How to Eat
Bestselling author Mark Bittman and physician David Katz cut through all the noise on food, health, and diet to give you the real answers you need   What is the “best” diet? Do calories matter? And when it comes to protein, fat, and carbs, which ones are good and which are bad? Mark Bittman and health expert David Katz answer all these questions and more in a lively and easy-to-read Q&A format. Inspired by their viral hit article on Grub Street—one of New York magazine’s most popular and most-shared articles—Bittman and Katz share their clear, no-nonsense perspective on food and diet, answering questions covering everything from basic nutrients to superfoods to fad diets. Topics include dietary patterns (Just what should humans eat?); grains (Aren’t these just “carbs”? Do I need to avoid gluten?); meat and dairy (Does grass-fed matter?); alcohol (Is drinking wine actually good for me?); and more. Throughout, Bittman and Katz filter the science of diet and nutrition through a lens of common sense, delivering straightforward advice with a healthy dose of wit.

How to Eat Details

TitleHow to Eat
Author
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherHoughton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN-139780358128823
Rating
GenreHealth, Nonfiction, Food and Drink, Food, Audiobook, Cookbooks, Self Help

How to Eat Review

  • Nenia ☠️ Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Protector of Out of Print Gems, Mother of Smut, and Actual Garbage Can ☠️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestI feel like I can't go a day without some clickbait article trying to sell me on pitaya or oat milk, or telling me why veganism is good and keto is bad (or is it vice-versa??), or that all bodies are beautiful, but here are 50 signs that you need to change your lifestyle. It's really stressful... and makes us question what should be easy: what the fudge are we actually supposed to eat? (Not fudge.) The U.S. weight loss industry is worth Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestI feel like I can't go a day without some clickbait article trying to sell me on pitaya or oat milk, or telling me why veganism is good and keto is bad (or is it vice-versa??), or that all bodies are beautiful, but here are 50 signs that you need to change your lifestyle. It's really stressful... and makes us question what should be easy: what the fudge are we actually supposed to eat? (Not fudge.) The U.S. weight loss industry is worth over $70 billion and it really does feel like celebrities and influencers are constantly hawking the latest fad diet, allegedly backed by "science."I am not a doctor but I know a lot about diets and dietary patterns and the effects that they can have on your health, primarily because of firsthand experience. I am sensitive to GMO corn (although I try to avoid most forms of it due to potential cross-pollination), and eating it makes me violently ill, similar to the way gluten sensitive people react to eating gluten. I used to get sick randomly, and I had a lot of facial and abdominal swelling. As soon as I figured out what the problem was and cut corn out of my diet, I stopped getting sick, my face actually changed shape a little, and I felt so much better-- I never used to know how some people knew when they were bloated or not because I literally felt that way all the time. As a result, I've been reading food articles and ingredient labels for a good 15 years, and have a pretty solid understanding of what I'm eating by necessity.**Fun fact: powdered sugar, shredded cheese, and American cheese all contain corn (it's used as an anti-caking agent) unless explicitly stated otherwise. In the U.S. it doesn't even need to be put on food labels if it's being used as an anti-caking agent or a lubricant because it's in small quantities and considered generally regarded as safe. Modified foodstarch is also corn (specifically, genetically modified cornstarch, usually).Diets can have a huge impact on your lifestyle (as it did mine). I literally cannot eat processed foods and haven't touched most kinds of fast food in almost 15 years, so I eat better than most people I know, and I guess in a twisted way, I'm lucky, because getting sick after eating so many different kinds of junk and processed foods has given me a taste aversion to things like snack cakes and American cheese (both of which are heavy with corn), to the point where I feel no hunger when looking at them because I know exactly what will happen if I try to eat them. Most people won't have that kind of extreme, visceral response to what they're eating, so it can be harder to retrain your body-- and even know where to begin. But this book gives you a good idea of where to start.I wish this was a textbook in high school and college health classes. It's short but it covers so much. It talks about diets and why some of them work, and the authors encourage you to think of diets as "patterns" of eating (kind of like how climates are "patterns" of weather). Whether your diet is healthy or not doesn't matter so much on the day to day (although, you know, don't go crazy), but more as persistent patterns over long periods of times. The takeaway is that most people should probably be eating diets that are prominent in fruits, vegetables, and anceint grains (kamut, farro, barley, quinoa, teff), legumes, with more sparing amounts of fish, poultry, meat, and dairy. This is not only healthier, it's also more sustainable for our overfished and overfarmed planet.After diet, the authors talk about foods and ingredients and nutrition. Are antioxidants as good as people say they are? Yes. Are superfoods actually a thing? No, they're more of a marketing gimmick, even though some of the superfoods do have excellent qualities when incorporated into a balanced diet. The authors talk about how being gluten-free isn't actually all that good for you unless you actually have Celiac's or are gluten-sensitive (gluten-free products tend to be higher in calories, lower in fiber, and have things like corn replacing the wheat gluten). They talk about juicing diets and how you'd be much better off just eating the fruit because concentrating the juice results in a higher "glycemic load", meaning all those sugars are hitting your body far more quickly and all at once, than they would if you were sitting and chewing your food slowly at the supper table. They also talk about fats, the good and the bad, and how much salt is too much salt.The last chapter is about research, and delves into the fake news and bunk science of the click bait world and how you, as a consumer, can navigate it. This section reminded me of a sketch CollegeHumor did called "Health Science Is B******," which was obviously written by someone who shares many of the frustrations as these authors, who urge you to be careful of revolutionary claims and how to gauge whether a study is done well and without bias.HOW TO EAT is one of the best books I've read on dieting and the advice it dispenses is really useful. I saw another reviewer complaining that the question and answer format is repetitive, but I used to tutor and they always told us that information really needs to be repeated three times for it to really sink in (supposedly, the human brain really likes things that come in triplicate), and the information in here bears repeating. I wish I could have everyone I know read this book because it doesn't just tell you how to eat for a better you; it also gives advice on eating for a better world.Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  3.5 to 4 stars
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  • Kyleen
    January 1, 1970
    This entire book could be summarized in one sentence! Extremely repetitive. Eat whole, unprocessed foods (fruits, vegetables), no meat or any animal products, maybe some (certain types of) fish but really just stick to beans, drink water, maybe plain tea and coffee and a glass of red wine with dinner. But dont add the red wine or plain tea or coffee if you dont already drink it. Done!I wasnt a fan of the q&a format, because most questions asked the same thing over and over and over again. I This entire book could be summarized in one sentence! Extremely repetitive. Eat whole, unprocessed foods (fruits, vegetables), no meat or any animal products, maybe some (certain types of) fish but really just stick to beans, drink water, maybe plain tea and coffee and a glass of red wine with dinner. But don’t add the red wine or plain tea or coffee if you don’t already drink it. Done!I wasn’t a fan of the q&a format, because most questions asked the same thing over and over and over again. I did learn some good info, though - for instance, it’s pretty stupid to pick one (plain) nut over another because of something like fat content because they’re all whole foods and therefore good.
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  • Scribe Publications
    January 1, 1970
    In an approachable Q&A format, award-winning New York Times columnist Bittman and Katz, the founding director of Yale Universitys Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Centre, tell you everything you ever wanted to know about eating healthily. Library Journal A sensible guide to health from two genial experts.KirkusExpect well-deserved demand for this very readable, reasonable food for thought.Booklist In an approachable Q&A format, award-winning New York Times columnist Bittman and Katz, the founding director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Centre, tell you everything you ever wanted to know about eating healthily. Library Journal A sensible guide to health from two genial experts.KirkusExpect well-deserved demand for this very readable, reasonable food for thought.Booklist
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  • Katie Bruell
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this. I already knew and follow most of the information, but the stuff that was new to me was really game changing! Now if only I could get my carnivore son to read it...
  • Licia Bailey
    January 1, 1970
    A lot of information we "know" but it cuts through the noise of what we know or think we know and how. The understanding of limited research and why health messaging feels all over the place is something that I feel few people understand, including myself. The term diet in our culture is pretty messed up and until we look at our lifestyle differently most people in our country and community will find it a daily struggle to be healthy.
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  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars
  • FunkMaster General
    January 1, 1970
    ***SPOILERS***"Our culture is long overdue for a dietary revolution that makes eating well easy rather than elusive." --David"A food system driven by common good would respect the earth itself, us people, and our fellow living creatures." --Mark
  • Emily Laga
    January 1, 1970
    4+. This book covers it all in terms of nutrition, health and diet. I didnt love its question and answer style, but the content is valid and sensible. Whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, beans, nuts, seeds and healthy fats are what make up a wholesome, delicious and nourishing diet. This is not revolutionary, but eating this way within a modern life is in fact, a revolution. 4+. This book covers it all in terms of nutrition, health and diet. I didn’t love its question and answer style, but the content is valid and sensible. Whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, beans, nuts, seeds and healthy fats are what make up a wholesome, delicious and nourishing diet. This is not revolutionary, but eating this way within a modern life is in fact, a revolution.
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  • George Jacobs
    January 1, 1970
    Let me begin by making two points about this book - How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered by Mark Bittman and David L Katz. First, I like the book because it has concise, easy-to-understand answers to so many of the questions asked by vegans (like me), vegan curious (people considering moving toward vegan), and others who are also keen to better understand the links between food, on one hand, and health, environment, and kindness toward our fellow animals, on the other hand. As I Let me begin by making two points about this book - How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered by Mark Bittman and David L Katz. First, I like the book because it has concise, easy-to-understand answers to so many of the questions asked by vegans (like me), vegan curious (people considering moving toward vegan), and others who are also keen to better understand the links between food, on one hand, and health, environment, and kindness toward our fellow animals, on the other hand. As I listened to the audiobook version of How to Eat, I found myself wishing I could memorize some of their answers.Not a 100% Vegan BookSecond, readers of this review should know that the book’s authors do not advocate that we eat 100% plant-based as the only way to go. The authors do, however, say that plant-based eating can be fine, and they do advocate what they call “plant-predominant” diets. They suggest that humans thrive on diets that are based on whole foods, minimally processed, mostly (or all) plants, and plain water. Indeed, several other recent books support vegan at the same time they also support other options that greatly minimize animal-based foods. Examples of such books include the Blue Zones books based on the diet and lifestyles found in small parts of the world with large percentages of people who live to 100 and beyond. Along similar lines, the books of Michael Pollan, including In Defense of Food, advocate that we eat “Food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” When Pollan says “food,” he means whole food, not processed food; he means potatoes not potato chips. In 2009, Jonathan Safron Foer wrote Eating Animals, a detailed indictment of the horrors of industrial animal agriculture. In 2019, he published We Are The Weather, which explains the great damage that the production of animal-based foods cause to the environment - https://healthpartners.sg/review-we-a.... Nevertheless, in that same 2019 book, Foer suggests people might want to try Vegan Before 6 diets, in which they eat vegan for breakfast and lunch but possibly eat animal foods for dinner. The Book’s AuthorsVegan Before 6 (VB6) is based on a book of the same title by one of the two authors of How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered, the book being reviewed here: Mark Bittman. Bittman is a former New York Times food writer who has written over 30 food books, including How to Cook Everything and How to Cook Everything Vegetarian.Bittman’s co-author is David L Katz, MD, a physician, president of True Health Initiative, founding director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, past-president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, and founder/CEO of Diet ID, Inc. His views on controlling Covid-19 have been published in The New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/op...One of Bittman and Katz’s goals seems to be to encourage us to stress less about what we eat. The authors state the only humans and the nonhuman animals whom we feed are confused about what to eat. The book recommends a combination of science and common sense. It makes reference to research, but at the same time, the authors appreciate that there is still much that the scientists do not know. Thus, they are not shy about admitting there are some questions they cannot yet answer. Furthermore, doubt is reasonable. The authors quote the philosopher Bertrand Russell, "The whole thing wrong with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so sure and wiser people so full of doubts."Vegan Is Good; Big Food Is BadThe book has much good to say about properly planned whole food vegan diets, in particular, the benefits of 100% plant-based eating for the environment and for our fellow animals. “Incalculable” is the word the authors use to describe the harm suffered by the animals whom are used for food. Furthermore, the book rebuts claims about the alleged health inadequacies of vegan diets. While the authors praise vegans, they come down hard on food companies, whom they accuse of producing food not for people but for profits. Thanks to chemicals, such as fertilizers and herbicides, Big Food grows huge quantities, but huge quantities of what? They are not growing food; they are growing commodities for sale. It’s no wonder people suffer from obesity, diabetes, and more, because what they are being sold is “actually closer to the dictionary definition of poison than the dictionary definition of food.” The big food companies take advantage of our cravings. We crave salt from our origins in the sea. Our craving for sweet is due in part to mother’s milk being sweet. Fats we crave because fat is the most energy-dense macronutrient. Big Food uses these cravings, combined with lots of artificial ingredients thanks to advances in food science and the billions they spend on advertising to make eating bad food something that is tasty, fun, quick, convenient, effortless, and culturally normative. As you can see, the authors might mince veggies but they don’t mince words about veggies and other foods: “our culture gives us junk food, gives us junk food for thought about junk food and then invites us to blame ourselves for not being as healthy and thin as we're all supposed to be. The goal of the food industry is to get us to eat badly.”Instead of blaming overweight people for not taking individual responsibility, perhaps we should talk about our collective responsibility to make healthy food an easier option. Bittman and Katz maintain that we can change our taste buds, especially with some help from the larger society. Once we escape the clutches of Big Food, we can adjust our taste buds for a lifetime of great eating.Instead of What?When addressing questions about what to eat, How to Eat often reminds us to ask “Instead of what?” For instance, is a high-tech plant-based burger, such as a Beyond Burger, good to eat? The authors will answer, “If you are eating a Beyond Burger instead of a Big Mac, yes it’s good, but if the Beyond Burger is instead of a whole food, plant-based meal made by a friend or family member, maybe the Beyond Burger isn’t the best choice.”A recurrent theme in How To Eat is to avoid short-term fad diets and instead find eating and lifestyle patterns that can last us for a lifetime. Therefore, what is called the Mediterranean Diet, and is recommended by the authors as a good option, is actually a lifelong, culture-embedded eating pattern. The Mediterranean eating pattern is not a “diet – die it” but a “live it,” a lifestyle, for example, also including exercise and social support.Relax and Eat BeansIf you are looking for universally true answers, you will not find many in How to Eat. Instead, the authors stress flexibility. For example, what is the most important meal of the day? is it good to snack? what about fasting? and Should we avoid gluten? In each case, it depends, and the book explains the factors you need to know about to make the right choice at this time for you and your loved ones. On the question of which one food contributes the most to human health, planetary health, and the health of our fellow animals, How to Eat does have a resoundingly clear answer: beans. Yet, even here flexibility is the watchword. If for some reason you don’t want to eat beans, you can still be healthy and still help the planet and the other animals. So, relax, please. Just remember to love food that loves you back, which is WFPB. And, if you want to take supplements, they should supplement an already good diet, not substitute for a good diet.In addition to reading or listening to How to Eat, you can read a newspaper interview with Mark and David at https://www.grubstreet.com/2018/03/ul.... And, you can listen to an interview with the authors and read the interview transcript at https://lifehacker.com/how-to-eat-wit...
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  • Ampersand Inc.
    January 1, 1970
    Just in case you need inspiration, or honest advice about a diet plan, Bittman and Katz provide real answers about food and diet in this handy question and answer style guide book.
  • BOOKLOVER10
    January 1, 1970
    Mark Bittman and Dr. David L. Katz's "How to Eat," is a useful question and answer book in which the authors explain how our diets affect our well-being. Bittman and Katz suggest that the best way to stay fit and vigorous is to eat a variety of wholesome foods that are filling, packed with vital nutrients, and high in fiber. Most of us know that there is no quick fix for obesity. People who lose weight and keep it off in a healthful manner generally make permanent changes in their eating habits. Mark Bittman and Dr. David L. Katz's "How to Eat," is a useful question and answer book in which the authors explain how our diets affect our well-being. Bittman and Katz suggest that the best way to stay fit and vigorous is to eat a variety of wholesome foods that are filling, packed with vital nutrients, and high in fiber. Most of us know that there is no quick fix for obesity. People who lose weight and keep it off in a healthful manner generally make permanent changes in their eating habits. They might try to avoid heavily processed foods that are loaded with salt and/or sugar, drink water instead of soda and fruit juice, and indulge in treats on infrequent occasions.High marks go to the Mediterranean Diet, since it is plant-based, well-balanced, and high in monounsaturated fats. On the other hand, the authors discourage strict low-carb, low-fat, and high-protein regimens, and recommend eating substantial portions of whole grains, green vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Furthermore, Bittman and Dr. Katz encourage us to cut down on dairy and meat products, not just for our well-being but also to promote a healthier environment. Our diets should, for the most part, consist of foods that reduce inflammation, are beneficial to our microbiome, and give our bodies what they need to thrive."How to Eat" is clear and well-organized, and it addresses eating from a scientific perspective. We learn a great deal about the plusses and minuses of a few high-profile diets, such as Paleo, ketogenic, Dash, and intermittent fasting. In addition, Bittman and Katz discuss which foods boost our immune system; why gluten has received so much attention; whether organic fruits and vegetables are worth the cost; the perils of sugar; and the pros and cons of vitamin and mineral supplements. The bottom line is that, for the most part, we should eat "foods that are close to nature, minimally processed, and plant predominant." For those who want a common sense approach to eating properly--not just for a few weeks but for life—Mark Bittman and Dr. David Katz offer evidence-based information that is enlightening, entertaining, and easy to digest.
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  • Keren Kang
    January 1, 1970
    Overall a worthwhile read, but I found the tone to be a bit judgmental and almost arrogant? Although they never claim having complete authority, they do state that they know a lot and that people should listen to them. They highly praise the Mediterranean diet, but I can see how it might be potentially harmful to any culture with far different foods. Also, I cannot ignore the fact that they are speaking from positions of great privilege. I like the message of common sense and having a balanced Overall a worthwhile read, but I found the tone to be a bit judgmental and almost arrogant? Although they never claim having complete authority, they do state that they know a lot and that people should listen to them. They highly praise the Mediterranean diet, but I can see how it might be potentially harmful to any culture with far different foods. Also, I cannot ignore the fact that they are speaking from positions of great privilege. I like the message of common sense and having a balanced diet (and that no one food item is going to make or break you). Also, I do like asking myself, "If I take this particular food out of my diet, what will it replace?" And the question and answer format is easy to read, allows one to stay focused, and get back to with breaks in between. Oh, and beans...they love beans...they sing the praises of beans. Maybe I should add more beans to my diet, especially since my kiddos like them.
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  • Stephen J. Kohn
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes a bit wordy but a life changerThe core message is simple. Legumes, fruit, vegetables, natural oils and nuts are the diet that has worked for select populations and it is good.The early part of the book explains the and and the rest goes in more detail about nutritional science. It gets a bit wordy and preachy, but it supports the core hypothesis. I am 80, slightly overweight, and recently have had some real and imagined health problems. I have spent two weeks strictly adhering to the Sometimes a bit wordy but a life changerThe core message is simple. Legumes, fruit, vegetables, natural oils and nuts are the diet that has worked for select populations and it is good.The early part of the book explains the and and the rest goes in more detail about nutritional science. It gets a bit wordy and preachy, but it supports the core hypothesis. I am 80, slightly overweight, and recently have had some real and imagined health problems. I have spent two weeks strictly adhering to the diet. I feel noticeably better and psychologically higher. It helped that I didn’t eat meat for five years but could not resist sweets. And each sweet bite made me feel guilty, so I took another bite.I’ll check back in two months and two years. And I have never enjoyed what I have been eating as much as I have in the last two weeks.
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  • thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Really well written book about food, diet, science research, et al.It is written in a question and answer format which at times can be a little annoying if you are not interested in the question.The biggest takeaway from the book is what is behind all those ads, posts, articles about the "best" diet, "guaranteed" weight loss and "superfoods" you need. You are really getting two books in one because you have a great food writer (Bittman) and a celebrated scientist (Katz). I read a lot on this Really well written book about food, diet, science research, et al.It is written in a question and answer format which at times can be a little annoying if you are not interested in the question.The biggest takeaway from the book is what is behind all those ads, posts, articles about the "best" diet, "guaranteed" weight loss and "superfoods" you need. You are really getting two books in one because you have a great food writer (Bittman) and a celebrated scientist (Katz). I read a lot on this topic so much of it was reinforcement of things I knew but I still was able to find interesting and helpful information.Highly recommended
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who eats mostly plant based (technically a flexitarian), it was at times frustrating that the book was geared towards a SAD audience. That said, I still learned a decent amount about some of the fad diets and the current state of nutrition science. Think it could have also touched more on portion control and emotional/distracted eating. It would be great to see a book aimed at optimal eaters interested in learning more about the US regulatory system, the precautionary principle, As someone who eats mostly plant based (technically a flexitarian), it was at times frustrating that the book was geared towards a SAD audience. That said, I still learned a decent amount about some of the fad diets and the current state of nutrition science. Think it could have also touched more on portion control and emotional/distracted eating. It would be great to see a book aimed at optimal eaters interested in learning more about the US regulatory system, the precautionary principle, comparative regulatory approaches (ie the EU and Member State approaches), and environmental impacts of dietary choices.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    Reminded me of Michael Pollan's books, but with more emphasis on nutrition. Bittman and Katz critique all of the diets and how they are good or bad for us. Nothing new here but makes it clear that we should be eating PLANTS whenever possible and seeking a balance of nutrients. Where is the PLANT instead of "where is the beef?". Also makes a case against the methodology researchers go about proving a diet choice is valid. Organized as a series of questions and responses and very thorough overall.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Although possibly a little preachy, even some laughs and giggles (their jokes and opinions rather than the actual info), this book is like reading an interview, questions are asked and they try and answer without being over technical or silly and patronising. Although very much in the 'vegan' camp, the main theme is to eat whole foods rather than processed. Quick read and some interesting thoughts and info, though none of it revolutionary but maybe for some, explained in another way might help. Although possibly a little preachy, even some laughs and giggles (their jokes and opinions rather than the actual info), this book is like reading an interview, questions are asked and they try and answer without being over technical or silly and patronising. Although very much in the 'vegan' camp, the main theme is to eat whole foods rather than processed. Quick read and some interesting thoughts and info, though none of it revolutionary but maybe for some, explained in another way might help. Fine for teens and adults alike.
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    A good primer on the basics of nutritionOther than a few details on macronutrients, there wasnt anything in this book that I didnt already know as someone who has been interested in food my entire life. Yet, I gave it a high rating because Bittman and Katz do present a lot of common sense, evidence-based information in an accessible way that would be very useful to anyone who feels lost about what to eat. A good primer on the basics of nutritionOther than a few details on macronutrients, there wasn’t anything in this book that I didn’t already know as someone who has been interested in food my entire life. Yet, I gave it a high rating because Bittman and Katz do present a lot of common sense, evidence-based information in an accessible way that would be very useful to anyone who feels lost about what to eat.
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  • Jeff J.
    January 1, 1970
    The abridged version: Eat fruits & vegetables, especially beans. Supplement with vitamin D, fish oil, and maybe probiotics. Drink water. The book has a Q&A format that is a little inefficient but supports browsing.
  • Dana Biscotti
    January 1, 1970
    Common sense advice. But it's nice to hear it in plain English.Fake food = poison.Real food = beneficial.What is fake food? Does it have more than a few ingredients? Chemicals? What is real food? An apple. And more than that, obviously. The idea is to eat real food as nature intended.
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  • Evan Reyes
    January 1, 1970
    Very strange writing style (everything is portrayed as an answer to a question in dialogue with some imaginary person) but excellent information that debunks a lot of dietary myths. Good information that changes the way we think about diet.
  • Margaret Martin
    January 1, 1970
    4 - Browsable (What is the DASH diet? What about keto?), repetitive (how many ways can you say the optimal diet is rich in unprocessed fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and grains?), but authoritative.
  • Pierke Bosschieter
    January 1, 1970
    Clear and sound advice, written in understandable language and not devoid of humour. It was a pleasure to read, and because of the excellent linked index in the ebook version, a book I will return to if I want to check up on facts.
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Not a lot of new information here for those up to date on nutrition, but I have to say that I enjoyed the format and humor. There are extensive citations included to inform the discussion and the emphasis on "what are you eating instead" makes sense and allows for informed consumer decision making.
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  • Betsy Dudley
    January 1, 1970
    Good interesting and informative.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing particularly new here- eat a lot of plants, little to no meat, dairy isn't necessary, alcohol in moderation.
  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Useful information, but pretty basic and quite repetitive.
  • Dlmrose
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Ray
    January 1, 1970
    A couple of glaring defects in the text did not give me confidence in what the authors had to say.
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