?Loyalties fall, love builds, truth conquers all.I absolutely loved this one as I'm a huge fan of anything with WWII significance and found this gripping and intriguing in all fronts.Thank you to Jan for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.It's a highly recommended read that was top on my TBR and for which I spent several days thinking of what to right to do this one justice.I hope you enjoyed my review and I hope you fall in love with this new work by Jan Eliasberg!
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  • Fgolum
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this historical fiction book about the development of the atomic bomb. It sparked an interest to explore further the involvement of women in this.
  • C Swayze
    January 1, 1970
    Because when I read, I dont really read; I pop a beautiful sentence into my mouth and suck it like a fruit drop, or sip it like a liqueur until the thought dissolves in me like alcohol, infusing the brain and heart and coursing on thought the veins to the root of each blood vessel. - Bohumill Hrabal, Too Loud a SolitudeI came across Hrabals words in the sidewalk of Library Way by the New York Public Library, just as I was in the midst of reading Jan Eliasbergs luminous novel, Hannahs War. The “Because when I read, I don’t really read; I pop a beautiful sentence into my mouth and suck it like a fruit drop, or sip it like a liqueur until the thought dissolves in me like alcohol, infusing the brain and heart and coursing on thought the veins to the root of each blood vessel.” - Bohumill Hrabal, Too Loud a SolitudeI came across Hrabal’s words in the sidewalk of Library Way by the New York Public Library, just as I was in the midst of reading Jan Eliasberg’s luminous novel, Hannah’s War. The quote perfectly encapsulates my reaction to the book: so often her language stopped me in my tracks, and I had to reread and even mark some portions for the simple pleasure of savoring the sentence, or phrase, or paragraph again. Although I finished the book a week ago, Eliasberg’s writing stays with me, a slight buzz of wonder at her ability to craft words in such an evocative and magnetic manner. But beautiful language is a poem, unless there is a strong story to go with it. Hannah’s War is also a fascinating read about the passion of discovery, both scientific and personal. As she weaves a riveting mystery/love story between Hannah and the two men who love her, Eliasberg’s careful research offers real insight into the tension and fervor that accompanied the developments leading to the deployment of the bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. She seamlessly incorporates a strong, intriguing and complex heroine and her equally complex male protagonists, with historical characters like Robert J. Oppenheimer, painting a portrait of their persona so vividly that I was not always certain who had actually lived and who was fictional, to the extent that I ended up doing some research of my own to be able distinguish the two.So treat yourself to a book that has it all: brilliant writing, vivid character development, historical context, and exciting storytelling. You won’t want the book to end, and when it does, if you are like me, you will anxiously await the film version to be released. Brava, Jan!Full disclosure: I received an Advanced Reader’s Copy in exchange for an honest review, but that in no way influenced my opinion of the book.
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  • Sabreena - Books and Prosecco
    January 1, 1970
    Stars: ⭐⭐⭐⭐Disclaimer: The amazing humans at Hachette Book Group Canada were kind enough to send me an arc of Hannahs War in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions below are my own. I will protect you, Hannah. If I can. Hannahs War is a beautifully written story told from two different times, before and during World War II. Hannah and Jack tell us their stories, from Hannah being on the verge of the greatest discovery of her time in 1938 to Jack finding the spy who has been Stars: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Disclaimer: The amazing humans at Hachette Book Group Canada were kind enough to send me an arc of Hannah’s War in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions below are my own. “I will protect you, Hannah. If I can.” Hannah’s War is a beautifully written story told from two different times, before and during World War II. Hannah and Jack tell us their stories, from Hannah being on the verge of the greatest discovery of her time in 1938 to Jack finding the spy who has been sharing secrets with Germany in 1945.This book is a must-read for any historical fiction fan, especially if you love stories of the secret heroes of the war. The ones who fought back in seemingly small ways that actually turned out to be huge, put themselves at risk of discovery, and stayed true to the end to fight for what is right.I’ve always loved books that are told from two times, and Hannah’s War was no different. Eliasberg’s writing is completely captivating, and I could barely put the book down. When I did put the book down, you know to go to work and stuff, I found myself thinking about the book. I needed to know what would happen next, how would it end, would Hannah be okay after the war?! “Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited; imagination circles the world.” I will admit that it took me a little while to become attached to any of the characters, but that almost always seems to happen with these kinds of books because of all the secrecy. By the end, I adored Hannah.First of all, she’s an insanely smart scientist and she knows it. She also knows that she lives during a time when being a smart woman is not exactly encouraged. Oh, not to mention, she’s Jewish. During WWII. She knows that she needs to be careful, but she also refuses to sit by and watch the Reich take over.I wouldn’t say I adored Jack, but I was definitely became invested in his story as we learned more of his history. I won’t spoil the story, but let’s just say, not everyone is as they seem! “The man I shouldn’t have trusted latches the manacle around my wrist and affixes it to a hasp welded hard to the bench.” In the author’s note, Eliasberg says this story is more fiction than fact, but the general idea holds true – there are heroes that we never truly learn about who we owe our lives to. There are some real characters in the book too though.If you like books told from two times, books set during WWII, and/or books with women who are brave and smart and rebellious in their own way, then I definitely recommend Hannah’s War for you!Trigger/content warning: war, torture, mentions of concentration camps, loved ones going missing.Thanks again to HBG Canada for sending me this to read and review!
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  • Cindi (Utah Mom’s Life)
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! The bright spot in all this social distancing and not leaving my house in a week has definitely been the quality of the books Ive had the privilege to read. I stayed up late into the night to finish Hannahs War because I simply couldnt stop. Dr. Hannah Weiss is an Austrian physicist working on the top-secret project deep in the New Mexico desert. Exiled from her homeland, under the Third Reich, shes had her work stolen and her loved ones taken. And now shes the chief suspect in Major Jack ⁣Wow! The bright spot in all this social distancing and not leaving my house in a week has definitely been the quality of the books I’ve had the privilege to read. I stayed up late into the night to finish Hannah’s War because I simply couldn’t stop. ⁣⁣Dr. Hannah Weiss is an Austrian physicist working on the top-secret project deep in the New Mexico desert. Exiled from her homeland, under the Third Reich, she’s had her work stolen and her loved ones taken. And now she’s the chief suspect in Major Jack Delaney’s investigation to catch the spy. ⁣⁣Hannah’s War caught my attention from the first chapter and held it fixed through the perfectly paced investigation into Dr. Weiss’s history. It’s smart and well researched and through the fictional character shines the light on the actual brilliant woman Dr. Lise Meitner, who discovered nuclear fission and was then erased from history. ⁣⁣Intrigue, history and romance, Hannah’s War has it all. The characters are brilliant, flawed humans with their own personal motivations. It’s passionate and important in its discussions of war and and the desire to harness power. ⁣⁣I loved the nearly flawless novel and know it will be one that leaves a lasting impression. ⁣
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  • Aisling
    January 1, 1970
    I was skeptical at first when I saw it was historical fiction relating to science, as a chemist myself my past experience of reading things of that genre have been somewhat disappointing as the science is made to sound unrealistic or the scientists themselves are portrayed without much human quality/the idea that they have ideas and lives outside of the lab. This book struck a good balance, the science was delicately woven throughout in a manner that helped hold the story together without I was skeptical at first when I saw it was historical fiction relating to science, as a chemist myself my past experience of reading things of that genre have been somewhat disappointing as the science is made to sound unrealistic or the scientists themselves are portrayed without much human quality/the idea that they have ideas and lives outside of the lab. This book struck a good balance, the science was delicately woven throughout in a manner that helped hold the story together without becoming intimidating or laborious for fiction. Set just before and during WWII the story focuses on Dr Hannah Weiss an Austrian Physicist working on nuclear fission in Berlin in 1938. Not only is she a woman in a male-dominated field she is Jewish and so these facts compound the reasoning behind the disrespect and harsh treatment she is shown by her colleagues. She is arguably the most intelligent mind working on the nuclear project a fact which her peers are well aware of and they find no remorse in taking credit for her work. The story alternates between her life at the start of the war in Berlin and towards the end in New Mexico where she is posted to contribute to the development of the US atomic bomb. Enter here Jack Delaney, certain that somebody is divulging the secrets of the project to the Germans for the development of their own device, Dr Weiss is his top suspect and as we learn of her history with Dr Stefan Frei it is easy to understand how one might reach this conclusion. The storyline is gripping you can feel all at once the strength, emotion and intelligence of Hannah as she recounts her story and Delaney's character is well developed also allowing you understand how he feels Hannah might be naive in spite of her brilliance. Eliasberg reveals to us a different kind of contribution that women made to the war effort, one which, due to the way credit is given in science, could be easily lost and buried in a pile of untold stories.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher, Back Bay Books for an Advanced Reader's Copy which I received at the Annual Hachette Book Club Brunch in October, 2019. This is historical fiction based very loosely on the life of Lise Meitner, an Austrian-Swedish physicist who became a professor in Berlin in the mid 1930s. This story takes place in Los Alamos in 1945, during the months leading up to and testing of the atomic bomb. Hannah Weiss is the only female physicist working at Los Alamos and is suspected of Thanks to the publisher, Back Bay Books for an Advanced Reader's Copy which I received at the Annual Hachette Book Club Brunch in October, 2019. This is historical fiction based very loosely on the life of Lise Meitner, an Austrian-Swedish physicist who became a professor in Berlin in the mid 1930s. This story takes place in Los Alamos in 1945, during the months leading up to and testing of the atomic bomb. Hannah Weiss is the only female physicist working at Los Alamos and is suspected of sending information back to Berlin to help the Germans develop their own nuclear weapon. Major Jack Delaney is sent to investigate. I liked the description of the area around Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico. There was some romance which seemed a little over wrought and unnecessary at times. I escaped for 2 days into this story and that made it a worthwhile read.
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  • Nancy Schecter
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Hannahs War, a delicious mix of espionage, nuclear physics, ethics, romance and history. Eliasbergs writing is cinematic, no surprise given her experience as a director and screenwriter. The characters ring true, its clearly well-researched. As a woman in science myself, I appreciate how Dr. Weiss is drawn with depth and complexity. The story behind the book, how Lise Meitner was not credited for her Nobel Prize winning discovery, brings the importance of Hannahs War to another level. I loved Hannah’s War, a delicious mix of espionage, nuclear physics, ethics, romance and history. Eliasberg’s writing is cinematic, no surprise given her experience as a director and screenwriter. The characters ring true, it’s clearly well-researched. As a woman in science myself, I appreciate how Dr. Weiss is drawn with depth and complexity. The story behind the book, how Lise Meitner was not credited for her Nobel Prize winning discovery, brings the importance of Hannah’s War to another level.
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  • Elizabeth Schmidt
    January 1, 1970
    I read an Advanced Reader copy - compelling fiction inspired by the real life female "non-Aryan" physicist, Dr. Lise Meitner, who was an important contributor to the Manhattan Project that developed the Nuclear bomb during WWII. The author asked herself the question "Why did the Germans never develop an atomic bomb?" This book is her imagined answer. Loved it!
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Captivating historical fiction about a female physicist on edge of making history in a totally male dominated field. Story is about life during WWII, love, friendship, tragedy and survival. I found some of the characters werent that developed but Im guessing more books will be forthcoming.. Captivating historical fiction about a female physicist on edge of making history in a totally male dominated field. Story is about life during WWII, love, friendship, tragedy and survival. I found some of the characters weren’t that developed but I’m guessing more books will be forthcoming..
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  • Jenny Q
    January 1, 1970
    Guest Post + Giveaway @ Let Them Read Books!
  • Sharlene
    January 1, 1970
    A gripping story about the German physicist who in Berlin 1938 is on the verge of splitting the atom. The is a book that is very hard to put down and you will be pulled into the mystery of who in the top-secret nuclear lab at Los Alamos has been leaking encoded equations to Hitler's scientists.I recommend this book to all that love a fast paced story with remarkable characters and well research history. All historical fiction fans will love this one..
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  • Alma
    January 1, 1970
    Lise Meitner, a physicist who discovered nuclear fission, is an unknown figure to those of us not part of the scientific world. Eliasberg wrote Hannahs war to get Lises story out there, and to explain why Hitlers scientists were never able to produce an atomic bomb of their own. Read the rest of the review on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.... Lise Meitner, a physicist who discovered nuclear fission, is an unknown figure to those of us not part of the scientific world. Eliasberg wrote “Hannah’s war” to get Lise’s story “out there,” and to explain why Hitler’s scientists were never able to produce an atomic bomb of their own. Read the rest of the review on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress....
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  • Shirley Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    The question is, did Hannah, a brilliant physicist, leak secrets about building the atomic bomb to her counterparts in Germany? This one kept me guessing. The character of Hannah is inspired by real-life scientist Lise Meitner, the woman who discovered nuclear fission and of course was never recognized for it. The novel, which will be published in March, is part spy story, part love story, and a fine piece of historical fiction.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    I loved reading Hannah's War from the first page to the last. I know it is fiction but love that it was based on a brilliant Jewish female physicist who played an essential part in discovering nuclear fission. It is fast paced, beautifully written and thought-provoking. I hated coming to the end but have continued to think about Hannah/Lise Meitner.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Deliciously entertaining--truly a page turner--and in addition insightful love story, history lesson and a tale of suspense. Warning: You'll want Eliasberg's next book, and soon!
  • murderino.booklover
    January 1, 1970
    Strong, Smart, Independent Woman!!! If you are looking for a book about a woman holding her own - this book will not disappoint. Dr. Hannah Weiss is a dynamo. She knows her stuff and isnt giving anyone access to her brilliant brain.This book had me in the edge of seat longing to know what happens next. I feel in love with the main characters.If you are into historical fiction, I strongly recommending. Its a must read!! Strong, Smart, Independent Woman!!! If you are looking for a book about a woman holding her own - this book will not disappoint. Dr. Hannah Weiss is a dynamo. She knows her stuff and isn’t giving anyone access to her brilliant brain.This book had me in the edge of seat longing to know what happens next. I feel in love with the main characters.If you are into historical fiction, I strongly recommending. It’s a must read!!
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  • Sara Grace
    January 1, 1970
    I cried on the subway in the middle of New York City rush hour while reading one of the most exciting sequences in Hannahs War.This book is a fast-paced spy thriller, but for all the great, page-turning plot (you will delight in the intricacy) it was the quieter scenes in Berlin that moved me most. Here is a woman, Hannah, navigating life - as a Jew, as a scientist, as a parent figure - as hitler and the nazis tighten their grip on Germany. It felt all too relevant. What decisions does she make? I cried on the subway in the middle of New York City rush hour while reading one of the most exciting sequences in Hannah’s War.This book is a fast-paced spy thriller, but for all the great, page-turning plot (you will delight in the intricacy) it was the quieter scenes in Berlin that moved me most. Here is a woman, Hannah, navigating life - as a Jew, as a scientist, as a parent figure - as hitler and the nazis tighten their grip on Germany. It felt all too relevant. What decisions does she make? What decisions would you or I?Ultimately, Hannah’s War is an intense and brave story of explosive passions - both romantic and scientific - set against the discovery of humankind's most horrifying “advance.”And it’s a story of faith - in ourselves and in the people we love.All the thumbs up! Read it and weep!
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  • Hallie Friedman
    January 1, 1970
    I won HANNAH'S WAR in a Goodreads Giveaway and, quite literally, couldn't put it down. I started reading in the afternoon and finished at about 3:00 a.m. I think I ate something for dinner but I was so engrossed in this remarkable story that I can hardly remember. I was completely immersed in the mesmerizing character of Dr. Hannah Weiss (inspired by the real nuclear physicist, Lise Meitner, who discovered nuclear fission only to be robbed of credit because she was female and Jewish). Hannah's I won HANNAH'S WAR in a Goodreads Giveaway and, quite literally, couldn't put it down. I started reading in the afternoon and finished at about 3:00 a.m. I think I ate something for dinner but I was so engrossed in this remarkable story that I can hardly remember. I was completely immersed in the mesmerizing character of Dr. Hannah Weiss (inspired by the real nuclear physicist, Lise Meitner, who discovered nuclear fission only to be robbed of credit because she was female and Jewish). Hannah's story, unfolding in parallel time periods -- 1938, Berlin and 1945, Los Alamos, N.M. -- has everything: the electrifying twists and turns of a great espionage thriller; a high-stakes historical backdrop in the race between the Allies and the Germans to create and test the atomic bomb; and an epic love story...the details of which I won't disclose because of spoilers. The history and themes of HANNAH'S WAR haunted me, staying with me so profoundly that I read it again, cover to cover, two days later. It was even better the second time.
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  • Jayenron
    January 1, 1970
    I was given an advanced copy of HANNAHS WAR by the publisher, in exchange for an honest review.This is a superbly written romantic thriller set against stakes that could not be higherthe race to build the Atomic Bomb, waged between the Third Reich and the Allies. Sparkling with period detail, it is reminiscent of Jennifer Egans Manhattan Beach and Anthony Doerrs All The Light We Cannot See with its absorption into a carefully researched time period. The story is brought to sparkling life by I was given an advanced copy of HANNAH’S WAR by the publisher, in exchange for an honest review.This is a superbly written romantic thriller set against stakes that could not be higher—the race to build the Atomic Bomb, waged between the Third Reich and the Allies. Sparkling with period detail, it is reminiscent of Jennifer Egan’s Manhattan Beach and Anthony Doerr’s All The Light We Cannot See with its absorption into a carefully researched time period. The story is brought to sparkling life by three marvelous central characters in a twisted web of relationships that had me turning every delicious page with anticipation. Equally impressive is the way in which Ms Eliasberg, in the tradition of E.L. Doctorow, so skillfully blends fact and fiction, as her protagonist Hannah showcases the 'shero'ism of real-life scientist Lise Meitner. HANNAH’S WAR is a jaw-dropping debut from a wildly talented novelist—buy this book!
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  • WillWorkForBooks
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite works of historical fiction -- Michael Ondaatje's THE ENGLISH PATIENT; Michael Cunningham's THE HOURS; Hilary Mantel's WOLF HALL -- are gorgeously crafted; deeply researched; brilliantly plotted, and filled with characters so rich and compelling that they make history urgent and mesmerizing. HANNAH'S WAR fulfills those expectations and even exceeds them. Its been a long time since Ive read a beautifully-crafted, gloriously-written novel with three-dimensional characters and My favorite works of historical fiction -- Michael Ondaatje's THE ENGLISH PATIENT; Michael Cunningham's THE HOURS; Hilary Mantel's WOLF HALL -- are gorgeously crafted; deeply researched; brilliantly plotted, and filled with characters so rich and compelling that they make history urgent and mesmerizing. HANNAH'S WAR fulfills those expectations and even exceeds them. It’s been a long time since I’ve read a beautifully-crafted, gloriously-written novel with three-dimensional characters and pitch-perfect dialogue, and it’s been an even longer time since I’ve read a novel that, when I turned the last page, left me with hope for humanity. This book is a gift; I believe it will go down as a masterpiece of the genre. Note: I was sent an Advanced Reader Copy by the publisher in return for an honest review.
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  • Naomi McDougall
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive an advance copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I opened the first page in the middle of quite a busy moment in my life and was so swept away by the story and characters that I ignored my growing to do list, glued to the page, finished the book in a day and a half. There is almost no greater pleasure for me than a book you can't put down and, if you feel the same, this is the book for you. Eliasberg is a wonderful, enchanting writer I was lucky enough to receive an advance copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I opened the first page in the middle of quite a busy moment in my life and was so swept away by the story and characters that I ignored my growing to do list, glued to the page, finished the book in a day and a half. There is almost no greater pleasure for me than a book you can't put down and, if you feel the same, this is the book for you. Eliasberg is a wonderful, enchanting writer and she peels back a whole new chapter on a piece of history that we think we know so well - prompting me to wonder about all the unsung women we have never heard of who changed the course of history. I hope that Eliasberg writes books about them all. Give this one a read, you won't regret it. A beautiful, captivating story.
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