The Paris Hours
One day in the City of Lights. One night in search of lost time. Paris between the wars teems with artists, writers, and musicians, a glittering crucible of genius. But amidst the dazzling creativity of the city’s most famous citizens, four regular people are each searching for something they’ve lost.Camille was the maid of Marcel Proust, and she has a secret: when she was asked to burn her employer’s notebooks, she saved one for herself. Now she is desperate to find it before her betrayal is revealed. Souren, an Armenian refugee, performs puppet shows for children that are nothing like the fairy tales they expect. Lovesick artist Guillaume is down on his luck and running from a debt he cannot repay—but when Gertrude Stein walks into his studio, he wonders if this is the day everything could change. And Jean-Paul is a journalist who tells other people’s stories, because his own is too painful to tell. When the quartet’s paths finally cross in an unforgettable climax, each discovers if they will find what they are looking for.Told over the course of a single day in 1927, The Paris Hours takes four ordinary people whose stories, told together, are as extraordinary as the glorious city they inhabit.

The Paris Hours Details

TitleThe Paris Hours
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 5th, 2020
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN-139781250307194
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Cultural, France

The Paris Hours Review

  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    This is first and foremost a work of literary fiction. I inhaled the pages because of the enhanced prose; every word and sentence was bewitching. The author took one day in the life of four characters and turned it into a beautiful story. Set in post-WWI Paris, four ordinary people begin an ordinary day until their paths cross.Mostly, the first few chapters start out with the characters everyday routines. Some ordinary stuff. But the polished language made these everyday things seem This is first and foremost a work of literary fiction. I inhaled the pages because of the enhanced prose; every word and sentence was bewitching. The author took one day in the life of four characters and turned it into a beautiful story. Set in post-WWI Paris, four ordinary people begin an ordinary day until their paths cross.Mostly, the first few chapters start out with the characters everyday routines. Some ordinary stuff. But the polished language made these everyday things seem fascinating. As the story progresses, their past is revealed in flashbacks. Secrets, regret, loss, and betrayal loom in the shadows as each character continues throughout their day.Chapters are short and the pacing is good. The cast of characters is colorful and engaging. It took me a few chapters in the beginning to remember which character was which. Chapters are narrated by each of the four different characters.If you do not like prolific writing or if you want mega fast-paced, then this probably isn't for you.Thank you to Flatiron books for sending me an advance copy. Opinions are my own.
    more
  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    Update...great book!.....It was fitting that I read this wonderful novel in one day....as the entire novel takes place in a single day. Its truly transporting and immensely satisfying....exactly my favorite type of fiction: great old fashion page turning storytelling. Having been a fan of two other books by Alex George ....A Good American, and Setting Free The Kites....I didnt hesitate for a second to read another book by Alex George. Hes a top-notched skillful storyteller! In the Authors notes Update...’great book’!.....It was fitting that I read this wonderful novel in one day....as the entire novel takes place in a single day. It’s truly transporting and immensely satisfying....exactly my favorite type of fiction: great old fashion page turning storytelling. Having been a fan of two other books by Alex George ....“A Good American”, and “Setting Free The Kites”....I didn’t hesitate for a second to read another book by Alex George. He’s a top-notched skillful storyteller! In the Author’s notes we learn that Alex went to boarding school in Paris at age 13. (Alex lives in Missouri today)Ten years after boarding school he returned to Paris, working as an attorney for an international law firm. He said....”When I sat down to write this book, it was a joy to revisit some of my old haunts”. “But writing about Paris is not without its challenges. After all, there are already more books and movies set in the French capital than there are croissants in the city’s boulangeries.: The symbol of Paris is the most recognizable architectural structure on the planet. So how to tell a story that offered a fresh perspective?”One of the ways Alex accomplished freshness was that he set the novel on the streets and parks where ‘real-every-day-Parisians’ lived and worked — away from the famous tourist attractions. He are so set the story in 1927, back when the city was in a post war explosion of creative brilliance—“populated by an army of geniuses whose artistic legacies survive to this day”.“Some of those characters appear in the book, but by design they exist on the periphery of the novel, not at heart”. Paris was between wars. Regular people were all searching for something they loss. Alex unfolds this story with grace - gorgeous lyrical prose — with interesting, complex characters - each who have a story to tell. He explores the brutality of war, love, longing, betrayal, and history....so exquisitely that I never wanted to set this book down - and didn’t - from start to finish....[one day in Paris - one day read here at home]. When I got to the ending pages — I almost forgot to breathe....as it was one of the most jaw-dropping powerful endings that I’ve read in years. You’ll meet Camille Clermont and her 10 year old daughter, Marie. who had worked for Marcel Proust: [The famous French novelist, critic, and essayist] > 1871-1922A little sample dialogue: “Since 1922, five years, Camille Clermont had been coming to visit Proust’s grave. He had been her employer. Marie watches her mother crying uncontrollably and asks, “was he a nice man?” “Oh yes. He was very nice. Very kind. I wish you could’ve known him better. she smiles down at her daughter. But he thought children were best enjoyed at a distance”. “He didn’t have children himself?” “Goodness no, Camille laughs and shakes her head. He had the characters in his books, though. They were his children, I suppose”. “Did you love him?, asks Marie” “Very much”. “More than papa?” “Oh no. Never more than papa. And in a very different way”. “Different how?” “It’s more like you and Irene”. “In some ways. We shared secrets, just like you and Irene. That’s why I come and put flowers on his grave. I come to say hello, and to tell him that I miss him, and to say thank you for his friendship”. “And, she thinks but does not say, to tell him that I am sorry for my betrayal. And to forgive him for his”. You’ll meet Guillaume Blanc— an artist who can’t afford his rent - can’t afford to eat - achingly love sick and was running from a debt he couldn’t repay.You’ll meet Souren Balakian, an Armenian refugee who performs puppet shows for children ( not your ordinary fairy tale stories)....You’ll meet Emile Brataille - an art dealer who came to Paris to declare his love to Therese, ( a prostitute)Jean-Paul Maillard is a journalist who dreams of America. Josephine Baker, Ernest Hemingway, and the streets of Paris are irresistibly celebrated ....This novel consumed me -as it will ‘every’ reader who loves riveting intimate storytelling! Note: it wasn’t a sacrifice at all to turn off my phone - turn off the world around me for a day....it was reading heaven! I do apologize to friends I owe messages to - I promise to return to our present lives together, soon. Many thanks for an advance copy from Flatiron Books. This book will be released in stores early May. WONDERFUL....HIGHLY RECOMMEND!
    more
  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    The Paris Hours is set during a single day in 1927. I LOVED THAT. I also loved the storytelling and was completely swept up in this most memorable story. More thoughts to come when I can collect them.I received a gifted copy from the publisher. All opinions are my own.Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader
    more
  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThe author came up with an original idea for a story which I always appreciate as a reader. It might not have hit me on quite the emotional level I was hoping for, but it was still an enjoyable reading experience. Paris in the 1920s was a wise choice for a setting as it's not a time period that is captured as often in historical fiction as say, the 1940s during World War 2. The story takes place over the course of a day and alternates between four characters. By the time my copy of the 3.5 starsThe author came up with an original idea for a story which I always appreciate as a reader. It might not have hit me on quite the emotional level I was hoping for, but it was still an enjoyable reading experience. Paris in the 1920s was a wise choice for a setting as it's not a time period that is captured as often in historical fiction as say, the 1940s during World War 2. The story takes place over the course of a day and alternates between four characters. By the time my copy of the book I arrived at my houese, I had actually forgotten the synopsis and I just decided to dive right in without refreshing my memory. I am glad I did because part of the enjoyment I got from reading this book was learning about each character bit by bit and watching things slowly unfold rather than getting a heads up about their backstories. If you don't mind taking a leap of faith on a book, I recommend going into this one blind rather than reading the publisher's synopsis.This book can be classified as historical fiction although you could place it in the literary fiction genre as well. There are a few famous people from the 1920s era that pop up in the story but for the most part this is a work of the author's imagination rather than relying heavily on historical facts or events. I've been having a kick lately out of reading this type of historical fiction as it's fun to see where a writer's creativity will go. This is a well-written story and I liked seeing how everything came together in the end. Unfortunately I didn't feel much for the characters minus a few moments here and there. I felt invested in them to want to find out what was in store for them, but not much more than that. There was potential here for this to be one of those good emotional type reads but in that area it fell flat, at least in my eyes. But just because I didn't necessarily feel anything while reading that doesn't mean this book wasn't worthy of my time. Might not have been the ultimate reading experience but it was still pretty darn good.I won a free advance copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway by the publisher but was not obligated to post a review. All views expressed are my honest opinion.
    more
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Some things are forgettable, but misfortune is not. It dogs you relentlessly once it gets the scent of defeat. Down-and-out, a day late, the wolf at the door all pull up a chair and take residence within the pages of The Paris Hours. But lest you feel the weight of all that suppressing you about now, remember that a determined and undaunted soul travels through life with mop and bucket in hand.Alex George sets this story in the midst of the streets of Paris in the late 1920's. The world is still Some things are forgettable, but misfortune is not. It dogs you relentlessly once it gets the scent of defeat. Down-and-out, a day late, the wolf at the door all pull up a chair and take residence within the pages of The Paris Hours. But lest you feel the weight of all that suppressing you about now, remember that a determined and undaunted soul travels through life with mop and bucket in hand.Alex George sets this story in the midst of the streets of Paris in the late 1920's. The world is still trying to find balance between recovery after the war and the weight of still aching wounds carried within by its citizens and by those misplaced and wayward souls wandering through those streets. Alex George will introduce us to four individuals who will find themselves stepping into connecting links that will snap back and forth across this incredible storyline. He will cleverly slip in characters like Josephine Baker, Marcel Proust, Gertrude Stein, and Ernest Hemingway in order to get a real feel for life in Paris during this time period.Souren Balakian, an Armenian seeking sanctuary in Paris, has set up a puppet theater on the streets to entertain and to benefit from the coins thrown into his open suitcase. We'll come to find that Souren's escape from Armenia was a dangerous and treacherous one.Guillaume Blanc is an undiscovered artist of questionable talent who needs desperately to pay back a loan that hangs over his head like a guillotine. His art dealer, Emile Brataille, has set up a meeting with Gertrude Stein who dabbles in acquiring up and coming art pieces. Will he catch her eye?Jean Paul Maillard is a newspaper writer sent to interview the famous and lovely Josephine Baker. Be ready for Jean Paul's backstory. It's gonna grab you.Camille Clermont is the wife of Olivier and mother of young Marie. When she and her husband were first married, she worked as a chambermaid and companion for Marcel Proust. Camille's relationship with Proust will have a bearing that will spread in quite a few directions here.The Paris Hours is a remarkable character study by this talented author. Alex George pulls threads through tiny openings unseen by the naked eye. The descriptors are rich and full in presenting life in Paris at such a tumultuous era with people desperate to escape the harsh realities of life. Happiness faded quickly if you didn't keep it front and center. Our characters will be signaling us with just that. Grab this one. It will stay with you for quite some time.I received a copy of The Paris Hours through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Flatiron Books and to Alex George for the opportunity.
    more
  • Britany
    January 1, 1970
    Four stories, four perspectives, Paris and celebrities?Four alternating storylines introduce a myriad of characters. We have Souren- an Armenian puppeteer, Jean-Paul a journalist missing his daughter, Guillaume - a painter that owes a debt, and Camille- housekeeper to Marcel Proust. I wanted to fall in love with this story and these characters so much. I really grasped to let them draw me in emotionally. I found the writing compelling and the stories were strong. There were just way too many Four stories, four perspectives, Paris and celebrities?Four alternating storylines introduce a myriad of characters. We have Souren- an Armenian puppeteer, Jean-Paul a journalist missing his daughter, Guillaume - a painter that owes a debt, and Camille- housekeeper to Marcel Proust. I wanted to fall in love with this story and these characters so much. I really grasped to let them draw me in emotionally. I found the writing compelling and the stories were strong. There were just way too many characters. I easily got confused and it always took a few sentences of a new section for me to orient myself as to whose story I was in. Then the addition of Hemingway, Stein, Proust and Josephine Baker was just too much. I struggled to connect but the threads of the main voice came through and for that I appreciated this read. Thank you to Netgalley and Flatiron for an advanced copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Great read... lots of wonderful characters.... great development of the stories surrounding each person.Really enjoyed the fluid images of places, love lost and found. Super ending! Thank you for the giveaway.
  • Amanda Zirn Hudson
    January 1, 1970
    I havent felt this way about a book since I read WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING.Every time I read Alex George and think he could not possibly write a more beautiful novel, he does.After turning the last page of The Paris Hours I instantly considered rereading the entire book just so I could experience the magic all over again.The Paris Hours will sweep readers off their feet from the very beginning and whisk them away to early 20th century Paris. It is lush and poignant, it is raw yet sophisticated; it I haven’t felt this way about a book since I read WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING.Every time I read Alex George and think he could not possibly write a more beautiful novel, he does.After turning the last page of “The Paris Hours” I instantly considered rereading the entire book just so I could experience the magic all over again.“The Paris Hours” will sweep readers off their feet from the very beginning and whisk them away to early 20th century Paris. It is lush and poignant, it is raw yet sophisticated; it is everything readers have ever wanted in their next favorite book.After the last sentence of the very last page, when the journey has ended, readers will realize this beautiful novel was the exact book they were looking for.
    more
  • Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance
    January 1, 1970
    Four ordinary Parisians on a regular day in 1927 mix with the likes of Ernest Hemingway and Marcel Proust and Josephine Baker and Gertrude Stein, and the result is an unexpected overlap of stories and situations. One is Camille, who ignored the wishes of her employer Marcel Proust and kept one of his journals. Another is painter Guillaume who must find a buyer for his paintings before those to whom he owes money force him to pay up or die. Yet another is Souran, a refugee from Armenia, who puts Four ordinary Parisians on a regular day in 1927 mix with the likes of Ernest Hemingway and Marcel Proust and Josephine Baker and Gertrude Stein, and the result is an unexpected overlap of stories and situations. One is Camille, who ignored the wishes of her employer Marcel Proust and kept one of his journals. Another is painter Guillaume who must find a buyer for his paintings before those to whom he owes money force him to pay up or die. Yet another is Souran, a refugee from Armenia, who puts on puppet shows to assuage his demons. And finally there is journalist Jean-Paul desperately seeking his lost daughter everywhere he goes.I enjoyed seeing how these lives intertwine and play out, on the streets of one of the greatest cities in the world.
    more
  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    Set in Paris in 1927, the City of Lights, vibrates with artists of all kinds. However, the story gives the center stage to four ordinary people, who rub elbows with famous artists. By meeting another person, they learn something about themselves. And sometimes what one person needs is simply kindness.Armenian refugee, Souren Balakian, escapes brutality of his native country imposed by invading Turks. Being forced from their homes and driven eastwards, into the Syrian desert, to die. He makes his Set in Paris in 1927, the City of Lights, vibrates with artists of all kinds. However, the story gives the center stage to four ordinary people, who rub elbows with famous artists. By meeting another person, they learn something about themselves. And sometimes what one person needs is simply kindness.Armenian refugee, Souren Balakian, escapes brutality of his native country imposed by invading Turks. “Being forced from their homes and driven eastwards, into the Syrian desert, to die.” He makes his way to Europe, remembering his mother’s words, “there were more than three hundred types of cheese made in France.” And he intended to eat every one of them. When he understands what makes him safe, being invisible, he takes his life in that direction by creating puppets and performing at the Luxembourg Gardens, beneath the chestnut trees where he waits for children to come. Escaping his brutal past and through an encounter with another person, he realizes what he’s been craving the most is human kindness.Guillaume Blanc escapes a small French country place and dreams of joining the ranks of the famous Parisian artists. He is struggling for now, but his fate might be changing today with a new patron, American novelist and art collector Gertrude Stein. She is to come and view his collection.Jean-Paul Maillard, a journalist, dreams of America. “The first Americans he met were soldiers.” When he thinks of America, he thinks of hope. He likes to observe the world, rather than be observed. He likes telling other people’s stories, rather than revealing his own, which also explains why he is a journalist. When he interviews Josephine Baker, American-born French entertainer, she reveals how different her life was in America and that’s why she made France her home. He realizes that her celebrity is a mask and now he needs to face his. Camille Clermont, once the maid for Marcel Proust, now she visits his grave with her daughter every week. While working for Proust, she gets surprised when he asks her about her childhood. How a man of such status who spends evenings with duchesses wearing tiaras could be interested in a simple country girl? He tells her why and he also tells her, “The only place where you can regain lost paradise is in yourself.” What he gives her is her independence.Each of the characters tries to escape the past, at least some aspect of it, but by escaping it they can’t free themselves from what haunts them. They need to face it. By encountering another person, it helps them learn something about themselves. Some see the mirror image of their experience; some see how little it takes to make another person happy. Through their life journeys we get a glimpse at their life lessons, which may even mirror some of ours. This is more than just a touching read. It has a deeper meaning. It’s up to you if you want to tap into it and learn a deeper message.The events happen over one day, but the stories of protagonists alternate between the present day and their pasts, revealing deeply touching stories, taking a reader on a very engaging journey and leaving with a lingering effect. Masterfully written and evoking human emotions, this story weaves human natures and touches upon many depths of not only those characters but also ours. Thus, creating the deep connection with the story. Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Mary Morris
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved Alex George's new novel. I found the mingling of invented characters and real people who populated Paris in the 1920s so well done. Fascinating and moving and amazing that it all happens in 24 hours. A real tour de force that I couldn't put down. The troubled puppeteer, the man searching for his lost daughter, the musician who only plays one tune over and over again. These touching portrayals and their powerful stories, all woven together brilliantly, will stay with me for a I absolutely loved Alex George's new novel. I found the mingling of invented characters and real people who populated Paris in the 1920s so well done. Fascinating and moving and amazing that it all happens in 24 hours. A real tour de force that I couldn't put down. The troubled puppeteer, the man searching for his lost daughter, the musician who only plays one tune over and over again. These touching portrayals and their powerful stories, all woven together brilliantly, will stay with me for a long time to come.
    more
  • Daniella
    January 1, 1970
    "This is how it ends!?" I cried out loud when i finished. I'm not mad though.
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Overall I really enjoyed this book.  It started of a bit slow, as with the changing POVs we only got a glimpse of each character and it was hard at first to connect or remember which person was which.  But once into the story, we are given more and more details and inner dialogue that helped a lot.  I have recently traveled to Paris and I loved all the places mentioned and scene descriptions. This story technically takes place during just one day in face, and yet each person is transported to Overall I really enjoyed this book.  It started of a bit slow, as with the changing POVs we only got a glimpse of each character and it was hard at first to connect or remember which person was which.  But once into the story, we are given more and more details and inner dialogue that helped a lot.  I have recently traveled to Paris and I loved all the places mentioned and scene descriptions. This story technically takes place during just one day in face, and yet each person is transported to their past in memories, which gives us a great look into each life.  I loved the premise of people with unimaginably different pasts whose lives all intersect on this day in Paris. Though each character seemed wildly different, they were all people who felt out of place in their own lives, reaching for something they could not see.  The way their pasts so wholly dictated this particular day, was written so well and with such strong emotion.  Though the story remains the pace of a slow wander through memories and feelings, the short chapters kept it from dragging._The ending is shocking and suddenly fast paced with so much going on. So much about the end is left to the imagination. As I closed the pages my heart hurt with such mixed emotions.  This is truly when I realized how much I had connected to the characters.  I wanted to know more of their secrets, more of their lives, and how they moved on from this single day.  I am torn apart by some characters and optimistic about others._I really recommend this book for all historical fiction lovers, and especially those who love Paris.  Thank you to the publishers for a copy of this book; I'm happy to give my honest thoughts.
    more
  • Amanda (TheBookwormAdventures)
    January 1, 1970
    (Thank you to Flatiron for reaching out and sending me an early copy of this novel in exchange for a review.)This novel is set in 1927, post WWI Paris. It follows four main protagonists - Camille, former maid for Marcel Proust; Souren, an Armenian refugee; Guillaume, an artist; and Jean-Paul, a journalist. They all lead separate lives, but their stories intersect at various points throughout the book. At the forefront of these stories are the damages that the war has done, in varying ways, to (Thank you to Flatiron for reaching out and sending me an early copy of this novel in exchange for a review.)This novel is set in 1927, post WWI Paris. It follows four main protagonists - Camille, former maid for Marcel Proust; Souren, an Armenian refugee; Guillaume, an artist; and Jean-Paul, a journalist. They all lead separate lives, but their stories intersect at various points throughout the book. At the forefront of these stories are the damages that the war has done, in varying ways, to each of the characters. In addition, there is Camille, who possesses a notebook that was supposed to have been destroyed after Proust’s death. It contains a secret that, should it get out, would cause an upheaval, but not just her own life. The Paris Hours was beautifully written, with brief chapters that offer a glimpse into each of the protagonists’ lives. I read it quickly, wanting to know the details of how the characters’ lives would intersect, and what the end result would be. I confess that, when I got to the last page, I was disappointed there wasn’t more.
    more
  • Ashley Curran
    January 1, 1970
    Im a HUGE historical fiction fan, so when BOTM has a historical fiction option, I almost always choose it. This one I couldnt put down! Once I got the characters straight this story sucked me in and didnt let me go until the very end! The Paris Hours follows four individuals over the course of a single day. Camille, a housemaid with a secret. She was asked to burn her employers notebooks but she kept one for herself. If she doesnt find it, her secret will be revealed. Guillaume, a painter in I’m a HUGE historical fiction fan, so when BOTM ⁣has a historical fiction option, I almost always choose it. This one I couldn’t put down! Once I got the characters straight this story sucked me in and didn’t let me go until the very end! The Paris Hours follows four individuals over the course of a single day. Camille, a housemaid with a secret. She was asked to burn her employers notebooks but she kept one for herself. If she doesn’t find it, her secret will be revealed. Guillaume, a painter in trouble who must repay a debt before someone comes to kill him. Souren, an Armenian refugee who relives his tragic past through puppet shows. Jean-Paul, a journalist who has never stopped searching for his missing daughter. The character’s stories all come crashing together at the end. This book is a beautiful, character-driven masterpiece! If you enjoy books written from multiple points of view and you are a historical fan, this one is for you!
    more
  • Melody
    January 1, 1970
    Its a myth, this idea that you can change who you are simply by climbing on a boat or boarding a train. Some things you cannot leave behind. Your history will pursue you doggedly across frontiers and over oceans. It will slip past the unsmiling border guards, fold itself invisibly into the pages of your passport, a silent, treacherous stowaway.This novel is a quiet, complex examination of suffering and how it manifests itself in different forms. While this might sound unappealing, its actually “It’s a myth, this idea that you can change who you are simply by climbing on a boat or boarding a train. Some things you cannot leave behind. Your history will pursue you doggedly across frontiers and over oceans. It will slip past the unsmiling border guards, fold itself invisibly into the pages of your passport, a silent, treacherous stowaway.”This novel is a quiet, complex examination of suffering and how it manifests itself in different forms. While this might sound unappealing, it’s actually quite beautiful. Allow yourself to get lost in the language and emotions; follow the stories to reveal their connections between each other and yourself. On the other hand, if you’re not a fan of slow-building character studies with rich, detailed language, this may not be for you. My one minor complaint is that the ending left some room for interpretation. While I understand and appreciate the author’s intention, after connecting so deeply with these characters I wanted a more concrete resolution for them. However, as it stands, I’m left imagining how their paths continue on, which I guess isn’t so bad after all.4.5 stars
    more
  • Anna at A Wondrous Bookshelf
    January 1, 1970
    I love Paris and I gravitate towards novels that are either about Paris or take place in Paris. And this, my friends, has proven to not always work for me. I went in with a great desire to love this book, but the multiple characters and multiple POVs made it a little choppy for me. Although still a good read, not the great read I was hoping for.
    more
  • Joann
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I won this awesome book in a Goodread's Giveaway and I want to thank Flatiron Books and Katherine Turro, Marketing Manager of Flatiron Books for making sure I received this book for my honest review. This is a story of one day in the city of light. Paris between the wars teems with artists, writers, and musicians, a glittering crucible of genius. But amidst the dazzling creativity of the citys most famous citizens, four regular people are each searching for something theyve lost. First of all, I won this awesome book in a Goodread's Giveaway and I want to thank Flatiron Books and Katherine Turro, Marketing Manager of Flatiron Books for making sure I received this book for my honest review. This is a story of one day in the city of light. Paris between the wars teems with artists, writers, and musicians, a glittering crucible of genius. But amidst the dazzling creativity of the city’s most famous citizens, four regular people are each searching for something they’ve lost. Since the death of her beloved employer, housemaid Camille has lived with a secret. When Marcel Proust asks her to burn his notebooks, she saved one for herself. Now it has disappeared, and she is desperate to recover it before her betrayal is revealed. Across town, lovesick painter Guillaume is also racing against the clock, with only a few more hours to repay a debt that threatens to bury him alive. Souren, an Armenian refugee, performs puppet shows for children, seeking connection in a city that has never felt like home. While Souren relentlessly relives his tragic past, journalist Jean-Paul is unable to confront his own, searching for his missing daughter in every stranger’s face. Alex George writes movingly of human connection. As the hours tick towards midnight, the City of Lights pulls these four characters ever closer, until their paths collide in an unforgettable climax. Told over the course of a single day in 1927, The Paris Hours takes four ordinary people whose stories, told together, are as extraordinary as the glorious city they inhabit. This was my first read by Alex George and I was impressed and he is now on my watch list. A big 5 stars.
    more
  • Carly Bohach
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advanced readinv cooy of this novel from Goodreads. I really enjoyed this little novel. It took place during one day and focused on 4 characters. Each chatacter's story was fascinating and all the stories were connected in slight ways. It was descriptive and easy to imagine Paris during this creative time period.
    more
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Alex George has captured the heart with this story of four incredible characters that have been through their own personal hell. Captivating, charming and mysterious - each character has special story to tell. As their paths cross, its exciting all the way till the last page.The Paris Hours is such a wonderful well written story, its hard to put down. Alex George has captured the heart with this story of four incredible characters that have been through their own personal hell. Captivating, charming and mysterious - each character has special story to tell. As their paths cross, it’s exciting all the way till the last page.The Paris Hours is such a wonderful well written story, it’s hard to put down.
    more
  • Jade Melody
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐½ This is a complicated book for me to review. Because while there were things about it that I absolutely loved, there was no crazy wow factor for me. I guessed the plot as soon as we were given the slighest hint, and while this in itself doesn't both me (it actually boosts my self-esteem that I was actually able to guess something correctly) it bothered me in the sense that if the reader did happen to guess this one wow factor detail, then there was nothing else, it just ends and Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️½ This is a complicated book for me to review. Because while there were things about it that I absolutely loved, there was no crazy wow factor for me. I guessed the plot as soon as we were given the slighest hint, and while this in itself doesn't both me (it actually boosts my self-esteem that I was actually able to guess something correctly) it bothered me in the sense that if the reader did happen to guess this one wow factor detail, then there was nothing else, it just ends and you are left wanting more. So part of me wants to give it 5 stars but another part of me is like 4.5 stars is more accurate because there was something that genuinely bothered me about the book. I really hope that there is a sequel to this. I was left wanting more. There is another story that could be written after this one to satisfy the desires the reader has to have closed ends. However, I think this author knows what he is doing and will purposely not give the reader what they want, which (to me) shows a great amount of talent. We will be left wondering and thinking about this story until we are satisfied with the fact that we have read all we were given.The aspect of this book that really took me by surprise was the writing. It was eloquent and beautifully crafted to show the reader, instead of tell them, the story. I felt attached to these characters because their backstories and feelings were written in a way where I had no choice but to love them and care about what happens to them. There wasn't a character whose story I wasn't invested in, which isn't common when I read books with multiple perspectives. The writing is what made me love the characters. They were developed and different, yet somehow they were connected in one way or another. So while I can say that I loved this characters and felt for them all deeply, it was (again) the writing that made me feel this way. The connected plots were brilliant. You learn the stories and (overtime) backstories of the characters and you create this idea in your head how they are connected because it says in the synopsis that they are. It kept me wanting to know how and why, these peoples lives were intertwined and when they were, I wasn't exactly blown away which was disappointing, but that didn't ruin the journey. Overall this was an amazing book and the writing alone, is why I would recommend it to everyone. And who knows, maybe you will not guess the plot. Maybe you will be left satisfied by the ending. Maybe you will have a completely different outlook on this book than I did, but I bet you'd still be glad you read it.
    more
  • Christine Mott
    January 1, 1970
    The Paris HoursBy: Alex George4⭐⭐⭐⭐This book is a series of characters own stories that come together in Paris.🇫🇷 Camille is a maid who lives with her employer. Her employer is an eccentric man who is writing a book. Camilles world revolves around her employer and his needs, so she does have to think about her husband who is in the war. Camille and her employer share secrets and vow not to disclose each others secrets.🇫🇷Souren is an Armanian refugee and a puppeteer who is trying to forget the The Paris HoursBy: Alex George4⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️This book is a series of characters own stories that come together in Paris.🇫🇷 Camille is a maid who lives with her employer. Her employer is an eccentric man who is writing a book. Camille’s world revolves around her employer and his needs, so she does have to think about her husband who is in the war. Camille and her employer share secrets and vow not to disclose each other’s secrets.🇫🇷Souren is an Armanian refugee and a puppeteer who is trying to forget the tragic death of his brother. His mother nudged him to safety and his journey is a painful one with some joy mixed in. He is trying to live day-to-day.🇫🇷Jean-Paul is a journalist who is trying to get published. He has been searching for his daughter.🇫🇷The last character is Guillaume who is a starving artist. He is having trouble with bills and borrows money from the wrong people. 🇫🇷I enjoyed how all of the characters come together is an unimaginable ending. The author talks about real life people like Ernest Hemingway and Josephine Baker and how they all come to know each other and the struggles so many had during the war. She touches on a few hard subjects. #theparishours, #alexgeorge, #flatironbooks, #bookofthrmonth, #stamperlady50, #bookstagram, #bookreview, #booksconnectus, #socialdistancing
    more
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoy it while you can, she thinks. Time travels in one direction only. There is no going back. - pg 186Mesmerizing. Beautiful. Sucks you into a world where everything and everyone around you will cease to exist. Absolutely captivating. Pulls you in and rips your heart out page after page. Everything about this novel is incredible. It took me about 30 pages to settle in, but once I did, I was hooked. The moment I finished reading, I wanted to start right back at the beginning because I wasn't Enjoy it while you can, she thinks. Time travels in one direction only. There is no going back. - pg 186Mesmerizing. Beautiful. Sucks you into a world where everything and everyone around you will cease to exist. Absolutely captivating. Pulls you in and rips your heart out page after page. Everything about this novel is incredible. It took me about 30 pages to settle in, but once I did, I was hooked. The moment I finished reading, I wanted to start right back at the beginning because I wasn't ready to part with these people. Four strangers in Paris post WWI. One day. The past and present woven together seamlessly to tell the story of these flawed and imperfect characters. A climactic ending that will make your jaw drop and your heart ache. One day with them in the year 1927 just wasn't enough for me. I want more. I had to force myself to slow down so my time with them wouldn't end so soon. Rarely have I loved a book so much. Thank you, Alex George! Pure literary perfection!
    more
  • Riley Harrell
    January 1, 1970
    I sometimes tend to get lost in historical fiction novels because I can't relate to what the times were like. However, Alex George creates a wonderful time setting and descriptive narrative of each of these character's lives that really transports you to early twentieth century Paris. I would highly recommend this book! It is a page-turner that keeps you reading because you want to figure out how in the world all these character's lives intersect. Once you begin to understand how they will I sometimes tend to get lost in historical fiction novels because I can't relate to what the times were like. However, Alex George creates a wonderful time setting and descriptive narrative of each of these character's lives that really transports you to early twentieth century Paris. I would highly recommend this book! It is a page-turner that keeps you reading because you want to figure out how in the world all these character's lives intersect. Once you begin to understand how they will eventually intertwine, it is a book that keeps you invested.
    more
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    A charming and unique exploration of ordinary people in 1920s Paris. This story takes place over the course of 24 hours and jumps between four characters, some more like able than others, and all haunted by some aspect of their past. Archetypal figures of Paris in the 20s, such as Hemingway, Proust, and Josephine Baker, make cameo appearances, but the emphasis lies on the stories of their overlooked contemporaries: less than successful artists, servants, and entertainers. There were times when I A charming and unique exploration of ‘ordinary’ people in 1920’s Paris. This story takes place over the course of 24 hours and jumps between four characters, some more like able than others, and all haunted by some aspect of their past. Archetypal figures of Paris in the ‘20s, such as Hemingway, Proust, and Josephine Baker, make cameo appearances, but the emphasis lies on the stories of their overlooked contemporaries: less than successful artists, servants, and entertainers. There were times when I felt like I could’ve cared more about the characters, but overall the plot was compelling and there were some wonderfully poignant lines that I had to underline. The descriptions were visceral and the stories satisfying in their interconnectedness as well as their real life disappointments. I thought that the ending was a wonderful combination of bittersweet hopefulness, half-resolutions, and uncertainty.
    more
  • Miranda Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe historical fiction is my new jam? Maybe Im a sucker for Paris? Whatever it was this book mesmerized me. Following 4 people during the course of a day, it definitely had a les miserables after taste. I Loved the ending the most and how it allowed the reader to imagine what comes next! I definitely recommend this book that reads like a work of art! Maybe historical fiction is my new jam? Maybe I’m a sucker for Paris? Whatever it was this book mesmerized me. Following 4 people during the course of a day, it definitely had a les miserables after taste. I Loved the ending the most and how it allowed the reader to imagine what comes next! I definitely recommend this book that reads like a work of art!
    more
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Day 10 of Coronavirus quarantine, and The Paris Hours was just what I needed. Paris in the twenties comes alive with fictionalized and true to life characters interwoven with individual plots that come together in the end. I most enjoyed the sections with Proust and his maid. Although I felt some of the stories seemed a bit too "convenient" to be plausible, I was wrapped up in the story, and practically read the book in one sitting. It will take you away and set you in Paris!
    more
  • Firetruckmama
    January 1, 1970
    I won an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway for which I would like to thank the publisher and author.It took me a while to get into this book, but once the stories started connecting, it became easier to read and enjoy. I found the four main characters interesting, but admit that I cannot say that I liked them all equally. Famous people are mentioned - and used - a bit in this story, though in most cases it seemed less of name dropping opposed to actually moving the plot along.An I won an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway for which I would like to thank the publisher and author.It took me a while to get into this book, but once the stories started connecting, it became easier to read and enjoy. I found the four main characters interesting, but admit that I cannot say that I liked them all equally. Famous people are mentioned - and used - a bit in this story, though in most cases it seemed less of name dropping opposed to actually moving the plot along.An enjoyable read and I liked the inclusion of how the author got the idea for this book, included in the endnote.
    more
  • Doreen Ashbrook
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book, but didn't love it. Well written with an interesting combination of characters.
  • Stephanie Crowe
    January 1, 1970
    The Paris Hours by Alex GeorgeIn between the World Wars Paris was the place to be. In the 20s many artists, writers and musicians lived in Paris. George tells us of four average people in Paris who are searching for something theyve lost. I loved these characters: Camille, Souren, Guillaume and Jean-Paul. All of these people had losses and were struggling to become whole again. And Paris, I loved the description of the sights and sounds of the City of Light! It felt as if I were there! A The Paris Hours by Alex GeorgeIn between the World Wars Paris was the place to be. In the 20’s many artists, writers and musicians lived in Paris. George tells us of four average people in Paris who are searching for something they’ve lost. I loved these characters: Camille, Souren, Guillaume and Jean-Paul. All of these people had losses and were struggling to become whole again. And Paris, I loved the description of the sights and sounds of the City of Light! It felt as if I were there! A wonderful story!
    more
Write a review