Once Upon an Eid
Once Upon an Eid is a collection of short stories that showcases the most brilliant Muslim voices writing today, all about the most joyful holiday of the year: Eid! Eid: The short, single-syllable word conjures up a variety of feelings and memories for Muslims. Maybe it’s waking up to the sound of frying samosas or the comfort of bean pie, maybe it’s the pleasure of putting on a new outfit for Eid prayers, or maybe it’s the gift-giving and holiday parties to come that day. Whatever it may be, for those who cherish this day of celebration, the emotional responses may be summed up in another short and sweet word: joy. The anthology will also include a poem, graphic-novel chapter, and spot illustrations.The full list of Once Upon an Eid contributors include: G. Willow Wilson (Alif the Unseen, Ms. Marvel), Hena Khan (Amina's Voice, Under My Hijab), N. H. Senzai (Shooting Kabul, Escape from Aleppo), Hanna Alkaf (The Weight of Our Sky), Rukhsana Khan (Big Red Lollipop), Randa Abdel-Fattah (Does My Head Look Big in This?), Ashley Franklin (Not Quite Snow White), Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow (Mommy's Khimar), Candice Montgomery (Home and Away, By Any Means Necessary), Huda Al-Marashi (First Comes Marriage), Ayesha Mattu, Asmaa Hussein, and Sara Alfageeh.

Once Upon an Eid Details

TitleOnce Upon an Eid
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 5th, 2020
PublisherAmulet Books
ISBN-139781419740831
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Short Stories, Contemporary, Anthologies, Religion

Once Upon an Eid Review

  • may ❀
    January 1, 1970
    full reviews finally postedyou guyssss!! i cannot recommend this anthology enough!!! especially for my muslim friends, if you're able to, ABSOLUTELY read this during the end of ramadan/during the days of eid because it gave me the most wonderful, warm, happy, celebratory feelingsa few things i want to mention before diving into mini reviews for each story, these books are targeted towards a younger audience. they have more straight forward writing, morals, and lesson. to me, most of the stories full reviews finally postedyou guyssss!! i cannot recommend this anthology enough!!! especially for my muslim friends, if you're able to, ABSOLUTELY read this during the end of ramadan/during the days of eid because it gave me the most wonderful, warm, happy, celebratory feelingsa few things i want to mention before diving into mini reviews for each story, these books are targeted towards a younger audience. they have more straight forward writing, morals, and lesson. to me, most of the stories felt to be at a middle grade level but that didn't hinder my enjoyment ONE BITthese stories are compelling and personal and so special individually and all together another thing, there is a page of illustrations introducing each story and i just LOVED that so much. in the ARC copy they weren't the final sketches (and most of them weren't finished) but from the ones i did see, they were absolutely beautiful and detailed and so creative i'm basically in loveokay ONTO THE MINI REVIEWS NOW👨‍👩‍👧 "Perfect" by Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow 👨‍👩‍👧- this was so cute- it really showed the fun mess that is the family the night before eid- the excitement of picking out fancy, festive clothes, laying them out, fighting with cousins etc. etc.- there were a lot of references to Mandinka culture and i myself learned a lot, so that was really informative- overall, very sweet with a great message though I do wish it could have been longer.4 stars🍫 "Yusuf and the Great Big Brownie Mistake" by Aisha Saeed 🍫- This was a cute story about a boy who is trying to make the famous eid brownies for his family.......when something goes terribly wrong- I liked the little brother and big sister dynamic the characters had, I’m always a sucker for siblings in books- a sweet ending (ha, you see what i did there) but definitely felt too short3 stars 🚲 "Kareem Means ‘ Generous’" by Asmaa Hussein 🚲- THIS WAS SO SWEET- I absolutely LOVED the message of this story and how the conflict and resolution came about in a realistic way- The way Kareem had to make the decision for himself and see the benefit of sharing and being generous with others- it was really so sweet and moral without being too preachy about 'doing the right thing.' I would absolutely recommend as a story to read to younger kids4.5 stars🍩 "Don’ut Break Tradition" by S. K. Ali 🍩- oh yeahhhh, love me some pain mixed with hope and happiness- this literally tore up my heart!!!- wow I really loved this one and the emotional journey it put me through- The progression from sadness to happiness is something you, the reader, get to actually feel through the words, atmosphere, and the aura of the characters- I loved getting to be a part of this sweet family eid tradition 🥺🥺5 stars 🧕 "Just Like Chest Armor " by Candice Montgomery 🧕- this is a story about an 11-year old Caribbean girl who is TOO EXCITED to finally be old enough to wear the hijab- it’s such a sweet, sweet story that shows the happiness and excitement she feels to finally be moving through this rite of passage, a time that’s so monumental in her life, her parents hesitance to how the rest of her world will react to this change, and Leila finding her place and identity despite what everyone else thinks- I think it’s such a deep, profound exploration (and much more realistic experience than most people would think) that many young girls go through- and it shows some really tender, beautiful family moments4 stars 🎁 "Gifts " by Rukhsana Khan 🎁- I swear this story took me back to when I was a kid omg the flashbackssss - It was nice to see the journey idrees experienced throughout the story- For him to see the magnitude of Ramadan and the practical application of the patience required of him (in more aspects than one)- was very wholesome, we loved it4.5 stars🍗 "The Feast of Sacrifice" by Hena Khan 🍗- This was okay to me- I felt like it could have expanded more on the characters growth. The characters and the lesson they learned felt kind of straight forward and one dimensional to me- it was nice but i didn't feel like it stuck out from the other stories3 stars🌙 "Seraj Captures the Moon" by G. Willow Wilson & Sara Alfageeh 🌙- THIS WAS SO COOL- I loved the change in format, the drawings were adorable and the story was the adventurous plot we needed to break up to monotony of the stories- I hope we get a longer story in the final bc I wanted to spend so much more time with Seraj and pickles4 stars 🌃 "Searching for Blue" by N. H. Senzai 🌃- The writing for this story was absolutely enchanting- So far the best written from all the stories, it was detailed and emotional without being heavy handed- I felt this one was directed for an older audience that the others (I’d say this feels more YA, while the others feel more middle grade)- I appreciate the attention to detail and the build of the story, it definitely made me more attached to the characters and the little world we got to experience- A sweet message as always and had an incredibly warm feeling of eid and celebration and a strong sense of community4.5 stars🧵 "Creative Fixes" by Ashley Franklin 🧵- One thing I love about this anthology is the experiences from so many different cultures and identities - Showing how the main character, a convert, celebrates her first eid and how her experience is so different from the other makes it so much more inclusive to different and unique muslim experiences- It felt really special and i liked the journey we got to see witness 3.5 stars 🍲 "Taste" by Hanna Alkaf 🍲- THIS RUINED ME!!!!!!!!!!!- I’m sitting here like an absolute sobbing mess - The writing, the prose, the storytelling, the emotion, it all built it to make me feel it all and feel for these small children who are trying to recreate a special eid meal during a tragic accident- I LOVE IT SO MUCH im still in pain over this5 stars, my absolute favourite from the anthology 🖼️ "Eid Pictures" by Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow 🖼️- This was beautiful- The parallels and imagery and writing it presented was so powerful- The black muslim community often doesn't get heard as much as the other communities and in reality, they have so much history and power and culture to celebrate and share- I just loved how short but poetic and impactful this poem was- Really hit me in the feels4.5 stars🎈 "Not Only an Only" by Huda Al-Marashi 🎈- I really like the friendship and feeling of community in this story- Eid can be extremely sad and depressing if you don’t have people and family and community to celebrate your happiness with- Showing that perspective was really eyeopening- Also love me some of that arab rep3.5 stars 🎇 "Maya Madinah Choose Joy" by Ayesha Mattu 🎇- this short story revolves around a little girl having to come to terms with her parents separation, especially during the holidays- she is very used to have Eid celebrations done a certain way and mentions the special ways they used to celebrate - the way her aunt handled the situation was so well done. It showed the whole cycle of acceptance and making her feel that her emotions were valid but also that change happens to everyone - I loved how they brought parallels from the Prophet’s (peace be upon him) life and were able to make those personal connections 🥺🥺🥺 that’s such a beautiful thing to teach kids- we love to see it4.5 stars🚘 "Eid and Pink Bubble Gum, Insha’ Allah" by Randa Abdel-Fattah 🚘- this was SO CUTE SO WHOLESOME SO SWEET SO FUNNY- I might be partial to big, noisy families, especially when they are stuck together during long road trips and make it their sole purpose to annoy the hell out of each other- the relatable content I signed up for- this story made me feel so soft, idk I wish it was longer because I loved the dynamic the siblings had between each other and the happiness and kindness they shared - it was also way funnier than I expected. Randa has a way of making me feel connected to her characters instantly and maybe it’s partially bc I saw myself in the main character but it just made me so incredibly nostalgic over the long, tiring road trips I shared with my noisy family as a kid5 starsAND THERE WE HAVE IT FRIENDS, i truly deeply loved reading this anthology and i might just have to pick up the final copy and give it a reread in the coming monthsi hope i've convinced you to pick it up bc you definitely need some wholesome goodness in your life~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~this was one of my MOST anticipated books for the year and i JUST got approved for an arc copy 😭😭😭 Thank you SO MUCH to Netgalley & the publishers, i can't wait to read it as soon as i stop crying :")
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  • ✨ A ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Rtc___it's been years since I've read a middle grade. But since it's a week till Eid (!!!) I think this will be a perfect read to get me into the celebratory feels!!Y'all this better have the Muslim rep I need. I cant handle another book misrepresenting us
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  • Ahmed Ejaz
    January 1, 1970
    I used to wonder how Eid feels like in other countries. This anthology is perfect to read if you are wondering the same. It has all the wonderful stories about Eid and all of them end on a happy note of joy and celebration.⁣ .⁣ .⁣The best thing I found about this anthology is that not all Muslim characters were portrayed so unrealistically good or perfect. They had flaws which they realized in the stories. And I feel them close to the reality too.⁣.⁣.⁣All of the authors in this anthology were ne I used to wonder how Eid feels like in other countries. This anthology is perfect to read if you are wondering the same. It has all the wonderful stories about Eid and all of them end on a happy note of joy and celebration.⁣ .⁣ .⁣The best thing I found about this anthology is that not all Muslim characters were portrayed so unrealistically good or perfect. They had flaws which they realized in the stories. And I feel them close to the reality too.⁣.⁣.⁣All of the authors in this anthology were new to me. I’m pretty glad to have found them.⁣.⁣All of the stories are good but few really deserve to be mentioned and I gave them 5 stars:⁣3. Kareem Means “Generous” by Asmaa Hussein ⁣4. Don’ut Break Tradition by S.K Ali ⁣9. Searching For Blue by N. H. Senzai [𝘈𝘣𝘴𝘰𝘭𝘶𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘧𝘢𝘷]⁣10. Creative Fixes by Ashley Franklin ⁣14. Maya Madinah Chooses Joy by Ayesha Mattu⁣.I hope from below quotes, you’ll be tempted to read the anthology. ^_^⁣..This was a buddy read with Rida Imran and Saba. It was fun! ✌ Thanks for inviting, Rida!✨⁣..⁣Do check out Rida's review. She has done better than me: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...𝐅𝐚𝐯 𝐐𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐬:⁣“The things you give away make you happier than the things you keep for yourself.” – Kareem Means “Generous”⁣.⁣“Anytime you share something you love, it comes right back to you like a boomerang. You never lose it. Just wait and see.” -- Kareem Means “Generous”⁣.⁣“Special days start when you run toward them.” -- Don’ut Break Tradition⁣.⁣“It’s never about the gift. It’s about the love behind it.”—Gifts⁣.⁣“Always look beyond what your eyes initially recognize and find out what is real, what is possible, and what is the truth.”—Searching for Blue⁣.⁣“It’s hard to see the beauty in things when you can’t see past your insecurities.” – Creative Fixes⁣.⁣“Sometimes things just happen, and we have to accept them and move on. Even when it’s hard. Especially when it’s hard.” – Taste⁣.⁣“Sometimes, before we can welcome joy in again, we need to acknowledge the sadness in our hearts”— Maya Madinah Chooses Joy
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  • Lala BooksandLala
    January 1, 1970
    Flawless
  • Saajid Hosein
    January 1, 1970
    *ARC review.Masha'Allah, this was was the cutest and purest thing I've read. I love the diversity of cultures, backgrounds, experinces that were represented in here. I especially love that their was a story about a Shia Mulsim girl. This is the kind of story that Muslim kids deserve in 2020 and I'm so happy it exists. I'll do a fuller review a bit later, but for now, please pre-order this book.
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  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 1, 1970
    WE DID IT FOLKS! I finally found an anthology I love from start to finish 😭I read this in one day on Eid and that was the most perfect thing I could have done. Every single story is so different but ultimately they all surround Eid, and the spirit and vibe of Eid is so present in each one of them no matter what type of story it is or the themes it explored. Each story surrounds a specific theme that pertains to the celebration (joy, gratefulness, community, hope, generosity, etc...) and I really WE DID IT FOLKS! I finally found an anthology I love from start to finish 😭I read this in one day on Eid and that was the most perfect thing I could have done. Every single story is so different but ultimately they all surround Eid, and the spirit and vibe of Eid is so present in each one of them no matter what type of story it is or the themes it explored. Each story surrounds a specific theme that pertains to the celebration (joy, gratefulness, community, hope, generosity, etc...) and I really loved that about them. I also loved the fact that the scope of stories and communities it explores is very wide, because eventhough we're all Muslim, our experiences can be very different. There are stories about Asian, Black, Middle Eastern Muslims, Sunni and Shia Muslim and not only that, but not all the stories are happy. Some are sad and hard but ultimately every single one of them ended with a hopeful note and left and smile on my face.I just loved how this anthology showed how differently we all celebrate and experience Eid, and it's not a happy time for everyone because of what they might be going through at the time. This was just. SO. GOOD.My favorite stories were by S.K. Ali about a little girl whose mom is sick but she's trying her best to keep the family Eid traditions and joy alive, Candice Mongomery which is about a girl who loved the Hijab and is set on starting to wear it on Eid and lastly N.H. Senzai's which is about a Syrian refugee in Greece celebrating in whatever means he can with his refugee community. But they were all so so good.
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  • Tucker (TuckerTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Abrams Books for Young Readers for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewPerfect by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow - ★★★★☆Yusuf and the Great Big Brownie Mistake by Aisha Saeed - ★★★★☆Kareem Means "Generous" by Asmaa Hussein - ★★★☆☆Don'ut Break Tradition by S.K. Ali - ★★★★☆Just Like Chest Armor by Candice Montgomery - ★★★★.5 Gifts by Rukhsana Khan - ★★.5☆☆The Feast of Sacrifice by Hena Khan - ★★★☆☆Seraj Captures the Moon by G. Willow Wilson & Sara Alfageeh - ★★★★☆Searching Many thanks to Abrams Books for Young Readers for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewPerfect by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow - ★★★★☆Yusuf and the Great Big Brownie Mistake by Aisha Saeed - ★★★★☆Kareem Means "Generous" by Asmaa Hussein - ★★★☆☆Don'ut Break Tradition by S.K. Ali - ★★★★☆Just Like Chest Armor by Candice Montgomery - ★★★★.5 Gifts by Rukhsana Khan - ★★.5☆☆The Feast of Sacrifice by Hena Khan - ★★★☆☆Seraj Captures the Moon by G. Willow Wilson & Sara Alfageeh - ★★★★☆Searching for Blue by N.H. Senzai - ★★★★☆Creative Fixes by Ashley Franklin - ★★★☆☆Taste by Hanna Alfak - ★★☆☆☆Eid Pictures - Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow - ★★☆☆☆Not Only an Only by Huda Al-Marashi - ★★★.5☆Maya Madinah Chooses Joy by Ayesha Mattu - ★★★★☆Eid and Pink Bubble Gum, Insha' Allah by Randa Abdel-Fattah - ★★★★.5This was so much fun to read. Filled with pure joy and yummy food, this book will definitely be enjoyed by many readers old an young.------------i'm not too familiar with Muslim culture so i am very grateful to Abrams Books for sending me this so i can learn more!| Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | Reddit | LinkedIn | YouTube |
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  • Zainab
    January 1, 1970
    I need it and I need it NOW.
  • Umairah | Sereadipity
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars Once Upon an Eid was a heart warming and uplifting anthology all about the indescribable joy of Eid and its power to bring people together. It was full of wholesome, own-voices Muslim representation and it's a brilliant read for Muslims and non-Muslims alike. As a Muslim, I felt like a saw a small piece of myself in every story and I think many others will feel the same. I loved how Muslims with so many different cultures and Eid traditions were represented. Reading this anthology duri 4.5 stars Once Upon an Eid was a heart warming and uplifting anthology all about the indescribable joy of Eid and its power to bring people together. It was full of wholesome, own-voices Muslim representation and it's a brilliant read for Muslims and non-Muslims alike. As a Muslim, I felt like a saw a small piece of myself in every story and I think many others will feel the same. I loved how Muslims with so many different cultures and Eid traditions were represented. Reading this anthology during Ramadan made the experience even better, filling me up with fuzzy, warm joy!(1) Perfect by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow, 4 stars: A twelve-year-old Black American hijabinista named Hawa was nervous about spending Eid-ul-Fitr with her father's side of the family from Guinea in New York. Despite what her father thought, she didn't feel like the 'perfect Mandinka girl' at all. It was about accepting all the different parts of herself and becoming closer to family. I could really sympathise with how awkward it can be to navigate language barriers and meet unfamiliar extended family.(2) Yusuf and the Great Big Brownie Mistake by Aisha Saeed, 4 stars: Yusuf was distraught when his favourite Eid tradition of making brownies went wrong and his sister decided she had grown out of it. This one was about the importance of tradition, but also how it can change. About how doing things with family can make them better.(3) Kareem Means Generous by Asmaa Hussein, 4.5 stars: Generosity is a core value that Islam teaches and, as the title suggests, this story was about a boy called Kareem learning about the importance of generosity and kindness by helping out a friend. He realised that not every one was as lucky as him and giving brought him more happiness than keeping everything to himself. "Anytime you share something you love, it comes right back to you like a boomerang. You never lose it." (4) Don'ut Break Tradition by S. K. Ali, 4.5 stars: For Nadia, this Eid didn't feel special because her mum was ill. This story was all about how Nadia was determined to make Eid special for her mother and the rest of her family. It was about the power of tradition and the magnitude small gestures can have. I loved how every member of the family was represented by a donut and the hopeful message the story had which really resonated with me.(5) Just Like Chest Armor by Candice Montgomery, 4 stars: Eleven-year-old Leila decided that she was ready to wear hijab, however, her parents weren't so sure. She took her time with it learning how to wear it and feel comfortable with it before wearing it outside. She decided that she didn't mind how other people reacted to her hijab because it was how she wanted to express her faith and it felt right for her. I liked how this story went against the idea that some people have that Muslims are 'forced' to wear hijab and it instead showed the pride, strength and connection that wearing hijab can bring. I also loved this story's emphasis on colour.(6) Gifts by Rukhsana Khan, 4 stars: Idrees was excited for Eid because he was excited to receive his gifts. He gradually realised though that the real gifts in his life were the non material aspects like love, memories and worship. "It's not the gift. It's the love behind it" (7) The Feast of Sacrifice by Hena Khan, 4 stars: This one was set around Eid-ul-Adha. Humza and his siblings had to stay with their grandparents whilst their parents embarked on the Hajj pilgrimage. As the eldest sibling, Humza was struggling having to be more responsible for his siblings and didn't like his grandparents' less exciting way of celebrating Eid. This story was about making sacrifices, about not being selfish and being able to give for someone else to receive. It was also about the importance of community in Islam, especially around Eid.(8) Seraj Captures the Moon by G. Willow Wilson and Sara Alfageeh, 4 stars: This was a really cute graphic short story where a boy called Seraj goes looking for the Eid moon in a hot air balloon. It was also about the importance of sometimes blocking out all the noise and distractions to focus on faith and sharing joy.(9) Searching for Blue by N. H. Senzai, 5 stars: This story was about celebrating Eid at a refugee camp in Greece. Bassem felt like their prayers were going unanswered and they had been forgotten. However, with everyone banding together they all managed to pull together a joyful, hopeful Eid for everyone despite their circumstances. It was really thought provoking and presented the many hardships and sorrows that refugees face and the writing was beautiful.(10) Creative Fixes by Ashley Franklin, 4.5 stars: Makayla's family had converted to Islam and all the changes to their lives were a lot for her to take in. It was about her finding the self confidence to be proud of herself and enjoy her first Eid. "It's hard to see the beauty in things when you can't see past your insecurities" (11) Taste by Hana Alkaf, 5 stars: Alia's mother had been in a car accident and was in hospital, she was so upset and ridden with guilt that all her food lost its taste. But that wouldn't stop her from cooking the lontong they had every Eid. It was about opening up to family and the power of food to bring people together. The writing was so compelling, I loved it!(12) Eid Pictures by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow, 4 stars: This was a moving poem about how Eid celebrations have changed over time and how the first Black Muslims in America must have celebrated their first Eids there.(13) Not Only an Only by Huda Al-Marashi, 4 stars: This story focused on a girl called Aya who was the only Muslim in her school which she didn't mind until an uncomfortable lesson about Sunni and Shia Muslims. The main message of the story was Sunni or Shia, we're all Muslims- one community- and that it what matters most.(14) Maya Madinah Chooses Joy by Ayesha Mattu, 4 stars: Maya Madinah didn't know how to enjoy Eid after her parents had divorced. She hated everyone else's joy and wanted to run away. This was a story about embracing change and focusing on creating love and joy around yourself.(15) Eid and Pink Bubble Gum, Insha'Allah by Randa Abdel-Fattah, 4 stars: Deyana, her three younger siblings and her parents were embarking on their annual Eid-ul-Fitr road trip to visit her grandparents who lived near Sydney. She missed the peace she had when she was an only child and found her brothers and sister frustrating beyond belief. This story was about how love between family can overcome anger and the importance of patience and responsibility. It was really cute and funny.All the short stories in the anthology were sweet and simple with a young main character and a moral or lesson to learn. I thought this was a good thing making the book accessible to a vast audience and a wide range of ages. I loved how all the stories focused on the core values of Islam and the true spirit of Eid: faith, family, community, kindness, generosity, responsibility and joy. Thank you to Amulet Books for providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Rida Imran
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a 23 year old Muslim. When I was growing up there were no mainstream books with Muslim characters except for maybe The Kite Runner but that was a refugee story. I'm not saying that's not important; it was and I love that book. But the Muslims you see regularly like us did not have characters experiences to relate too. And it's not just us Muslims; it's most of us POC and non christians. Growing up our children's books were filled with white characters. All illustrations were white. Books mov I'm a 23 year old Muslim. When I was growing up there were no mainstream books with Muslim characters except for maybe The Kite Runner but that was a refugee story. I'm not saying that's not important; it was and I love that book. But the Muslims you see regularly like us did not have characters experiences to relate too. And it's not just us Muslims; it's most of us POC and non christians. Growing up our children's books were filled with white characters. All illustrations were white. Books movies everything is about Christmas; we don't see other cultures or religions and it's not fair. Colouring in school we were told to use peaches and pinks for the skin no matter what colour was our skin. Reflecting on it I thought maybe it had something to do with the fact that my early school years were in a white majority place ( does not excuse it though there were a lot of black, brown kids in my class and a few east Asians and none of us were peach). But my sister is now 6 and we live where in a place where all of us are brown; and one day when we're sitting colouring she tells me that her teacher told her to colour face as peach. I was so annoyed and then I told her I don't know anyone that's peach. We then looked at pictures of people and illustrations over the internet and ended up using brown shades of brown with light browns and dark browns and all beautiful. I'm so glad my sister has a few books which have characters of colour illustrations and even one with a visibly Muslim - hijabi in them. Because let's be honest I'm so done with peach. So you can tell how excited I must've been when I saw on social media S. K Ali and Aisha Saeed announce that their bringing an anthology of Eid related short stories in collaboration with other amazing writers. I buddy read during Eid (perfect time) this with amazing GR friends Ahmed Ejaz and Sabat.This heart warming Muslim collection is filled with diverse stories representing different Muslim cultures; and a convert story; and being from a divorced family; and a refugee story and even being a minority within Muslims. Because there is no one typical Muslim Eid story it's different for all us but at the heart it's about the same thing coming together of a community. I wish these stories had been around when I younger but I'm happy they finally are. 1. Perfect by Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow: ✰✰✰ Overall fun story about African culture. Favourite scene was when Fanta's mom orders her through her eyes. Like that was so relatable whenever we're in public or out moms are scolding us and ordering us through their eyes 😂Also the characters feeling embarrassed for not being in touch with their culture or to western world felt very real. The fights and etc made them feel like children which they were.I love how through reading we explore other cultures. It's such a beautiful welcoming feeling! 2. Yusuf and The Great Big Brownie Mistake by Aisha Saeed: ✰✰✰ Cute story reminded me of our own Eid traditions. But I really think it could've been shorter and been a children's picture book instead. I know Aisha Saeed has one Bilal makes Daal I think I'd like to read them to my younger sister if I ever find them. Most pictute books just have white people 😂This was also the first time I read anything by Aisha Saeed; her books have been on my tbr for so long. 3. Kareem Means “Generous” by Asmaa Hussein: ✰✰✰✰✰ the things you give away make you happier than the things you keep for yourself.Loved it.I think what most non Muslims don't realise is how big of a part generosity and kindness plays in our religion (i think most religions).I loved how realistic this story was. Children don't always want to share and care since birth but you can teach them.This is especially a great message during these times when so many people are out of work. If one can help out by donating do as much as one can. 4. Don’ut Break Tradition by S.K Ali: ✰✰✰✰✰ what makes a special day special?This story was so beautifully written. It was simultaneously heart aching and heart warming. And i simultaneously hated and loved the mysterious vibes like they were coop but I thought her brother had died then thought their father had left them. My brain needs to stop jumping to conclusions that fast man.It was also relatable. Eid used to be so special when we lived in a joint family; I used to be young and us kids would have so much fun. Then we moved to a different country with them and for one year it wasn't so cool. Then our grandparents moved here too and bought some special element with. And now they've passed away too. I don't have much family that lives here. So we pretty much just have a normal day but dress up for a few hours.But I loved how children make Eid special. My sister is just 6 but since she was born we try to put in a little Eid effort take pictures etc.Nadia was obviously older. But children overall are such a ray of sunshine.I loved the idea of a whole community coming together too.And also that scene where she's worried that her dad might not be able to afford the Eidi he gave; it's so emotional. 5. Just Like Chest Armor by Candice Montgomery : ✰✰✰✰ Personally I think it's pretty accurate depiction of choosing to wear a Hijab in this world (but I do not wear one so I'm not the best judge). Being warned about how others would make you feel doesn't make it better when it does happen.But I honestly how normal this thing is. Racism sucks and also kills #BlackLivesMatter it starts with subtle things like this being mean to muslims and black kids and one day you're a cop killing innocent black people. I cannot imagine what it feels like to be black in America; it's hell and no black parents should have to give their children the talk about this.. And can you believe how many atrocities the police must've committed that were not caught on camera. And these officers were just fired..that is not justice. George Flyod; Ahmed Aubrey were killed cause of white supremacy. #ICannotBreathe. 6. Gifts by Rukhsana Khan: ✰✰ Not sure why but mostly I found this one a bit boring. Don't get me wrong it's a nice story about learning and growing to like Ramadan. Nothing wrong with it though just we didn't vibe i guess. I did however like how it doesn't say fasting is to learn how poor people feel; it's to learn self restraint.7. The Feast of Sacrifice by Hena Khan: ✰✰✰ I sit down on a bench and look around at the crowd, watching the mix of people, old and young, rich and not, speaking different languages and wearing their nicest clothes. There’s a blend of colorful African prints, sparkling saris, leather kufis, and embroidered shalwar kameezes like mine. Everyone has happiness on their faces and is here for the same reason—to gather and feast and worship. It occurs to me that this is probably similar to what Mama described Hajj to be like, on a smaller scale. I hope I can make the pilgrimage one day too. The beautiful diverse Islamic community coming together 🧡 I too hope that we can make the pilgrimage one day. This one is different; while most of the stories are about Eid ul Fitr (the one after Ramadan) this one is about the one I think is lesser known Eid ul Adha and Hajj. The sibling fights are so realistic. The growing relation with their grandparents is so pure. Really liked this one. 8. Seraj Captures the Moon by G. Willow Wilson and Sara Alfageeh: ✰✰✰✰✰ I don't if she illustrated the whole book or just this story but this story and this whole book in fact as beautiful pictures. Loved this cute short adventurous graphic story. This reminds me of how confused we were about the moon this year so many people had finished their taraveeh prayers..I was 6/20 done when I learnt that it's Eid and I don't have to pray. Loved the donkey. I know Sven from Frozen isn't a donkey but that Kristoff's Sven's voice was this donkey's voice in my head. I'm gonna read this one to my little sister! 9. Searching for Blue by N. H. Senzai: ✰✰✰✰✰ “always look beyond what your eyes initially recognize and find out what is real, what is possible, and what is the truth.” Sometimes when I read or watch something absolutely beautiful I am at a loss of words. One of my favourite books of all time is Long Way Down my review from what I remember is just "this was Absolutely Beautiful". And this is what happened here I don't know what to say. While all the other stories are of Alhumdulilah (Thanks to God) about privileged families which some of us can relate to. But that's not what Eid is for everyone or any other celebratory occasion such as Christmas. This is the story of refugees. During these quarantine days I saw many people posting about now do we realise how it feels to be locked down in Yemen/Syria/Palestine/Kashmir but no we don't know; we can't know. We are safe in our homes not afraid that a bomb might blast us away any moment it is nothing alike. Everyone should read this story.By the way if anyone ever asks what Ramadan is: holy month of Ramadan, when you abstained, from dawn to dusk, not only from food and drink but also from negative thoughts and actions. It was a time of reflection, personal improvement, and increased devotion to God. It was also a month of charity I think all 3 of us found this story to be our favourite. 10. Creative Fixes by Ashley Franklin: ✰✰✰✰ How are all these stories so beautiful. This one is about a convert family who aren't so well financially. It's about family. And how friendships can be when you feel insecure about yourself financially. Her mom's character was so beautiful 💙 “It’s hard to see the beauty in things when you can’t see past your insecurities.” 11. Taste by Hanna Alkaf: ✰✰ This was a story in verse about a girl whose mom is in the hospital. It was heartbreaking but for some reason I didn't connect to it.12. Eid Pictures by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow: ✰✰✰✰ This was also in verse. This was beautiful.13. Not Only an Only by Huda Al-Marashi: ✰✰✰✰ Okay so Iraqi biryani is different from ours. I wonder how it is. On a serious note though; this was beautiful. Our main character is Shia in this one which is a minority Muslim sect; shia communities such as the Hazaras have often faced oppression (have you read the acclaimed The Kite Runner). This was a heartwarming story of coming together, looking at our similarities instead of differences and of new friendships. 14. Maya Madinah Chooses Joy by Ayesha Mattu: ✰✰✰✰✰ Joy and sorrow follow each other endlessly like moon phases, Maya Madinah. There are times of shining fullness and times of emptying out. Sometimes, before we can welcome joy in again, we need to acknowledge the sadness in our hearts Oh this was just wonderful and heartwarming (seems like I'm saying that about all of them). Maya Madinah is torn because her parents have divorced and she wants to run away. She goes to her Aunt's. This has that magical childhood feeling when you just can't wait to grow up cause you think then everything will be according to your rules. Her aunt is such a beautiful character; paying attention to everything she is saying treating her like an actual person; instead of dismissing what a child is saying..because that is what so many do and not give children's thoughts the release they need. I also loved how her aunt used a religious story to teach her to choose joy; I've never heard of it in such a personal context. And of course this: “Families can look a lot of different ways, Maya Madinah. And each of them is beautiful. We each have a biological family, the one we’re born into. You have your parents and relatives. And we each have a chosen family, which might include people we are related to and those we aren’t. Such a beautiful way to put it. Also how calm we call kids of divorced parents as kids from broken homes. We should probably stop with that and teach these kids like this lit Aunt here and we need more empathetic language. 15. Eid and Pink Bubble Gum, Insha’Allah by Randa Abdel-Fattah: ✰✰✰✰ This anthology ends on a great note. This story was about a family's road trip a day before Eid. It was fun! Also I was a lot like Noor!Overall: ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ Highly recommended to both Muslim and Non Muslim Readers!And a big thank you to everyone involved in putting this book out.Also the illustrations before each story were incredible!___________Aah what heartwarming stories. I'm so glad such a book exists now. Though I really do wish such stories had been around when I was younger too...because I barely ever got to see Muslim characters in such glory. Thank you so much for putting this out in the world. Full RTC____________Happy Book Birthday to this collection!Hey guys! Planning to read this over Eid. Would be cool if this could be a buddy/ group readComment to let me know if your interested!if you're interested this is the link to the group we'd be doing this:https://www.goodreads.com/group/invit...
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  • S.K. Ali
    January 1, 1970
    You know that delish feeling of being wrapped in the warmth of a story filled with characters confident and true? How it feels like the whole world is content but it's not out there being content, it's actually in your heart being content? Contained and cozy?That's a readerly-feeling I got to experience often as a kid -- in books like All-of-a-Kind-Family and Beverly Cleary's works. And Judy Blume's Fudge-escapades!And now, we present you the same cozies, in settings familiar to those who've exp You know that delish feeling of being wrapped in the warmth of a story filled with characters confident and true? How it feels like the whole world is content but it's not out there being content, it's actually in your heart being content? Contained and cozy?That's a readerly-feeling I got to experience often as a kid -- in books like All-of-a-Kind-Family and Beverly Cleary's works. And Judy Blume's Fudge-escapades!And now, we present you the same cozies, in settings familiar to those who've experienced Eid before, and brand new but totally inviting to those who haven't.All are welcomed to these stories featuring characters at ease in their skins, with confidence in their hearts, discovering how fun it is to grow those hearts even bigger as they encounter challenges and adventures on a very special day in their lives. Step into Once Upon an Eid to celebrate with them, with us, and grow the world a little more happy! <333
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  • Maha
    January 1, 1970
    i received an ARC of this book from the publisher through netgalley in exchange of an honest review. this does not affect my thoughts in any way. Once Upon an Eid is a celebration of the joy and magic that is Eid. throughout multiple short stories, we discover Eid through multiple cultures and families. and it was. so. cute. i even felt tears in the corners of my eyes multiple times.each contributor in this anthology brings something new and special. i felt more love growing inside me after e i received an ARC of this book from the publisher through netgalley in exchange of an honest review. this does not affect my thoughts in any way. Once Upon an Eid is a celebration of the joy and magic that is Eid. throughout multiple short stories, we discover Eid through multiple cultures and families. and it was. so. cute. i even felt tears in the corners of my eyes multiple times.each contributor in this anthology brings something new and special. i felt more love growing inside me after every story, which were all unique in their own way, with a little lesson for the characters and for the people reading them. it reminded me of the purpose of celebrating Eid, the whole happiness surrounding it, and how it all feels.because this book sets the mood for Eid. with descriptions of food and family gatherings and traditions and more. it even made me a little sad that i probably won’t be participating in that this year.in conclusion, Once Upon an Eid is an anthology that garantees happiness, a lot of new information for muslim and non-muslims, and maybe a few tears. but you will have a great time reading it.
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  • Sian
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received via netgalley.Once upon an Eid is an anthology of stories about Muslim holidays that are filled with joy, happiness, diversity and love. It's edited by one of my favourite authors S.K.Ali and Aisha Saeed, with contributions from 13 other authors.This was really, really cute. This won't be the longest review because this is written as a children's book and really isn't very complicated.... but there's no denying that many of these stories were absolutely adorable. These stories were ARC received via netgalley.Once upon an Eid is an anthology of stories about Muslim holidays that are filled with joy, happiness, diversity and love. It's edited by one of my favourite authors S.K.Ali and Aisha Saeed, with contributions from 13 other authors.This was really, really cute. This won't be the longest review because this is written as a children's book and really isn't very complicated.... but there's no denying that many of these stories were absolutely adorable. These stories were the embodiment of joy and happiness. Each one left you with a good feeling at the end.I definitely had my favourites. S.K. Ali's story made my tear up a little bit and Randa Abdelfattah's made me laugh hysterically - seeing an Australian author and story included was something I really appreciated.. I also had a few that I wont name that I didn't like very much but that's just what happens in anthologies.This was a really important book. I've always felt to be reasonably knowledgeable about cultures and religions other than my own but I feel like I learnt a lot about Islamic terminology and what it's like to grow up Muslim. I was able to get a taste of how important and loving Muslim communities are. Learning about Eid's from a Catholic perspective in school led me to believe they were often a somber event whereas this anthology really made me feel the happiness of these holidays. This book is important both for non-Muslims to better understand Islamic culture or religion and for Muslims to be able to see their lives represented in paper by authors who are just like them.I'm rating this one 3.5 stars out of 5 because while I loved a few of the stories and think it's really important representation, I'm not the biggest fan of children's books (the personal enjoyment wasn't always there) and there were a few stories where the writing style really wasn't to my taste.
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  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Annie McCannThe holy month of Ramadan is the 9th month on the Islamic Calendar. It is the holiest month of the year for Muslims as it was during the month of Ramadan when Islam was born. This is the time Muslims observe the fast during daylight hours to remember those less fortunate and to also reflect on our lives and remember to remain humble. A time for prayer, a time of family and togetherness. Of course, this year – everything has changed b Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Annie McCannThe holy month of Ramadan is the 9th month on the Islamic Calendar. It is the holiest month of the year for Muslims as it was during the month of Ramadan when Islam was born. This is the time Muslims observe the fast during daylight hours to remember those less fortunate and to also reflect on our lives and remember to remain humble. A time for prayer, a time of family and togetherness. Of course, this year – everything has changed but one thing that shows hope during a challenging time is a beautiful collection of short stories called Once Upon an Eid, a compilation of wonderful short stories composed by Muslim authors from around the world. This was a chance to share our most sacred holiday, Eid, which marks the end of the Holy Month of Ramadan.Many call this “The Muslim Christmas” and whilst we don’t celebrate a birthday, Eid is the one word that can bring out mixed emotions and memories for the Islamic community. In this particular book, authors share what Eid can mean to them from their own perspectives and cultures. From the sound of frying samosas to the comfort of bean pie or the pleasure of putting on a new outfit for Eid prayers, gift-giving, and holiday parties. Whatever it is, Eid is a very special day for Muslims worldwide.As a Muslim reader and blogger, I was honoured to have received an advance copy to be one of the first readers in Australia to enjoy this amazing book. I was also very elated to see a compilation that brings positive light to our community and faith by telling stories of our most auspicious occasion. I believe this is a compilation that can be enjoyed by both Muslims and non Muslims alike as it’s told in a way that many can relate from family ties to celebration, food, and togetherness. The compilation is so cleverly constructed that includes not just short stories but a poem, graphic-novel chapter, and spot illustrations. The emotional responses to each experience shared in this compilation can be summed up in one word: joyWhat I loved most about this compilation was how diverse it was. Although the authors were Muslim, each author was of a different culture and each story brought out many different cultures and rituals during Eid. It was amazing to discover different cultures through stories. What I also loved was how not every story was a happy story – realistically not all Muslims have the joy of really celebrating a happy Eid due to family issues, finance, or health and this too was beautifully captured in this compilation. The graphic story within the compilation was also a favourite and was quite clever. The editors did an amazing job in putting this together and I truly believe this compilation is an opportunity for Muslims to read something they can relate to as well as reach out and bridge a gap with the wider community.
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  • Shehzeen Muzaffar
    January 1, 1970
    As a kid this book would've made all the difference but I am so glad that this book exists and so many Muslim kids would be able to see themselves in these characters and will feel the same joy these characters felt. I was so excited for this book and it didn't disappoint me at all. Because the book is middle grade, all of the stories are very straightforward and easy to understand. Each story brings something very unique to the whole book and I absolutely loved all of them.Listen, I have read s As a kid this book would've made all the difference but I am so glad that this book exists and so many Muslim kids would be able to see themselves in these characters and will feel the same joy these characters felt. I was so excited for this book and it didn't disappoint me at all. Because the book is middle grade, all of the stories are very straightforward and easy to understand. Each story brings something very unique to the whole book and I absolutely loved all of them.Listen, I have read so many Christmas books given the fact that I don't even celebrate the holiday, it still never failed to bring joy and smile to my face. But reading about an occasion that is a part of who I am? reading about something that always brings joy to me was something else. Even though the characters in the book are way young but the excitement of Eid, the feeling of happiness and satisfaction was still there.Eid-ul-Fitr and Eid-ul-Azha are equally important to me as a muslim and this book made it possible for me to read about it as well and I am so emotional about it. We need more books like this.E-ARC was provided to me by Netgalley and AbramsKids in exchange of an honest review.
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  • lethe marks
    January 1, 1970
    Insightful. Fun. Juvenile.This was quite an enjoyable read. As a non-Muslim person, this anthology was such an incredible insight into the culture of Islam and more specifically Eid. I want to begin this review by expressing how important I believe this book to be, and how incredible I know it will be for young kids to be able to finally see themselves in the stories they choose to read. The fact that this entire anthology is told through own-voices authors was a marvelous idea, and I'm so happy Insightful. Fun. Juvenile.This was quite an enjoyable read. As a non-Muslim person, this anthology was such an incredible insight into the culture of Islam and more specifically Eid. I want to begin this review by expressing how important I believe this book to be, and how incredible I know it will be for young kids to be able to finally see themselves in the stories they choose to read. The fact that this entire anthology is told through own-voices authors was a marvelous idea, and I'm so happy that a book like this exists today.Now, I understand I am not the target audience for this story. And I mean that not so much as to point out that I'm not of Islamic faith, but rather because I am not an eleven year old child. My mistake going into this book was that I did not know it was middle grade, and for that my enjoyment took a bit of a beating. I found the characters to be true to their age which many would see as a huge positive, but in my case I got tired of reading about children as I myself could not really relate to any of them.That being said, one thing that I related to on a much larger scale were the sibling dynamics. I have a younger sister myself, and some of the fights between brothers and sisters were very reminiscent of fights I've had with her. For many of the short stories, the imagery was lush and enchanting and oh my GOODNESS, the descriptions of food throughout this book were so wonderful. I can also appreciate the inclusion of other forms of storytelling such as the graphic novel and the poetry. To include mixed media like that was a very intelligent choice.Every story in this anthology connected to each other very well, and the conscious choice to place the darker, more melancholic stories between the blatantly joyful ones was a choice well made. I can see the editors of this anthology did their job well.Although the stories flowed well together, I did find them getting repetitive as I continued to read. The stories all seemed to blur into one, and there were points where I felt like I just kept reading the same thing, despite there being several obvious differences between the pieces. In the end, I think this was a very well written collection, despite it not being a favorite of mine or something I could necessarily relate to. My favorites stories were definitely "Not Only an Only," "Just Like Chest Armor," and "Searching for Blue." Lastly, thank you again to NetGalley for giving me a chance to read this early review copy, especially seeing as this book was one of my most highly anticipated releases of this year!
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  • Elvina Zafril
    January 1, 1970
    Bismillah. For all readers who know Eid joy, and for all who want to share in it.Have you ever feel like when you read a book you feel the warmth and comforting when you finished reading it? That's how I felt with Once Upon an Eid.There are 15 stories in total by 15 muslim authors. All short stories are incredibly amazing. Some are fun and some are sad. However, I felt 15 stories are not enough. Am I greedy? Yes, I am.All the stories contained so much moral values and this book targeted on young Bismillah. For all readers who know Eid joy, and for all who want to share in it.Have you ever feel like when you read a book you feel the warmth and comforting when you finished reading it? That's how I felt with Once Upon an Eid.There are 15 stories in total by 15 muslim authors. All short stories are incredibly amazing. Some are fun and some are sad. However, I felt 15 stories are not enough. Am I greedy? Yes, I am.All the stories contained so much moral values and this book targeted on young readers. I must say it was a brilliant idea to put Perfect by Jamilah Thompkins Bigelow for the opening. I was having fun reading about the story and I imagined myself as Hawa. Because we are almost same lol. Atleast I was like Hawa. Other stories are so good. I liked every single one of them. The mood and the feeling on the last day of Ramadan are the things that I can relate the most as a muslim. Love the feelings.I always loved a book when they talked about food. In this case when I read lontong, I kind of feel like craving for it until now. Overall, this book is good for young readers as it contains a lot of morals and lessons. Happy Book Birthday to Once Upon an Eid!Thank you Netgalley and Amulet Books New York flr the copy of Once Upon an Eid.
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  • Fizah(Books tales by me)
    January 1, 1970
    I am not a fan of short stories, It is hard to keep a good balance. When I came across this book, I just knew that I have to read it.It is based on 15 stories, celebrating eid in different cultures, countries and families. Eid is just around the corner so It is perfect time to read it.I just loved the concept...Stories were simple, beautiful and heartwarming. Some were like sunshine in chilly winters others were like finding shadow of trees in hot summer afternoon. One thing was common in all st I am not a fan of short stories, It is hard to keep a good balance. When I came across this book, I just knew that I have to read it.It is based on 15 stories, celebrating eid in different cultures, countries and families. Eid is just around the corner so It is perfect time to read it.I just loved the concept...Stories were simple, beautiful and heartwarming. Some were like sunshine in chilly winters others were like finding shadow of trees in hot summer afternoon. One thing was common in all stories "HOPE".There were so many elements: stories of cousin bantering, to kids taking responsibility of their siblings, broken families, happy families, family traditions, new traditions, kind neighbors, mean kids...I loved the way most of the characters were just human without any tag of religion.Bonus: A lot of food from different countries...I googled all of these and I was drooling.I simply loved it.Advance Eid Muabarak you guys <3
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  • rachel ☾
    January 1, 1970
    super sweet mg anthology. review tc! Perfect by Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow // ★★★☆☆Yusuf and the Great Big Brownie Mistake by Aisha Saeed // ★★★★☆Kareem Means ‘Generous’ by Asmaa Hussein // ★★★★★Don’ut Break Tradition by S.K. Ali // ★★☆☆☆Just Like Chest Armor by Candice Montgomery // ★★★★★Gifts by Rukhsana Khan // ★★★★☆The Feast of Sacrifices by Hena Khan // ★★★☆☆Seraj Captures the Moon by G. Willow Wilson & Sara Alfageeh // ☆☆☆☆☆ (not in my eARC)Searching for Blue by N.H. Senzai // ★★★★☆Creative super sweet mg anthology. review tc! Perfect by Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow // ★★★☆☆Yusuf and the Great Big Brownie Mistake by Aisha Saeed // ★★★★☆Kareem Means ‘Generous’ by Asmaa Hussein // ★★★★★Don’ut Break Tradition by S.K. Ali // ★★☆☆☆Just Like Chest Armor by Candice Montgomery // ★★★★★Gifts by Rukhsana Khan // ★★★★☆The Feast of Sacrifices by Hena Khan // ★★★☆☆Seraj Captures the Moon by G. Willow Wilson & Sara Alfageeh // ☆☆☆☆☆ (not in my eARC)Searching for Blue by N.H. Senzai // ★★★★☆Creative Fixes by Ashley Franklin // ★★★☆☆Taste by Hanna Alkaf // ★★★★★Eid Pictures by Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow // ★★★★☆Not Only an Only by Huda AL-Marashi // ★★★★☆Maya Madinah Chooses Joy by Ayesha Mattu // ★★★☆☆Eid and Pink Bubble Gum, Insha’ Allah by Randa Abdel-Fattah // ★★☆☆☆◯ Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Blog • Goodreads • Twitter • Instagram • The Book Depository
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  • Rameela (Star)
    January 1, 1970
    Initial thoughts: I felt so emotional while reading such heartwarming relatable and beautiful stories!!!!
  • ✦ Maica ✦
    January 1, 1970
    And that's how Makayla would always remember her first Eid-patched together, yet imperfectly perfect. Big thanks to Divine. I wouldn't have discovered this book without her. Check our her amazing review here: click me!This is one of those books that I'm proud I've read. The Philippines is a melting pot of different beliefs and cultures. Muslims are a huge part of that community. But up until today, I haven't read any books about them. This book has greatly educated me about the cultur And that's how Makayla would always remember her first Eid-patched together, yet imperfectly perfect. Big thanks to Divine. I wouldn't have discovered this book without her. Check our her amazing review here: click me!This is one of those books that I'm proud I've read. The Philippines is a melting pot of different beliefs and cultures. Muslims are a huge part of that community. But up until today, I haven't read any books about them. This book has greatly educated me about the culture, religion, and struggles that our Muslim brothers and sisters face daily. I really hope more books like this are published.It's time we heard their stories.
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute! Personal favorite stories were Ashley Franklin’s and Hannah Alkaf’s but the whole thing is full of celebration and family and love and joy.
  • Amy Layton
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so glad I read this--I certainly came out of it having learned so much about Eid and why it's so important and for all the different reasons.  I think this anthology got stronger the more you read, and I loved that the themes and style matched with the age of each main character.  I also appreciated that there was a comic short story!  It certainly goes to show that the love of Eid transcends different types of media."Kareem Means 'Generous'" and "Don'ut Break Tradition" were my top two in t I'm so glad I read this--I certainly came out of it having learned so much about Eid and why it's so important and for all the different reasons.  I think this anthology got stronger the more you read, and I loved that the themes and style matched with the age of each main character.  I also appreciated that there was a comic short story!  It certainly goes to show that the love of Eid transcends different types of media."Kareem Means 'Generous'" and "Don'ut Break Tradition" were my top two in this collection--I was so pleased to see the exploration of not only class relations but also how families feel as though they're crumbling when a medical tragedy strikes.  After all, how can you continue traditions when nothing seems right?  Overall, this was so great, and I can imagine that it's so incredibly important for young folks to read.  So glad I read this!Review cross-listed here!
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  • Sakina (aforestofbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an adorable collection of stories! I loved seeing how different cultures and families celebrate Eid. The food descriptions made me so hungry lol, so reading this while fasting was a challenge 😂 But there was so much great representation, and it was nice to see families in different situations all celebrating the same holiday. Some of the stories broke my heart, and I almost cried more times than I can count. My favourite story has to be "Not Only An Only" because it was the first t This was such an adorable collection of stories! I loved seeing how different cultures and families celebrate Eid. The food descriptions made me so hungry lol, so reading this while fasting was a challenge 😂 But there was so much great representation, and it was nice to see families in different situations all celebrating the same holiday. Some of the stories broke my heart, and I almost cried more times than I can count. My favourite story has to be "Not Only An Only" because it was the first time that I saw my sect mentioned in a story. I've never read anything like that before and seeing Aya voice her worries and fears, and how she sometimes feels like an outsider was super relatable.Overall, really great! I definitely think this book would be perfect for younger kids. I wish I had a collection of Eid stories when I was growing up!
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  • Rainbow (Lovegood | Wizard 9 ¾)
    January 1, 1970
    I decided to read this book as we are all at home and we cannot go out. What better way spending my time then readin’ spend this amazing amazing book. Each story is unique and beautifully written.would highly highly recommend you to read it even if you are not a Muslim it’s just not about being a Muslim or something it’s abt reading a culture and knowing the festivities a bit. ❤️
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  • Atul_reads
    January 1, 1970
    Aww, such a sweet and cute story!! MashaAllah. It's like I'm turning back into a kid somehow because of the joyous celebration. What a mistake if I didn't request this. And I am so happy that I did. All in all, this is my new experience of reading multiple stories on Muslims in one book. And as a Muslim in Malaysia, I didn't even know what it's like for another Muslims across the world. I am super excited to learn the Arabi, Pakistani, American, Mandinka Muslim's way and many more including thei Aww, such a sweet and cute story!! MashaAllah. It's like I'm turning back into a kid somehow because of the joyous celebration. What a mistake if I didn't request this. And I am so happy that I did. All in all, this is my new experience of reading multiple stories on Muslims in one book. And as a Muslim in Malaysia, I didn't even know what it's like for another Muslims across the world. I am super excited to learn the Arabi, Pakistani, American, Mandinka Muslim's way and many more including their tradition on that occasion, clothes - Lapa, Kameez, Abaya (in Malaysia we wear either Baju Kurung for woman and Baju Melayu for male and of course simple abaya),and food, not just in my own compartment. Don't get me started with the mouthwatering foods mentioned in this book, which had me fantasize a lot. I never eat or heard of them, except chicken biryani and brownies (which our house don't unusually bake during the Eid), such as Lontong, Ka'ak, Lentil Stew, Falafel, Hummus, Fried Plantains, Jollof Rice, Gulab Jamun, Bean Pie, and so on. I'll just stop there before I break someone fast.I don't even know Chaand Raat was another name for Eid ul-Fitr for Muslim in Bangladesh, Pakistan and India until I read this book. New input indeed. This book didn't fail to make me laugh too. The sujood scene. Also when Hanna Alkaf insert the agak-agak phrase. So now everyone knows what's Malaysian mom was like. Since what I'm reading is eARC, therefore, the arts are not finalized yet but I bet it would look wonderful. The 15 stories, each incredibly intact with their own unique storyline to spark the joy of Eid celebration was very heartwarming. I'm sure kids can understand the language and it's definitely relatable to the adult, with a simple explanation and words of wisdom of why Muslims fast, what time, the benefit, and do and don't - beautifully communicated by the characters. Overall it's an incredible book. Go ahead and buy a copy.
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  • Neelam
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Abrams Kids and Netgalley for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely adored this book and all the wonderful stories!This book was pure joy and happiness to read. Even the stories which showed people in difficult situations were full of hope. I cried happy tears several times reading this book and this book will forever hold a special place in my heart.Eid is such an important day for Muslims and this book captures what it can be like and how varied everyone’ Thank you to Abrams Kids and Netgalley for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely adored this book and all the wonderful stories!This book was pure joy and happiness to read. Even the stories which showed people in difficult situations were full of hope. I cried happy tears several times reading this book and this book will forever hold a special place in my heart.Eid is such an important day for Muslims and this book captures what it can be like and how varied everyone’s experiences are. Being the oldest sibling I always tried to make Eid a fun and memorable day for my sisters and little cousins. From putting up decorations and gifts which would be opened after Eid prayer to going to the Eid fair and playing games we had so much fun. And reading this book brought back all those memories.I loved every single story in this anthology which is rare but they were all written so wonderfully and beautifully and I sobbed my way through the book. I loved how diverse the stories were and how everyone celebrates differently and has their own traditions in their family, community and their culture. We see how people all over the world have different food they will want to make or the clothes they were and how they get together with family. I loved how family wasn’t just the mum, dad and kid but showed how families are a lot more varied. It was so inclusive and I was weeping with joy.The stories themselves were so great and even though this is a middle grade book, and I am an adult I loved them so much. I loved Aisha Saeed’s story about how everyone in the family came to the rescue when Yusuf overcooked the brownies and Asmaa Hussein’s story of how Kareem learns what it truly means to be generous and giving and caring for those who are less fortunate. I also loved that there was also a graphic short story because I know lots of kids love graphic novels!Each story is full of hope, even the stories where the situation the people are in are less than ideal. Searching for Blue by N.H. Senzai is the story of a young boy who is in a refugee camp in Greece and how the refugees get together with some wonderful people who love there to make the best of the situation and make it a special day for everyone. Such a beautiful heart warming story while simultaneously showing how difficult the lives of refugees are. In fact all the stories have some really wonderful lessons which are integral parts of Islam woven beautifully into the stories.I cannot wait to get my finished copy and see all the artwork to go with the stories! This book is phenomenal, filled with much needed stories of joy and hope and I adored every single one of them!PS. These books will make the perfect Eid gifts!
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  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss+ and Amulet Books for an eARC of this book.This is an incredibly special book. It's an anthology of 15 stories, written by different authors, that focus on experiences surrounding Eid. I know I'm not the target audience, but I learned so much from these different perspectives, and truly appreciate a glimpse into celebrations about which I knew very little. I will definitely purchase the book for my library when it is released in May 2020, and I look forward to seeing the f Thank you to Edelweiss+ and Amulet Books for an eARC of this book.This is an incredibly special book. It's an anthology of 15 stories, written by different authors, that focus on experiences surrounding Eid. I know I'm not the target audience, but I learned so much from these different perspectives, and truly appreciate a glimpse into celebrations about which I knew very little. I will definitely purchase the book for my library when it is released in May 2020, and I look forward to seeing the final copy with illustrations. A must read for middle grade lovers, and a vital book to have as part of our collections for young people.
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  • Tzipora
    January 1, 1970
    Once Upon an Eid is a fantastic YA/Middle Grade (seems to straddle the line and has appeal for all ages) anthology. It has such a broad array of different authors from different backgrounds, writing in a variety of different styles, about a diverse range of Muslim experiences. One story is even told in comic form and another is more of a prose poem. While most stories focus on Eid-al-Fitr, the feast of breaking the fast observed at the end of Ramadan, there is at least one story in the collectio Once Upon an Eid is a fantastic YA/Middle Grade (seems to straddle the line and has appeal for all ages) anthology. It has such a broad array of different authors from different backgrounds, writing in a variety of different styles, about a diverse range of Muslim experiences. One story is even told in comic form and another is more of a prose poem. While most stories focus on Eid-al-Fitr, the feast of breaking the fast observed at the end of Ramadan, there is at least one story in the collection about Eid-al-Adha, the feast of sacrifice that marks the tenth day of the month Hajj. Of course, this collection will be most meaningful and special to Muslim children and teens but I think it would be an absolutely fantastic addition to any school or classroom library. I was absolutely geeked to win it, as a Jew who majored in Middle East Studies. And upon receiving my copy posted to my bookstagram account noting how excited I was to receive it and that Judaism and Islam share so much (if anything, Islam has far more similarities to Judaism than Christianity does to Judaism) and how much better we all are when we learn and listen to one another. And I genuinely believe there’s a great deal of value in kids and teens who are not Muslim reading this. I know I would’ve enjoyed and learned so much from it as a kid. As I stated already, this collection is every bit as diverse as the Muslim community itself. It opens with a story of a Black American Muslim girl whose mother is from Philadelphia while her father is Mandinka from Guniea. There’s a story of a Caribbean and Algerian girl who is anxious to start wearing hijab. Another focuses on a convert to Islam celebrating her first Eid and struggling with both adjusting and the poverty her family lives in compared to the more well off girls in her mosque. My absolute favorite in the collection, “Not Only an Only” by Huda Al-Marashi, is about a girl named Aya who is the only Muslim in her class. She enjoys being the only one and getting to be a sort of expert on all things Muslim and Iraqi (where her family is from). As a Jew who spent her early years in a town with very few Jews (and a largely aging Jewish community, with very few kids and teens) I could relate because I also liked being the “only” and getting to be a sort of expert. At one point in the story, Aya’s class learns about Islam and Shia Muslims, which Aya’s family is, are described as radicals and Aya is very upset and struggles to explain how much complex it is. I can remember getting into arguments- even in a community college religion class when I was 16, where I was unhappy with how simplistically or in my mind, wrong, aspects of Judaism were described and it made me chuckle a bit to remember while also deeply relating to that frustration. Then a new girl arrives in school, another Muslim and she even wears hijab, and Aya is upset and worries the new girl must know more about Islam and be more religious than she is. However, the two end up bonding and the new girl invites Aya and her family, who had previously observed Eid alone as a family, to a huge community celebration. I loved this because just like Aya, I eventually found myself in larger Jewish community and realized how much I was missing and how it’s not so great to be the only one after all. I also really loved S. K. Ali “Don’t Break Tradition” about a girl whose mother is very ill. The family is struggling but our main character decides to do all she can to keep up with the family’s Eid traditions. This story had a weight to it and a beauty, much like another stand-out piece- “Searching for Blue” by N. H. Senzai that is about Bassem, a Syrian refugee boy who has lost his father and recently escaped with his family to Greece. Very timely and raw, yet like Ali’s story ends on a hopeful note of community and family togetherness and Eid joy. Of course, there are also much lighter stories in the collection, such as one about an Eid brownie baking mishap. Truly, there’s something for everyone here. Personally I also was drawn to the more religiously detailed stories, the one I mentioned early on about the girl longing to wear hijab for the first time. Or there’s another, “The Feast of Sacrifice” by Hena Khan, that focuses on a boy named Humza who along with his younger siblings is staying with their grandparents while their parents are on Hajj. There’s a beautiful description of the meaning of Eid al-Adha as well as what it means to sacrifice. This collection was so much richer and more varied than I expected. As much as I had several standout favorites, I enjoyed each story in the bunch. There really is something for every reader here. While my ARC did not have completed artwork and many pages were marked as art to be added, there’s also fantastic illustrations on between each story. Abrams and their imprint Amulet really went above and beyond with this one. I think it would make a wonderful Eid gift for a Muslim child or a standout addition to any children’s library. Thank you so much to Abrams and Goodreads for this very special giveaway win!
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  • Farah Fakhirah
    January 1, 1970
    To me Eid means celebration, festivity, and food. It means a lot of warmth and love. Once Upon An Eid is about all of that, about experiencing Eid in the various background and in various community. ⁣⁣This book centers diverse Muslim voices and diverse Muslim background, in a perfectly diverse form of stories. There are stories written in verse, and there is a graphic stories as well. Each incorporated to a well-written, heartwarming story about celebrating Eid (TWO EIDS. There is a story Eid-al To me Eid means celebration, festivity, and food. It means a lot of warmth and love. Once Upon An Eid is about all of that, about experiencing Eid in the various background and in various community. ⁣⁣This book centers diverse Muslim voices and diverse Muslim background, in a perfectly diverse form of stories. There are stories written in verse, and there is a graphic stories as well. Each incorporated to a well-written, heartwarming story about celebrating Eid (TWO EIDS. There is a story Eid-al-adha too.) ⁣⁣I love every story in this book, but a few really, really hits home close. S.K Ali's 'Don'ut Break Tradition' made me cry because of the significant, simple story about maintaining tradition. Candice Montgomery's 'Just Like Chest Armor' hits home hard because it fits so well into my initiation of wearing the hijab, especially since I, too, want to wear it from a young age but held a lot by my mom. Hanna Alkaf's taste--a story told in verse about Lontong--made my mouth waters (and brings up some memory of confusing ginger and galangal at kitchen), Huda al-Marashi's 'Not Only an Only' talks about the different sects and how it matters that we all Muslim first, and in the end, we all worship Allah. I could go on and on about every story and why they matter so much to me. ⁣⁣But ultimately, it all comes to this: this book talks about what a joy Eid is, and despite many differences in celebrating them, the diversity of celebration is what makes the joy even more special, and what makes us, as a Muslim, united in one. ⁣
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