Burn-In
An FBI agent teams up with the first police robot to hunt a shadowy terrorist in this gripping technothriller—and fact-based tour of tomorrow—from the authors of Ghost FleetAmerica is on the brink of a revolution. AI and robotics have realized science fiction’s dreams, but have also taken millions of jobs and left many citizens fearful that the future is leaving them behind. After narrowly averting a bombing at Washington’s Union Station, FBI Special Agent Lara Keegan receives a new assignment: to field test the first police robot. In the wake of a series of shocking catastrophes, the two find themselves investigating a conspiracy whose mastermind is using cutting-edge tech to rip the nation apart. To stop this new breed of terrorist, Keegan’s only hope is to forge a new kind of partnership. With every tech, trend, and scene drawn from the real world, Burn-In blends a technothriller’s excitement with nonfiction’s insight to illuminate the darkest corners of our chilling tomorrow.

Burn-In Details

TitleBurn-In
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2020
PublisherHoughton Mifflin Harcourt
Rating
GenreFiction, Science Fiction, Science, Technology, Science Fiction Fantasy

Burn-In Review

  • Peter Tieryas
    January 1, 1970
    I blurbed this book and highly recommend it: "Burn In is a profound look into an all too believable future, brilliantly weaving together a moving narrative that challenges readers with its mix of robots, AI, and politics. The action is stirring, the characters are all too relatable, but it’s the questions about humanity that will leave their mark, burning their way into your brain and leaving you breathlessly wanting more."
    more
  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic book. A techno-thriller that examines AI, robotics, and unmanned systems and how they will change everyday life. What stands out in this book is the dialogue. It is the interaction of the characters that paints the picture of our future.
  • Xavier Hugonet
    January 1, 1970
    Burn-In - A Novel of the Real Robotic Revolution is a futurist techno-thriller by P. W. Singer and August Cole. In a near future where technology has advanced, and unfortunately put a lot of people out of jobs, Lara Keegan is a Washington FBI Special Agent getting a new partner, an advanced AI-powered robot she’s to teach in order to maybe pioneer a fleet of new law enforcement machines. While she patrols and avert various crimes, terrorists cyber attacks on the infrastructure start rocking the Burn-In - A Novel of the Real Robotic Revolution is a futurist techno-thriller by P. W. Singer and August Cole. In a near future where technology has advanced, and unfortunately put a lot of people out of jobs, Lara Keegan is a Washington FBI Special Agent getting a new partner, an advanced AI-powered robot she’s to teach in order to maybe pioneer a fleet of new law enforcement machines. While she patrols and avert various crimes, terrorists cyber attacks on the infrastructure start rocking the city. When the events plaguing Washington get linked together, Keegan and her TAMS partner embark on a mission to stop the individuals responsible. P. W. Singer is a futurist author specialized in national security. August Cole is also a futurist, specializing in conflict. Both have collaborated before on best-selling books, and this is their new novel published énd May 2020. Both researchers are fascinated by their topics and, in the case of this book, maybe a little too much. A lot of time is spent describing in minute details the technology of the world the events occur in. As it can be fascinating in itself, it slows down the story to a crawling pace. Without spoiling anything about the plot, the main antagonist only appears a third in the book, and the actions really starts after the half mark. Then, the story gets really interesting. However, it’s way too late, and some readers might not get that far, especially if they feel the need to read the many notes validating this possible technological future. From a societal point of view, the world seems not to have progressed as much, even if the authors are often on the mark, for example with a bunkered White House, or monuments celebrating those who fought for equality. This is a book for those who enjoy learning about technology through fiction, but maybe not so much for those liking their techno-thrillers more casual. Thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley for the ARC provided in exchange for this unbiased review.
    more
  • Wes
    January 1, 1970
    For as much as Burn-In is techno-thriller fiction and don’t get me wrong, the story is compelling and immediately draws the reader in and keeps you turning the pages, I can’t help but think about how much this book could legitimately be non-fiction as well. At the very least, 5, 10, maybe 25 years from now we may look back and consider it more non-fiction than fiction. So much of the technological advances discussed in the book already exist or on the fringes of becoming reality. From songs writ For as much as Burn-In is techno-thriller fiction and don’t get me wrong, the story is compelling and immediately draws the reader in and keeps you turning the pages, I can’t help but think about how much this book could legitimately be non-fiction as well. At the very least, 5, 10, maybe 25 years from now we may look back and consider it more non-fiction than fiction. So much of the technological advances discussed in the book already exist or on the fringes of becoming reality. From songs written entirely by AI, to small UAS deliveries, to augmented reality (to name a few), these technologies that already exist. The forte of this book is not just the technology but the dilemma of how it’s used and integrated in society. With that said, don’t lose sight of the narrative. Above all, it really is a fascinating story and the storyline takes precedence as it should.
    more
  • Anneke
    January 1, 1970
    Book Review: Burn-In: A Novel of the Real Robotic RevolutionAuthor: P. W. Singer; August ColePublisher: Houghton Mifflin HarcourtPublication Date: May 26, 2020Review Date: June 7, 2030I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the blurb:“An FBI agent hunts a new kind of terrorist through a Washington, DC, of the future in this groundbreaking book - at once a gripping technothriller and a fact-based tour of tomorrowAmerica is on the brink of a revolu Book Review: Burn-In: A Novel of the Real Robotic RevolutionAuthor: P. W. Singer; August ColePublisher: Houghton Mifflin HarcourtPublication Date: May 26, 2020Review Date: June 7, 2030I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the blurb:“An FBI agent hunts a new kind of terrorist through a Washington, DC, of the future in this groundbreaking book - at once a gripping technothriller and a fact-based tour of tomorrowAmerica is on the brink of a revolution, one both technological and political. The science fiction of AI and robotics has finally come true, but millions are angry and fearful that the future has left them behind.After narrowly stopping a bombing at Washington’s Union Station, FBI Special Agent Lara Keegan receives a new assignment: to field-test an advanced police robot. As a series of shocking catastrophes unfolds, the two find themselves investigating a conspiracy whose mastermind is using cutting-edge tech to rip the nation apart. To stop this new breed of terrorist, their only hope is to forge a new type of partnership.Burn-In is especially chilling because it is something more than a pulse-pounding read: every tech, trend, and scene is drawn from real world research on the ways that our politics, our economy, and even our family lives will soon be transformed. Blending a techno-thriller’s excitement with nonfiction’s insight, Singer and Cole illuminate the darkest corners of the world soon to come.”This is a fantastic high-tech sci fi thriller about AI and robotics. As mentioned in the blurb, it is so close to our current technological present, but everything is pushed forward, in ways as we might to be true in the very near future. The book was very fast-paced and engaging. I loved the presentation of the AI robot, TAMS, who is FBI Special Agent Lara Keegan’s partner. I dinged the book 1 point, giving it 4-stars because it seemed that there was one disaster after another, written solely as devices to push the plot along. Still I highly recommend this book, especially if you like techno thrillers in the style of Blake Crouch. The protagonist characters, both Lara and TAMS, were very well written. The book takes place in the Washington D.C. Metro Area, which I personally loved as I went to school at Georgetown University and had a love affair with D.C. It was so satisfying to read about not only the famous Washington landmarks, but also the not so famous streets and neighborhoods that I got to know as a D.C. resident. Both of the authors have written other books that I intend to check out. Thank you to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for access to this book. Best of luck to both of the authors. This review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads and Amazon. #netgalley #burn-in #pwsinger #augustcole #houghtonmifflinharcourt
    more
  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    DNF, stopped at 25%.One of my favorite books is roboticist Daniel Wilson's Robopocalypse, which is both a pageturner and a truly fascinating (and terrifying) look at AI now and in the near future. Given my love of Wilson's novel, I was thrilled to receive an arc of Burn-In (thank you Edelweiss). Unfortunately, these two titles could not be more different.Instead of harnessing developments in AI to tell a riveting tale about the future of policing and criminal investigation, as well as society at DNF, stopped at 25%.One of my favorite books is roboticist Daniel Wilson's Robopocalypse, which is both a pageturner and a truly fascinating (and terrifying) look at AI now and in the near future. Given my love of Wilson's novel, I was thrilled to receive an arc of Burn-In (thank you Edelweiss). Unfortunately, these two titles could not be more different.Instead of harnessing developments in AI to tell a riveting tale about the future of policing and criminal investigation, as well as society at large, Singer and Cole used the trappings of plot, character, setting--in short, story--as a reason to detail as many AI advances as possible. Every time, a character became relatable or a scene engrossing, the authors would segue into a multi-page treatise on the wondrous capabilities of various forms of AI. In short, "Burn-In" is all about Story in service to technology, when it should be the other way around.
    more
  • Marina Malenic
    January 1, 1970
    The authors of Ghost Fleet have returned. This time it’s with a futuristic thriller featuring the central character of Marine-turned-FBI agent Lara Keegan. She teams up with a sophisticated police robot to track down a shadowy terrorist in a story that explores the potential of artificial intelligence. AI’s role as an assistant and, eventually, as a full partner to those that do difficult and dangerous work is investigated in this gripping crime narrative.August Cole, a writer and analyst specia The authors of Ghost Fleet have returned. This time it’s with a futuristic thriller featuring the central character of Marine-turned-FBI agent Lara Keegan. She teams up with a sophisticated police robot to track down a shadowy terrorist in a story that explores the potential of artificial intelligence. AI’s role as an assistant and, eventually, as a full partner to those that do difficult and dangerous work is investigated in this gripping crime narrative.August Cole, a writer and analyst specializing in national security issues, and Peter Singer, the expert on twenty-first-century warfare, paint a picture of a dystopian America on the verge of revolution. AI and robotics have become part of everyday life but have also replaced millions of people in the workforce, making many citizens fearful that the future is leaving them behind. Bridging the counter-terrorism work Keegan did in the Marine Corps with the future, the opening sequence shows FBI Special Agent Keegan narrowly dodging a bombing at Washington’s Union Station and then quickly receiving a new assignment: to field test artificial intelligence for regular use by the bureau.Keegan and her AI sidekick find themselves investigating a high-tech conspiracy to destroy America. The Tactical Autonomous Mobility System (TAMS) and Keegan end up training each other on the complexities of police work and human interaction while they track down the deadly insurgent.Before the FBI put it to the test, the fictional TAMS is imagined as having been developed as a military robot by the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)–presumably at some point after the Iraq War had concluded. Notable in the book is the authors’ use of exhaustive research. Hundreds of footnotes detail the real-world scientific breakthroughs that could lead to a human-robot policing partnership. Singer and Cole have a track record of writing compellingly about technology, so their careful work explaining the uses of futuristic hardware is nothing new for them.But the way the authors build the relationship between Keegan and her new partner, particularly through their oftentimes charming dialogue, is exceptional and becomes the core of Burn-In.
    more
  • Daniel O'Donnell
    January 1, 1970
    This is urban high tech crime fiction with a deep infusion of modern and near future reality that is backed up by heavy footnoting. It is also what the authors call "useful fiction".Start with urban crime that is evolved cyberpunk and add ML/AI, robotics, drones, autonomous vehicles and neo-luddites to counter it. Then add a cynical FBI special agent and her next-gen robot sidekick (that she doesn't trust) who also has personal problems, and give her an existential, civilization-ending problem t This is urban high tech crime fiction with a deep infusion of modern and near future reality that is backed up by heavy footnoting. It is also what the authors call "useful fiction".Start with urban crime that is evolved cyberpunk and add ML/AI, robotics, drones, autonomous vehicles and neo-luddites to counter it. Then add a cynical FBI special agent and her next-gen robot sidekick (that she doesn't trust) who also has personal problems, and give her an existential, civilization-ending problem to solve with a deadline that she can feel but she doesn't know exactly when it's going to end.She has problems with her history (hiding something), problems with her body (old injuries), problems with her management bureaucracy (can't trust the ambitious higher-ups), problems with the establishment (can't trust them either because they are amoral and greedy) and a whole flock of alt right white supremacists that are being exploited by advanced neo-luddites, then throw in some crime and some emotion and a timeline and you've got a modern thriller.The point of all this crisis is to hold the readers attention with the story while introducing many various types of new and emerging technology that the modern reader may want to know about but wants to see illustrated in a tableau about what might be done with it. The book is extensively footnoted too, so the near-future technology that we are introduced to can be investigated more, and with a more understanding minds eye. There are many footnotes from the past few years, but they even go back to Claude Shannon and Marvin Minsky (1955) and even back to Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Hobbes. So there is even some philosophy and politics as one might expect from a Washington DC setting about modern life and violent anti-civilization beliefs.This is the second book by this pair of authors, and this is as good as or better than the first (Ghost Fleet). They have also consulted on a number of motion pictures and modern television shows, so they know their audience and how to hold their (our) attention.
    more
  • Nick Frazier
    January 1, 1970
    The story is about a former Marine FBI agent paired with a cutting edge robotic partner for field testing. It takes place 30ish years in the future (I think). The buddy-cop story cliche ends there. The story exposes the reader to a wide range of tech issues and how they may play out in the near future. Without giving away the story, the "baddie" exploits the seams of technology and society driving the main character and robot on an investigation. If I had to classify it for readers, I'd call it The story is about a former Marine FBI agent paired with a cutting edge robotic partner for field testing. It takes place 30ish years in the future (I think). The buddy-cop story cliche ends there. The story exposes the reader to a wide range of tech issues and how they may play out in the near future. Without giving away the story, the "baddie" exploits the seams of technology and society driving the main character and robot on an investigation. If I had to classify it for readers, I'd call it "near Science Fiction." The authors use the term "useful fiction" which is apt from a professional development view. The story is fiction, yet all the technology and trends have citations referenced throughout the book - definitely a FICINT entry. Instead of having to suspend disbelief, you start thinking about the very obvious intersections of AI, robotics, automation, and domestic politics. A few questions from the book:What happens when automation displaces blue-collar and white-collar jobs alike? Neo-Ludditism is a very real possibility. People may simultaneously embrace technology where it makes life easier, but reject the aspects that prevent members of society from earning a living wage. "What do we do with our hands?" Human-on-the-loop AI is going to change the way we interact in society. Our AI tools are only as good as the data we put in. In turn, the AI tools, when employed, cause humans to change behavior to account for the fact that a robot/AI can do some things better. Two memorable passages for me cover violence and sex. In one scene, we see the conflict of government tech vs Commercial-Off-The-Shelf technology during an FBI Hostage Rescue Team raid. In another scene, we get a peek into the darker side of sex and robotics. Overall, It was entertaining, useful, and thought-provoking. The references alone at the end of the book make for an interesting read.
    more
  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Burn-In is a new type of tale. It’s almost like a future docudrama. It combines a fictional story with existing technology in new and exciting ways.Special Agent Lara Keegan finds a terrorist hidden in plain sight. As a “reward”, she is given a Tactical Autonomous Mobility System robot, or TAMS, to beta test for the FBI. Workers in the US are increasingly angered by their jobs, both blue and white collared, being converted into “metal-collar jobs” filled with robots. There was no real guarantee Burn-In is a new type of tale. It’s almost like a future docudrama. It combines a fictional story with existing technology in new and exciting ways.Special Agent Lara Keegan finds a terrorist hidden in plain sight. As a “reward”, she is given a Tactical Autonomous Mobility System robot, or TAMS, to beta test for the FBI. Workers in the US are increasingly angered by their jobs, both blue and white collared, being converted into “metal-collar jobs” filled with robots. There was no real guarantee of a Guaranteed Basic Income program going live in the US anytime soon.If you don’t know about this new genre of “useful fiction”, it can seem at first to be an overlong thriller, which it is. The overlong part is because there is a non-fiction science book hiding within this book. All the technology is based on fact and fully referenced in a comprehensive Notes section at the end. Who knew that Finnish prisoners are training AI?I’m the best possible consumer for this book. I love both thrillers and non-fiction, especially stories featuring technology. But I still feel there was a pacing issue in Burn-In. The world-building didn’t feel as effortless as it does in good science fiction. It slowed down the action, especially in the first half of the book. I enjoyed it but I’m not sure if there are enough people out there to make this book a bestseller. Give it a try if it sounds intriguing. 4 stars!Thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • K.S. Ferguson
    January 1, 1970
    If you like slow-moving thrillers, then this is the book for you. Do you want to know what research the author did to come up with the ideas and futuristic technology presented in the story? You're in luck! You'll find a footnote on every page or three. Sometimes you'll find as many as three footnotes on the same page. How about sermons? Do you enjoy those? Do you get a chill down your spine when a character spouts propaganda for a full page? You'll be reaching for a blanket in no time!Okay, tha If you like slow-moving thrillers, then this is the book for you. Do you want to know what research the author did to come up with the ideas and futuristic technology presented in the story? You're in luck! You'll find a footnote on every page or three. Sometimes you'll find as many as three footnotes on the same page. How about sermons? Do you enjoy those? Do you get a chill down your spine when a character spouts propaganda for a full page? You'll be reaching for a blanket in no time!Okay, that's a little harsh, but really, the book had so much promise. The premise caught my eye. The main character is smart, engaging, and likable. The plot gripped me. I just couldn't get past the stop-and-go of all that infodumping. When I'm reading a thriller, I don't want to drop out to read a historical article or a research paper or get a lecture on computer encryption. It breaks the fictive dream for me. I have no problem with the author noting source material, but it belongs in a list at the end of the book, not scattered through the text. The author wants to sway the reader into like-minded thinking, but it's done in a heavy handed way that I didn't appreciate. Get all that stuff out of the way and tell me the story. The bones are there, but they're masked in such a way that I gave up 30% of the way through.
    more
  • Steve Solnick
    January 1, 1970
    I was a fan of the authors' earlier "Ghost Fleet” so I really wanted to love this book. Alas, I found it a bit disappointing. It began as a Tom Clancy techno-thriller, morphed into a TED Talk, and ended with a Dan Brown race against time. While the human characters were given a lot of backstory, I was disappointed when the focus moved away from the robot. The book is, at its core, a buddy movie - FBI agent learns to trust her new robot partner. I'd have been happier with more of that and fewer f I was a fan of the authors' earlier "Ghost Fleet” so I really wanted to love this book. Alas, I found it a bit disappointing. It began as a Tom Clancy techno-thriller, morphed into a TED Talk, and ended with a Dan Brown race against time. While the human characters were given a lot of backstory, I was disappointed when the focus moved away from the robot. The book is, at its core, a buddy movie - FBI agent learns to trust her new robot partner. I'd have been happier with more of that and fewer footnotes. In fact, the footnotes ultimately distracted me here. Do we really need a footnote on the origins of the phrase “look under the kimono”? It takes a character note and turns it into an authorial show of erudition, too meta for this genre to handle. At one point, the authors give us the Hebrew translations (in Hebrew script) of a key bit of evidence - why? Again, it seemed like a moment where the authors wanted to show off, even if at the expense of the characters. I was happy to have the references for the AI developments that the authors build on to create their world, but I felt they went too far here and I found the exercise, ultimately, took me out of the plot. As a world-building exercise I give it a B+; as a thriller, a C.
    more
  • Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars. Another great “near futuristic” work by Peter Singer and August Cole! As much about AI, Augmented & Virtual Reality, 5G (though never mentioned) and the Internet of Things, Autonomy, Biotechnology and Human Enhancement, WoMan-Machine Teaming as Robotics! Imagine a world where AI has enhanced all fields and merged with ubiquitous communications to enable autonomy, human enhancement, the merging and display of real-time analysis to assist professionals and citizens alike in all fields of 5 stars. Another great “near futuristic” work by Peter Singer and August Cole! As much about AI, Augmented & Virtual Reality, 5G (though never mentioned) and the Internet of Things, Autonomy, Biotechnology and Human Enhancement, WoMan-Machine Teaming as Robotics! Imagine a world where AI has enhanced all fields and merged with ubiquitous communications to enable autonomy, human enhancement, the merging and display of real-time analysis to assist professionals and citizens alike in all fields of work and recreation, and where robotics have displaced vast fields of labor save those where passion, compassion, empathy and intuition are of greatest value. Peter and August describe just such a world in the not too distant future where technological and conceptual advancements have both enhanced and disrupted society and where the balance between embracing or rejecting these enhancements is still fragile. Well conceived, well told. Enlightening and entertaining!
    more
  • Thomas Lennek
    January 1, 1970
    Frightening, thought provoking, or bothI won this book on Goodreads, and am glad I did. I found this book hard to read, as I kept finding the action getting in the way of the implications to our society. Nonetheless, there is plenty of action, interesting characters - both human and artificial, and a fast moving plot. Footnotes are plentiful (I know, in a novel.) and references are included. When I checked, I recalled reading a number of the articles that were footnoted. Read this book of you li Frightening, thought provoking, or bothI won this book on Goodreads, and am glad I did. I found this book hard to read, as I kept finding the action getting in the way of the implications to our society. Nonetheless, there is plenty of action, interesting characters - both human and artificial, and a fast moving plot. Footnotes are plentiful (I know, in a novel.) and references are included. When I checked, I recalled reading a number of the articles that were footnoted. Read this book of you like military science fiction, or contemporary thrillers. After reading, figure out how you will take action upon our human path for artificial intelligence, smart machines, and the rise of algorithms controlling our future.
    more
  • Mike Kanner
    January 1, 1970
    As he did with GHOST FLEET (2015 ), Singer gives us a view of the future.P.W. Singer is a dominant voice on the role of technology in warfare (see his WIRED FOR WAR and LIKE WAR). The research that he has done for those books and his other work is the basis for this techno-thriller. The FBI experiments with a human-robotic partnership just when a cyber-terrorist threat arises. Each of the attacks is based on the ten plagues visited on Egypt. That is the story. Singer uses this to show how depend As he did with GHOST FLEET (2015 ), Singer gives us a view of the future.P.W. Singer is a dominant voice on the role of technology in warfare (see his WIRED FOR WAR and LIKE WAR). The research that he has done for those books and his other work is the basis for this techno-thriller. The FBI experiments with a human-robotic partnership just when a cyber-terrorist threat arises. Each of the attacks is based on the ten plagues visited on Egypt. That is the story. Singer uses this to show how dependant we have become on cybernetics (artificial intelligence) in our everyday life from predictive ordering to infrastructure control systems. He shows how this dependency is a weakness that can be exploited (or just fail, which is what motivates the terrorist). Singer never goes as far as saying that we should turn our backs on technology, just that we should be cautious in its adoption. I did not give it five stars for two reasons - 1) there are times where Singer goes overboard on the tech discussions; 2) none of the characters go much beyond stereotypes so the reader couldn't get emotionally invested in the story.
    more
  • Douglas Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    P.W. Singer and August Cole do it again! If you liked Ghost Fleet, you will love Burn-In. I personally found Burn-In more digestible and engage-able as a reader than Ghost Fleet. Singer & Cole put their research there their proverbial mouth is. This book has endless endnotes, but they are placed so as to not distract from the narrative. The technology drives the story, not the story driving the technology. This is a perfect blend of political thriller, future-"war," cyberspace/AI/space, robotics P.W. Singer and August Cole do it again! If you liked Ghost Fleet, you will love Burn-In. I personally found Burn-In more digestible and engage-able as a reader than Ghost Fleet. Singer & Cole put their research there their proverbial mouth is. This book has endless endnotes, but they are placed so as to not distract from the narrative. The technology drives the story, not the story driving the technology. This is a perfect blend of political thriller, future-"war," cyberspace/AI/space, robotics, and story-telling. You will not be disappointed.
    more
  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    Well done and well documented story of the future that awaits humans and their ever increasing dependence on electronics. The author footnoted all references included from ancient philosophers to technocrats. The story also read well and was engaging.I recommend this book to any reader interested in the changing world we live in.I received a Kindle version of this book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Ken
    January 1, 1970
    This was a scary and all too realistic view of a potential future. Set perhaps thirty years in the future, it shows us where technology, AI, information sharing, automation, and robotics could all too easily take us. Jam packed with a large number of mentions of real-life technologies, but with hundreds of footnote type references to recent articles and publications that make you realize how real the scenarios in this book could be.
    more
  • Allie Weiskopf
    January 1, 1970
    Singer’s new book was less like “Likewar” and more like “Ghost Fleet” - it was a look at futuristic warfare, this time at home with the FBI and robots. It read more like a Dan Brown adventure novel than a thought piece on the future of technology and conflict. Still raises some good points for morale debates.
    more
  • Zaid
    January 1, 1970
    Meld of fiction and non-fiction about automation, robotics, and A.I. Novel woven with real-world research. The notes section, at times, is more interesting than the actual story itself. Meh. Wouldn’t be my first recommendation (far deeper stuff out there) but an interesting read nevertheless visualizing the real issues in the coming years.
    more
  • Russ Mathers
    January 1, 1970
    A very good book showing how data analytics, modeling and robotics will change things in the future. Good mystery novel story line and OK character development, while not quite a “Jack Reacher” story the mix of technology and story of this sassy ex Marine/now FBI agent is entertaining. I listened to it on Audible, and really enjoyed it. And I work in data and modeling.
    more
  • Joel Radunzel
    January 1, 1970
    Great read about the chilling implications of our society's increasing and inevitable intertwining with technology, and how we respond to it. The book starts off fast-paced and never slows down, while still managing to provoke deep questions about the benefits and pitfalls of AI and society. Highly recommended!
    more
  • Dale
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a book chalked full of tech stuff this is for you. This team does a good job of explaining a potential tech future, so good that sometimes I loose the story line. Cool robot but who was the bad guy again? Some of the examples of robot human interface hark back to P.W. Singer's book Wired for War.
    more
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    I really like Ghost Fleet by these two, but just could not get into this one. Maybe too technical. It has a great premise and I was very excited to start it, but found myself bogged down by it. Disappointing.
  • Zachery Tyson
    January 1, 1970
    Burn-In is the story of a smart, tech-savvy female cop on a mission to save the country from all the bumbling men in her life, from her dolt of a husband & her incompetent bosses to a duplicitous tech-bro. 8/10, must-read. Raising hands Burn-In is the story of a smart, tech-savvy female cop on a mission to save the country from all the bumbling men in her life, from her dolt of a husband & her incompetent bosses to a duplicitous tech-bro. 8/10, must-read. Raising hands
    more
  • Lee Thames
    January 1, 1970
    A competent novel. The purpose of which is to look at AI, Surveillance and robotic technology on our human culture in the very near future. One of the Authors, P.W. Singer, has quite the credentials.If you like techno-thrillers this is a good one.
  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    A must read piece of "fiction" that paints an eerily accurate picture of the current chaos of the world, with a plausible (and likely) vision of the coming years and decades.One of the best novels I've read in a while, and I'm excited to see what these guys do next.
    more
  • Kristen Winne
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting read, definitely gives you a lot to think about.
  • Alexa Singer
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent story and well researched. A great book to occupy your time if you are home social distancing. I am not typically a fan of this genre but this book really had me engaged.
  • Vaclav Kosar
    January 1, 1970
    Starts fairly strong, but dissipates into a very cliché story towards the end.
Write a review