Remain in Love
Two iconic bands. An unforgettable life. One of the most dynamic groups of the '70s and '80s, Talking Heads, founded by drummer Chris Frantz, his girlfriend Tina Weymouth, and lead singer David Byrne, burst onto the music scene, playing at CBGBs, touring Europe with the Ramones, and creating hits like "Psycho Killer" and "Burning Down the House" that captured the post-baby boom generation's intense, affectless style.In Remain in Love, Frantz writes about the beginnings of Talking Heads--their days as art students in Providence, moving to the sparse Chrystie Street loft Frantz, Weymouth, and Byrne shared where the music that defined an era was written. With never-before-seen photos and immersive vivid detail, Frantz describes life on tour, down to the meals eaten and the clothes worn--and reveals the mechanics of a long and complicated working relationship with a mercurial frontman.At the heart of Remain in Love is Frantz's love for Weymouth: their once-in-a-lifetime connection as lovers, musicians, and bandmates, and how their creativity surged with the creation of their own band Tom Tom Club, bringing a fresh Afro-Caribbean beat to hits like "Genius of Love."Studded with memorable places and names from the era--Grace Jones, Andy Warhol, Stephen Sprouse, Lou Reed, Brian Eno, and Debbie Harry among them--Remain in Love is a frank and open memoir of an emblematic life in music and in love.

Remain in Love Details

TitleRemain in Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 21st, 2020
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250209221
Rating
GenreMusic, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Biography, History

Remain in Love Review

  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Chris Frantz ends his autobiography by explaining that he's not a person who "moves on" from friends and family. Instead, he "remains" and "remains in love." Chris Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth have been a matched set for over forty years since they met at the famed art college RISD and formed the rhythm section (drums and bass respectively) a unique and original band with classmate David Byrne and later Jerry Harrison. This is not just another rock legend biography, but a lifelong love stor Chris Frantz ends his autobiography by explaining that he's not a person who "moves on" from friends and family. Instead, he "remains" and "remains in love." Chris Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth have been a matched set for over forty years since they met at the famed art college RISD and formed the rhythm section (drums and bass respectively) a unique and original band with classmate David Byrne and later Jerry Harrison. This is not just another rock legend biography, but a lifelong love story as well. Although as with most of these rock star biographies, there are times Chris gets bogged down in the details of each tour, it is a fascinating and well-written book that takes us from Chris' childhood through his college years and the big adventure moving to the Bowery with Tina and David. And not signing a record contract till they were ready even though they wrote Psycho Killer years before it debuted on the radio, timed with amazing synchronicity as the Son of Sam (David Berkowitz) haunted the NYC streets. Their first world tour is across Europe opening for the Ramones. Some of us perhaps never made the connection that the Tom Tom Club was Chris and Tina's solo project when Byrne and Jerry went to do solo albums. A completely different sound, an explosive beat, and they toured at least once with their second band opening for their first. Of course, it's not all wine and roses as the book details Byrne's habit of taking credit for group lyrics and being the face of the Talking Heads. But, Chris and Tina's story is powerful in a world of short lived rock and roll marriages how they remained together creating On and off stage. Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review.
    more
  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    The author of this book, Charton Christopher Frantz, starts by saying not many books about his main band, Talking Heads, were much cop. Well, in a way this isn't either, but it at least is an official volume. What's more, I think you can easily declare this has not been ghostwritten. There's an almost blunt, direct stylelessness about the memoir that proves he's not the ultimate purveyor of wordsmithery. The shot game for this book will kill you, if you imbibe every time a girl is rated by her l The author of this book, Charton Christopher Frantz, starts by saying not many books about his main band, Talking Heads, were much cop. Well, in a way this isn't either, but it at least is an official volume. What's more, I think you can easily declare this has not been ghostwritten. There's an almost blunt, direct stylelessness about the memoir that proves he's not the ultimate purveyor of wordsmithery. The shot game for this book will kill you, if you imbibe every time a girl is rated by her looks (luckily, every one he can remember is gorgeous – and a lot of the blokes get a compliment, too). This does seem to stop, however, when he finally narrates his nuptials.We have to accept this is an attempt at the definitive story, so accept a lot of fan-only detail of his childhood (military family moving around a lot, lots of private education) and college years. The shithole of the loft apartment Chris, Tina and David Byrne tried to live in while the Heads were a trio shows some of what the band has had to work through, private and art college schooling regardless. And then, on the basis of one single, copious live sets and an unfinished debut album, they toured France and Britain with the Ramones, which is again in forensic detail. You might take against this as a bit of name-dropping; I call it a minor marvel when Damon Albarn, working nights at a round-the-clock hotel bar, mentions he's got a band – especially as this is 1977 and he is nine years old.So this is a mixed bag – the Head head will learn just as much about who did what at the author's wedding as they could ever care to, all the while praying for more than the gnomic dripfeed of What Went Wrong With the Band. By the end, with all the depth of detail, there's so little mention of Jerry Harrison, you might be led to believe there was a beef in that direction, and not just with what we are told was Byrne's irreparable selfishness. (They don't seem to have been really social together – it's unclear, but I don't think the full band were at Chris and Tina's wedding, and four people so allegedly close never seemed to really be connected outside of work.) But also by the end our guide to all this does seem a likeable and reliable narrator, telling us how the band managed to do more albums than the guy on the street might remember, and how he and Tina managed to work so well outside the Talking Heads world – even when Happy Mondays proved to be pretty much their worst nightmare come true. So by the end you do just about manage to forgive the nitpicking delivery of the early chapters, and appreciate the story for what it is. It might have been a lot shorter, it might have been a lot more subjective, but I was still grateful to read it.Three and a half stars.
    more
  • Tosh
    January 1, 1970
    Kimley and I on our podcast BOOK MUSIK discuss the Chris Frantz memoir. I was disappointed with the book. Hear the podcast here: Book Musik podcast Kimley and I on our podcast BOOK MUSIK discuss the Chris Frantz memoir. I was disappointed with the book. Hear the podcast here: Book Musik podcast
    more
  • Geoff
    January 1, 1970
    Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of all time, so I was very interested to read this memoir account by drummer Chris Frantz. Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth were the rhythm section for the Heads and the creative partnership behind Tom Tom Club, and their marriage and relationship really created a steady foundation for the band and their lives. David Byrne comes off pretty badly in this book ("David is a person incapable of returning friendship") and I think some of that comes down to Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of all time, so I was very interested to read this memoir account by drummer Chris Frantz. Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth were the rhythm section for the Heads and the creative partnership behind Tom Tom Club, and their marriage and relationship really created a steady foundation for the band and their lives. David Byrne comes off pretty badly in this book ("David is a person incapable of returning friendship") and I think some of that comes down to different values and outlooks on life. From this telling, Frantz treated the Heads as a family that produced great music together while Byrne (in this telling) saw it as a way to create good music/art and left when his ambition and plans outgrew the band, a more business outlook that would not mix well with Franz's approach. I loved Franz's description of the energy of playing live, the relationships he formed with other bands, and the details of studio recording, but I would have loved hearing more about how they came up with the music. Frantz also comes off as somewhat bourgeoisie for a rock star, with discussions of real estate, celebrity encounters, and listing of menus at music industry soirees, but that also matches well with his family and comfort values (the cocaine habit maybe not). There was way too much commentary about females' appearances; came off as a bit creepy. It's also strange the there's very little discussion of Jerry Harrison in the book compared to the other bandmates. But in the end, Talking Heads made amazing music, the book is very interesting and listenable, and while Byrne maybe the cooler and more artistic one, Frantz and Weymouth are the ones I'd rather be friends with. **Thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Mark Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    The color of the bridesmaids and the groomsmen‘s clothing at Chris and Tina’s wedding is just one of the scintillating anecdotes that you’ll skim over while zipping through this pedestrian account of what I assume to be an interesting life.Poor writing and an astonishing lack of insight make this the least essential rock memoir ever.
    more
  • Quirkyreader
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I won this in a goodreads giveaway. Thank you St. Martin’s press.The irony of this book is that I constantly have Tom Tom Club and Talking Heads Songs stuck in my head. Mostly “Gangster of Love” “Road To Nowhere” and their cover of “Take Me To The River”.In this book Chris Frantz talks about his life and how his bands and Tina are the most important to him.What I enjoyed most about this book was the CBGB “years”. That time is one of my favourites in late 20th Century art and music. Fr First off, I won this in a goodreads giveaway. Thank you St. Martin’s press.The irony of this book is that I constantly have Tom Tom Club and Talking Heads Songs stuck in my head. Mostly “Gangster of Love” “Road To Nowhere” and their cover of “Take Me To The River”.In this book Chris Frantz talks about his life and how his bands and Tina are the most important to him.What I enjoyed most about this book was the CBGB “years”. That time is one of my favourites in late 20th Century art and music. Frantz mentions the artists and musicians that he met during this time.Give this book a go, and read about the things that Frantz participated in and saw.
    more
  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received from NetGalley for reviewMy initial reaction on finishing Chris Frantz's memoir came as a wave of relief, a feeling of happiness for having read a story steeped mainly in positivity while we continue to ride out COVID. Coming off books weighed down by heartbreaks (Open Book) and heroin (Slowhand), I was ready for something to lift me. I figured I couldn't go wrong with the story of a co-founder of an awesome band who's still in love with his awesome co-founder wife after forty-plus ARC received from NetGalley for reviewMy initial reaction on finishing Chris Frantz's memoir came as a wave of relief, a feeling of happiness for having read a story steeped mainly in positivity while we continue to ride out COVID. Coming off books weighed down by heartbreaks (Open Book) and heroin (Slowhand), I was ready for something to lift me. I figured I couldn't go wrong with the story of a co-founder of an awesome band who's still in love with his awesome co-founder wife after forty-plus years.This is not to say you're getting 400 pages of unicorns and gummy bears in Remain In Love. While Frantz gives a straightforward and easygoing voice to his memoir, there's an underlying restraint in the passages that discuss the speed bumps in his journey - about 90% of which involve David Byrne (Johnny Ramone makes up some of the difference). Frantz's life is quite a learning experience, especially for those intent on pursuing a career in music. Though I went into Remain in Love knowing next to nothing about the band (and Frantz emphasizes here that what books exists aren't wholly accurate - par for the course), I suspected I'd find some history of "us versus him" when recounting work with Byrne. That Frantz is able to handle conflicts with song ownership and contracts with calm is very admirable, and even in his writing he doesn't paint pictures of villains.Remain in Love is a fun history of the Talking Heads, Frantz and Weymouth's long relationship and their Tom Tom Club projects. It is bit of a non-linear story, so be warned if that rankles. The highlight for me was Frantz's steel-trap recall of the Heads' European tour with the Ramones early in their career, a micro-history within the era of CBGB, early MTV, and a band that straddled rock and punk so well. If you're a fan, you'll come away from Remain in Love with a smile and a valuable lesson: listen to the woman in your group.
    more
  • Ron S
    January 1, 1970
    Art school rockers Talking Heads were one of the oddest and brightest lights to shine from the grotty, hallowed ground of CBGB in the mid-70s. As drummer and co-founder Chris Frantz notes in this fun reading memoir (I’ll get back to that), they “were post-punk before there even was punk.” Frantz married bassist Tina Weymouth, and went on to form dance band Tom Tom Club with her and later work as a producer. Even judged by pre internet/social media standards, there was never a great deal of infor Art school rockers Talking Heads were one of the oddest and brightest lights to shine from the grotty, hallowed ground of CBGB in the mid-70s. As drummer and co-founder Chris Frantz notes in this fun reading memoir (I’ll get back to that), they “were post-punk before there even was punk.” Frantz married bassist Tina Weymouth, and went on to form dance band Tom Tom Club with her and later work as a producer. Even judged by pre internet/social media standards, there was never a great deal of information made available about the band in their heyday, and frontman David Byrne’s books since haven’t dealt with them. Frantz reveals a great amount of detail here in a lively memoir that both does and doesn’t trod familiar ground. He does recount a lot of frustration with Byrne for receiving too much credit for the Talking Heads’ success, and he does recount the problems with alcohol and cocaine that almost ended his marriage. But what makes this such a fun read is that Frantz doesn’t write from a place of anger or bitterness in the way of so many musician memoirs. Through it all, he seems to have remained in love, and that makes this a great read.
    more
  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    Back when I was in high school, I had musical tastes that ran counter to my traditional rural Midwestern classmates. While most were headbangers, or the milder version of arena rockers, or into post-outlaw country, I tended to the occasionally cerebral, often fun songs by artists outside of the mainstream as it existed where I was. Which means I enjoyed new wave, art rock, and the like, much of it British. Out of that conglomeration of sounds came “Psycho Killer”. I was a fan of Talking Heads fr Back when I was in high school, I had musical tastes that ran counter to my traditional rural Midwestern classmates. While most were headbangers, or the milder version of arena rockers, or into post-outlaw country, I tended to the occasionally cerebral, often fun songs by artists outside of the mainstream as it existed where I was. Which means I enjoyed new wave, art rock, and the like, much of it British. Out of that conglomeration of sounds came “Psycho Killer”. I was a fan of Talking Heads from the time I first heard them. Got the vinyl, saw a 1982 concert, got some of the post-band albums, and even (much more recently) read David Byrne’s books on music and bicycles. Now, with Chris Frantz’s new book, you get the story from Chris and, maybe, wife and bandmate Tina Weymouth. Chris tells a personal version of events, from his early years to the formation of the band. His early band years stories are quite interesting, mixing the rock and roll business stories of touring, writing, and partying with his own story of falling in love with Tina. It seems they have their rolls here – David Byrne as the self-centered occasionally crazy one, Chris as the drug-taking but earnest one, and Tina as the beauty/Mom/responsible one (she's the Winnie Cooper of New Wave). Frantz provides an extremely detailed retrospective of their lives, with quite funny stories about the first major tour with the Ramones. Some of the later stories showed some reflection, as he talks about the band’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and about sailing. As I listened to this audiobook, I found myself wondering a few things. One, how did he keep track of all the venues and all the anecdotes he relates here. At times, he even mentions the food they ate, forty years ago. I didn’t catch an explanation. Also, what was Tina’s role in the writing of this book? Perhaps this was described in the paper book, but in the audiobook with no addenda or intro, she is the often mentioned party who happens to live with the author, and who would have made a great co-author. This makes me wonder if Tina has her own book in the pipeline. When it comes to Tina, this book is a tribute to her from Frantz. He has absolutely nothing bad or critical to say about her. Perhaps she was greatly involved in writing this book but didn’t want her name on it because of this. Nevertheless, this is refreshing as a celebrity describing the love of his life, and I am surprised to say that this is the part, or theme of the book I feel I will remember the best. I also wonder why Frantz reads the unabridged audio of his book. His tempo is very slow and plodding. I don’t think I could have listened to the entire book at normal speed, but at double speed it moved at a good pace. Still, there are a lot of stories here. Fans will find a lot of interest. I found it enjoyable, but you're left with a kind of bad taste for David Byrne. So now, I deserve a little break with some Tom Tom Club. Play that bass, Tina.
    more
  • Jessica Haider
    January 1, 1970
    So, I am a fan of Talking Heads, but not a Mega-fan. It is not like I have posters up or have all of their lyrics memorized. However, I have a good number of songs on regular rotation. In fact, I played Psycho Killer so much that when my son was 2 or 3 I occasionally heard his little voice from the backseat of my car saying "play Psycho Killer!"This new memoir by Chris Frantz tells of his youth, his time with the Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Frantz tells of how he met his wife Tina Weymouth a So, I am a fan of Talking Heads, but not a Mega-fan. It is not like I have posters up or have all of their lyrics memorized. However, I have a good number of songs on regular rotation. In fact, I played Psycho Killer so much that when my son was 2 or 3 I occasionally heard his little voice from the backseat of my car saying "play Psycho Killer!"This new memoir by Chris Frantz tells of his youth, his time with the Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Frantz tells of how he met his wife Tina Weymouth and David Byrne while they were students at the Rhode Island School of Design and formed a band that was called The Artistics. Later, after he graduated, Chris and Tina moved to NYC where they moved into an industrial loft space with David Byrne so they could work on their music. They became regulars at the nearby club CBGB, where many bands got their start in the 1970's. Like any celebrity or rock & roll memoir, there is lots of name dropping of people they met along the way...The Ramones, Debbie Harry, Grace Jones etc. to name a few. We also see that there have been tensions between David Byrne and the rest of the band since early on. David has issues connecting and socializing with the band and is apparently oblivious to giving others credit. I found this to be an interesting and entertaining read. While, Chris Frantz may not be a wordsmith, his voice does come through and we clearly feel the love he has for his wife and his passion for music. The audio version is narrated by Chris himself. What to listen to while reading (or taking a break)Clearly, the obvious choice here is The Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Other groups mentioned that you can listen to include The Ramones, XTC, Blondie, Bob Marley...I received an audio review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    Chris Frantz has written an evocative, resonant and provocative coming-of-age memoir about his life as drummer/songwriter and founding member of both Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Fans of Patti Smith's JUST FRIENDS will find much to admire in Frantz's REMAIN IN LOVE, especially the sensory way he describes life as a struggling musician in the early 1970s on New York City's Lower East Side. He remembers stepping over corpses on the sidewalks; avoiding five-dollar hookers and their pimp armed wi Chris Frantz has written an evocative, resonant and provocative coming-of-age memoir about his life as drummer/songwriter and founding member of both Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Fans of Patti Smith's JUST FRIENDS will find much to admire in Frantz's REMAIN IN LOVE, especially the sensory way he describes life as a struggling musician in the early 1970s on New York City's Lower East Side. He remembers stepping over corpses on the sidewalks; avoiding five-dollar hookers and their pimp armed with a baseball bat; and never making eye contact with anyone on the streets. But Frantz also recalls neighbors including Debbie Harry, Lauren Hutton, William S. Burroughs and Robert Mapplethorpe.Frantz shared an apartment (with toilets in the hall) with future wife Tina Weymouth, as well as David Byrne. In 1975, their musical group Talking Heads made its debut opening for the Ramones at CBGB bar. Jerry Harrison joined the group in 1977. Frantz offers fascinating stories of world travels, working with idols and how the group's style repeatedly changed. There are also tales of conflict within the band, which Frantz tells with remarkable clarity, fairness and insight. In 1991, "David sneaked out of Talking Heads," with Byrne announcing the end of the band without consulting the other members. A decade later, there was finally a happy ending when the band reunited to play at their induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.Fans of the new wave music scene will appreciate Frantz's generously detailed and compelling memoir of those volatile and exciting times in REMAIN IN LOVE.
    more
  • Jennifer DeBernardis
    January 1, 1970
    #netgalley #stmartinspress #remaininloveOpening this book, I was a fan of TH music, but knew nothing about the band, outside of the name of their quirky lead singer. And so it was with interest and fascination that I read the story of drummer Chris Frantz, with a heaping side helping story of bassist Tina Weymouth, who would eventually become Frantz’s wife. The three principals of Talking Heads (joined later by Jerry Harrison), all seem to come from privileged backgrounds which converge at Rhode #netgalley #stmartinspress #remaininloveOpening this book, I was a fan of TH music, but knew nothing about the band, outside of the name of their quirky lead singer. And so it was with interest and fascination that I read the story of drummer Chris Frantz, with a heaping side helping story of bassist Tina Weymouth, who would eventually become Frantz’s wife. The three principals of Talking Heads (joined later by Jerry Harrison), all seem to come from privileged backgrounds which converge at Rhode Island School of Design. Frantz walks us through the founding of the band while at RISD and then brings the NYC of the Late 70’s/80’s into Sensorial technicolor, with guest appearances by a long list of names from Warhol, Patti Smith, the Ramones and many more. A tour through Europe opening for the Ramones is full of minute detail, down to the meals and vintage of the wine consumed. Frantz must have kept a diary. While Frantz is enigmatic and somewhat befuddled in his account of why Byrne broke away from his band mates, and seems to harbor little resentment, his love for Weymouth (working on a book of her own, we’re told) leaps from almost every page. That, in itself, in the world of rock and roll, is remarkable.Thanks to NetGalley for the review copy.
    more
  • Perry
    January 1, 1970
    The best thing I can say about this book is that it made me revisit the Talking Heads catalog. That is a lot of good music. The writing is bad. There are a lot of seemingly superfluous details. The author tries to put the best spin on things (except David Byrne) and this slant just wore me down. Despite my interest in the band, this book was a slog.
    more
  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 4th rock autobiography I've read or listened to (Peart, Helm, R. Robinson). By far, it is the worst. If we add up everything Frantz writes about meals eaten 40 years ago in restaurants that no longer exist and compare that to what he writes about Jerry Harrison, the restaurants win the word count competition by a large margin. How could Frantz not get a damned editor? It is clear from reviews of this book, for instance in the WSJ, that the reviewers did not actually read this book.Ch This is the 4th rock autobiography I've read or listened to (Peart, Helm, R. Robinson). By far, it is the worst. If we add up everything Frantz writes about meals eaten 40 years ago in restaurants that no longer exist and compare that to what he writes about Jerry Harrison, the restaurants win the word count competition by a large margin. How could Frantz not get a damned editor? It is clear from reviews of this book, for instance in the WSJ, that the reviewers did not actually read this book.Chris' editor should have said/suggested/demanded:"Chris, you've know Jerry Harrison for 40 years. Come up with 10 pages of stuff to write about him. Are you guys friends?""Chris, you never studied music before starting Talking Heads, but you became a successful producer, write about that.""Chris, no one gives a goddamn that a person you met is related to or interacted with someone who was famous but who you never met, and you fall into providing this useless information 100 times.""Chris, lots of people want to know about your style, method, approach to, or philosophy of drumming. You have to write a few pages about that, because to drummers, this is VERY important.""Chris, lots of people want to know about your style, method, approach to, or philosophy of producing other people's recordings. You have to write a few pages about that and how you split the work with Tina.""Chris, lots of people want to know a little about the economics of being a rock star without many publishing rights. You need to touch on this with more than the story of Tina counting the money before you were a hit. Did you get rich? You went from not enough money for lunch to buying a yacht and multiple homes, but you're not on the credits as the writer. Where's the money come from?""Chris, no one cares, NO ONE, about the dressing you had on a salad 40 years ago.""Chris, you took a lot of drugs. When you had kids, did you feel differently about drugs? You mention that Tina did, but how did you FEEL? What do you think?""Chris, why didn't you make more Tom Tom Club music?""Chris, Talking Heads ended 30 years ago. You need more than 3% of your book to be about this half of your life. You wrote more about what you ate while touring for 'Talking Heads: 77' than you wrote about 30 years of your life.""Chris, what's a rock star say to his 16-year-old kid? What kind of father are you?""Chris, your book will be much better if you drop 100 fewer names and provide 100 fewer menus from meals.""Chris, what do you do for fun? What do you read? Do you still paint? Where do you live? Have you kicked drugs? Do you still drum? Is there anything left in the music tank?"
    more
  • Nathan
    January 1, 1970
    I'm relatively new at wholeheartedly discovering Talking Heads (fall of 2018), and a thirst for anything related them after that first true helping of their music, naturally, led me to ask why they're not a band anymore. Between internet searches and talking to friends who are also substantial TH appreciators, the band dynamic laid out by Frantz in this book was essentially what I had already gathered. I wouldn't for a moment consider anything in here trash-talking, however; it all feels like it I'm relatively new at wholeheartedly discovering Talking Heads (fall of 2018), and a thirst for anything related them after that first true helping of their music, naturally, led me to ask why they're not a band anymore. Between internet searches and talking to friends who are also substantial TH appreciators, the band dynamic laid out by Frantz in this book was essentially what I had already gathered. I wouldn't for a moment consider anything in here trash-talking, however; it all feels like it comes from a benevolent place, and that's one of the things that makes Frantz what has to be one of the more unique figures in music. Many moments of strife and turmoil the band encountered seemed to have a clear, singular source--but it's all treated, more or less, in a "c'est la vie" manner. Now, while those tantalizing details/opinions (or the potential therein) about fellow band members might be what gets this book the most sales, I don't think it's the greatest thing going for it--not by far. You get a front-seat tour into what it looked and felt like to be a musical pioneer (on two accounts), the experience of making what's arguably the best concert film ever made, not to mention meeting the love of your life, having the incredible experience of gaining fame alongside said partner, and being able to look back upon your career together as a high watermark for what a musical partnership can truly be. Frantz writes adoringly, and with great frequency, about Weymouth and her own artistic impacts. He's also frequently rubbing elbows with some incredibly famous names (most musicians, but some not) over the years, and, as such, has some hellaciously cool stories to tell us. In terms of what precisely we're talking about here, we get to cover Frantz's youth, slowing things down around the time that TH first truly forms up until their final album is released, and then we kind of speed the business up to their Hall of Fame induction. Those looking for Frantz to become long-winded about Byrne leaving them high and dry aren't going to be satisfied: His thoughts on the matter are concise, though certainly memorable. His recounting of hitting the European tour circuit does get a little rinse-and-repeat, but it didn't really bother me. The wisdom of rocking hard since the 70s brings forth a story so cool and wild that it's an absolute page-turner. Now knowing that Weymouth is working on her own book, I'll be waiting anxiously for that, as a complementary read, if nothing else. Frantz says that all of the other TH biographies up and until this point haven't been worthwhile, so I suppose you need to take it from the man himself and check this out. Many thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the advance read.
    more
  • James Hewkin
    January 1, 1970
    I love Talking Heads. Their music is incredible and original and makes me feel great. This memoir by the drummer, Chris Frantz was fascinating but, God bless him, he's a terrible writer. The book was really unbalanced. It goes into painstaking detail about two Talking Heads tours; four Tom Tom Club albums aren't even mentioned and he skims over the last 30 years in less than 50 pages. Some of the stories are really cool, but he’s not great at telling them. You can tell he’s from a middle-class I love Talking Heads. Their music is incredible and original and makes me feel great. This memoir by the drummer, Chris Frantz was fascinating but, God bless him, he's a terrible writer. The book was really unbalanced. It goes into painstaking detail about two Talking Heads tours; four Tom Tom Club albums aren't even mentioned and he skims over the last 30 years in less than 50 pages. Some of the stories are really cool, but he’s not great at telling them. You can tell he’s from a middle-class Middle/Southern America WASP background by his superficial, conservative views. You often get the impression that life is just something that happens to him and he's the nice guy who either marvels at the good bits or merely shrugs off the assholes. There are countless examples of how he and Tina were wronged by others, particularly David Byrne and Johnny Ramone, but the details are so spare that you are left suspecting you are only getting half the story. Tina and he are always the blameless victims. Despite all his slagging-off of David Byrne, it is obvious that they were just very different types of people who didn't really get or even particularly like each other. Jerry Harrison, (one quarter of Talking Heads) is barely mentioned at all. There was a great deal of detail about various meals the author had eaten or outfits people he met were wearing and yet we learn so little about his creative contribution to two extremely creative and critically acclaimed bands. There is very little insight into his approach as a drummer or producer. Chris mentions having an apparently serious drug problem in the last few pages. He manages to get on top of it by the sound of things, but this deserved more than two lines in a book about his life.I feel this was a missed opportunity, but I appreciate the effort. Where were the publishers/editors?
    more
  • chris
    January 1, 1970
    Vacillates between drivel (sorry Chris, really don't care about your wedding or who you thought was "gorgeous," and I REALLY don't care about your f***ing boat) and vindictiveness (Talking Heads broke up almost 30 years ago, but man, he still feels compelled to drag David Byrne through the mud). Readers should be aware that Frantz and Weymouth have been taking public shots at Byrne almost since the band's inception (https://www.salon.com/2003/12/03/head...). Weymouth, at times, has come off as l Vacillates between drivel (sorry Chris, really don't care about your wedding or who you thought was "gorgeous," and I REALLY don't care about your f***ing boat) and vindictiveness (Talking Heads broke up almost 30 years ago, but man, he still feels compelled to drag David Byrne through the mud). Readers should be aware that Frantz and Weymouth have been taking public shots at Byrne almost since the band's inception (https://www.salon.com/2003/12/03/head...). Weymouth, at times, has come off as less than kind and maybe even a little nuts (unless you believe that Byrne conspired with a Brazilian Voodoo doctor to kill a 14-year-old child--no, she wasn't kidding). The fact that she told the world Byrne had Aspergers and meant it as an insult says more about her than it does about Byrne. Then there's the rumor she started about Byrne having a "baby penis" (I'm not making it up! This is all well documented.) Byrne, for his part, has admitted that he was difficult to work with, but you have to give him this: he doesn't go around vilifying and humiliating his ex-bandmates. Frantz skips over the more salacious bits here, but otherwise it's no holds barred, and you really could choke on the hypocrisy. He accuses Byrne of stealing credit for lyrics? He and Weymouth famously stole whole songs from Adrian Belew, then shunned him. David Byrne was a meanie and didn't pay Frantz enough compliments? Well, he didn't publicly stab you in the back again and again and again.Bottom line: Frantz and Weymouth latched onto a genius, rode him to personal fortune, then apparently resented the hell out of him for it. Watch STOP MAKING SENSE again: only one member of that band was irreplaceable. Three decades later, Frantz is still relying on Byrne for sales. Don't oblige him. Read Byrne's HOW MUSIC WORKS instead--Byrne actually has something to say.
    more
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Distinctly out of love with David Byrne could be the subtitle. This book is an important corrective to anyone who saw Talking Heads as David Byrne plus backing band and you get the sense that Chris Frantz wants to right a few wrongs, especially regarding writing credits. In fact throughout the book he is meticulous at giving credit to the studio staff and musicians he's worked with over the years. I'm sure he's making a point to someone.....Chris Frantz seems to adhere to some Southern gentleman Distinctly out of love with David Byrne could be the subtitle. This book is an important corrective to anyone who saw Talking Heads as David Byrne plus backing band and you get the sense that Chris Frantz wants to right a few wrongs, especially regarding writing credits. In fact throughout the book he is meticulous at giving credit to the studio staff and musicians he's worked with over the years. I'm sure he's making a point to someone.....Chris Frantz seems to adhere to some Southern gentlemanly behaviours and I wonder if that is what annoyed him so much about Byrne. He's just not a gentleman in dealing with people. Perhaps Frantz needs some more understanding of people 'on the spectrum' as he alludes Byrne to be on. Byrne's subsequent solo career is pretty impressive. Another slight criticism is the need to describe any woman with an adjective about her beauty or elegance. They are always positive but he certainly doesn't say the 'gorgeous Steven Scales' at any point either!There are some great fun encounters on the way. Johnny Ramone gets a rough ride but to be honest he doesn't come across well in any book I've read about him. Surprisingly little to say about Jerry Harrison though. I love reading about the early years of any group, especially one as constantly innovative and exciting as the Talking Heads at their peak.
    more
  • Pamela Laferriere
    January 1, 1970
    Chris Frantz is an utter dullard. Avoid.
  • Elle
    January 1, 1970
    I finally finished reading Remain In Love, the book by Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Man, I did not like this book at all. I can pretty much summarize this book by the 3 main themes that run through the book. Let me save you the trouble of reading 400 pages.1. Chris Frantz is totally over the top in love with his wife Tina Weymouth and has been since they were both at Rhode Island School of Design. 2. He really hates David Byrne and doesn’t try to sugarcoat how he fee I finally finished reading Remain In Love, the book by Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Man, I did not like this book at all. I can pretty much summarize this book by the 3 main themes that run through the book. Let me save you the trouble of reading 400 pages.1. Chris Frantz is totally over the top in love with his wife Tina Weymouth and has been since they were both at Rhode Island School of Design. 2. He really hates David Byrne and doesn’t try to sugarcoat how he feels like he was mistreated and lied to, and DB was not the genius behind the band.3. He’s white and privileged. I think if I had read this book a month ago, the 3rd theme would not have stood out as much. Chris Frantz is from a small town in Kentucky and boy does it show in his perspective of things. I have to admit, I’m not a huge fan of Talking Heads. I like a few songs but I’m more of a casual listener than a fan. I wanted to read this because I was interested to read about CBGB’s in the late 70s. All Chris Frantz does though is shit on Joey Ramone about how awful a person he was and talk about how David Byrne stole lyrics and writing credits from him. Reading this did not make me a fan. The first 70 pages or so are all these mundane stories about his friends growing up. He’s like your granny who tells you all about these people she knows but you couldn’t care less about. I almost stopped reading because it was such a slog. I really didn’t need to know about all the different apartments that he lived in while he was at RISD! The most interesting thing about the book? I found out that I stayed in the same hotel in Amsterdam as they did on their first tour of Europe. Cool, huh?
    more
  • Chad Guarino
    January 1, 1970
    Chris Frantz steps out from behind the drum kit to chronicle an amazing life in music and marriage in Remain in Love, the memoir of the former Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club drummer. This book was highly anticipated for me, as the Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of the post-punk era and they are also one of the more enigmatic ones, with little information surrounding their time together and eventual break up. Despite this, Frantz's memoir ended up being a bit of a mixed bag for me. Wr Chris Frantz steps out from behind the drum kit to chronicle an amazing life in music and marriage in Remain in Love, the memoir of the former Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club drummer. This book was highly anticipated for me, as the Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of the post-punk era and they are also one of the more enigmatic ones, with little information surrounding their time together and eventual break up. Despite this, Frantz's memoir ended up being a bit of a mixed bag for me. Written with an enthusiastic but clearly amateur zeal, the prose is at turns charming and infuriating as Frantz delves into what must be a near photographic memory, detailing the minutiae of his day to day life recording and touring, down to what everyone had to eat and drink on each particular day back in the 1970s and 80s. While these hyperactive details can get grating at times, the strength of the narrative comes when Frantz is talking about his relationship with his girlfriend and later wife, Talking Heads bassist Tina Weymouth. Frantz is clearly still head over heels for her and their relationship seems very strong, which is amazing given the amount of drugs and partying Frantz describes partaking in throughout the band's career. Talking Heads fans looking for the juicy details on David Byrne's fractured relationship with his bandmates and the band's breakup may be a bit disappointed. Frantz is clearly a "go with the flow" type to the extreme, so even his occasional slights towards Byrne and collaborator/producer Brian Eno seem like afterthoughts. However, this lack of gossip is made up for by the fantastic stories Frantz relates about the CBGB era of the New York art/music scene: seeing Patti Smith play for the first time, opening for the Ramones and Television, drinking scotch with Iggy Pop, David Bowie stealing their peanuts, and eating ice cream and pancakes with Lou Reed at 4am. While this book may not have been the tell-all expose I was expecting, it was a fun read that was made engaging by the clear zest the author has for life. Frantz also mentions offhandedly that Tina Weymouth is also working on a memoir about her life as a woman in music, so I am going to add that to my list of future reads to get another side of the story. **I was given a copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to St. Martin's Press**
    more
  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club, opens up about life with Tina Weymouth, his spouse and musical partner. This zippy memoir explains how Frantz, studying art at the Rhode Island School of Design in the early 1970s, meets fellow students Weymouth and David Byrne. This trio forms the seminal band Talking Heads, with Byrne as front man and Weymouth on bass. The next decade is a whirlwind: as Talking Heads (with the addition of Jerry Harrison) become an international sensatio Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club, opens up about life with Tina Weymouth, his spouse and musical partner. This zippy memoir explains how Frantz, studying art at the Rhode Island School of Design in the early 1970s, meets fellow students Weymouth and David Byrne. This trio forms the seminal band Talking Heads, with Byrne as front man and Weymouth on bass. The next decade is a whirlwind: as Talking Heads (with the addition of Jerry Harrison) become an international sensation Frantz and Weymouth marry, starting a lifetime of collaboration with punk and pop musical legends. Frantz has a terrific memory for people and places, and while this is generally an affectionate story he doesn't shy from giving his point of view on, among other things, his relationship with the enigmatic Byrne. Queue up the extensive musical catalogue from these two bands to accompany this delightful read!
    more
  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I won this in a Goodreads giveaway.Interesting memoir from Chris Frantz. Little too much detail.
  • Marshall
    January 1, 1970
    The reason the book is so odd for me is that I was there, I was at the RISD in 1973 for one week when I was 16 years old. I was at that time the youngest student ever admitted to RISD. The school also offered me a full 4-year scholarship, which I foolishly walked away from. But maybe not foolish, since I seem to be one of the only successful painters or artists—even with my mere week—to come out of RISD. [Judge for yourself by googling Eric Green Artist.] And since I also was seduced by Andrea A The reason the book is so odd for me is that I was there, I was at the RISD in 1973 for one week when I was 16 years old. I was at that time the youngest student ever admitted to RISD. The school also offered me a full 4-year scholarship, which I foolishly walked away from. But maybe not foolish, since I seem to be one of the only successful painters or artists—even with my mere week—to come out of RISD. [Judge for yourself by googling Eric Green Artist.] And since I also was seduced by Andrea Andi Shapiro, who was Chris's girlfriend for over a year, this was a must-read for me, and of course I found parts of it compelling and am delighted he wrote it.The reason I've given it one star is that as a professional writer myself, with five published books of poems, three published novels, 50 award-winning syndicated columns, I feel I can say that the book is pretty awful from a prose point of view. No editor? Why not?And speaking of point of view, it is so painfully from a silver-spoon, self-infatuated pompous rich person, that at times it is unbearable and even worse, downright whiny. If David was so impossible and it was Chris's band, why not get rid of him? I think it is obvious why. Talent cannot be purchased. How many times have the upper-classes used us poor boys and girls for our talent? It seems David was shrewd and sober enough to come out on top.And, FINALLY I understand the appeal of the Talking Heads. They are a rich-kid rock band when most are poorboy and poor-girl bands. The evaluation of class in this book would be fascinating. I remember all these trust-fund kids in Montpelier Vermont obsessed with the Talking Heads. They had found their voice, a band of their own, which obviously bled over to everyone.Andrea Andi Shapiro called me back to Providence in January 1974 after she met me for a few hours the last evening I was at RISD. My time with her was quite a week for me. I was barely 17 by a few weeks and she was 21 and VERY beautiful as Chris has duly noted. I think Chris dropped her because she was NOT into drinking or drugs and Tina obviously was. Some things are that simple, eh?SHEfor Andi ShapiroShe who stood before me naked;"Isn't my body perfect,"She'd say and it was.She in her last year of art school,The girl I hitchhiked a thousand milesTo see when I was seventeen.Before I left I had inspected my face,I had a few issues, an uncertain complexion,Maybe I should wait a month or twoTill my skin cleared;She so doll-like and blemish-freefrom upscale Chappaqua, New York.I hitchhiked a thousand miles in winterWith my pool cue and my freight-riding sackPacked inside with handmade gifts for her,Things I had labored over."I wish you had a sports car," she said.While she was attending painting classesI'd either be in the freight yard wandering,Angling my complexion to the January sun,Or in one of the two poolrooms.(But how do you win a sports car on a pool tableIn Providence, Rhode Island, in 1974?)She the first to put the mouth to meAnd she choked badly in my moment,Thereafter eyeing it suspiciously.She who kicked me out after a week,After my meager money was gone andThe pool balls had stopped dropping.How can a seventeen-year-old chokeWhen he is playing for the woman he loves?She did—I did.He heard I was around and wounded,(I'd called his ex-wife looking for him)And in a decrepit yellow ex-mail vanHe found me and offered the Wendell woods,A tiny cabin chained to a massive pine tree.No well, a rusted-out wood stove, gas lamps,The January wind keeping that chain taught.My complexion cleared right up.Over frozen rutted dirt roads, thereThe lone payphone at Lake Wyola,The single light above it now,A small shrine in darkness,The frozen lake the wind had blownto white waves in the moonlight,Black Label pounders between our legs,Oh, I had to call her,Damn, I had to call her,Just had to.And after the miles of fierce dirt roadsAnd the coins pressed hard into the slotAnd standing there shivering in theForever wind of our belief in salvationAnd then me whispering her name whenShe answered.Whispering it again withAll the humility and fear of what I felt.And she said,"I can't talk now, I'm with someone."He gathered me up out of the snow,I'd tripped somehow leaving the boothAnd I looked out again over frozen Lake Wyola.And I looked at him and I said,I should have knownI should have knownDamn it, I should have known.I should have known the second time too,When I hitchhiked to see her again,Though, at least, the distance was downTo two hundred miles.
    more
  • Ewan
    January 1, 1970
    Whenever a band busts up, the book tour of a less-than-publicly-prominent band member is inevitable. Russel Senior of Pulp fame gave us Freak Out the Squares, Alex Jones surrendered his memories of Blur in his autobiography, A Bit of Blur, and now, Chris Frantz, drummer and one quarter of Talking Heads, dedicates his life and memories to his debut book, Remain in Love. Looking back with tinted nostalgia at the glory days of Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club, Frantz’s autobiography doesn’t wish to b Whenever a band busts up, the book tour of a less-than-publicly-prominent band member is inevitable. Russel Senior of Pulp fame gave us Freak Out the Squares, Alex Jones surrendered his memories of Blur in his autobiography, A Bit of Blur, and now, Chris Frantz, drummer and one quarter of Talking Heads, dedicates his life and memories to his debut book, Remain in Love. Looking back with tinted nostalgia at the glory days of Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club, Frantz’s autobiography doesn’t wish to bury the hatchet with those that have crossed them or vice versa, but looks to recount the life of the Rockstar, and the unexpected marriage that has lasted for over forty years through it all with bass guitarist and fellow Talking Heads member, Tina Weymouth. Opening by telling us of his early days as a student at Rhode Island School of Design, his first meeting with wife Tina Weymouth and frequent collaborators David Byrne and Jerry Harrison, Remain in Love fixates much of its long-winded opening on these moments. The rise to fame is documented in such vivid detail, but at times drones on for far longer than expected. Detailing every tour with a checklist of every venue they played, and then an unchanging rigmarole of how great the band is. “We played three encores”, “we played two encores”, and so on, and so on. It never changes from that fixed point, and outside of a few interesting anecdotes about The Ramones, XTC, Dire Straits and The B-52s, these moments never offer anything wholly fruitful. It’s a shame too, since once the book makes its way to the real selling point, the Talking Heads period from Remain in Light to Stop Making Sense and The Tom Tom Club, Frantz’s steam has run out. He talks more about the fancy villas and apartments he and Weymouth rented in the Bahamas than of the recording process. Any anecdotes surrounding the band and its recording process are overwhelmed entirely by a never-fading bitterness towards frontman Byrne. Understandable, to a degree, and Frantz tries his best to balance his seemingly hate-fuelled sentences for Byrne with a ballast of praising his artistic work from time to time. His compliments to his former bandmate are few and far between, but, as he notes, so were those of Byrne’s. Tension doesn’t so much seep off of the pages as it does slowly trundle its way through a rather predictable set of topics. Frantz’s lack of direction in bringing to life his more interesting stories is a real shame, his energy going into recounting celebrity encounters and naming hotels he stayed at, rather than talking of the Rockstar lifestyle that he eventually sought help for. They’re glanced at momentarily, his cocaine problem left as a mere paragraph towards the end of the book, their time producing Happy Mondays delegated to a meagre five pages. The dedication is there, but it’s in all the wrong places. A comfortable read for only the most dedicated of Talking Heads fans, Remain in Love is a somewhat jaded recollection of memories, moments and mishaps during the rise and fall of arguably one of the most innovative bands to have ever graced music. Frantz’s writing style is solid, but is mired almost entirely by celebrity name-dropping, glossing over the ghoulish details fans of his work will no doubt be interested in.
    more
  • Ayaan
    January 1, 1970
    Keep in mind that prior to reading this memoir, I had never heard of the Talking Heads and the only song of familiarity to me was that of "Burning Down the House." I received this book in the mail and it took me ages to read, along with keeping me bored constantly. Mainly, why it took so long to read was for the reason that the writer, Chris Frantz, came off as stuck up and immature. It seemed as if a college boy is writing it enamoured by the life around hin, yet stuck in a place in which he be Keep in mind that prior to reading this memoir, I had never heard of the Talking Heads and the only song of familiarity to me was that of "Burning Down the House." I received this book in the mail and it took me ages to read, along with keeping me bored constantly. Mainly, why it took so long to read was for the reason that the writer, Chris Frantz, came off as stuck up and immature. It seemed as if a college boy is writing it enamoured by the life around hin, yet stuck in a place in which he believed he was the martyr for the world he lived in. The author does not seem at all grateful for the cards that he has been dealt. By the way he writes his story, he seems to have lost all sense of humility. Continually, the author spends more time villainizing his peers and victimizing Tina than he does acting in any sorts grateful. In fact, it almost seemed as if he was living vicariously through Tina. He ruins every sweet and tender moment with a dig at David or someone of the sorts. I felt myself getting constantly annoyed at the narrator throughout the book, and it seems as if he has not come to terms with his past which leads to childish pettiness that makes me as the reader feel annoyed with the narrator. The memoir as a whole seemed very stuck in the past in terms of writing style. He was very judgemental of the world around him and mentioned the races of others in a way that enhances common stereotypes stated about those who are Latino/a, Puerto Rican, etc. He never mentioned when a person around him was white, only when the person was Black or of different ethnicity. Topics of sensitivity such as assault and drug addiction were treated without any disclosure or a second thought. He looks down upon those who ended up in a bad place due to drugs, but treats drugs as his way of life. The memoir provides a time capsule of a world that shaped us today but includes remarkable differences. Additionally, the writing style is very poor with nothing to distinguish itself from a middle school book report, along with it continuously jumping from topic to topic confusing the reader as words filled onto the page, making it a poor middle school book report at that. The book fails to emphasize the most important moments of the book such as when they first performed and instead dwells on minuscule details that have no impact on the overall story. There were so many characters that the story became not cohesive and instead, a mind game. It just seemed so random at times, like how is this thought about you looking into the mirror relevant? Please research Chekhov's gun. The memoir does not have a central focus and teetered many times throughout the book. All in all, though, it is storytelling at its finest. Frantz combines numerous stories from his life that are inspiring and extremely fascinating to read at certain times. His fascination and admiration for his wife is endearing and truly beautiful. The book picks up speed halfway through and finally becomes in some way interesting. Overall, it is a beautiful and remarkable story that is masked in extreme bias and bad writing taking away from the inspiring story at heart.
    more
  • Daniel Field
    January 1, 1970
    I should start by saying I truly think Chris Frantz is an amazing drummer and has always seemed to me a good person. There's something wonderful about the enduring love he has with Tina, and it is made very obvious in this book.However, this might be one of the worst memoirs I've ever read. Frantz is a creative person, but that does not make one a good writer or memoirist. And I don't necessarily blame Frantz - it is far harder than it seems to write a good music memoir, but it almost feels like I should start by saying I truly think Chris Frantz is an amazing drummer and has always seemed to me a good person. There's something wonderful about the enduring love he has with Tina, and it is made very obvious in this book.However, this might be one of the worst memoirs I've ever read. Frantz is a creative person, but that does not make one a good writer or memoirist. And I don't necessarily blame Frantz - it is far harder than it seems to write a good music memoir, but it almost feels like there was no editor around to help guide him into making a better book. A quick list of issues:-Frantz describes everyone based on how attractive they were. Everyone, it seems, was gorgeous.-A lot of namedropping of random people in his life, plus namedropping of famous people he ran into (whose function most of the time is just to be a famous person who has shown up)-literally so much detail about Talking Heads' 1977 European tour that I started to laugh. Literally every show was amazing. Literally every show had three encores. Literally every bed he and Tina slept in was tough. Johnny Ramone was a bully and didn't like European food. I'm guessing Frantz referred to some journals from this time, but good lord it was boring.-I saw another review that mentions that while there were issues with David Byrne that are clearly laid out, it almost feels like Jerry Harrison barely existed (outside of a tough time in Harrison's life before being able to bounce back)-Frantz talks about getting help for a drug problem almost in passing as if it wasn't a big deal.-Zero discussion of anything that happened in the late nineties, all the way up to present day, save for the induction into the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame.-For no real reason, Frantz tells a story about John Martyn being abusive in Bahamas.-The way Frantz wrote what happened after the Rock Hall party with David Byrne, and then a quick concluding paragraph and the book is over. The tone was outright bizarre.Had this book been shortened to half its length, with most of the minute details culled, it might have been a little bit better as a book. It is nice to hear from his perspective, as Byrne has spent most of the last 25 years in a bigger spotlight, and not really given the other band members the space to talk. To be honest, I bet Byrne would read the book and agree with everything Frantz said. It doesn't make me love Byrne or Frantz any less - they're both flawed and that's fine. But Byrne's How Music Works is a significantly better book (even though the purpose of his was different), because it was just better written. I'm mostly sad this book isn't better. I was very excited to read it but it was at times written so badly I wondered if I should stop. That's never a good sign when reading about a band someone loves...
    more
  • Ex-Priest Tobin
    January 1, 1970
    This is an account of Chris Frantz' life and music career, predominantly with the new wave band Talking Heads. The style is simplistic and anecdotal.Frantz comes from a privileged background (his father was a Harvard-educated lawyer) and the early accounts of his life are of little interest. The action picks up on his descriptions of the New York music scene and the CBGB in particular: it never ceases to amaze that so many fantastic bands all cut their teeth at the one venue. The Heads' professi This is an account of Chris Frantz' life and music career, predominantly with the new wave band Talking Heads. The style is simplistic and anecdotal.Frantz comes from a privileged background (his father was a Harvard-educated lawyer) and the early accounts of his life are of little interest. The action picks up on his descriptions of the New York music scene and the CBGB in particular: it never ceases to amaze that so many fantastic bands all cut their teeth at the one venue. The Heads' professionalism and dedication to their craft are evident throughout, and Frantz' account goes some way to explaining the tightness of the band on the superb 'The Name of this Band is Talking Heads' live record.The last third of the book focuses more on Frantz and his partner and fellow Head member Tina Weymouth's side projects, Tom-Tom Club in particular, which are of little interest to myself. More upsetting are Frantz' attacks on Heads' frontman David Byrne. Some of these are justified - in cases where Byrne apparently omitted the rest of the band from songwriting credits - but the majority are criticisms of character. A late shot about Byrne's marriage splitting up is particularly nasty. As a matter of decency the divorce is surely none of Frantz' business and this piece of unpleasantness alone gives some indication as to why the frontman may have decided to break away from the rest of the band.I don't know if Frantz is expecting sympathy from the reader with respect to Byrne's behaviour, as by this account Frantz has certainly lived a charmed life. He has had a stable and prosperous upbringing, a happy and lasting marriage, achieved his career dreams and creative objectives and now seems to spend the majority of his time cruising the Bahamas. As to the truth of the division of songwriting between Byrne and the rest of the band, based on Byrne's own books he certainly seems a deeper thinker and more reflective character than Frantz, who, while ambitious, does seem inordinately caught up in namedropping celebrities whom he has had the pleasure to meet throughout his career. There is little reflection here on the Heads' role in the development American popular music, or of their place on the historical spectrum of American pop/rock. I was expecting more from Frantz in this respect. Taking into account Frantz/Weymouth's and Byrne's solo music careers also, personally I suspect that Frantz and Weymouth were the groove of Talking Heads, while Byrne (and to a lesser extent producer Brian Eno) were the brains of the operation that distinguished the band from its inferior New Wave peers.
    more
  • Danny
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to read this book when I heard Richard Blade promoting it on XM First Wave. The book gives a detailed description of Chris’s life and career. The highlights were the stories of the Talking Heads European tour with The Ramones, detailed stories about recording at Compass Point studios, stories about the formation of the Tom Tom Club and their success.The author must have kept a detailed journal over the years because his memory of setlists, tour dates, and hotels is impressive. This is g I wanted to read this book when I heard Richard Blade promoting it on XM First Wave. The book gives a detailed description of Chris’s life and career. The highlights were the stories of the Talking Heads European tour with The Ramones, detailed stories about recording at Compass Point studios, stories about the formation of the Tom Tom Club and their success.The author must have kept a detailed journal over the years because his memory of setlists, tour dates, and hotels is impressive. This is great when hearing about the European tour with the Ramones, but a little grating when hearing the names of all of his childhood friends. The authors style is very anecdotal and took me awhile to get used to. It feels very Forrest Gumpish at times , ex:“we did talk to a group of kids who’d come up from Athens, Georgia..they said they were starting a band…What’s the name of your band, they replied The B-52’s”; “one of the night bar men was Damon Albarn who told us I’ve got a band”. As another reviewer mentioned, the timeline on the Damon Albarn anecdote had to have been off, as he would of only been 9 years old at the time of this tour. Other times this writing style is very entertaining such as when the Frantz is telling Lee “Scratch” Perry stories or detailing the production of The Happy Mondays album “Yes Please!”.If you are a Talking Heads fan you will enjoy a lot of the details on creation of songs and the recording of albums. Frantz portrays David Byrne as not giving the other band members credit from the beginning, but never explains why the other band members wanted to keep The Talking Heads together. It feels like there might be some pieces of the story missing.The book took me awhile to read, but was entertaining. If you are a fan of the Talking Heads it is definitely worth a read. It is also an interesting read if you are interested in hearing information about CBGB in the late 70’s, Compass Point Studios/Island Records, or the “Stop Making Sense” film. Thanks to Net Galley and St. Martin’s Press for an advanced copy
    more
  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Remain in Love is an extremely detailed memoir, almost an autobiography of the drummer for Talking Heads and the Tom Tom Club.Beginning at the beginning, the book starts with the author’s birth. Then it backtracks to his parent’s meeting for the first time. In fact, it takes quite awhile to get to his musical career. Chris was already a couple with Tina in college. He decided to start a band. Soon, Chris, Tina and David wrote their first two songs together, Psycho Killer and Warning Signs. It wa Remain in Love is an extremely detailed memoir, almost an autobiography of the drummer for Talking Heads and the Tom Tom Club.Beginning at the beginning, the book starts with the author’s birth. Then it backtracks to his parent’s meeting for the first time. In fact, it takes quite awhile to get to his musical career. Chris was already a couple with Tina in college. He decided to start a band. Soon, Chris, Tina and David wrote their first two songs together, Psycho Killer and Warning Signs. It was 1974. There were already troubling signs emerging. According to Chris, David had “a continual need to aggrandize himself at the expense of his collaborators, as if their contributions were not as important as his.” The band continued to have issues from then on.As a friend of many (not-so-famous) bands, this complaint about lead singers is common. Many times the band creator feels slighted by the attention paid—by the public, management, and groupies—to the person singing and standing in front. This is especially true if the songs are written by another member of the band. So this seemed repetitive to me, but if you have no experience with bands, you may be surprised by the in-fighting.My personal favorite part of Remain in Love was the behind-the-scenes look at not only these bands but others they worked with. If you are a fan of 70s and 80s punk and New Wave music, you will enjoy these long-delayed newsflashes too. 4 stars!Thanks to St. Martin’s Press and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
    more
Write a review