How to Fly
In this intimate collection, the beloved author of The Poisonwood Bible and more than a dozen other New York Times bestsellers, winner or finalist for the Pulitzer and countless other prizes, now trains her eye on the everyday and the metaphysical in poems that are smartly crafted, emotionally rich, and luminous. In her second poetry collection, Barbara Kingsolver offers reflections on the practical, the spiritual, and the wild. She begins with “how to” poems addressing everyday matters such as being hopeful, married, divorced; shearing a sheep; praying to unreliable gods; doing nothing at all; and of course, flying. Next come rafts of poems about making peace (or not) with the complicated bonds of friendship and family, and making peace (or not) with death, in the many ways it finds us. Some poems reflect on the redemptive powers of art and poetry itself; others consider where everything begins.Closing the book are poems that celebrate natural wonders—birdsong and ghost-flowers, ruthless ants, clever shellfish, coral reefs, deadly deserts, and thousand-year-old beech trees—all speaking to the daring project of belonging to an untamed world beyond ourselves.Altogether, these are poems about transcendence: finding breath and lightness in life and the everyday acts of living. It’s all terribly easy and, as the title suggests, not entirely possible. Or at least, it is never quite finished. 

How to Fly Details

TitleHow to Fly
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 22nd, 2020
PublisherHarper
ISBN-139780062993083
Rating
GenrePoetry

How to Fly Review

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know Barbara Kingsolver wrote poetry, but I really enjoyed this collection. I'd put it up there with Mary Oliver in thematic material and think the same readers would like both. (That's high praise, I love Mary Oliver!) - nature, aging, death & dying as part of life, wisdom etc.My favorites (linking to them online if I can find them)How to Drink Water When There is WineHow to Have a ChildHow to Survive This (published in the NYT during high pandemic numbers in NYC)How to Do Absolutely N I didn't know Barbara Kingsolver wrote poetry, but I really enjoyed this collection. I'd put it up there with Mary Oliver in thematic material and think the same readers would like both. (That's high praise, I love Mary Oliver!) - nature, aging, death & dying as part of life, wisdom etc.My favorites (linking to them online if I can find them)How to Drink Water When There is WineHow to Have a ChildHow to Survive This (published in the NYT during high pandemic numbers in NYC)How to Do Absolutely Nothing How to Be MarriedMy Mother's Last Forty Minutes "...Here begins my life as no one's bad daughter..."Forests of Antarctica"...You are the world that stirs. This is the world that waits."I had a copy from the publisher through Edelweiss. It comes out in September but I was worrying about my eARC expiring before I had a chance to review it so here we are.
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  • Alicia Bayer
    January 1, 1970
    I love any book of poems that Barbara Kinsgsolver writes. She is a poet who still knows what it is to be a poet, to say things in such a way that you think of little things in brand new ways, to use words as art and dance, to make you understand the nature of life with tiny observations that give meaning to the most insignificant things around us.There were definitely poems and sections that I liked in this book better than others, but it's the sort of book that I'd like a physical copy of to do I love any book of poems that Barbara Kinsgsolver writes. She is a poet who still knows what it is to be a poet, to say things in such a way that you think of little things in brand new ways, to use words as art and dance, to make you understand the nature of life with tiny observations that give meaning to the most insignificant things around us.There were definitely poems and sections that I liked in this book better than others, but it's the sort of book that I'd like a physical copy of to dog-ear and underline and read again and again. These are the sorts of poems you read to realize you're not alone in the universe and other people are living all the same heartbreaking, wonderful, terrible, mundane, awful, beautiful things you are. "Passing Death" was especially heartbreaking for me because it describes so well what is happening to my wonderful mother-in-law right now, whom we can't even visit because of covid-19.For her children, this gradual dyingis like those tests at school that leave no one behind: death mastered in small increments.Last summer, they lost her laugh,the surprise of a marshmallow sandwich,jokes while she folded the laundry,a sheet furled around the make-believe bride.By then we knew she wouldn't see their weddings...Topics range from friendship to aging to nature to love, arranged by chapters that each have their own style and general theme.A great collection, with something for everyone (as long as you're willing to think a bit).I read a temporary digital ARC of this book for review.
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  • Sharyn
    January 1, 1970
    Barbara Kingsolver has visions, knows and uses words like an alchemist. This collection of poetry soars from inner musings on the natural world to tracing and illuminating personal family history from roots in Italy to Africa and rural Kentucky. The word images can be illuminating, startling, befuddling and astute.As in her prize winning fiction and non-fiction works, the breadth and depth of her experience, knowledge and curiosity is an amazement.It is not easygoing reading and at times you may Barbara Kingsolver has visions, knows and uses words like an alchemist. This collection of poetry soars from inner musings on the natural world to tracing and illuminating personal family history from roots in Italy to Africa and rural Kentucky. The word images can be illuminating, startling, befuddling and astute.As in her prize winning fiction and non-fiction works, the breadth and depth of her experience, knowledge and curiosity is an amazement.It is not easygoing reading and at times you may push yourself to slog through lines and metaphors that leave you in the dark. Then, the next line will take your breath away. Stay with her for those times are worth it.
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  • Pamela Scott
    January 1, 1970
    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...Kingsolver is one of my favourite fiction writers so I was looking forward to reading her poetry. This is an incredible collection of poetry. I loved every word and every line of every poem. Her style reminds me a lot of the poetry of my other favourite writer, Joyce Carol Oates. The collection is split into seven sections, perfect to read across a week, with each section dealing with a different theme such as loss, hope and how to seek out the good things https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...Kingsolver is one of my favourite fiction writers so I was looking forward to reading her poetry. This is an incredible collection of poetry. I loved every word and every line of every poem. Her style reminds me a lot of the poetry of my other favourite writer, Joyce Carol Oates. The collection is split into seven sections, perfect to read across a week, with each section dealing with a different theme such as loss, hope and how to seek out the good things in life. Kingsolver puts so-called popular Insta Poets to shame with her dense, beautiful poetry and her imagery which will stay in my head for days and maybe weeks to come. Kingsolver’s poetry is as stunning as her prose. I loved every poem in this collection. Some gems include How To Drink Water When There Is Wine, The Roman Circus, Burying Ground, By The Roots, Thief, Where It Begins and The Nature of Objects.
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  • Amie
    January 1, 1970
    Barbara Kingsolver's poetry collection How to Fly (in Ten Thousand Easy Lessons) is a recommended read! The collection is divided into themed sections and each theme is insightful, heatfelt, reflective, and powerful on its own. My favorite poems were "How to Lose That Stubborn Weight", "Swimming in the Bay of Naples", "My Mother's Last Forty Minutes", and "My Afternoon with the Postman". Kingsolver is a skilled poet and How to Fly should be added to your to-be-read list.Advanced readers' copy pr Barbara Kingsolver's poetry collection How to Fly (in Ten Thousand Easy Lessons) is a recommended read! The collection is divided into themed sections and each theme is insightful, heatfelt, reflective, and powerful on its own. My favorite poems were "How to Lose That Stubborn Weight", "Swimming in the Bay of Naples", "My Mother's Last Forty Minutes", and "My Afternoon with the Postman". Kingsolver is a skilled poet and How to Fly should be added to your to-be-read list.Advanced readers' copy provided courtesy of the publisher via #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Available September 2020.
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  • DaShannon
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve enjoyed reading Kingsolver for decades and this is another amazing read from her. I’ve read her nonfiction and fiction but never poetry so this is new. This is a poetry collection I will return to again and again. Her poem ‘How to Survive This’ is available on her website to read. At the end of How to Fly, Kingsolver dedicates several of the poems to specific people and also expounds on several aspects in various poems. It makes for an interesting read. Many of Kingsolver’s signature themes I’ve enjoyed reading Kingsolver for decades and this is another amazing read from her. I’ve read her nonfiction and fiction but never poetry so this is new. This is a poetry collection I will return to again and again. Her poem ‘How to Survive This’ is available on her website to read. At the end of How to Fly, Kingsolver dedicates several of the poems to specific people and also expounds on several aspects in various poems. It makes for an interesting read. Many of Kingsolver’s signature themes are here- environmentalism, parenthood, marriage, gardening, nature.
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  • Jenni
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all....I got an early copy of this from Netgalley...brb reading this IMMEDIATELY (you may not know this, but Barbara is my idol)
  • Karen Troutman
    January 1, 1970
    How to Fly (In Ten Thousand Easy Lessons)Poetryby Barbara KingsolverHarperCollins Publishers You Like Them You Are Auto-ApprovedHarperPoetryPub Date 22 Sep 2020 | Archive Date 17 Nov 2020As a fan of Barbara Kingsolver I was quite excited to read her poetry. Thanks to Net Galley and Harper Collins Publishers for the ARC. Well done! Will recommend to our patrons.
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  • Rachel Stansel
    January 1, 1970
    A journey of poems. So I enjoyed. Overall, it was not gripping as I was hoping it would be. The themes were good, but to me, they just didn't draw my emotions. Full disclosure- I received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Can't wait to read it!
  • Sue Frances
    January 1, 1970
    5+ stars. I loved this book. Barbara Kingsolver has a beautiful way with words.
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