Mamie on the Mound
Mamie Peanut Johnson had one dream: to play professional baseball. She was a talented player, but she wasn't welcome in the segregated All-American Girls Pro Baseball League due to the color of her skin. However, a greater opportunity came her way in 1953 when Johnson signed to play ball for the Negro Leagues' Indianapolis Clowns, becoming the first female pitcher to play on a men's professional team. During the three years she pitched for the Clowns, her record was an impressive 33-8. But more importantly, she broke ground for other female athletes and for women everywhere.

Mamie on the Mound Details

TitleMamie on the Mound
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 2020
PublisherCapstone Editions
ISBN-139781684460236
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Nonfiction, Sports, Baseball, Cultural, Biography

Mamie on the Mound Review

  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    Mamie on the Mound tells the story of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson and her three years in the Negro Leagues.It's a well-written look at a trailblazer, highlighted with appealing illustrations. I can see this book having appeal to a number of audiences: those interested in sports, history, feminism, and racism in the United States will find plenty of interest here. There's a brief note at the back detailing what happened to Mamie after her time playing professional baseball, as well as a photograph of Mamie on the Mound tells the story of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson and her three years in the Negro Leagues.It's a well-written look at a trailblazer, highlighted with appealing illustrations. I can see this book having appeal to a number of audiences: those interested in sports, history, feminism, and racism in the United States will find plenty of interest here. There's a brief note at the back detailing what happened to Mamie after her time playing professional baseball, as well as a photograph of the woman herself.There's not much to complain about here. I'm not a sports fan, but I still found Mamie's story (and her determination to follow her passion) captivating.Thank you to NetGalley and Capstone Editions for providing a digital ARC.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    A woman playing sports on a men's team is unusual enough, but to find out that this happened back in the 1950s was amazing. Mamie tried to join the women's baseball league, but because she was black, she was not allowed in. So, she went to the Negro League, and because she could pitch as well, if not better than the men, she made the team, and proceeded to play for three years.What an amazing time that must have been. She eneded up being one of three women on the team.This picture book gives the A woman playing sports on a men's team is unusual enough, but to find out that this happened back in the 1950s was amazing. Mamie tried to join the women's baseball league, but because she was black, she was not allowed in. So, she went to the Negro League, and because she could pitch as well, if not better than the men, she made the team, and proceeded to play for three years.What an amazing time that must have been. She eneded up being one of three women on the team.This picture book gives the story of her life, from teaching herself how to play, to making the team. There are photos in the back of what she looked like, as well as a timeline.Must have for women and sports and women's history, and black history, and just history in general. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Finally! A picture book biography of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson, African American baseball player who played in the Negro Leagues (yes, with the boys!) for three years in the 1950s. Sprightly text matches a sprightly personality in this biography that's perfect for young sports fans and women's history. Get it on your shelves before baseball season starts.
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  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    Mamie on the Mound is the story of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson and her three years in the Negro Baseball Leagues. She was up against a lot. She couldn't play in the All Women's league because of her skin colour, and she had to fight to play in the Negro Baseball League because she was a female. She did not give up and eventually broke through the male barrier to play the game she loved. This is a well-written book about a trailblazer who helped to open doors for female athletes. This book tells how Mamie on the Mound is the story of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson and her three years in the Negro Baseball Leagues. She was up against a lot. She couldn't play in the All Women's league because of her skin colour, and she had to fight to play in the Negro Baseball League because she was a female. She did not give up and eventually broke through the male barrier to play the game she loved. This is a well-written book about a trailblazer who helped to open doors for female athletes. This book tells how Mamie overcame the prejudice and segregation of the 1950s to fulfill her dream of playing professional baseball, breaking ground for female athletes everywhere. This picture book gives the story of her life, from teaching herself how to play baseball, to making the team. There are actual photos in the back of the book, as well as a timeline. This book would appeal to many readers, such as those interested in sports, history, feminism, and racism in the United States. It is also a good book to discuss following your dreams, being determined and persevering at something you love. A great book to use in late primary, early junior classrooms to discuss those topics, but also to use when teaching about biographies. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book upon request. The rating, ideas and opinions shared are my own.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Mamie on the Mound: A Woman in Baseball's Negro Leagues by Leah Henderson, illustrated by George Doutsiopoulis, is utterly charming and everything I typically hope for and expect from a picture book biography.Telling the story of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson, this story manages to give us a brief look into an incredible part of baseball history. The book covers Mamie's childhood love of baseball into her adulthood where she became the first woman to be a professional pitcher in baseball history. Mamie on the Mound: A Woman in Baseball's Negro Leagues by Leah Henderson, illustrated by George Doutsiopoulis, is utterly charming and everything I typically hope for and expect from a picture book biography.Telling the story of Mamie "Peanut" Johnson, this story manages to give us a brief look into an incredible part of baseball history. The book covers Mamie's childhood love of baseball into her adulthood where she became the first woman to be a professional pitcher in baseball history. Reading this book really had me feeling Mamie's love for baseball, and even though there were hard times, you can see her love for the sport shine through it all in this picture book. The illustrations are cute and charming, and they show Mamie's story just as well as the words do.I would definitely recommend this book to any fans of picture book biographies, baseball, sports, or specifically Black women in sports. I think any child with a love of sports will find something to connect to in Mamie's story.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Capstone for sharing an early copy with our #bookexpedition group!This picture book biography tells the incredible story of Mamie “Peanut” Johnson’s childhood and the three years she played professional baseball in the Negro Leagues. Celebrating female athletes and trailblazing black athletes, this book tells how Mamie overcame the prejudice and segregation of the 1950s to fulfill her dream of playing professional baseball, breaking ground for female athletes everywhere. With themes Thank you to Capstone for sharing an early copy with our #bookexpedition group!This picture book biography tells the incredible story of Mamie “Peanut” Johnson’s childhood and the three years she played professional baseball in the Negro Leagues. Celebrating female athletes and trailblazing black athletes, this book tells how Mamie overcame the prejudice and segregation of the 1950s to fulfill her dream of playing professional baseball, breaking ground for female athletes everywhere. With themes of determination and perseverance, this is a preorder must. Publishes 2/1/20.
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  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the story and the backmatter. A definite add to the library.
  • Christina Carter
    January 1, 1970
    Leah Henderson gives the reader an informative introduction to Mamie Johnson’s journey to playing Negro League Baseball. From her love of the sport in her early childhood to playing professionally as a pitcher for three seasons with the Negro League in the early 1950s.Mamie “Peanut” Johnson’s story is one that will inspire students to pursue their dreams, athletic or otherwise. The obstacles she faced would not stop her. She kept pressing forward, even when she (and other Black baseball players) Leah Henderson gives the reader an informative introduction to Mamie Johnson’s journey to playing Negro League Baseball. From her love of the sport in her early childhood to playing professionally as a pitcher for three seasons with the Negro League in the early 1950s.Mamie “Peanut” Johnson’s story is one that will inspire students to pursue their dreams, athletic or otherwise. The obstacles she faced would not stop her. She kept pressing forward, even when she (and other Black baseball players) were rejected by the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. The organization’s name then was a misnomer if, in fact, they did not mean for their league to include ALL women. “All was still not equal.” As a woman, I can applaud their efforts to create a platform for women baseball players but as a Black woman, I wish they would have known what it meant to be an ally in the fight for equality. Still, Mamie Johnson persisted-to the point of success on the pitcher’s mound and beyond.This is a book I can’t wait to share with my students. Thank you to the organizers of the Multicultural Children’s Book Day (Co-Founders: Valerie Budayr and Mia Wenjen) for providing us with a copy. It has been added to our K-5 library for our staff and students to enjoy.
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  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    The text of this book alone might have warranted only four stars, but with the truly outstanding illustrations, this is a five-star book.The story of Peanut Johnson is one that should not be overlooked. It is sad that the days of Jim Crow and segregation still existed during her entire career, but the weird result was that she pitched against men her entire professional baseball career. It was bigotry that kept her from playing against the best women baseball players.I had heard a little about The text of this book alone might have warranted only four stars, but with the truly outstanding illustrations, this is a five-star book.The story of Peanut Johnson is one that should not be overlooked. It is sad that the days of Jim Crow and segregation still existed during her entire career, but the weird result was that she pitched against men her entire professional baseball career. It was bigotry that kept her from playing against the best women baseball players.I had heard a little about her from other sources, but this concise version of her story was a real treat.
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  • Grab
    January 1, 1970
    Tons of content packed in, and what a story. Illustration style was fun--looks almost more like an animation style.
  • Lisa D
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it!
  • Lynne Marie
    January 1, 1970
    https://literallylynnemarie.blogspot....
  • Kristi Bernard
    January 1, 1970
    Mamie “Peanut” Johnson only played professional baseball for 3 years, but she certainly left an impression. She received an honor from First Lady Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama recognized her accomplishments as well. This book tells the story of how she turned her dream into a reality.Mamie Johnson spent a lot of time figuring out how she could be a baseball player as a child. It was unusual for a little girl or even a little black girl to play baseball. She knew if she were given Mamie “Peanut” Johnson only played professional baseball for 3 years, but she certainly left an impression. She received an honor from First Lady Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama recognized her accomplishments as well. This book tells the story of how she turned her dream into a reality.Mamie Johnson spent a lot of time figuring out how she could be a baseball player as a child. It was unusual for a little girl or even a little black girl to play baseball. She knew if she were given the chance, she could show them how good she was. She had a great right arm and that was her secret weapon. She tried to play with other girls but preferred to play sandlot baseball with the boys. When she was older, she went to try out at the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League and the white women didn’t want her there.One day, Bish Tyson, a former Negro League player, told her about Bunny Downs who was in charge of a team called the Indianapolis Clowns. This was a professional ball team. Mamie was asked to be on the team and now she could play professional baseball just like Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and Satchel Paige. Life was hard on the road in the Jim Crow south, but Mamie hung in and followed her heart and her dream.Author Leah Henderson has done a fantastic job telling this inspiring story of a woman who cleared the way for others. This beautifully illustrated treasure brings the story to life. Parents and teachers can use this guide to teach readers about baseball, history and how if you work hard you can do anything.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Leah Henderson is starting 2020 off with a fantastic new book about the incredibly talented Mamie Johnson. Mamie "Peanut" Johnson was an amazing trailblazer in the world of women's baseball. She grew up in New Jersey with a passion for baseball, and a determination to be the best. Mamie joined the Negro Leagues and broke several records. She overcame the prejudice and segregation of the 1950s to fulfill her dream and challenge the expectations of others. The illustrations by George Leah Henderson is starting 2020 off with a fantastic new book about the incredibly talented Mamie Johnson. Mamie "Peanut" Johnson was an amazing trailblazer in the world of women's baseball. She grew up in New Jersey with a passion for baseball, and a determination to be the best. Mamie joined the Negro Leagues and broke several records. She overcame the prejudice and segregation of the 1950s to fulfill her dream and challenge the expectations of others. The illustrations by George Doutsiopoulos are rich in color and detail. The back of the book has more information about the baseball player as well as a black and white photo of Mamie Johnson. Leah Henderson wrote a well-researched nonfiction text that is perfect for Black History Month, as well as National Women's Month. A must-have for school and classroom libraries.
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  • Sara Magnafichi
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Capstone Publishing and Leah Henderson for sharing Mamie On the Mound: A Woman in Negro Leagues with #Collabookation. This is a fantastic nonfiction text about Mamie "Peanut" Johnson, and how she became one of the players for the Indianapolis Clowns. During a time period when the All American Girls Professional Baseball League wouldn't allow her to play, due to the color of her skin, she persevered and showed the world what she was capable of with a record of 33-8. This is a Thank you to Capstone Publishing and Leah Henderson for sharing Mamie On the Mound: A Woman in Negro Leagues with #Collabookation. This is a fantastic nonfiction text about Mamie "Peanut" Johnson, and how she became one of the players for the Indianapolis Clowns. During a time period when the All American Girls Professional Baseball League wouldn't allow her to play, due to the color of her skin, she persevered and showed the world what she was capable of with a record of 33-8. This is a wonderful nonfiction story about an amazing woman! Be sure to read the back matter! Publish date January 1, 2020.
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  • emyrose8
    January 1, 1970
    Really neat story about one of the first female, African American pitchers in professional baseball. The illustrations are great! Plus the text includes a bunch of quotes from Mamie herself and others who came in contact with her. It touches on segregation, but focuses mostly on her baseball story. The end of the book features a note on what happened to Maime after her baseball career plus a picture of her when she was young. Great picture book biography!Thanks Netgalley for the ARC! All Really neat story about one of the first female, African American pitchers in professional baseball. The illustrations are great! Plus the text includes a bunch of quotes from Mamie herself and others who came in contact with her. It touches on segregation, but focuses mostly on her baseball story. The end of the book features a note on what happened to Maime after her baseball career plus a picture of her when she was young. Great picture book biography!Thanks Netgalley for the ARC! All opinions are my own.
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  • Amy Hodges
    January 1, 1970
    Mamie on the Mound was a great biography about Mamie Johnson. I really enjoyed the illustrations and the facts that the author gave. I didn't realize that shehad paved the way for people such as Mo'nae Davis and others to play baseball. This is the prefect literary nonfiction book for elementary aged students. I will be purchasing a copy for my library.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Great story of one of the first women in the negro baseball league. Good vision of goal setting and staying true to that goal and being willing to overcome the norm. Great for younger readers but will entice that stronger reader to look for more.
  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    A black woman playing professional baseball in the 1950’s- groundbreaking and inspiring for female athletes and women! Mamie Johnson was the only woman to play on a professional men’s team. I’m adding this to my shelf for sure!
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    I will order this title for our collection. It's a good biography.
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