Grown-Up Pose
A delightfully modern look at what happens for a young woman when tradition, dating, and independence collide, from acclaimed author Sonya Lalli.Adulting shouldn’t be this hard. Especially in your thirties. Having been pressured by her tight-knit community to get married at a young age to her first serious boyfriend, Anu Desai is now on her own again and feels like she is starting from the beginning. But Anu doesn’t have time to start over. Telling her parents that she was separating from her husband was the hardest thing she’s ever done—and she’s still dealing with the fallout. She has her young daughter to support and when she invests all of her savings into running her own yoga studio, the feelings of irresponsibility send Anu reeling. She’ll be forced to look inside herself to learn what she truly wants.

Grown-Up Pose Details

TitleGrown-Up Pose
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 24th, 2020
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139780451490964
Rating
GenreRomance, Contemporary, Fiction, Adult, Adult Fiction

Grown-Up Pose Review

  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    This is sweet, charming, emotional and also a motivational reading Growing up is not only a physical thing. You need to open yourself to grow mentally by experiencing new things, learning new life lessons, touching peoples lives. But its mostly about discovering who you are, what you want to do with your life and what makes you happy. So in my opinion Sonya Lalli chose a very good subject and work on the story of Anu Desai, still young and is imposed to believe that growing up means being This is sweet, charming, emotional and also a motivational reading… Growing up is not only a physical thing. You need to open yourself to grow mentally by experiencing new things, learning new life lessons, touching people’s lives. But it’s mostly about discovering who you are, what you want to do with your life and what makes you happy. So in my opinion Sonya Lalli chose a very good subject and work on the story of Anu Desai, still young and is imposed to believe that growing up means being responsible, building a family, obeying the rules of the society, doing what your family tells you. But at some part of her life, she understands that she is not happy with her marriage, prying eyes of her in laws. She feels trapped, depressed and wanting a divorce. So she leaves her husband and start dating with somebody else but she is not ready to tell this to her parents. She is hanging out with her best two friends and criticized by them for being so predictable, over responsible. She never tried to discover herself and her hopes, dreams about the life but one day she takes a step into a yoga studio where she feels so peaceful and let the serenity capture her soul. And she takes a risk for the first time in her life and decides to buy the place. So this book is about: awakening your soul, discovering yourself, rebuilding life. I enjoyed the idea and fast pacing of the book that helps you never lose your interest. And the ending was also satisfying. But I think the romance, emotional depth of the story were missing elements. Maybe this should be thought and classified as a women’s fiction because there are not much romantic parts and I couldn’t get attached to the characters and feel for them. The idea about a woman’s losing herself and experiencing the life to learn how to be real grown-up was great but when it comes to Anu’s story, she acts like she coincidentally finds everything about her life and I couldn’t get her emotional struggle, her pain, her anger or any other specific feeling that I could hold on. At some parts, I found her a little annoying. I was expecting a little more and I have to admit this book served to my brain so well with its brilliant ideas but it didn’t serve to my heart and warm or melt it. I wanted something more to shake me to the core. I wish to read something more effective, angsty, riveting. So I’m giving my solid 3 stars. It’s still fast, easy, soft women’s fiction reading.Special thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for sharing this ARC in exchange my honest review.
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  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    Adulting is definitely overrated! Sonya Lalli has written a clever story full of heart and humor about the complexities of being an adult. Anu is in her 30s a wife, a mother, and a good daughter. But Anu isnt sure this is what she wants, or that this is who she is. Was she so busy making everybody else happy and living up to cultural expectations that she forgot about herself? Then after she is tempted by another man at a work party, she begins to really question everything. What follows is a Adulting is definitely overrated! Sonya Lalli has written a clever story full of heart and humor about the complexities of being an adult. Anu is in her 30s a wife, a mother, and a good daughter. But Anu isn’t sure this is what she wants, or that this is who she is. Was she so busy making everybody else happy and living up to cultural expectations that she forgot about herself? Then after she is tempted by another man at a work party, she begins to really question everything. What follows is a fun sometimes serious story about a woman who thought she was all grown up, trying to figure out what she wants to be when she finally really grows up. This story was so relatable, I think we’ve all questioned our choices at one time or another. However I do have to say Anu was much more impetuous when it came to some decisions than I would be, especially for someone who seem to be so rigid when it came to the rules. There are some major life decisions that she came to rather quickly including separating from her husband and purchasing a yoga studio. Not going to lie the way she came about purchasing this yoga studio was bazaar at best. I did like the inclusion of yoga in the story, but I think it might have been less cluttered if the yoga storyline had not been included. What I really loved about the story and found very realistic was how Anu felt and acted after separating from her husband. I also really love the family dynamics both between her and her parents and her mother-in-law, especially when it came to cultural expectations. I also really liked her friends, but I have to admit I wish they were a little kinder to one another at times. I have some friends I am very sarcastic with, but it is also balanced out with kind words. All in all this was a very good story about figuring out what you really want out of life. Sweet, funny, emotional, with the perfect ending.This book in emojis 🧘🏻‍♀️ 🍷 👩‍👧 💪🏻*** Big thank you to Berkley for my gifted copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ***
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed Sonya Lallis first book, The Matchmakers List, and could not wait to read Grown-Up Pose.Anu is in her thirties and is feeling the pressure to get married. Shes been married before, at a young age, due to the demands from her family and community. That marriage ended in divorce and Anu has a young daughter and her own yoga studio. Ahh, yoga!Grown-Up Pose addresses some important issues, including finding oneself and juggling the demands of life, while also immersing the reader in an I enjoyed Sonya Lalli’s first book, The Matchmaker’s List, and could not wait to read Grown-Up Pose.Anu is in her thirties and is feeling the pressure to get married. She’s been married before, at a young age, due to the demands from her family and community. That marriage ended in divorce and Anu has a young daughter and her own yoga studio. Ahh, yoga!Grown-Up Pose addresses some important issues, including finding oneself and juggling the demands of life, while also immersing the reader in an Indian American family. There were moments I heartily laughed (much needed!). Overall, Grown-Up Pose is a warmhearted, refreshing story, and this was a great time to read it!I received a gifted copy. All opinions are my own.Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader
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  • Reading_ Tam_ Ishly
    January 1, 1970
    My problem with the book is that the main character is like a thirteen year old girl and it doesn't get better. Nah, I just cannot feel the goodness, the romance, the feels. It's just too chatty. Of course, I had to expect that for such a book but I just cannot stand the drama of thirty year old adult women behaving like thirteen year olds getting too overexcited over touching and kissing right from the first chapter. No, it didn't happen between the women😁 I love drama, I love romance, I love My problem with the book is that the main character is like a thirteen year old girl and it doesn't get better. Nah, I just cannot feel the goodness, the romance, the feels. It's just too chatty. Of course, I had to expect that for such a book but I just cannot stand the drama of thirty year old adult women behaving like thirteen year olds getting too overexcited over touching and kissing right from the first chapter. No, it didn't happen between the women😁 I love drama, I love romance, I love chicklit, but I don't like chatty kids in the form of adult characters. The writing just .... Ok. No more. I cannot do this. No.
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  • Lisa (Remarkablylisa)
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review. I love Sonya Lalli's books but if you didn't like The Matchmaker's List, this book might not be for you as it features similar themes and characters. Our main heroine is a mess despite her being a "grown-up" with a mortgage, a child, and a husband she takes very good care of. She has lost direction in what she wants to do, what she wants, and questions whether or not she missed out by only dating and marrying I received an ARC from Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review. I love Sonya Lalli's books but if you didn't like The Matchmaker's List, this book might not be for you as it features similar themes and characters. Our main heroine is a mess despite her being a "grown-up" with a mortgage, a child, and a husband she takes very good care of. She has lost direction in what she wants to do, what she wants, and questions whether or not she missed out by only dating and marrying her husband. This book is about someone who makes mistakes, makes them again, and again, and again until she finally realizes maybe she should stop beating herself up and just learn from mistakes. I totally get why this is a conflicting novel. It deals with frustrating situations and you're constantly bashing yourself on the head and asking why would you ever think that would be a plausible thing to do?! But it was still good to me. I trusted the novel to take me on this journey. I sympathized with our character who needed some space to figure it out and come out of the cloud she was stuck in. Side note: I did not like her best friend, Jenny, and her other Yoga friend that I forgot the name of. They're snarky, rude, and wrong whenever they preached to Anu. I thought Anu would stand up for herself towards the end but nope, she believed in their words and blamed herself. Awful. Hated that part. I also took a star off because the ending was a mess???? It just seemed like a last minute attempt at creating angst and making readers believe a happily ever after was not possible. Overall, I still recommend this book!!
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  • aarya
    January 1, 1970
    I should've DNFed. I wanted to read this for the desi rep, and that was pretty much all I liked. The writing was cringeworthy and referenced pop culture at random times (for example: the MC once says, "It's easier to just let it be." Then she smirks and says "Like the Beatles!" The book is full of odd tangents like that. Its weird).The pacing and plot were all over the place. Unlike the blurbs emphasis, the yoga place isnt that important. It was kinda just... there? Im still not sure why it had I should've DNFed. I wanted to read this for the desi rep, and that was pretty much all I liked. The writing was cringeworthy and referenced pop culture at random times (for example: the MC once says, "It's easier to just let it be." Then she smirks and says "Like the Beatles!" The book is full of odd tangents like that. It’s weird).The pacing and plot were all over the place. Unlike the blurb’s emphasis, the yoga place isn’t that important. It was kinda just... there? I’m still not sure why it had to exist because the book didn’t need it. I’m not opposed to “heroine finds herself and what she really wants” stories because I do enjoy those books. But Anu’s epiphanies and desires jumped from plot thread to plot thread. By the end, I had no idea if she got what she was originally looking for. She was really unhappy for most of the book and decided to do new things: dating other guys, traveling, opening up a yoga studio (it was sooo financially irresponsible and she put zero thought into it. It just happened after she wandered into the place!). Mild spoilers re: Anu's love life: (view spoiler)[There’s nothing wrong with that but her revelations felt like, “These new things don’t make me happy, either. I’m a really crappy person for leaving my husband and abandoning my daughter to go to London. Let me return to my old life!” I’m simplifying things a lot, but it was so frustrating. Again, there’s nothing wrong with wanting her old life back but her husband didn’t do much to reearn her love/trust! Her relationship with her parents was far more satisfying than her relationship with her husband, daughter, and mother-in-law. I was disappointed that Anu’s conflict with her mother-in-law wasn’t resolved. I couldn’t tell you what Anu really felt by the end because she was all over the place. The correct word is confused. Obviously things happened and plot points/relationships were resolved, but I couldn’t tell you why. I was just so freaking confused by the end. The ending in particular infuriated and baffled me; I don't understand how the heroine reached the conclusion to choose X Love Interest when literally the entire novel was about her breaking away from aforementioned X Love Interest. Bewildering and thoroughly unsatisfying to a romance reader. It doesn’t help that I loathed X Love Interest and was actively rooting for Anu to NOT choose him. This pretty much ruined any enjoyment I had derived from the desi rep. (hide spoiler)]It’s possible that I'm not the best audience and YMMV. This just wasn't for me because I didn't think the romantic resolution was satisfactory. I'd recommend you read an excerpt to see where you stand.Disclaimer: I received a free e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • ABookwormWithWine
    January 1, 1970
    Song/s the book brought to mind: Hey Girl by Lady Gaga and Florence WelchGrown-Up Pose by Sonya Lalli is such a fun book! I loved learning more about Indian culture and I could definitely see this as a movie.I never did read The Matchmaker's List even though I own it, but I am going to be changing that shortly. Grown-Up Pose was https://www.thebookdrop.com/ Books For Bubbly selection for April and since I subscribe to it that's how I found out about this book. I excepted this to be a lighter Song/s the book brought to mind: Hey Girl by Lady Gaga and Florence WelchGrown-Up Pose by Sonya Lalli is such a fun book! I loved learning more about Indian culture and I could definitely see this as a movie.I never did read The Matchmaker's List even though I own it, but I am going to be changing that shortly. Grown-Up Pose was https://www.thebookdrop.com/ Books For Bubbly selection for April and since I subscribe to it that's how I found out about this book. I excepted this to be a lighter read, and it was, but it was also on the serious side as well. I loved Anu, and especially how flawed the characters are. This really spoke to me and made it more realistic. I may not be a mother, but I did understand her want to follow her dreams, the mistakes along the way, and being a wife to someone that at times drives you crazy. I think her marriage was relatable, although her friendships were a little odd to me since they were so mean to each other. I do appreciate sarcasm though and there was plenty of that!I think there are plenty of things that are very relatable in Grown-Up Pose, and I was definitely able to connect with Anu and some of the pressures she felt. This book basically tells you it is ok to make mistakes and be a bit messy along the way and I really loved that. If you want something that is quick, heartfelt, and funny then I highly recommend reading Grown-Up Pose!
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  • Mackenzie - PhDiva Books
    January 1, 1970
    After reading The Matchmakers List last year, Sonya Lalli became a must-read author for me. She writes these incredible contemporary fiction novels that explore the push and pull between tradition and modern life on Indian women. Her latest novel Grown-Up Pose is fresh, heart-warming, thought-provoking, and compulsively readable to the very last page.I almost want to call this a coming of age book, but that would imply a main character in adolescence approaching adulthood. I think there needs to After reading The Matchmaker’s List last year, Sonya Lalli became a must-read author for me. She writes these incredible contemporary fiction novels that explore the push and pull between tradition and modern life on Indian women. Her latest novel Grown-Up Pose is fresh, heart-warming, thought-provoking, and compulsively readable to the very last page.I almost want to call this a coming of age book, but that would imply a main character in adolescence approaching adulthood. I think there needs to be a better genre to describe that transition from college through your early 30s. For many people (and our main character Anu), this is a period of time when our lives develop quickly and we don’t always get a chance to finish growing up.Anu is an Indian woman living in Canada, and as the book opens she is nearly a year into a separation with her husband Neil, struggling to manage the co-parenting. Anu’s marriage happened the way good Indian marriages do—they met young (mere teenagers), courted, married young, and had a child. Anu has done everything right to be a good Indian daughter and wife. She does the cooking and cleaning, she became a nurse, and she does the bulk of the childcare duties.Years into their marriage, Anu suddenly realizes how unhappy she is. She is in a job she isn’t passionate about, barely has any friends, and basically acts as a parent to both her daughter and her husband. Now during the separation, she has started dating someone new, but she’s not really getting the experiences she missed getting married so young.On her journey to find herself, Anu finds herself purchasing a failing yoga studio, having some reckless nights out, and amidst all of the trial and errors, Anu may just come out of the other side finally able to be her best grown-up self.One of the main themes of this book is the pressure put on Indian women, and really women in general, to be a certain type of person and make the right steps in life. In The Matchmaker’s List, we saw a woman who defied those early, now uncertain if she will be able to find the things she rejected as a young woman. In Grown-Up Pose, we see a woman who did everything she was supposed to and then a decade later she realizes she is going through the motions of a life she isn’t sure she wanted.If we haven’t lived a little and made some mistakes, how can we ever know if we got the life we wanted?A story full of ups and downs, laughs and heartfelt moments, and telling the story of a woman who was forced to grow up before she really lived.Thank you to Berkley Publishing for my copy. Opinions are my own.
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  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    Anusha has always been the good Indian wife and daughter, never questioning her familys demands or asking herself what she wants from her own life. But when she is tempted to kiss a coworker one night, she realizes she cant stop ignoring her own unhappiness. She decides then and there to start following her heart, even if it leads her away from the comfortable life shes created for herself.MY THOUGHTSDont let the cartoony cover fool you This is actually a surprisingly serious (but hopeful) story Anusha has always been the good Indian wife and daughter, never questioning her family’s demands or asking herself what she wants from her own life. But when she is tempted to kiss a coworker one night, she realizes she can’t stop ignoring her own unhappiness. She decides then and there to start following her heart, even if it leads her away from the comfortable life she’s created for herself.MY THOUGHTSDon’t let the cartoony cover fool you… This is actually a surprisingly serious (but hopeful) story about a woman trying to redefine herself after years of marriage and parenting have left her worn out, dissatisfied, and lost. The story line isn’t perfect; in fact, it’s downright clunky more times than it should be. Part of the problem is there are SO many issues packed in here: separation, divorce, friendship drama, dating after separation, one-night stands, travel abroad, small business issues, parenting woes, fights with parents, fights with in-laws, mental illness, and drug overdose. Did I get everything? Yeesh. It’s a lot, and it’s hard to cover all that without making the book feel like it’s jumping all over the place.The other part of the problem is that it’s basically impossible to explore so many relationship dynamics at once and still do each one justice. Anusha’s relationship with her husband is mostly believable, but the ending is a little hard to accept. Her friendships struck me as odd, too, mostly because she and her girlfriends are SO mean to each other. Lots of catty comments between alleged besties means the relationships didn’t always ring true.Still, I’m giving this book four stars because I relate to Anusha as a wife and mother, and I understand and appreciate her struggle to find balance, to find herself. I also like that this book focuses on an Indian family. It adds some diversity to my otherwise often humdrum reading lineup, and I enjoyed taking a peek into a different culture. Maybe I’m not supposed to boost my star rating for that, but I did.Ultimately, this is a fast-moving and thoughtful look at one woman’s struggle to “be herself” while meeting the needs of so many other people in her life. I enjoyed it.Big thank you to Net Galley and Berkley for the ARC! See more of my reviews at www.bugbugbooks.com.
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  • eyes.2c
    January 1, 1970
    When differing cultural practices collide Traditional life expectations run into conflict for Anu Desai. A good girl who followed her family's strictures, and married the first serious boyfriend she had. The problem is that now she feels trapped. In effect she's painted herself into a corner and is kept there by her own and others expectations. Throughout this navel gazing Anu and her husband are growing away from each other. You could feel Anu's to some extent, self imposed cultural standards When differing cultural practices collide Traditional life expectations run into conflict for Anu Desai. A good girl who followed her family's strictures, and married the first serious boyfriend she had. The problem is that now she feels trapped. In effect she's painted herself into a corner and is kept there by her own and others expectations. Throughout this navel gazing Anu and her husband are growing away from each other. You could feel Anu's to some extent, self imposed cultural standards resulting from her traditional upbringing, causing her inner dissatisfaction. So here she is with a husband, a young daughter and doting, traditional parents, reclaiming her friendships, and making a run for it.Anu forges ahead, aided by her girlfriends, to claim her freedom and of course finding disappointment on the relationship level. There's a rather funny scene when she discovers her new interest wining and dining someone else. I applauded.Her decision to follow her heart and buy a yoga studio comes with some interesting twists. Making it pay becomes even more complicated. Taking up the role of single parent comes with unforeseen complications and angst.Coming full circle this is an interesting take on a coming of age novel when you're supposedly well beyond that time.Not as satisfying a read as I'd hoped, but some interesting moments and cultural disconnects. A Berkley Group ARC via NetGalley
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  • The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsReview to come!
  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    It's a yikes from me.
  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good read.
  • Annie MacDonald
    January 1, 1970
    Grown-up Pose was a highly enjoyable novel that I would recommend to anyone who likes a good story, endearing narrator, and well-paced plotline. The story will be relatable to many who hit 30 and find themselves questioning the path theyve chosen so far. This book is really about finding oneself and living an authentic life rather than making choices based on external expectations. However, that theme is explored in an accessible and enjoyable way - unlike some writers who feel the need to Grown-up Pose was a highly enjoyable novel that I would recommend to anyone who likes a good story, endearing narrator, and well-paced plotline. The story will be relatable to many who hit 30 and find themselves questioning the path they’ve chosen so far. This book is really about finding oneself and living an authentic life rather than making choices based on external expectations. However, that theme is explored in an accessible and enjoyable way - unlike some writers who feel the need to dramatize and catastrophize this kind of existential “crisis”, Lalli allows her protagonist (and her readers) to process these issues through a light-hearted, compassionate and often laugh-out-loud story. The book explores the protagonist’s relationships with friends and family, and these relationships are well-developed and compelling, but the most interesting is her relationship with herself. The yoga studio plotline is a vehicle for exploring that relationship and about learning how to centre oneself. This book is a page turner that had me hooked right from the start until the very end, and I highly recommend it.
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  • BookLover10019
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyable book! I got swept up in Anus journey as she figured out who she was and what she wanted, and the conclusion was heartwarming and gave me all the feels. Highly recommend. Really enjoyable book! I got swept up in Anu’s journey as she figured out who she was and what she wanted, and the conclusion was heartwarming and gave me all the feels. Highly recommend.
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  • Mana
    January 1, 1970
    Damn. Maye its the quarantine, but this book was fantastic. It really took me back to a time where I could leave the house. Do you guys remember that? Traveling outside of ones home/neighborhood/city/country? Wild. But forreal, there was a lot of travel and large group gatherings, which is nice. A lot of books have solitary characters who think a lot, which is often interesting, but not during a quarantine. This book tackles serious topics like immigration, trauma, racism, cultural Damn. Maye it’s the quarantine, but this book was fantastic. It really took me back to a time where I could leave the house. Do you guys remember that? Traveling outside of one’s home/neighborhood/city/country? Wild. But forreal, there was a lot of travel and large group gatherings, which is nice. A lot of books have solitary characters who think a lot, which is often interesting, but not during a quarantine. This book tackles serious topics like immigration, trauma, racism, cultural appropriation, adult relationships, accountability, etc. The book is funny, dramatic, emotional, and real. Sonya Lalli shows off her sharp wit and intelligence with her descriptions of gross hipster yoga studios and nightclub life.Lalli, explores what happens when the good Indian girl (Anu) listens to her family who tells her: “Yoga is a hobby, Anu, not a passion.” “What kind of wife and mother teaches yoga?” Anu realizes that her identity revolves around her husband, steady job, and a kid. So she leaves her husband and finally explores who she is. Chaos and self-discovery ensues.Lalli is a writer coming out of Berkely Books that explores established relationships and how they function. This new wave that explores the highs and lows of relationships and how to balance your own autonomy.
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  • Parker Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    This book wasnt the worst read and definitely isnt a bad choice if you want something a little bit on the fluffier side, but its definitely got some issues with the amount of content in the book. Ill keep it spoiler free since I got an ARC but there was too many side characters that felt underdeveloped/didnt get enough time. The author should have added a few more chapters, or merged/cut a few characters so they didnt feel so rushed and neglected.I also think this book was marketed a bit oddly This book wasn’t the worst read and definitely isn’t a bad choice if you want something a little bit on the fluffier side, but it’s definitely got some issues with the amount of content in the book. I’ll keep it spoiler free since I got an ARC but there was too many side characters that felt underdeveloped/didn’t get enough time. The author should have added a few more chapters, or merged/cut a few characters so they didn’t feel so rushed and neglected.I also think this book was marketed a bit oddly as her founding her yoga studio is honestly more secondary to Anu’s interpersonal relationships with her friends and family. It’s more of a backdrop for her to have interactions that could have happened truly anyplace else with roughly the same emotional impact. Overall this wasn’t bad, and it’s probably worth a read if you like fluffy romance with just a bit of substance, but it does have some fairly obvious pacing/character issues. Grab it for some light escapism and a mostly feel-good plot but don’t set any crazy high expectations for its overall quality.
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  • Pooja Banga
    January 1, 1970
    I was quite excited for this book after I read its synopsis .Unfortunately this didn't work for me !
  • BookWorm99
    January 1, 1970
    This book had me from start to finish. Heartwarming, hilarious, and well-executed. Lalli has a special talent in that she can create a protagonist who is both endearing and flawed at the same time. I really felt for Anu and was cheering for her to succeed, while simultaneously feeling frustrated at some of her choices. I think that is part of what makes this book great - it doesn't pretend like people are perfect and life is one smooth journey. Instead, it tells a heartfelt story about the bumps This book had me from start to finish. Heartwarming, hilarious, and well-executed. Lalli has a special talent in that she can create a protagonist who is both endearing and flawed at the same time. I really felt for Anu and was cheering for her to succeed, while simultaneously feeling frustrated at some of her choices. I think that is part of what makes this book great - it doesn't pretend like people are perfect and life is one smooth journey. Instead, it tells a heartfelt story about the bumps along the way while we try to figure ourselves out. An excellent novel that I would highly recommend!
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  • Akelly
    January 1, 1970
    Grow up poses plot was as lost as the main protagonist, it felt that it was grasping at many different concepts but never really emotionally invested in one. The characters mostly felt like caricatures, the snarky bestfriend group, the overprotective mothers and the early mid life crises protagonist. I kept reading because not many chick lit novels are based in Vancouver, nice to have a lay of the land. It read breezy, and inconsequential. Nothing much to gain here. Grow up pose’s plot was as lost as the main protagonist, it felt that it was grasping at many different concepts but never really emotionally invested in one. The characters mostly felt like caricatures, the snarky bestfriend group, the overprotective mothers and the early mid life crises protagonist. I kept reading because not many chick lit novels are based in Vancouver, nice to have a lay of the land. It read breezy, and inconsequential. Nothing much to gain here.
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  • Addie BookCrazyBlogger
    January 1, 1970
    I firmly believe that every woman needs a slut phase. I said what I said. Now Im going to explain it. When I say slut phase, what I really mean is starting to figure out who you are, what you want in life and especially what you dont want in life. Experimenting with sex, flirting with different hobbies and activities and establishing what your passion in life is. Anu Desi has never had her slut phase or an experimental phase. Shes always been the good girl, whose followed her close-knit Indian I firmly believe that every woman needs a slut phase. I said what I said. Now I’m going to explain it. When I say slut phase, what I really mean is starting to figure out who you are, what you want in life and especially what you don’t want in life. Experimenting with sex, flirting with different hobbies and activities and establishing what your passion in life is. Anu Desi has never had her slut phase or an experimental phase. She’s always been the good girl, whose followed her close-knit Indian family’s expectations to the letter. She married the first boy she ever kissed, Neil, in her early twenties while going through nursing school and quickly became pregnant. With her illusions about her relationship as popped as the balloon at a 5 year old’s birthday party, she asks her husband for a separation and finds herself in a serious relationship with a white man. When she catches the white man cheating at the club (“These white man are dangerous,” has never been SO real, thank you Pocahontas), she goes on a journey to discover who she really is and what her passion really lies. I LOVED this book. I loved the messages behind it: that in order to be happy with your life, you have to first be happy with yourself. I loved that romance was in the book but it wasn’t the entire point of the book. I loved learning about Indian culture and I loved learning more about yoga. This book may have inspired me to take a yoga class but we’ll see.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Grown Up Pose is a romance book beginning with separation. Told interspersed with memories of the past, it's a story about both figuring out what went wrong in our relationship, and how we can fix it. Grown Up Pose focuses on Anu's journey of self re-discovery. At the same time, it's focused on her Indian family (and family in law) who constantly challenge her ideas of tradition (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Grown Up Pose is a romance book beginning with separation. Told interspersed with memories of the past, it's a story about both figuring out what went wrong in our relationship, and how we can fix it. Grown Up Pose focuses on Anu's journey of self re-discovery. At the same time, it's focused on her Indian family (and family in law) who constantly challenge her ideas of tradition versus modernity. What does it mean for women now as opposed to before? Anu struggles with their expectations of her as well as the ways their beliefs have filtered into her own mind. There is fabulous diversity as Anu talks both about beliefs her mother has, that differ with her own, as well as looking at these various images of women - herself, her mother, and her friends. I loved how seamlessly her culture is interwoven whether it be those memories of food, the relationships and superstitions we have, or even just the way we celebrate. But Grown Up Pose is about more than balancing modernity and tradition. It's about Anu's journey to find herself.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/blog...
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  • Heather (tales.of.a.bookbound.mom)
    January 1, 1970
    Part of the song Olaf sings in Frozen 2 kept popping into my mind as I was reading this book: cause when youre older, absolutely everything makes sense. Not everything, Olaf. Haha! And Anu was an example of that in this book. Anus life had been controlled by her parents as she was growing up, so here she is at thirty years old figuring out who she really is. In that way, I found her quite relatable. Her journey of self discovery was a fun and sometimes eyebrow-raising ride. Knowing who you are Part of the song Olaf sings in Frozen 2 kept popping into my mind as I was reading this book: “‘cause when you’re older, absolutely everything makes sense.” Not everything, Olaf. Haha! And Anu was an example of that in this book. Anu’s life had been controlled by her parents as she was growing up, so here she is at thirty years old figuring out who she really is. In that way, I found her quite relatable. Her journey of self discovery was a fun and sometimes eyebrow-raising ride. Knowing who you are and what you want in life is important for your happiness and helps you be a better person for those who need you..This was a fun, entertaining, and heartwarming read with a great message. Definitely check it out!
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  • Belinda M
    January 1, 1970
    I think Sonya Lalli has a knack for writing characters who are at difficult crossroads in their lives. Shes not afraid for them to be flawed nor fall down flat on their faces because theyll eventually pick themselves up after much soul searching. Grown-Up Pose spoke to me on so many levels and I enjoyed going along on Anus journey. I think Sonya Lalli has a knack for writing characters who are at difficult crossroads in their lives. She’s not afraid for them to be flawed nor fall down flat on their faces because they’ll eventually pick themselves up after much soul searching. Grown-Up Pose spoke to me on so many levels and I enjoyed going along on Anu’s journey.
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  • Bookishbrookeish
    January 1, 1970
    I wont rate this book since I didnt finish it, but here is what didnt work for me:- unlikeable narrator- main character and her friends all seem kind of selfish - cheating/blindsiding spouse by leaving just isnt a storyline I usually like I won’t rate this book since I didn’t finish it, but here is what didn’t work for me:- unlikeable narrator- main character and her friends all seem kind of selfish - cheating/blindsiding spouse by leaving just isn’t a storyline I usually like
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  • Jaclyn
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet and moving women's fiction. I so rarely find books about women having a mid-life crisis moment (pre-mid-life crisis?) at 30, and even rarer to find one about an Asian woman with traditional immigrant parents. So I love that this book exists.
  • Rachel Wells
    January 1, 1970
    This book was charming from start to finish! Anu has followed rules and tradition her whole life until now. A wonderful story that follows Anu as she navigates a separation, being a mom, and finding her identity.
  • Mia
    January 1, 1970
    What was the reason?? Such a frustrating read, I didn't like anything except Anusha relationship with her parents.
  • Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    Anus journey kept me so intrigued, I stayed up past midnight to finish it. It was real, raw, and human. Her story with Neil, as well as her parents and his mother was compelling, and her quest to figure out who she really was is something done beautifully. She made mistakes, but she needed to. Love her friends, and daughter too! Important issues were also handled very well. Anu’s journey kept me so intrigued, I stayed up past midnight to finish it. It was real, raw, and human. Her story with Neil, as well as her parents and his mother was compelling, and her quest to figure out who she really was is something done beautifully. She made mistakes, but she needed to. Love her friends, and daughter too! Important issues were also handled very well.
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  • Christa
    January 1, 1970
    Winner of an ARCI stayed up so late reading this! I just couldnt put it down and got so upset when I had to during the day to deal with real life responsibilities *sigh*. It wasnt at all what I was really expecting, it was so much more! I loved the message of the book that at no matter what age you are, youre always still growing. It never stops, and you just have to learn to grow as life goes on and new things happen.The explanations on Indian culture were great for someone like me who does not Winner of an ARCI stayed up so late reading this! I just couldn’t put it down and got so upset when I had to during the day to deal with real life responsibilities *sigh*. It wasn’t at all what I was really expecting, it was so much more! I loved the message of the book that at no matter what age you are, you’re always still growing. It never stops, and you just have to learn to grow as life goes on and new things happen.The explanations on Indian culture were great for someone like me who does not know many of the traditions or ways of thinking. I love love love Anu and watching her try to figure herself out all the while trying to put her daughter first and wanting to be a good role model for her. And although we did not get to watch Neil grow as we did Anu, just hearing the differences he made himself made my heart warm at the end of the book, which, no spoilers, I think wrapped up everything quite perfectly. I only had a few questions myself on Imogen because there were a few things I didn’t think were exactly explained, but everything and everyone else got the ending they deserved. My one qualm would be that I do wish the plot had focused a bit more on the yoga studio like I thought it would have been by the synopsis. There were parts of the studio that I thought were rushed and didn’t go in depth as maybe it could have, but I did really enjoy reading what I got of it.Sonya Lalli has become one of my new favorite authors, quite literally over night. Thank you to goodreads and Berkeley for hosting the giveaway of the ARCs. I’m so so grateful to have had a chance to read this one so early!!
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