Borne of the Deep
Emancipated during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man—until he finds himself indebted to a doctor for treatment for injuries incurred during the New York Doctors’ Riot. Recruited to recover the stolen grimoire, Al Azif, Salem embarks on a journey north, to Arkham, Massachusetts. Plagued by rain and the incursion of strange, otherworldly creatures, the seaside town of Arkham has become a dark and dangerous place. Unable to trust the locals, Hawley is forced to rely on only his wits to track down the thief. He must also contend with Louise LeMarché, an outcast and suspected witch who is searching for the missing tome, as well. Time is against Hawley. Something ancient and evil is rising from the depths of the Atlantic, and if Al Azif is not recovered quickly, it could spell doom to Arkham… and all of humanity.Borne of the Deep, the second book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of Lovecraftian cosmic horror and continues the story that began in The Resurrectionists.

Borne of the Deep Details

TitleBorne of the Deep
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherHigh Fever Books
Rating
GenreHorror, Lovecraftian, Novella

Borne of the Deep Review

  • Jeremy Hepler
    January 1, 1970
    The second installment in the Salem Hawley series picks up right where the first left off and moves at breakneck speed. Hicks deeper dive into the Lovecraftian mythos, and the addition of bad-ass heroine Louise LeMarche, ratchets this twisted, gruesome tale up to an unfathomable level and promises one hell of a finale in book three. I cant wait! The second installment in the Salem Hawley series picks up right where the first left off and moves at breakneck speed. Hicks deeper dive into the Lovecraftian mythos, and the addition of bad-ass heroine Louise LeMarche, ratchets this twisted, gruesome tale up to an unfathomable level and promises one hell of a finale in book three. I can’t wait!
    more
  • Char
    January 1, 1970
    After the events in THE RESURRECTIONISTS, Salem Hawley is on a quest to find Al Azif, the mysterious grimoire stolen at the end of that book. Now, prepare yourself for a rip-roaring ride to Arkham!In a horse drawn carriage on the way to find the book, Salem deals with racism and other problems. Even though he is a free man, he doesn't command much respect. Once he arrives at Arkham, he meets a mysterious woman named Louise LaMarche. Together they will have to face the most serious threats yet, After the events in THE RESURRECTIONISTS, Salem Hawley is on a quest to find Al Azif, the mysterious grimoire stolen at the end of that book. Now, prepare yourself for a rip-roaring ride to Arkham!In a horse drawn carriage on the way to find the book, Salem deals with racism and other problems. Even though he is a free man, he doesn't command much respect. Once he arrives at Arkham, he meets a mysterious woman named Louise LaMarche. Together they will have to face the most serious threats yet, namely, Dagon and the Deep Ones. Will he and Louise be able to find Al Azif? If so, will they find it in time to prevent Dagon and the others from overtaking Arkham? Lastly, will Salem and Louise survive? You'll have to read this to find out!BORNE OF THE DEEP features some of the best battle scenes I've read in a long time. I thought a lot of blood was shed in the first book, but this one goes entirely off the rails. Salem is a brave, brave man to stand strong against what Dagon has in store. Fans of Lovecraft will recognize these names and see them brought to life more vividly than I've ever read before, and that includes Lovecraft's writing itself!With a great historical background, and the integration of cosmic horror to boot, (most better than the original, [sorry, Lovecraft]), there is no way this series could fail to please or satisfy serious horror readers. I initially rated this 4 out of 5 stars, but after thinking about it overnight, I boosted my rating to the full 5. I couldn't have asked for anything more-other than the next book be released. Right now!Highly recommended! Kindle copies available now, just in time for social distancing! https://amzn.to/2Qr0r7I*Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the e-ARC of this book in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!*
    more
  • Steve Stred
    January 1, 1970
    ** Edited as review is now live on Kendall Reviews! **So I wake the gods from the tomb of the ancients, hail the sunCult of Dagon by Book of Black EarthAnyone else shocked there isnt a Historical Horror Fiction category for the Bram Stoker Awards?I am. And while some may argue that Alma Katsu would be a sure-fire win, Id ask that you pump the brakes and dive into the world of Salem Hawley and just what Michael Patrick Hicks has done with book one and book two. The set up hes created for book ** Edited as review is now live on Kendall Reviews! **“So I wake the gods from the tomb of the ancients, hail the sun”“Cult of Dagon” by Book of Black EarthAnyone else shocked there isn’t a Historical Horror Fiction category for the Bram Stoker Awards?I am. And while some may argue that Alma Katsu would be a sure-fire win, I’d ask that you pump the brakes and dive into the world of Salem Hawley and just what Michael Patrick Hicks has done with book one and book two. The set up he’s created for book three – wowsa.The book picks up immediately after book one has ended – Hawley in hot pursuit with the bigoted Doctor in search of the forbidden tome.It had been some time since I’d read book one, The Resurrectionists, but there was no issue jumping back into this world or following these characters.While book one took a little bit to introduce the gore and grotesque that we know and love from Hicks, book two wastes little time and if the first few chapters are a six on the G & G scale, the book solidly ends at twenty.This is a hard one to review without giving things away, but it’s safe to say that Hicks goes full Lovecraft with some of the abominations he throws at us, all the while keeping the characters grounded in real life. Case in point – as a city falls under attack from ‘things’ Hawley yells for everyone to take up arms and fight back. While this should be a rallying cry and a key moment for the tide to turn, instead Hawley is met with indifference and disgust – who is a black man to tell white men what to do?The constant back and forth between Hawley striving to save mankind and prevent the Earth from splitting open and being consumed by the creatures from the deep and the push back he faces because of the color of his skin is a very unique plot line and it works incredibly well to further the narratives of both sides.I thoroughly enjoyed this and much like book one, I was enthused to see Michael had included some research links in the back.The Resurrectionists made my 2019 best reads list and it’s safe to say Borne of the Deep will make my 2020 list. Much like last time, now I lament the fact that I’ll need to patiently wait for the third and final book.
    more
  • Elke
    January 1, 1970
    The second part in the Salem Hawley series seamlessly follows the gripping events of 'The Resurrectionists'. To clear a debt, Salem travels to Arkham, Massachusetts, in pursuit of Al Azif, the grimoire that was stolen at the end of part one. Strange events take place in Arkham, and Salem meets a woman with mysterious powers called Louise LeMarché. Together, they have to face a powerful and otherworldly enemy. While at the end of 'The Resurrectionists' Salem only cast a short glimpse into the The second part in the Salem Hawley series seamlessly follows the gripping events of 'The Resurrectionists'. To clear a debt, Salem travels to Arkham, Massachusetts, in pursuit of Al Azif, the grimoire that was stolen at the end of part one. Strange events take place in Arkham, and Salem meets a woman with mysterious powers called Louise LeMarché. Together, they have to face a powerful and otherworldly enemy. While at the end of 'The Resurrectionists' Salem only cast a short glimpse into the realm of a very ancient horror, now he has to face some of the monsters that have already spread on earth. But will he succeed in his battle against the rise of the Old Ones?'Borne of the Deep' was even grimmer than its predecessor, and I loved the determination and strength Salem summoned to make his stand, even in the most hopeless situation. The appearance of Louise LeMarché adds another intriguing character to the story, and I hope to meet her and Salem again in the near future.(thanks to netgalley, the author, and the publisher for a copy of the book, all opinions are my own)
    more
  • D.K. Hundt
    January 1, 1970
    BORNE OF THE DEEP, Book Two in the Salem Hawley series by Michael Patrick Hicks, was a lot of fun to read! Having not read any of Lovecrafts work, yet, I wasnt familiar with Dagon. What?!, you say. I know, right?! Now I have to give back my Honorary Horror Fan Membership Card with matching macabre decoder ring?Say It Isnt So?!?!I kid, of course, I traded my bloody skull ring with Bobby Ferguson down the street decades ago for one of his Tales From The Crypt comic books. Hey, I kept the BORNE OF THE DEEP, Book Two in the Salem Hawley series by Michael Patrick Hicks, was a lot of fun to read! Having not read any of Lovecraft’s work, yet, I wasn’t familiar with Dagon. ‘What?!’, you say. I know, right?! Now I have to give back my Honorary Horror Fan Membership Card with matching macabre decoder ring?Say It Isn’t So?!?!I kid, of course, I traded my bloody skull ring with Bobby Ferguson down the street decades ago for one of his Tales From The Crypt comic books. Hey, I kept the membership card, so it still counts, right?In all seriousness, I enjoyed reading Hicks’ take of the deity, Dagon.The imagery throughout BORNE OF THE DEEP, in particular, that one ALIEN-ish scene is one I won’t soon forget—creepy as hell—and I Loved It! I became a fan of Hicks’ writing last year after reading book one in this series, THE RESURRECTIONISTS, and I’m excited to see what’s in store for Salem in Book Three. Thank you, NetGalley and High Fever Books, for loaning me an advance eBook of BORNE OF THE DEEP in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Horror DNA
    January 1, 1970
    Ive enjoyed the fiction of Michael Patrick Hicks for several years now; an author who specialises in blending fast-paced pulpy horror, thriller and science fiction, check out Mass Hysteria or Broken Shells for some cool examples of his work. The Resurrectionists series is a major departure from his previous style, and I admire authors who stretch the boundaries of their writing with clever changes of direction. The series takes us back to the 1780s for a fascinating tale of cosmic horror and I’ve enjoyed the fiction of Michael Patrick Hicks for several years now; an author who specialises in blending fast-paced pulpy horror, thriller and science fiction, check out Mass Hysteria or Broken Shells for some cool examples of his work. The Resurrectionists series is a major departure from his previous style, and I admire authors who stretch the boundaries of their writing with clever changes of direction. The series takes us back to the 1780s for a fascinating tale of cosmic horror and dark experiments, set in America a few years after the country gained its independence by kicking out the British overlords. Make sure you read The Resurrectionists before embarking upon Borne of the Deep, as they need to be tackled in the correct order for maximum enjoyment.You can read Tony's full review at Horror DNA by clicking here.
    more
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    NetGalley provided ARC.Again, another fabulous story. Historical horror, who knew I would enjoy it? Hicks continues the story of Salem Hawley in a most Lovecraftian way.
  • Valerie
    January 1, 1970
    With great pleasure and excitement I was thrilled to be back with Salem Hawley in the second installment of Hicks The Salem Hawley Series! Hawley is a free man, emancipated during the American Revolution. He finds himself indebted to a doctor for treatment he received for injuries suffered during the NY Doctors Riot. He has been tasked with the recovery of a stolen grimoire, Al Azif. He travels to Arkham, Massachusetts which has become a dark and dangerous place! While tracking the thief he runs With great pleasure and excitement I was thrilled to be back with Salem Hawley in the second installment of Hick’s The Salem Hawley Series! Hawley is a free man, emancipated during the American Revolution. He finds himself indebted to a doctor for treatment he received for injuries suffered during the NY Doctors Riot. He has been tasked with the recovery of a stolen grimoire, Al Azif. He travels to Arkham, Massachusetts which has become a dark and dangerous place! While tracking the thief he runs into another person on the stolen grimoire’s trail, an outcast and suspected witch.This one starts off right out of the gates with Harley’s nightmares of a mysterious pyramid, snow and tentacles coiling around him! Once he arrives in Arkham, he finds hell on earth. It culminates during a night Hawley was “shattered by the sights no human mind could reasonably tolerate or observe without fracturing.” I couldn’t put this down and didn’t want it to end! I will be waiting patiently for the third book! #BorneoftheDeep #NetGalley
    more
  • Coty
    January 1, 1970
    i really really want to like this series but i just don't think it's possible. the gore and the horror is just straight up disturbing and gross in a Bad Way for me. dagon was pretty cool, though i feel like it was underutilized
  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    This book starts off quite ominously and perilously for the protagonist, Salem. He is disturbed by visions of a mysterious pyramid. For those who read the first book and thought they wanted more Lovecraftian vibes, they're in luck because this sequel contains that type of material in spades. The writing is strong, the characters memorable, and overall i enjoyed it.
    more
  • Steven
    January 1, 1970
    The first book in the Salem Hawley series was kind of a watermark for me. It was the first cosmic horror book I'd read that:A.) Had a black protagonist.B.) Handled matters of race with a deft touch and not a sledgehammerSo I was gearing up to read the follow-up when it came out. So imagine my disappointment I got around to reading it and finding out that it felt like a massive step down. I only have myself to blame for jumping onto my own hype train.The plot of Borne of the Deep is a direct The first book in the Salem Hawley series was kind of a watermark for me. It was the first cosmic horror book I'd read that:A.) Had a black protagonist.B.) Handled matters of race with a deft touch and not a sledgehammerSo I was gearing up to read the follow-up when it came out. So imagine my disappointment I got around to reading it and finding out that it felt like a massive step down. I only have myself to blame for jumping onto my own hype train.The plot of Borne of the Deep is a direct sequel to The Resurrectionists in that it follow Hawley soon after the events in New York where shit rocketed skyward and the city was plagued by beasties from wet dream spawned from Stuart Gordon (R.I.P you amazing bastard). Hawley has been tasked by Dr. Bayley to retrieve the Necronomicon AKA Al Azif from the clutches of Dr Ellory, a fellow occultist that unbeknownst to Hawley was actually tasked with starting the ritual over in Arkham, Massachsetts. So what follows is Hawley arriving in the city, only to get wrapped up in a scheme that involves creatures from beyond reality and.....Haven't I read this before?!Yeah I have, because beat for beat it's pretty much a retread of the first book, with the Cosmic Horror "From Beyond" nasties replaced with "The Shadow over Innsmouth" Deep Ones. Now keep in mind, that's not necessarily a bad thing. I'd be a hypocrite if I didn't point out that a lot of Lovecraft's own work often followed similar treads of their own. But those stories were one-offs. The Salem Hawley stories is an ongoing series, so a bit of variety would not go astray. Now if that was the only issue that I had with this novella, that might still be enough to make me want to rate it higher. But the retreaded plot isn't the only problem here. A big chunk of this story isn't a story. It's a plot dump with characters plonked into it for the sole purpose of expositing Lovecraftian lore and backstory. Once arriving in Arkham - after the meaningless death of Hawley's carriage driver - we are introduced quite awkwardly to Louise LeMarche, an occultist of the Order of Eibon, whose role in the plot is to dump a load of info about the Esoteric Order of Dagon into our laps. The main villain of the story is also a step-down. Bayley and Hereford from the Resurrectionists were their own characters with their own goals and motivations that were suitably fleshed out given the story's length. Ellory meanwhile gets two scenes; one that introduces her, where she exposits more infodumpage and one where she pops her clogs. That's it. She's such a flat character, you may as well shred her into confetti to celebrate the pity party this review has become.Now to be fair, it isn't all bad. The pacing is still solid, so much so that found myself getting out of bed, just so I could finish it to see what happens. The gore is still suitably chunky and horrifying with a highlight scene being Hick's take on how Deep One children are created.You said it Pooh BearMeanwhile Hawley is still as endearing and engaging as ever with some extra character depth added in the form of an old bloodlust he acquired from the Civil War. Makes him not so much of a goody two-shoes which in cosmic horror is a big no-no. And the final climactic scene is suitably epic with the exception of Ellory's anti-climactic demise. Seriously Hicks, if you want your readers to connect to the villain, if only to hate them, give them more depth than a tablespoon of saltwater.But overall I wasn't angry with Borne from the Deep. Just disappointed. It feels like Hicks found a formula that worked for him and is prepared to ride that fucker into the ground, which I sincerely hope doesn't end up being the case. The Resurrectionists was a bright spot in an otherwise dark landscape of modern Cosmic Horror with most authors either relegating Lovecraftian entities to August Derleth levels of cartoon evil, or using the genre as an excuse to bang on about race relations to their readers like a patronizing schoolteacher. Borne from the Deep meanwhile feels like that cold patch of spunk left over in your undies after a wet dream. It's a reminder of something awesome but you can't help but feel a little icky and disappointed afterwards.
    more
  • Dwayne McIntosh
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in the Salem Hawley series picks up where the last one left and leaves the reader wanting the next in the series ASAP.Hicks knows how to set up a cliffhanger of sorts - where is it all headed. The Resurrectionists and Borne of the Deep wrap up for the most part, but you should read the first beforehand.Borne of the Deep gets into the Lovecraftian horror even more than the first book. Hicks's writing creates some memorable scenes that stick with you. The attention to detail makes The second book in the Salem Hawley series picks up where the last one left and leaves the reader wanting the next in the series ASAP.Hicks knows how to set up a cliffhanger of sorts - where is it all headed. The Resurrectionists and Borne of the Deep wrap up for the most part, but you should read the first beforehand.Borne of the Deep gets into the Lovecraftian horror even more than the first book. Hicks's writing creates some memorable scenes that stick with you. The attention to detail makes it work and his world building are on point.
    more
  • The Scary Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    For me the positives in Borne of the Deep are the characters, especially Salem. I really felt for him. My full review can be found here ---> https://wp.me/p5t5Tf-1TT
  • Al Burke
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come.
  • Spaka Eon
    January 1, 1970
    Horror with a disturbing imaginary! Would give you a memorable material for nightmares. Looking forward to the next book in a series.
  • Kim Napolitano
    January 1, 1970
    I am absolutely upset my detailed review vanished from here. Ill try again but it wont be as amazing as this book is. This story takes place immediately after the first one as Salem Hawley escapes the city in search of the book that will call up hell on earth. He reaches Arkham severely wounded and the town is a dark, filthy place of relentless rain and rough locals. Something evil is happening as creatures from hell are unleashed by a witch trying to release the demon to end all time. Fast, I am absolutely upset my detailed review vanished from here. I’ll try again but it won’t be as amazing as this book is. This story takes place immediately after the first one as Salem Hawley escapes the city in search of the book that will call up hell on earth. He reaches Arkham severely wounded and the town is a dark, filthy place of relentless rain and rough locals. Something evil is happening as creatures from hell are unleashed by a witch trying to release the demon to end all time. Fast, bloody and bleak, this is a creature feature on steroids, something that makes Godzilla look like a plain old lizard, the ending has you holding your breath! No spoilers! MPH never, ever disappoints and I can not wait for book 3! Read immediately!
    more
Write a review