Hood
You have the blood of kings and rebels within you, love. Let it rise to meet the call. Isabelle of Kirklees has only ever known a quiet life inside the sheltered walls of the convent, where she lives with her mother, Marien. But after she is arrested by royal soldiers for defending innocent villagers, Isabelle becomes the target of the Wolf, King John's ruthless right hand. Desperate to keep her daughter safe, Marien helps Isabelle escape and sends her on a mission to find the one person who can help: Isabelle's father, Robin Hood.As Isabelle races to stay out of the Wolf's clutches and find the father she's never known, she is thrust into a world of thieves and mercenaries, handsome young outlaws, new enemies with old grudges, and a king who wants her entire family dead. As she joins forces with Robin and his Merry Men in a final battle against the Wolf, will Isabelle find the strength to defy the crown and save the lives of everyone she holds dear?

Hood Details

TitleHood
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 9th, 2020
PublisherDisney-Hyperion
ISBN-139781368047456
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Retellings, Fantasy, Historical, Historical Fiction

Hood Review

  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    **3.5-stars**What happened after Robin Hood and Maid Marian rode off into the sunset?They had a daughter, Isabelle. This is her story.Finding herself on the wrong side of the law, Isabelle is forced to flee the village of Kirklees and the priory where her mother, Marian, is Prioress.Her mother instructs her to seek a particular public house, a few days away, where one of her old friends will help to hide her from the King's men.After a long and fearful journey, Isabelle is relieved to finally re **3.5-stars**What happened after Robin Hood and Maid Marian rode off into the sunset?They had a daughter, Isabelle. This is her story.Finding herself on the wrong side of the law, Isabelle is forced to flee the village of Kirklees and the priory where her mother, Marian, is Prioress.Her mother instructs her to seek a particular public house, a few days away, where one of her old friends will help to hide her from the King's men.After a long and fearful journey, Isabelle is relieved to finally reach the Inn, no matter how questionable some of the other patrons seem to be. It's there she joins up with the Merry Men, learns the truth of her parentage and grows ever closer to meeting the infamous, Robin Hood.This was an action-packed, super fun story, full of adventure and close calls.I enjoyed where Moke took this, finding out how Robin and Marian's 'happily ever after' went.While I had fun reading this, it was quick and light, I wasn't necessarily blown away by anything here. Don't get me wrong, this is a good story, and if you are a fan of the Disney animated version, you should definitely check it out, but I can't help but wish it would have been built out further.Moke has a very pleasing writing style and all the bones were here, but I just wanted more.I believe this is a standalone, but I sort of wish it was going to be a duology. I started to feel very connected with Isabelle towards the end, and the rest of the Merry Men. Personally, I would really enjoy following them on further adventures.While I wasn't crazy about some parts of the conclusion to this tale, I do believe there is a lot more story to tell and Moke is the perfect person to tell it. Give me more Isabelle. She is just starting to come into her own!Thank you so much to the publisher, Disney Book Group, for providing me with a copy of this to read and review. I appreciate the opportunity and look forward to reading more from Jenny Elder Moke!
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  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    This one was just hard for me to connect to the MC but I did like the world building!
  • Helena of Eretz ✰
    January 1, 1970
    DNFI've read enough of this, seen enough reviews of this and have been disappointed enough times by YA Robin Hood retellings to lose interest in this. Sorry.For those wanting an ACTUAL Robin Hood retelling, try Scarlet. It has a rough start, but is worth it in the end, and seems to be the only YA Robin Hood retelling worth reading that I've come across, in my opinion. DNFI've read enough of this, seen enough reviews of this and have been disappointed enough times by YA Robin Hood retellings to lose interest in this. Sorry.For those wanting an ACTUAL Robin Hood retelling, try Scarlet. It has a rough start, but is worth it in the end, and seems to be the only YA Robin Hood retelling worth reading that I've come across, in my opinion.
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  • Jenny Moke
    January 1, 1970
    I've heard it's *pretty* good. You should read it yourself and find out.
  • Jeff Bishop
    January 1, 1970
    Did everybody else know that Robin Hood was real? And if so, THEN HOW COME NO ONE TOLD ME???Now that I am aware of said fact, the Robin Hood I think of will not be the gritty, dour Russel Crowe version, but the eponymous character from Elder Moke's HOOD. It isn't a retread origin story however, at least not in the classic sense. HOOD follows Isabelle, a young woman who quickly learns that she is the daughter of the infamous outlaw (who again, was real!)I don't think I've read historical fiction Did everybody else know that Robin Hood was real? And if so, THEN HOW COME NO ONE TOLD ME???Now that I am aware of said fact, the Robin Hood I think of will not be the gritty, dour Russel Crowe version, but the eponymous character from Elder Moke's HOOD. It isn't a retread origin story however, at least not in the classic sense. HOOD follows Isabelle, a young woman who quickly learns that she is the daughter of the infamous outlaw (who again, was real!)I don't think I've read historical fiction since middle school, but I'm glad I started here. The action sequences are expertly put together, and the plot has a Mad Max-esque feel, where the characters all start out at point A, run scorched-earth to a destination, only to come whipping around the bend and wind up where they began. Moke's got a real handle on distilling a character's wants and worries, and a relaying it in an effective way without hitting the reader over the head. The ending's a real trip too; on three different occasion I thought "okay, here's the wrap-up" only to have something else hit the proverbial fan. I can also speak to the "Daddy issues" rep, which I think is handled quite well here (though I've heard Moke is want to mock those with such hang-ups in her personal time). Plus, she uses the phrase "the earth is my floor, the heavens my roof" which I really love. If I wrote fanfic, which I don't, but IF I did I would def lift that and pass it off as my own. In summary: HOOD>>The animated fox one>>Russell Crowe>>Monsieur Hood (Shrek)
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  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    This book was one I was so excited for but so nervous about. I truly did not know what I would end up feeling by the end of the book because so often these retellings are just 'okay' versions of what I make up in my head in excitement. I started this book and was immediately hooked. I've never read a retelling of Robin Hood (at least, from what I can remember) and I'm not sure why because I don't see a reason to not like it? I thoroughly enjoyed being introduced the Isabelle and the Merry Men an This book was one I was so excited for but so nervous about. I truly did not know what I would end up feeling by the end of the book because so often these retellings are just 'okay' versions of what I make up in my head in excitement. I started this book and was immediately hooked. I've never read a retelling of Robin Hood (at least, from what I can remember) and I'm not sure why because I don't see a reason to not like it? I thoroughly enjoyed being introduced the Isabelle and the Merry Men and watching this journey unfold.Each character had their own charming personality and Robin Hood was clearly the best of the best, he was charming and witty and kind... all the things I had hoped for but not expected because YA usually makes me expect the worst outcome in a highly anticipated meeting of two long lost characters.Moke opens up the world of Merry Men in an exciting new way and one that I hope I get to revisit in another book or two (I'm sensing duology or trilogy vibes). The writing was excellent and the story was fun.... it was never a dull moment.This loses a star because I feel like the cover could've been better. I expect a lot from Disney so it just feels lacklustre.Thank you NetGalley and Disney for the ARC in exchange for an honest review
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    My first Robin Hood retelling. I feel like there needs to be a medal—a plaque! And for my first, what a fun one this was!Full review at Write, Read, RepeatYes, this book was a grand old time, running around the great oaks of Sherwood Forest and besting those pesky Sheriffs. Outlaws stealing gold to give away and shooting arrows like its nobody's business. Someone described it as campy fun—they legit all wear hose and tunics—and now I can't think of a better way to describe this. Even though this My first Robin Hood retelling. I feel like there needs to be a medal—a plaque! And for my first, what a fun one this was!Full review at Write, Read, RepeatYes, this book was a grand old time, running around the great oaks of Sherwood Forest and besting those pesky Sheriffs. Outlaws stealing gold to give away and shooting arrows like its nobody's business. Someone described it as campy fun—they legit all wear hose and tunics—and now I can't think of a better way to describe this. Even though this book is centred on Robin Hood's daughter, there are many characters we recognize like Marien, Little John, and a passing reference to Friar Tuck. And, obviously, the big man himself. The story goes that Isabelle must find her father, whom she has never met, in order to keep her mother, Marien, safe from the King's righthand man. She leaves Kirklees and the priory she calls home for the first time, and ventures out into the unknown to find the fabled Merry Men. And while this is a great way to kick off this story, it was executed very poorly. As a writer myself, I am obsessed about starting a book off right. Drop your reader into the last possible moment before they don't know what's going on. This felt like page 30, not 1. Within three pages, Isabelle is randomly thrown in prison, is sprung from it, and sent off to meet a mysterious man her mother says will help. As the reader, I sorely needed that extra time to see what she did to land in jail. I needed that extra time to meet Isabelle before she's slapped with the label of Robin Hood's daughter. A label that essentially defines her. And although we got off to a sour start, I did come to like Isabelle. Adore, even. She's an innocent yet fiery little thing who doesn't seem all too hung-up on the religion she's grown up with and is a crackshot with a bow. Most of the characters in this band of outlaws were great, actually. The villains were a little bland for me, but the Merry Men made up for it. They are a tight-knit group that is a family found. Isabelle is welcomed into their ranks, even without them knowing who she is, and it was sweet reading of their interactions with one another. A of them few were hard to tell apart because they were all abnormally huge and two were named Little in some form. As expected, there is a romance, but it's a small one. It's very obvious who Isabelle will be with—can it be one-sided instalove if it's the whole book but actually a few days? However, aside from two memorable moments, I didn't really get chemistry between them beyond friends.It pains me to say this, but while this was super entertaining, I fear it won't be memorable for me. In the moment it's great, but it didn't feel bold enough a retelling to stick with me down the road. I'm fairly certain that if I were to try writing this review in a week, it would be a lot shorter. 3.5 rounded to 4 stars
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  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Laura ErneI have loved every Robin Hood inspired YA novel that I’ve read and Hood by Jenny Elder Moke is no exception. I fell in love with the idea that Robin of Locksley and Lady Marien got their happy ever after (well sort of) and as a result got to see the next generation of protectors of Sherwood Forest. I found this take on the subject of Robin Hood a unique perspective on the legend because I haven’t seen a plot that centres around a less Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Laura ErneI have loved every Robin Hood inspired YA novel that I’ve read and Hood by Jenny Elder Moke is no exception. I fell in love with the idea that Robin of Locksley and Lady Marien got their happy ever after (well sort of) and as a result got to see the next generation of protectors of Sherwood Forest. I found this take on the subject of Robin Hood a unique perspective on the legend because I haven’t seen a plot that centres around a less than confident female lead like Isabelle. She had to learn quick how the real world worked and she adapted the best she could. She is a main character who isn’t great at everything and I found that refreshing, plus her development throughout the plot was substantial. It ushered in a new perspective of how Robin’s actions have affected the lives of his beloved village years later. This is a story about loyalty, justice, and heart. It’s incredibly easy to follow, there’s tons of character development across many characters, and this features a main character who’s the best of both of her parents as she’s stubborn like her mother and strong like her father.Read the FULL REVIEW on The Nerd Daily
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  • Sheena ☆ Oh, the Sheenanigans!
    January 1, 1970
    “Hood” was better a retelling than I was originally expecting and despite some elements being changed around to draw in more of a YA audience with the focus of the story primarily on Robin Hood’s daughter Isabelle instead, this whirlwind adventure about the great legendary heroic outlaw left me wanting more. If you haven’t already know, this novel based on the world renowned English Folklore that takes readers through a journey of epic proportions as we follow Isabelle, the newly “Hood” was better a retelling than I was originally expecting and despite some elements being changed around to draw in more of a YA audience with the focus of the story primarily on Robin Hood’s daughter Isabelle instead, this whirlwind adventure about the great legendary heroic outlaw left me wanting more. If you haven’t already know, this novel based on the world renowned English Folklore that takes readers through a journey of epic proportions as we follow Isabelle, the newly discovered daughter of the notorious outlaw, find the father she's never known while dealing with wild thieves and mercenaries, handsome young outlaws (and possible romance), new enemies with old grudges, and a king who wants her entire family dead.It has all the elements you would want in a story like this and would highly recommend it if you’re a fan of the childhood series or want to further explore what made Robin Hood so infamous.
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  • Vee_Bookish // stan shea couleé
    January 1, 1970
    This cover looks like the sneak peek cover before they release the real one, or an ARC cover.
  • Shannon Doleski
    January 1, 1970
    GAH I AM A SUCKER FOR A RETELLING/REINVENTION WITH A NEW POINT OF VIEW, AND HOOD DELIVERS.Okay, so this is the story of Isabelle. Imprisoned for shooting a soldier, she is rescued by her mother Marien, who tells her she must flee the priory and seek refuge with Thomas, a three-day journey away. An adventure begins. When she finds the Merry Men, she falls for a boy with brown curls, reconnects with her father, and learns how to be braver than she feels.The writing in this book is so lush and beau GAH I AM A SUCKER FOR A RETELLING/REINVENTION WITH A NEW POINT OF VIEW, AND HOOD DELIVERS.Okay, so this is the story of Isabelle. Imprisoned for shooting a soldier, she is rescued by her mother Marien, who tells her she must flee the priory and seek refuge with Thomas, a three-day journey away. An adventure begins. When she finds the Merry Men, she falls for a boy with brown curls, reconnects with her father, and learns how to be braver than she feels.The writing in this book is so lush and beautiful. But that doesn't take away from the action. It is all action adventure. And Elder Moke can write some action scenes with heart, let me tell you. It is fast and fun and witty. Our main character, Isabelle, is everything a good hero is. She is brave and smart. But my favorite is when she is tentative and scared. We all feel this way. Even heroes. And Isabelle isn't the only woman or girl. We've got an expert archer, Marien as a prioress, and nuns. I loved the next generation of Merry Men, including a cast of characters that will be full of shipping potential for every fan of fantasy, historical fantasy, and historical alike. 1000 out of 100 totally recommend!!!
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  • Last Book Marauder
    January 1, 1970
    There will never be enough Robin Hood re-imaginings to suit me
  • Alaina
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh, another hard book to rate.Okay, so when I saw that Hood was coming out I was freaking excited. Then when I got denied on NetGalley.. well I was still excited but it did dim a little bit. Once I finally got my hands on this book - I think I was A-Okay with being rejected to read the ARC of it.In this, you will meet a girl name Isabelle who is pretty good with an arrow. So she's like the female version of robin hood but lamer than Katniss from Hunger Games. Also, she barely listens to anyone Ugh, another hard book to rate.Okay, so when I saw that Hood was coming out I was freaking excited. Then when I got denied on NetGalley.. well I was still excited but it did dim a little bit. Once I finally got my hands on this book - I think I was A-Okay with being rejected to read the ARC of it.In this, you will meet a girl name Isabelle who is pretty good with an arrow. So she's like the female version of robin hood but lamer than Katniss from Hunger Games. Also, she barely listens to anyone in this book and constantly finds herself in trouble. So, yeah.. she's a stubborn fool and gets lots of people in danger. Besides that, the merry man expanded a bit and there are now females! I loved that part but that's pretty much it. The ending most definitely pissed me off and I'm honestly happy that this is a standalone. This book had so much potential in it but it just disappointed me right and left.
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  • Uma | Books.Bags.Burgers
    January 1, 1970
    (A huge thank you to the FFBC toursand the publisher for the eARC of the book) ~3 THOUGHTS WHILE I READ HOOD~ ~Fast paced and doesn't slow down till the end~ Hood is a really fast read; the kind of book where you start reading and then realize you're already 50% in. I read the book in one sitting and the action starts from page one. We are introduced to the protagonist, Isabelle when she's been captured by the soldiers and the story just takes off. I did think that while it was fast paced, (A huge thank you to the FFBC toursand the publisher for the eARC of the book) ~3 THOUGHTS WHILE I READ HOOD~ ~Fast paced and doesn't slow down till the end~ Hood is a really fast read; the kind of book where you start reading and then realize you're already 50% in. I read the book in one sitting and the action starts from page one. We are introduced to the protagonist, Isabelle when she's been captured by the soldiers and the story just takes off. I did think that while it was fast paced, it glossed over a lot of things and times didn't give me enough time to know the characters or understand the surroundings. Nevertheless, the speed at which the plot moved, kept me hooked and turning the pages quickly. ~Found family love~ If there's only one trope I could ever read, I'd pick found family. Robin and his merry men are obviously the best characters for a lovely found family. Although we don't get acquainted with all the merry men, I did like the ones who were the secondary characters. Helena and Patrick were my favourites. Helena with her sharp tongue, quick temper and immense skill in archery was fun to read about and learning how despite her rough attitude, she also cares about her friends with a fierce loyalty.Patrick is a kind soul and the best at making Isabelle feel at home among the merry men. i liked that he takes the time to teach Isabelle something. Even though it wasn't much, he made her feel welcome by teaching her how to use a knife.I wanted to like Adam, but he felt too two dimensional for my taste. The moment we meet this boy with piercing eyes, smelling of pine, I knew he was to be the love interest and I wasn't impressed. i hoped he's impress me later on but alas. But the other secondary characters definitely make up for the lack of Adam's originality. ~Action filled plotline~ Like I mentioned, the action moves really fast and there are multiple fighting scenes that were done quite well. The plot keeps moving and while nothing in it shocked me, I didn't think a certain incident towards the end would happen. It was a bittersweet and considering the fun adventurous tone, I wasn't expecting that and was surprised!My only issue is that as far as plot twists go, I found most of them predictable. I wish the story had made me jump up in my seat a lot more than it did. That being said, the way the story ended, I think a sequel would be great. This book wraps up as a standalone really well but there's a lot of scope for sequels or other books set in this world. I would like to have a closer look at some of the political schemes that were kind of the the far background in this book. Hood is a unique take on the robin Hood tale as it revolve's around his daughter. I enjoyed the premise and fast writing but would have loved to see more depth in the main character.
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  • Precious ✨
    January 1, 1970
    I was graciously granted this book via Netgalley (all opinions are my own)I am happily surprised by how much I enjoyed reading this. I’ve been eyeing the Disney retellings in the bookstores for ages now, thinking.. it can’t possibly be any good if I already know the original story. So when I saw I was approved for this ARC I was excited.. 1) since it was my first go at it and 2) because this one I could take a chance on without knowing too much of the original. The story of Robin Hood is the one I was graciously granted this book via Netgalley (all opinions are my own)I am happily surprised by how much I enjoyed reading this. I’ve been eyeing the Disney retellings in the bookstores for ages now, thinking.. it can’t possibly be any good if I already know the original story. So when I saw I was approved for this ARC I was excited.. 1) since it was my first go at it and 2) because this one I could take a chance on without knowing too much of the original. The story of Robin Hood is the one I only know by the many remakes and renditions throughout the years so I was open to whatever happened. The story has great pacing, plenty of action, emotion upheavals. There were times throuhgout the book that a few things were predictable but nothing that took away from the book itself. I was able to connect to Isabelle, our MC, plenty enough and was hoping for a HEA for her and myself once I got through the first couple of chapters. If you’re into retellings or coming of age (with a small side of romance and/or big side of family reunions) I’d recommend this. I personally like that the main focus of the story was Isabelle and her family and the differences in the lifestyle she grew up in versus what she finds when she leaves to start her adeventure. There is a love interest but it stays very much second fiddle in comparison but it was enough that I also wanted to see how that set up played out. Overall I loved the novel for keeping Robin Hood alive as well as doing a good job of it.
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  • Raquel Gilliland
    January 1, 1970
    HOOD is what I like to call a legit Portal Book. It opens into its own, ancient oak-lined pathway, inviting you to step into its world, drink its mead, and banter with its characters as you follow an irresistible story. Isabelle, daughter of prioress Marien, finally discovers the identity of her father. He’s Robin Hood— a man whose existence she wasn’t even sure about until then. And now she must deliver to him the most urgent of messages. Robin Hood, unsurprisingly, is a difficult man to find, HOOD is what I like to call a legit Portal Book. It opens into its own, ancient oak-lined pathway, inviting you to step into its world, drink its mead, and banter with its characters as you follow an irresistible story. Isabelle, daughter of prioress Marien, finally discovers the identity of her father. He’s Robin Hood— a man whose existence she wasn’t even sure about until then. And now she must deliver to him the most urgent of messages. Robin Hood, unsurprisingly, is a difficult man to find, so Isabelle utilizes the help of the Merry Men, including the mysterious and handsome Adam, who Isabelle finds just a bit too distracting.HOOD contains a large cast of characters, each one so well-crafted and palpable, you can hear the deep rumblings of Little John or the snarl of Helena (the two who quickly became my favorites).HOOD is a retelling, and Elder Moke’s version is so tantalizing, I foresee a devout fandom in its future, complete with fanfiction. When an author envisions a world so rich with detail and lyrical descriptions, with a voice that’s funny and wise all at once, it’s impossible not to imagine the tales happening alongside our main narrative. Even as I read it, I immediately needed to know the origin story of Robin and Marien (so, get on that, please, author!). With phenomenal world building, a strong and sensitive protagonist, a charming and hot romance, HOOD is a book you will treasure, just as a skilled archer does with her beloved bow.
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  • Cindy ✩☽♔
    January 1, 1970
    This sounds like a promising retelling, so fingers crossed
  • Sanne ♔ (Sanne and the Books)
    January 1, 1970
    i'm really sorry but is this the final cover? because i hope not i'm really sorry but is this the final cover? because i hope not
  • Annie (Putt)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI thoroughly enjoyed this story minus two elements that weighed heavily enough that I docked a star and a half. Isabelle was a compelling heroine, and I loved that the story had the campy feel of a Robin Hood movie. It didn't need to be totally believable in how the Merry Men were "that" good at fighting or how they always got out of the worst situations with nary a scratch. Yet Moke did a great job writing it where the story had stakes while also containing those nostalgic feels for th 3.5 starsI thoroughly enjoyed this story minus two elements that weighed heavily enough that I docked a star and a half. Isabelle was a compelling heroine, and I loved that the story had the campy feel of a Robin Hood movie. It didn't need to be totally believable in how the Merry Men were "that" good at fighting or how they always got out of the worst situations with nary a scratch. Yet Moke did a great job writing it where the story had stakes while also containing those nostalgic feels for the old shows. Isabelle had skills with a bow, and could shoot extraordinarily well, and, is it believable? Not entirely, but the fact that she regularly didn't have a bow or any type of weapon added credibility to her as she wasn't always pulling out arrows and God-moding her way through situations.I loved Robin and Marian. The family dynamics in this are some of the best I've ever seen in YA. Isabelle starts off the story not knowing who her father is, and when she finally meets Robin, it's so sweet and his love for her is so completely selfless. Robin was quirky and goofy while yet retaining an air of mystery and seriousness. Marian was loving while being stern, and strong when most might consider her weak. She's not a BA character who kicks butts and defeats men, but she's subtle in her power, and a lot of her strength comes from her beliefs and devotion to helping anyone.But, my complaints: I hated the romance, especially after the idiotic drama that occurred. You could tell exactly who Isabelle would fall for the minute they appeared on screen, and there was no development. They met, and instant attraction, then kisses and the end. It was rough, it was bad, and there was absolutely no chemistry.The drama issue that plagued a good portion of the book was so beyond pointless that it made me despise every person in Isabelle's friend group.(view spoiler)[Isabelle doesn't know who her father is, and as such, when she finds out, she starts asking the Merry men and her friends a bunch of questions, because she wants to know more about her father. No one thinks anything of it because she has an important message to give Robin, from her mother. She never mentions to them that Robin is her dad, and when it's revealed, her friends turn their backs on her and go so far as to say that they're "angry, and it's justified." It's justified for her to fall in to a gang of people whom she has never met and just tell them that SHE just found out Robin Hood is her father? Also, the whole reason she never brought it up is because she was warned by another character that telling her friends could put them in mortal danger with the person chasing her. So by being silent and protecting her own personal secret that would also harm them if they were caught, she's ostracized and blamed for it, and the book fully believes Isabelle was in the wrong for not wanting to talk about this. The story goes so far as to talk about how guilty and horrible she feels and how she's basically having a full breakdown because none of her supposed friends feel any pity or understanding for her and instead all act like she has the plague.Not. Cool.This carried on for such a long amount of time, and literally only one of the four characters even apologizes to her, that I have them on my black list. They were awful, and I genuinely wish that whole drama fest was excluded from the story completely because other that and the stupid romance, they were minor characters the entire time, so there was no reason for this. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Prerna Pickett
    January 1, 1970
    HOOD by Jenny Elder Moke is a fast-paced, action packed adventure. With a memorable cast of characters, both old and new, Elder Moke has created a unique yet familiar story that centers around Isabelle, the daughter of Robin Hood himself. What I loved about this historical fiction novel is that it took the classic tale of Robin Hood and wove it into a reimagined feminist tale. Isabelle is a relatable character who comes into her own but not without some doubts and struggles. Isabelle is thrown i HOOD by Jenny Elder Moke is a fast-paced, action packed adventure. With a memorable cast of characters, both old and new, Elder Moke has created a unique yet familiar story that centers around Isabelle, the daughter of Robin Hood himself. What I loved about this historical fiction novel is that it took the classic tale of Robin Hood and wove it into a reimagined feminist tale. Isabelle is a relatable character who comes into her own but not without some doubts and struggles. Isabelle is thrown into an unfamiliar world and even though she’s afraid and unsure of herself, it doesn’t stop her from doing what she must to keep the people she loves safe. Isabelle, in short, is a badass. There is romance, comedy, and lots of emotion in this wonderful debut. You’ll want to add it to your list immediately! And I cannot wait to read what else Jenny Elder Moke has up her sleeve.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I had the privilege of reading this delightful book early, and I am SO glad I didn’t have to wait! HOOD is straight up my street — an incredibly fun historical that gives an immersive world without getting bogged down in details, complete with mystery, costumed heists, and a feisty heroine who has daddy issues and a smoldering love interest. Also, archery contests! Because what’s the point of a Robin Hood retelling without some of those, right? If Robin Hood was one of your childhood favorites, I had the privilege of reading this delightful book early, and I am SO glad I didn’t have to wait! HOOD is straight up my street — an incredibly fun historical that gives an immersive world without getting bogged down in details, complete with mystery, costumed heists, and a feisty heroine who has daddy issues and a smoldering love interest. Also, archery contests! Because what’s the point of a Robin Hood retelling without some of those, right? If Robin Hood was one of your childhood favorites, you may rest assured that his legacy is safe in Elder Moke’s talented hands. This story has every bit as much fun and adventure as the original, but with a delightfully fresh take.
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  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    I mean this sounds cool but that's a very basic/half finished cover. I hope that's not the final one. Pretty underwhelming from Disney.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    The myth. The man. The legend. Or is it woman? We all know the story of Robin Hood and his Merry Men. Ms. Moke brings us a fresh gender bent retelling of Robin Hood that will especially appeal to fans of young adult fiction.“Hood” by Jenny Elder Moke explores the next generation after Robin Hood and his Merry Men. Our main character, Isabelle, becomes a new Robin Hood figure and explores her place in the Merry Men, her family and the world around her. She is a smart, brave, fierce and kind heroi The myth. The man. The legend. Or is it woman? We all know the story of Robin Hood and his Merry Men. Ms. Moke brings us a fresh gender bent retelling of Robin Hood that will especially appeal to fans of young adult fiction.“Hood” by Jenny Elder Moke explores the next generation after Robin Hood and his Merry Men. Our main character, Isabelle, becomes a new Robin Hood figure and explores her place in the Merry Men, her family and the world around her. She is a smart, brave, fierce and kind heroine. Throughout the book, Isabelle is trying to fit in and find her place in the world. Isabelle meets many old, familiar characters as well as a new generation of Merry Men (and women). She develops some strong friendships and I love the “squad” she becomes a part of. There is even a sweet romance. “Hood” is written with lots of great lessons to take away as well. Isabelle learns to be braver than she feels and to not let the constraints of the past define her future. At some points, I felt the pacing rather lagged, whereas at other points the book is very action packed. There are some great fight scenes and archery contests (of course!). Overall, it is a fun retelling of Robin Hood that fans of retellings, Disney, Robin Hood and young adult literature will love!Content: I give this book a PG rating. Some examples of the content are: people are at a pub, many are drunk and use ribald language, but it’s not actually written; the word “as*” is used in reference to a horse; the words “bloody,” “hell” and “d*mn” are used; there is mention of a girl being physically abused in her past; a man curses, but the words aren’t written; the word “bastard” is used; a girl dresses up as a prostitute as a disguise; there are a few sexual innuendos.Rating: I give this book 4 stars.I want to thank Jenny Moke, Disney-Hyperion and NetGalley for the complimentary copy of this book for review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are my own. This is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s CFR 16, Part 255.
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  • Andria Sedig
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly, the story was a bit underwhelming. It didn't feel like there was anything particularly special about this retelling. The writing was solid, but the dialogue felt very stiff at times. There were not a lot of descriptive sections in the text and it seemed very straightforward. I think that one of the biggest downfalls of this novel was the lack of development between any of the characters. Keeping secrets from the friends caused them all to be angry but they forgave quickly and moved on Honestly, the story was a bit underwhelming. It didn't feel like there was anything particularly special about this retelling. The writing was solid, but the dialogue felt very stiff at times. There were not a lot of descriptive sections in the text and it seemed very straightforward. I think that one of the biggest downfalls of this novel was the lack of development between any of the characters. Keeping secrets from the friends caused them all to be angry but they forgave quickly and moved on as if it never happened. There wasn't any real development between Isabelle and her father, so his death had less of an impact; they'd just met and had traveled together - yes it was sad that her father died, but because there wasn't an established relationship I didn't feel like the impact was as much as it could have been. Overall, I think the plot was strong and it was clear where the inspiration for this story was from - it followed the Robin Hood archetypes well; I think that what this novel needed more of for me was character development, particularly the relationships between the characters. One other thing to note is that I've seen this book tagged as fantasy in a few different places - there isn't any magical elements in this book, so I don't know that that tag fits the story well. Seeing the fantasy tag left me wanting those magical elements and I wish I hadn't been expecting those. This seems more like a historical fiction adventure or a straight fairytale retelling.
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  • Lauriane (L.M. Durand)
    January 1, 1970
    Hood is such a thrilling young adult fantasy with a cast of characters that will make laugh out loud. This loose retelling of Robin Hood is fast-paced and I simply couldn’t put it down.Isabelle is in great danger. After being thrown in jail, her mother, Merien, frees her and sets her on a mission. Isabelle must leave the priory where she lived her whole life to deliver a very important message. In one night, Isabelle sees her world turned upside down. She discovers a world where outlaws fight fo Hood is such a thrilling young adult fantasy with a cast of characters that will make laugh out loud. This loose retelling of Robin Hood is fast-paced and I simply couldn’t put it down.Isabelle is in great danger. After being thrown in jail, her mother, Merien, frees her and sets her on a mission. Isabelle must leave the priory where she lived her whole life to deliver a very important message. In one night, Isabelle sees her world turned upside down. She discovers a world where outlaws fight for the greater good and Robin Hood and The Merry Men are not only a legend. She befriends a unique set of young outlaws that will show her what love and family really mean. But as she uncovers an unsettling truth about her past, she faces a terrible choice that will set her in motion to face the enemy once and for all, and ultimately, fight for what is right.This story was everything I love in a YA Fantasy. It was a fast-paced quest with great banter and true friendship, badass characters with giant hearts, and a slow burn romance. I definitely hope there will be another book, but I’m not sure if this is planned. The ending made me laugh, cry, and gasp. It wraps up pretty nicely but still remains open enough for another book. (crossing my fingers here). I very much enjoyed the writing - beautiful, entertaining, and easy to read. The author did a really great job here. It gets all the stars from me. I highly recommend it.
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  • The Clever Reader
    January 1, 1970
    I love the story of Robin Hood. The princess falls in love with the philanthropist bad boy. What more could you want? How about the story of their daughter?Isabelle grew up in a priory but when soldier’s invade one night and her mother sends her away to find her father, who she never knew existed, she doesn’t hesitate. She trusts her mother wholeheartedly but also wonders why she never told her about him. She always thought Robin Hood was just a story, not a real person, but when she finds herse I love the story of Robin Hood. The princess falls in love with the philanthropist bad boy. What more could you want? How about the story of their daughter?Isabelle grew up in a priory but when soldier’s invade one night and her mother sends her away to find her father, who she never knew existed, she doesn’t hesitate. She trusts her mother wholeheartedly but also wonders why she never told her about him. She always thought Robin Hood was just a story, not a real person, but when she finds herself among his Merry Men it finally sinks in. She has a father. She has to keep her identity a secret for everyone’s safety but you can tell as time goes by, and she gets to know each of the individuals she’s travelling with, that not telling them is getting more and more difficult.I really liked Isabelle’s character. I enjoyed getting to know her through her experience navigating having been thrown into some intense situations. I loved the banter between her and Adam, one of the cute Merry Men, and the competition she feels with Helena when it comes to knowing her way around a bow and arrow. Despite being thrown into a world she never knew existed she’s able to handle it well.I enjoyed the adventures they came across throughout the book and seeing small connections to the original story. Overall I felt this was a great retelling and now I think I’ll go put on some Disney + !
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  • Kris
    January 1, 1970
    A really good book!!!!! I was surprised by this as I went into it with little to no expectations. The characters were good, story was good. Highly recommend
  • Steff Pasciuti
    January 1, 1970
    | Reader Fox Blog | I need a Robin Hood retelling to fall in love with because Jenny Elder Moke's Hood was not it. What breaks my heart the most is that it almost could have been. Ironically, even with some of the monumentally annoying--and unnecessary--changes that were made, Moke's retelling had a lot of potential. Featuring Robin and Marian's (spelled Marien in this novel for some reason) daughter as our protagonist, Hood exists as a coming of age story for a young girl who grew up in a p | Reader Fox Blog | I need a Robin Hood retelling to fall in love with because Jenny Elder Moke's Hood was not it. What breaks my heart the most is that it almost could have been. Ironically, even with some of the monumentally annoying--and unnecessary--changes that were made, Moke's retelling had a lot of potential. Featuring Robin and Marian's (spelled Marien in this novel for some reason) daughter as our protagonist, Hood exists as a coming of age story for a young girl who grew up in a priory but doesn't quite belong there.Right from the start, Hood asks me to suspend some emotional attachments I have to the story of Robin Hood. The first, and most prominent, is that Marian plays an almost non-existent role in Robin's life as an outlaw. As a massive fan of the BBC Robin Hood, this was kind of a problem for me. However, since both Robin and Marian are supporting roles in this novel I was able to let it go.Then there's the fact that Robin and Marian's backstory is entirely changed. A few smaller ones exist as well, primarily as character names, from Isabelle--which just doesn't fit Robin's daughter in my mind--to Little, who somehow is the son of Alan-a-Dale rather than the more obvious, Little John.Overall, I began my read genuinely enjoying Hood.When The Wolf, a man who has had it out for Robin from the beginning, learns of Isabelle's existence he sets out to use her as a way to trap Robin. It is here that our young teenager's journey begins. Her world is flipped upside down as her mother sends her from the priory she has known all her life in search of Robin without even bothering to tell Isabelle who this man really is to her.I loved so much about this book in the beginning. From the general plot, to the writing, to the characters. Adam was utterly endearing, as were Patrick, Helena, and Little. The tale Moke weaves is excellent and engaging. And then we meet Robin.I almost liked Moke's Robin.When we first met Robin, I was actually rather enamored with him. I found myself giggling at several of his comments and antics. He was definitely somewhat like himself. As the story progressed, though, I found myself increasingly disgruntled with the way he was written. Nostalgia took over and this Robin just didn't match the Robin I knew.Which, ultimately, is understandable. Everyone who rewrites a Robin Hood story is going to have a different take. This is why there are some Robin Hood films I love and some I absolutely cannot stand. To this day, my favorite Robin remains Jonas Armstrong's from the BBC series.So, Robin wasn't realistic to me. It wasn't the worst thing and certainly didn't destroy the story for me. But then it got worse. Robin let Isabelle put herself in danger without having him along for assistance. And then suddenly Marian, who was absent for a portion of the novel, didn't match the character I've loved for a large portion of my life.The ending was awful.At the end of the day, this is more opinion than anything else, but I hated the ending. I read an entire novel, most of it good and some of it kind of bad only to leave it with that. And I hated it. I can't see myself ever reading this book again nor would it be one I would point anyone to, let alone read to a child, in the future to fall in love with and adore the story of Robin Hood.And I suppose that's where my disappointment truly lies. Moke wasn't able to capture the two most titular characters of the entire story, Robin and Marian. While her own characters were brilliant (and I loved Little John, too), what she did to them couldn't be ignored in favor of that for me.I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.| Instagram | Twitter | Reader Fox Blog | Bloglovin’ | Facebook |
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  • Samantha Hastings
    January 1, 1970
    A thoroughly enjoyable jaunt through the forest with merry men, danger, sweet romance, and of course, arrows. Isabelle has grown up in a convent, but after defending villagers from a soldier, she’s under arrest. Her mother, Marien, frees her and sends her on a journey of discovery about the world and who she really is. Isabelle is a little naive, having grown up in a convent, but she’s also brave and smart. She’s surrounded by capable women and merry men. There is a lovely little romance, but fr A thoroughly enjoyable jaunt through the forest with merry men, danger, sweet romance, and of course, arrows. Isabelle has grown up in a convent, but after defending villagers from a soldier, she’s under arrest. Her mother, Marien, frees her and sends her on a journey of discovery about the world and who she really is. Isabelle is a little naive, having grown up in a convent, but she’s also brave and smart. She’s surrounded by capable women and merry men. There is a lovely little romance, but friendship and family take center stage in this story. This retelling feels fresh and new because it’s told by the next generation and the historical facts are actually accurate. Robin Hood explains that King Richard was a great soldier, but a terrible king. John Lackland (Prince/King John) DID succeed his brother. And the “rebel barons” forced him to sign the Magna Carta, one of the most important documents in history.
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    Now this was the Robin Hood retelling that I was waiting for! A standalone filled with all the things I love about a YA book. Adventure, romance, emotion and fun. I am definitely adding this to my YA rec list. Part of me hopes there’s a second book because of the open ending. Plus, who doesn’t wanna keep reading about Robin Hood and his merry men‽‽ I received an arc and this is my honest review.
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