The Tell
Rey Tanic is not like other 14 year olds. His dad is a mafia boss. His dad is also in jail. When Rey’s life explodes, every decision he makes will shape the rest of his life. How far does the apple really fall from the tree?Action, crime and intense family drama combine to create a powerful story in the vein of Two Wolves or a young Boy Swallows Universe.

The Tell Details

TitleThe Tell
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 28th, 2020
PublisherPenguin Random House Australia
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Action, Young Adult

The Tell Review

  • Dimity Powell
    January 1, 1970
    Raze is a young teen with a pedigree heritage. His dad is a feared mafia boss and convicted felon. His older brother is keen to pursue an unlawful way of life; it pays tremendous dividends in the form of big booties after all. Being the son of such notoriety does not come without some major conflicts. For Raze, aka Rey Tanic, life is a continuous violent clash between his criminal family's expectations of him and his desire to break free from them and live a life less outlawed. More normal and h Raze is a young teen with a pedigree heritage. His dad is a feared mafia boss and convicted felon. His older brother is keen to pursue an unlawful way of life; it pays tremendous dividends in the form of big booties after all. Being the son of such notoriety does not come without some major conflicts. For Raze, aka Rey Tanic, life is a continuous violent clash between his criminal family's expectations of him and his desire to break free from them and live a life less outlawed. More normal and honest.He tries his determined best to keep his head down at school and is fortunate to have mates like Ids and Candy on his team. They're a motley crew glued together by spray paint and an unspoken respect for each other. Each is battling their own struggle against an identity title they'd rather not have, except maybe Ids who is the brilliant cool comical chum throughout. One title they do revere is MCT - their graffiti tag. Despite the nominal illicitness of their actions, their 'art projects' enable them to work tightly together. Understanding and skill sets bond creating a solidarity that is tested to the limit when Raze's world begins to implode or rather explode.After a dramatic prison escape by his father, Raze nose-dives into a series of near death situations, each more unexpected and brutal than the last. Not only are Raze's nerves shredded beyond recognition but so too are ours as his home and life is systematically destroyed. On the run, homeless and confused as to why his dad has suddenly abandoned the family, it's Raze's close affiliation with corruption that hones his instincts for survival. It might sound completely implausible that a trio of 14-year-olds could riddle and dodge their way through a seething mess of iniquitous deception but Chatterton's razor sharp narrative style and cutting teen voice flip unlikely into, 'Can I come too!' As Raze is sucked into a sinister vortex of nastiness, he and his friends each face their own baptism of fire; for Candy, being the daughter of the head of police is not as idealistic as it seems for instance. Chatterton loops brutal reality and disconsolate yearnings into complex character patterns. It's thrilling getting to watch these kids unravel and then find themselves again. As a fan of Tristan Bancks' gripping middle grade thrillers, The Tell, ranks up there among them. The pace is just as frantic. The plot lines just as absorbing. Chatterton's style is courser and feels a lot more up close and in your face, however this keeps the robust thread of helplessness taunt and compelling. I was drawn in by the 'tell' tale signs, the form of body language that gives away a person's true feelings and although this aspect of the story was reinforced strongly in the beginning, further reference to it in relation to Raze's demise dwindled after that. This niggling unrequited expectation aside (and a bit of a Hollywood ending that teasingly suggests a follow on book), The Tell really is an-edge-of-your-seat thriller that explores the seedier side of life rather spectacularly from a kid's point of view. It is this point of difference that makes this novel so memorable. In that respect it is the perfect younger reader's rendition of Boy Swallows Universe.
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  • Blue
    January 1, 1970
    Want to see more... Bookstagram Website Thank you Penguin for this book in exchange for an honest reviewOhhh now this was interesting. As you may or may not know, I love my crime books but am superrrr fussy! Generally I find crime books are too predictable or don’t create enough suspense around the plot. The Tell was an exception. To be honest, I thought our main character Rey would be more inclined to get assistance from other characters but instead Rey instead tried to take on the world! I lov Want to see more... Bookstagram Website Thank you Penguin for this book in exchange for an honest reviewOhhh now this was interesting. As you may or may not know, I love my crime books but am superrrr fussy! Generally I find crime books are too predictable or don’t create enough suspense around the plot. The Tell was an exception. To be honest, I thought our main character Rey would be more inclined to get assistance from other characters but instead Rey instead tried to take on the world! I love this. Usually young characters always seek assistance for other’s instead of struggling for their own survival and I am here for it! I love determined yet desperate characters!I loved that there was violence, guns, arson and all over conspiracies which kept the book interesting and fast paced!
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  • Tasha Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    Short and sweet because im tired 😂.Going in this novel seemed A LOT different to how it turned out. I was expecting tough kid goes into hiding. Instead I got gangster kid plots against the world.I was given this as a potential middle grade read to recommend for purchase by school. Um, so, not middle grade. It fits into that gray area between full blown YA and young YA (its a thing. Dont @ me). There's violence, abuse and gun use on many occasions. There's also arson, conspiracies and a big arse Short and sweet because im tired 😂.Going in this novel seemed A LOT different to how it turned out. I was expecting tough kid goes into hiding. Instead I got gangster kid plots against the world.I was given this as a potential middle grade read to recommend for purchase by school. Um, so, not middle grade. It fits into that gray area between full blown YA and young YA (its a thing. Dont @ me). There's violence, abuse and gun use on many occasions. There's also arson, conspiracies and a big arse bomb. But its all wrapped up into a story from a 14 year olds POV. Which was weird to start but turned out amazingly. Its a quick read which was actually not particularly predictable for the most part. I would however recommend reading this one for yourself before making the decision to give it to your kids if they are under the age of 13ish.
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  • Matthew Goodwin
    January 1, 1970
    A punchy crime drama with loads of Aussie teen angst and occa slang to stone a magpie, bro! I enjoyed the Sydney setting and the occasional urban street chase, but the novel sells its readers short in the plot department, and its climax is rushed and, ultimately, unsatisfying. The young adult market has an ever- increasing hole yawning beneath it, waiting to feed on something that isn't 'Hunger Games' imitations or girl meets the charmingly handsome boy (who is undoubtedly a vampire) who tells h A punchy crime drama with loads of Aussie teen angst and occa slang to stone a magpie, bro! I enjoyed the Sydney setting and the occasional urban street chase, but the novel sells its readers short in the plot department, and its climax is rushed and, ultimately, unsatisfying. The young adult market has an ever- increasing hole yawning beneath it, waiting to feed on something that isn't 'Hunger Games' imitations or girl meets the charmingly handsome boy (who is undoubtedly a vampire) who tells her she isn't like other girls, angsty drama crap, so kudos to Martin Chatterton for throwing this uncut gem out there into the maelstrom. More please. Recommended for all younger readers.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic action/suspense novel for teenagers. Set in Sydney the main characters are 3 friends Raze, his father is a crime boss, Candy, her father is Chief of Police and Ids a Somali/Australian with a wicked sense of humour. The action starts when Raze’s father is broken out of a high security prison, by helicopter.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    Review to appear in Magpies magazine
  • Tina Gumnior
    January 1, 1970
    A fast paced crime novel for teens set in Sydney. It was thoroughly enjoyable and hard to put down.
  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    Strong storytelling.
  • Laura Mitchell Hutchinson
    January 1, 1970
    Rey 'Raze' Tanic's dad is Australia's most wanted criminal. Raze is not sure he wants to follow in his father's footsteps... but does he really have a choice?
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