November Volume I
In this new sequence of three graphic novellas by MATT FRACTION and ELSA CHARRETIER with colors by MATT HOLLINGSWORTH and exquisitely-crafted lettering by cartoonist KURT ANKENY, NOVEMBER follows the lives of three women intersecting in a dark criminal underground. As fire and violence tears through their city on a single day and night, they discover their lives are bound together by a mysterious man that seems to be the cause of it all.One night. One city. Three women. NOVEMBER.

November Volume I Details

TitleNovember Volume I
Author
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534313545
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fiction, Mystery, Crime

November Volume I Review

  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    A very elliptical and noirish comics turn for the usually cleverly humorous Matt Fraction, trying his best to channel Frank Miller, with a dash of pomo Matt Kindt thrown in. Very "spare," and short first (of three) volume focused on three separate stories of women in a nameless urban landscape: Dee, an addict, approached by a guy to do some job involving being a go-between involving electronic transmissions, in exchange for a lot of money; a woman coming home other apartment who finds a gun; and A very elliptical and noirish comics turn for the usually cleverly humorous Matt Fraction, trying his best to channel Frank Miller, with a dash of pomo Matt Kindt thrown in. Very "spare," and short first (of three) volume focused on three separate stories of women in a nameless urban landscape: Dee, an addict, approached by a guy to do some job involving being a go-between involving electronic transmissions, in exchange for a lot of money; a woman coming home other apartment who finds a gun; and Kowalski, an overworked night-shift 911 dispatcher at a busy police precinct. Random violence seems to happen everywhere, unsettling us as it will. Matt Hollingsworth's oddly off-kilter coloring contributes to the unease, as do the sketchy, cramped stylings of Elsa Charretier, with a bit of Darwyn Cooke sixties retro feel to the art. I'm not a huge fan of the cursive lettering, which I had trouble making out in places, but I get the purpose: Intimacy, kind of a journal feel, we are there.The story? No idea what is happening, really, it's all fragments and innuendo so far, those transmissions, the gun, the 911 call, but it's a mystery, first of three volumes, so take a breath, but the three women we expect will connect in ways I hope will be interesting. I like the team so I lean to liking it, but it could go south quickly, or come together beautifully. I'm hopeful.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars"We're all parts of a machine we cannot see. A system. All of us have our function." - the mysterious 'Mister Mann,' page 72I am familiar with writer Matt Fraction from his excellent Hawkeye series earlier in this decade, so when I spotted his November, Vol. 1: Girl on the Roof on my library's new release shelf - and tagged as 'crime/mystery/noir' plus a 'Rated M for Mature' warning (yes!) - so I figured "What the hell . . ."Well, "What the hell?" indeed. Although the story exactly 3.5 stars"We're all parts of a machine we cannot see. A system. All of us have our function." - the mysterious 'Mister Mann,' page 72I am familiar with writer Matt Fraction from his excellent Hawkeye series earlier in this decade, so when I spotted his November, Vol. 1: Girl on the Roof on my library's new release shelf - and tagged as 'crime/mystery/noir' plus a 'Rated M for Mature' warning (yes!) - so I figured "What the hell . . ."Well, "What the hell?" indeed. Although the story exactly doesn't gel in an comprehensible fashion, I'll chalk that up in part to the subsequent volumes arriving in 2020. The plot, set in a nameless but depressed urban landscape in the style of Gotham City, follows three dissimilar women in this order - a crippled, drug-addicted nighthawk named Dee; an unidentified Good Samaritan who stumbles upon a discarded pistol in a foreboding alley by her apartment building; and Kowalski, a diligent but overworked and disrespected night-shift 911 dispatcher at a busy police precinct. Even though it did not all quite make sense just yet the gritty style glosses over the lack of substance. It was also quietly amazing how colorist Matt Hollingsworth was able to stretch a limited palette (largely just copper and blue hues, though red makes an appearance) to provide an appropriately unsettling look.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I was so disappointed in this. I typically love Fraction's writing but this was incomprehensible. Each issue switches to a different character that doesn't fit together until almost the end of the arc. The storytelling is disjointed and confusing. The cover blurb makes note of the groundbreaking lettering. I found this to be some of the worst lettering I've seen in a comic. Cursive in comics is always problematic and this was the case here. I couldn't read half of it. The art was very sketchy, I was so disappointed in this. I typically love Fraction's writing but this was incomprehensible. Each issue switches to a different character that doesn't fit together until almost the end of the arc. The storytelling is disjointed and confusing. The cover blurb makes note of the groundbreaking lettering. I found this to be some of the worst lettering I've seen in a comic. Cursive in comics is always problematic and this was the case here. I couldn't read half of it. The art was very sketchy, often with too many panels. They were too tiny to portray the story. Even the coloring by Matt Hollingsworth felt off, giving everyone blue skin tones. To say I was disappointed in this is an understatement.Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic, exquisitely crafted, expertly told story. Fraction channels his best David Lynch here, with a dash of noir storytelling style of Frank Miller and Ed Brubaker. Elsa Charretier's artwork is perfect, and Matt Hollingsworth's colouring is as much part of the story here as Fraction's script or Charretier's art. Same goes for Kurt Ankeny's brilliant hand-written lettering, which almost tells an entire story of its own. November is the kind of book where the more you pay attention to the Fantastic, exquisitely crafted, expertly told story. Fraction channels his best David Lynch here, with a dash of noir storytelling style of Frank Miller and Ed Brubaker. Elsa Charretier's artwork is perfect, and Matt Hollingsworth's colouring is as much part of the story here as Fraction's script or Charretier's art. Same goes for Kurt Ankeny's brilliant hand-written lettering, which almost tells an entire story of its own. November is the kind of book where the more you pay attention to the details, the more it rewards you. I'll definitely be re-reading the entire thing once volumes 2 and 3 are out. Boy, am I glad Fraction is writing comics again, proving that he's still one of the absolute best writers in the business. This was a masterpiece, and surely one of the best comics of the year.
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    A super pilot for a crime thriller. It's twisty and a bit hard to follow, but I love the art, and I'm totally addicted to finding out what happens next.Note to self: Definitely re-read this volume before reading volume 2, whenever it is published.
  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    My normal problem with Matt Fraction books is that they can be so preoccupied with the smart pitch, the cool ideas and the nice moments that they don't quite work as stories. Whereas with this one, I don't remotely get yet where it's aimed or what it's trying to do, but I'm intrigued. Elsa Charretier draws, and though I know her stuff primarily from odd superhero issues, and Matt Hollingsworth's colours from Anglophone comics, there's something about the work they're doing here (and Kurt My normal problem with Matt Fraction books is that they can be so preoccupied with the smart pitch, the cool ideas and the nice moments that they don't quite work as stories. Whereas with this one, I don't remotely get yet where it's aimed or what it's trying to do, but I'm intrigued. Elsa Charretier draws, and though I know her stuff primarily from odd superhero issues, and Matt Hollingsworth's colours from Anglophone comics, there's something about the work they're doing here (and Kurt Ankeny's freestyle lettering, and the book's in-between length, closer to a BD album than either a US single or trade) that give the whole thing more of a European comics feel. And the story plays into that, following women in enigmatic predicaments not entirely explicable by what we see or what they say. There's a grubby, almost modern city, and sudden outbursts of criminality, and mysterious transmissions, and I'd definitely read a second volume just in the hope of some hint as to why, but also because they do seem so rounded and alive.And yes, being me I'm obviously miffed that the expiry dates on Edelweiss ARCs mean I needed to read November before the end of October.
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  • Frances
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully weird little slices of grim life coming together to build the first part of a story.
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not positive I know what the hell is going on, but I'm here for it. Volume 2, please!
  • AndrĂ© Habet
    January 1, 1970
    ooooph. Usually find something to dig about Fraction's work, but this was needlessly obtuse while simultaneously really shallow. Feels like a remix of Matt Kindt and Ed Brubaker's 'Criminal' series. The art is not of my preferred liking. Its cartoonish styling also detracted for me from the noir tone that it seems to be going for. I flew threw this in less than an hour which is why I didn't abandon it. Do something else with your hour. Have greater wisdom than me, and come back for the next ooooph. Usually find something to dig about Fraction's work, but this was needlessly obtuse while simultaneously really shallow. Feels like a remix of Matt Kindt and Ed Brubaker's 'Criminal' series. The art is not of my preferred liking. Its cartoonish styling also detracted for me from the noir tone that it seems to be going for. I flew threw this in less than an hour which is why I didn't abandon it. Do something else with your hour. Have greater wisdom than me, and come back for the next solid Fraction book.
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  • Brenna Sydel
    January 1, 1970
    This is shaping up to be a really interesting and neat and weird and complicated book. First volume - of course - leaves me with lots of questions and curiosities. I look forward to seeing what else this story holds and what the answers will be! Fraction keeps up the good work we expect of him. Kudos.
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