Rise & Shine
Each morning, the last humans start their day with graphic footage from the front. This is what sustains them - literally.In a world where eight billion souls have perished, the survivors huddle together apart, perpetually at war, in the city-states of Rise and Shine. Yet this war, far from representing their doom, is their means of survival. For their leaders have found the key to life when crops, livestock, and the very future have been blighted - a key that turns on each citizen being moved by human suffering. The question is, with memories still bright of all the friends they've lost, all the experience they'll never know, will compassion be enough? Or must they succumb to, or even embrace, darker desires?Rise and Shine is a tale that speaks to our troubled times, a Kafkaesque fable of hope from the imagination of Miles Franklin nominee Patrick Allington.

Rise & Shine Details

TitleRise & Shine
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 2nd, 2020
PublisherScribe Publications
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Dystopia, Fiction, Apocalyptic, Post Apocalyptic

Rise & Shine Review

  • Marchpane
    January 1, 1970
    Two city-states, one called Rise and the other Shine, house the remnants of humanity in a post-apocalyptic world—a world so environmentally toxified that there is no such thing as food. Instead the survivors get their sustenance from the televised footage of a perpetual war.That’s right, they consume violent media—they ‘eat’ it—in order to stay alive. Actually, it is their emotional responses that nourish them—which becomes a problem as some people have become desensitised; as they can’t muster Two city-states, one called Rise and the other Shine, house the remnants of humanity in a post-apocalyptic world—a world so environmentally toxified that there is no such thing as food. Instead the survivors get their sustenance from the televised footage of a perpetual war.That’s right, they consume violent media—they ‘eat’ it—in order to stay alive. Actually, it is their emotional responses that nourish them—which becomes a problem as some people have become desensitised; as they can’t muster an appropriate emotion, they literally begin to starve to death.The contrived war between Rise and Shine rages on amid annual peace talks (an obvious charade with the perpetual slogan: ‘PEACE: not this year, maybe next year’), and meanwhile a small resistance is secretly, illegally, growing plants—that they hope will be non-toxic—as an alternative food source. This novel has the vibe of Golden Age sci-fi and classic dystopian fiction like 1984 or Fahrenheit 451, mixed with the surrealism of Kafka or perhaps Jesse Ball. I must confess I kept trying to work out the underlying message/allegory and coming up confused. Despite that, Rise and Shine is an entertaining, darkly funny read. 3.5 stars.
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  • Michael Livingston
    January 1, 1970
    A strikingly original book, utterly stuffed with ideas. The satire is sharp and it's packed with vivid moments. I'll be mulling over the idea of people sustaining themselves on others' suffering for a long time. I didn't find the characters particularly fleshed out, but that's not really the point of this book.
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  • Robert Lukins
    January 1, 1970
    This book is: good. Very good. Very, very good.
  • Bram
    January 1, 1970
    Set forty years after an unspecified apocalypse, Rise & Shine follows a small group of survivors who, in creating twin warring cities, have saved what's left of humanity. Highly reminiscent of the works of Karel Capek - hands down my favourite spec-fic novelist of all time - it sparkles with creative flair and humour while also saying many deadly serious and profound things about the dire state of our world. I could crap on for ages about how much I love this book, but suffice to say, it is quit Set forty years after an unspecified apocalypse, Rise & Shine follows a small group of survivors who, in creating twin warring cities, have saved what's left of humanity. Highly reminiscent of the works of Karel Capek - hands down my favourite spec-fic novelist of all time - it sparkles with creative flair and humour while also saying many deadly serious and profound things about the dire state of our world. I could crap on for ages about how much I love this book, but suffice to say, it is quite possibly the most perfectly realised work of speculative fiction I've read in years.
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  • Scribe Publications
    January 1, 1970
    You never knew fiction could do this.Jane Rawson, author of From the WreckA novel of rare visionary brilliance, Rise & Shine blew me away.Bram Presser, author of The Book of DirtFiercely imaginative and astonishingly written.Robbie Arnott, author of Flames and The Rain HeronIt should be of interest to fans of satire, surrealism and magic realism. Rise & Shine is clearly inspired by texts such as Brave New World, Catch-22 and even Waiting for Godot. It is an able critique of reality TV, media man You never knew fiction could do this.Jane Rawson, author of From the WreckA novel of rare visionary brilliance, Rise & Shine blew me away.Bram Presser, author of The Book of DirtFiercely imaginative and astonishingly written.Robbie Arnott, author of Flames and The Rain HeronIt should be of interest to fans of satire, surrealism and magic realism. Rise & Shine is clearly inspired by texts such as Brave New World, Catch-22 and even Waiting for Godot. It is an able critique of reality TV, media manipulation, personality politics and ecological catastrophe. Books+Publishing Richly imagined and described and close enough to our own world to feel scarily possible. FOUR STARSGood ReadingUnputdownable.ANZ LitLoversAn astonishingly imaginative work of speculative fiction.Elizabeth Flux, Kill Your DarlingsRise & Shine is a piece of timely, suitably intriguing speculative fiction.Ben Adams, Herald Sun[Rise & Shine] could easily be an episode of Charlie Brooker’s Netflix series Black Mirror … Rise & Shine does not shy away from the complex moral terrain of political agency. Carefully, subtly, Allington lets the tension between multiple propositions build: that law and order form a part of collective survival; that service of the people can easily slip into control of the people; that people want a leader; that effective leadership requires multiple perspectives; that people can change; that some people don’t. Allington sustains the tension until the final pages, where he offers a thought-provoking ending worthy of his imaginative take on dystopia.Naama Grey-Smith, Australian Book ReviewPatrick Allington’s Rise & Shine, drops up headfirst into a future in the wake of an ecological catastrophe that claimed the lives of more than eight billion people … The novel strikes a balance between the absurd and the horrific that feels reminiscent of George Saunders’ science-fiction work.Jack Rowland, The Saturday PaperThere is a definite Kafkaesque air to Allington’s writing, as well as echoes of 1984 and Brave New World … The dialogue is one of the great strengths of Rise & Shine: buoyantly paced, drolly comic and easily absorbing … Rise & Shine is apt reading for our current atmosphere of environmental, societal and economic precarity. It is an undeniably imaginative and engrossing fable.Jack Callil, The AgeIn his first novel since the Miles Franklin-nominated Figurehead in 2009, Adelaide writer Patrick Allington again vividly paints a dystopian future that pushes the reader to explore the human condition … This is a Day of the Triffids for our times.Kylie Maslen, The Adelaide Review[T]he novel is certainly effective in highlighting contemporary issues of government surveillance, political manipulation and the pervasive impact of fake news.Colin Steele, The Canberra Times[A] witty piece of thinking from the Adelaide-based author, reminiscent of the thought play found in spec fiction authors such as China Mieville … Rise & Shine is an intriguing addition to a series of recent speculative Australian authors whose work eschews the dominant realism of Australian literature.Ed Wright, The Australian
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  • Cade Turner-Mann
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Scribe for the ARC.This will surely be one of the books of the year. A novel that takes the conventions of dystopian fiction and twists them into something far more interesting than your stock-standard post apocalyptic tale. A fantastic effort that should be on everyone's watch list.
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  • Jennifer (JC-S)
    January 1, 1970
    ‘The end, when everything seemed lost, turned into the beginning.’Two city-states are all that have survived after eight billion people have perished. The world is now so environmentally toxic that there is no longer any food. So how do the survivors, living in the city-states of Rise and Shine survive? By watching televised footage of their perpetual war. Their emotional responses to violence sustain them. Except that, once a survivor becomes desensitised and can no longer respond with appropri ‘The end, when everything seemed lost, turned into the beginning.’Two city-states are all that have survived after eight billion people have perished. The world is now so environmentally toxic that there is no longer any food. So how do the survivors, living in the city-states of Rise and Shine survive? By watching televised footage of their perpetual war. Their emotional responses to violence sustain them. Except that, once a survivor becomes desensitised and can no longer respond with appropriate emotion, they begin to starve to death. The two city-states have annual peace talks:‘PEACE: not this year, maybe next year.’But it is all a charade. In the meantime, a small group is secretly (and illegally) trying to grow food from seeds. They are hoping to establish a non-toxic alternate food source.We do not know what disaster befell the world. Everyone has a theory or two about what happened, but who can you trust? All we know is that the world is almost entirely bereft of animal and plant life, and there is toxic rain. Nothing is simple: if you cannot trust your leaders, who can you trust? Survival becomes a matter of existence from one day to the next.‘Each of them had taken a city and declared a war of survival on the other.’But thirty years later, amidst the carefully orchestrated appearance of a new normality, dependent on a perpetual war between the two cities it is not clear how much longer long the current state can survive. Science is important, as is medicine. But maintaining the status quo is the point, and that hardly facilitates any progress. Is there any hope for the future?Mr Allington packs an entire world into fewer than 250 pages, and it is very unsettling. Why? Because aspects are believable. Look at the damage we are doing to the world, look at the disinformation that surrounds us. Look at our reactions to the current COVID-19 pandemic. What is ‘the common good’? And who can we trust?Unsettling reading. A brilliant novel.Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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  • Mark Booth
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting idea but really didn't keep my interest - I felt the characters were not well developed and were very one dimensional which really distracted from the story.
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Back in 2010 when my blog was still very young, I reviewed Patrick Allington's first book, Figurehead which had been longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award. It remains in my memory as an outstanding novel which tackled some complex moral issues in an entertaining way. (Which is mostly what I like my books to do).Ten years later comes Rise and Shine which—though set in a dystopean world after an apocalypse—again wrestles with complex issues. Amongst other things, it's about leadership, and how i Back in 2010 when my blog was still very young, I reviewed Patrick Allington's first book, Figurehead which had been longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award. It remains in my memory as an outstanding novel which tackled some complex moral issues in an entertaining way. (Which is mostly what I like my books to do).Ten years later comes Rise and Shine which—though set in a dystopean world after an apocalypse—again wrestles with complex issues. Amongst other things, it's about leadership, and how it can lose its way, even when it's motivated by the common good.'Rise' and 'Shine' are two cities on what's left of the earth after the catastrophe which left it bereft of animal and plant life, and subject to toxic rain.No one who survived could really say whether it was a single big catastrophe, or a series of smaller messes, or if it was just the slow grind of excess. Probably it was all of that. Maybe Russia dropped a bomb on San Francisco. Maybe it didn't. Maybe the Nile became poisoned. Maybe it didn't. Maybe the last of the ice caps turned yellow. Maybe they didn't. Maybe Vitamin C turned out to be carcinogenic. Maybe it didn't. Governments of all brands, the UN, the anti-UN, the World Bank, FIFA all spoke loud and long about what needed to happen, but by then no one could tell information from lies.The details hardly matter now. The earth, pushed past its limits, began to eat its own. Most of the eight billion victims died over a period of a few months. Quickly, slowly: these things are relative. Living another day, and another, depended on who you were and where you were. (p.1)Drones and robots have established that there's nothing left in the barren landscape, only these two cities, founded by the charismatic Barton and Walker and their four offsiders, Cleave, Hail, Curtin and Holland. Thirty years after they found each other in extremis, they are still alive, though sick, in the way that everyone is.Cleave lives in self-imposed isolation, and is the Chief Scientist in Rise. With the assistance of Malee, who collects and analyses information for her, Cleave interprets data for toxicity, pathogens and salinity in the precious water supply, and she observes the environment far and wide for any signs of emerging plant or animal life. So science has been elevated to an important and respected position in this society.Curtin is the Chief Medical Officer, tasked with keeping the population alive. But increasingly her time is focussed on the health of Walker, attending to his tumours and sores. Minions help him dress in garb that conceals his wasted frame, because it is important that the figurehead looks the part. But Walker thinks it's more important that she attend to others. This is a society whose leader is focussed on the common good.To read the rest of my review please visit https://anzlitlovers.com/2020/05/31/r...
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  • Iwasaplatypus
    January 1, 1970
    Rise & Shine is a strange book. It is set somewhere in a future where most living things on earth have perished. 8 billion people have died and the remainders are huddled together in the twin cities of Rise and Shine. In a world where sustenance has been blighted, the inhabitants of Rise and of Shine live off human suffering, the feelings that human suffering brings to them. The two cities are at war with one another, orchestrated by the leaders, Walker and Barton. The war is recorded and played Rise & Shine is a strange book. It is set somewhere in a future where most living things on earth have perished. 8 billion people have died and the remainders are huddled together in the twin cities of Rise and Shine. In a world where sustenance has been blighted, the inhabitants of Rise and of Shine live off human suffering, the feelings that human suffering brings to them. The two cities are at war with one another, orchestrated by the leaders, Walker and Barton. The war is recorded and played to the inhabitants of each city, as nourishment. Some of the combatants are stars, such as Sergeant Sala, who has half of her face blown off. Still shots of her injuries sell for a premium. This is only half the story. The people are riddled with tumours and sores, which break through despite the sustenance of suffering. Some people, like Walker, now seem to be immune to human suffering. Their health is failing. Others are defying the edicts and trying to grow vegetables, as blighted as they are. They are venturing into these blighted zones to collect water and seeds. The times are changing. I read Rise & Shine in a state of constant questioning. How could they survive on feelings alone?? What caused the tumours? Why do we humans follow the leader no matter how ludicrous the terms?? And why do we get off on watching others suffer??Rise & Shine was a book that made me think, long past the end of the last page. Thank you to Scribe Publications for the advanced reading copy.
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  • Houna
    January 1, 1970
    I would’ve given it a 5 star rating had I understood what’s the ‘morale’ behind it. All post apocalyptic / sci-fi have some sort of ‘morale’ in the end right? Like a fable ? I liked the authors writing very smooth and easy to read. The book remind me a bit of Fahrenheit 451 but it’s a bit less clear and more ambiguous. I didn’t understand if Walker was a ‘good’ guy or ‘bad’ guy - a bit of both probably. An antihero. Saved the people and gave them a substitute to food by watching war videos of a I would’ve given it a 5 star rating had I understood what’s the ‘morale’ behind it. All post apocalyptic / sci-fi have some sort of ‘morale’ in the end right? Like a fable ? I liked the authors writing very smooth and easy to read. The book remind me a bit of Fahrenheit 451 but it’s a bit less clear and more ambiguous. I didn’t understand if Walker was a ‘good’ guy or ‘bad’ guy - a bit of both probably. An antihero. Saved the people and gave them a substitute to food by watching war videos of a fake war. A war that the two leaders Walker and Barton created. Why? Because they believed they needed enemies to survive. It’s all a farce really Reminds me a bit of the situation of Lebanon now (2020 mid economic crisis) the fake propaganda, people starving and the leaders giving the people footage of themselves defending their parties and vowing to their people that they’re defending their rights - their religions and beliefs. Though Walker was a better man doing what’s best for his people - what he thinks is best for his people and it ended up killing him slowly. The propaganda he knows is fake will never satisfy his hunger.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    I had wanted to enjoy this book more than I did, but in saying that I did enjoy it a lot. I think this is a case of it's not the book, it's me. I don't think I grasped the message of the book or what it was trying to do/say, I think it went over my head and was perhaps just too clever for me. There were a lot of characters, all with odd names and I found them difficult to keep track of and who was who. I didn't connect with any of them for that reason. It was however very well written and kept m I had wanted to enjoy this book more than I did, but in saying that I did enjoy it a lot. I think this is a case of it's not the book, it's me. I don't think I grasped the message of the book or what it was trying to do/say, I think it went over my head and was perhaps just too clever for me. There were a lot of characters, all with odd names and I found them difficult to keep track of and who was who. I didn't connect with any of them for that reason. It was however very well written and kept me interested, started and finished it in a day. I think had I been able to keep track of the characters and found the meaning within the story I would have enjoyed it more. I would recommend this book especially if you enjoy dystopian novels, as I'm sure a more smarter reader than myself would get a lot from it.
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  • Rob O'Hearn
    January 1, 1970
    If I told you this was a post-apocalyptic sci-fi tale of urban rebellion, battle and disease, you might yawn and think it’s all been done. But it hasn’t been done quite like this. Allington’s stylish and surreal novel is both a moral tale of ethics and suffering, and a philosophical study in memory and consciousness. Weaving many influences from cyberpunk to manga, Kafka to the classics, Rise & Shine is visceral and gritty, and immediately enthralling. With its themes of fragile mortality and pa If I told you this was a post-apocalyptic sci-fi tale of urban rebellion, battle and disease, you might yawn and think it’s all been done. But it hasn’t been done quite like this. Allington’s stylish and surreal novel is both a moral tale of ethics and suffering, and a philosophical study in memory and consciousness. Weaving many influences from cyberpunk to manga, Kafka to the classics, Rise & Shine is visceral and gritty, and immediately enthralling. With its themes of fragile mortality and parasitic desire set amongst the debris of post-consumerism, this is a satire for the anthropocene, post-liberalist world. If you’ve been reading Daniel Defoe in your lockdown, this will follow up nicely. Timely and provocative for sure, but not heavily so, leaving your quick read with long afterthoughts
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  • Vivian
    January 1, 1970
    This was a strangely odd but readable book. For the most part a community who literally feeds on compassion, its leaders were practically devoid of it when it came to their personal relationships. Most of the dialogue read like an Abbott and Costello skit which was entertaining but detracted from what could have been a powerful and thought provoking read.
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  • Rachelle Du-Shane
    January 1, 1970
    The sort of book that you finish reading and continue to think about for days, weeks and months to come!! I’m sure I will be re-reading this one in the very near future!!
  • ClaireEva
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 ⭐️
  • Michelle Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Masterful. Shades of Vonnegut through the dialogue. The idea is just wacky enough to work.
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