A Rogue of One's Own (A League of Extraordinary Women, #2)
A lady must have money and an army of her own if she is to win a revolution - but first, she must pit her wits against the wiles of an irresistible rogue bent on wrecking her plans...and her heart. Lady Lucie is fuming. She and her band of Oxford suffragists have finally scraped together enough capital to control one of London’s major publishing houses, with one purpose: to use it in a coup against Parliament. But who could have predicted that the one person standing between her and success is her old nemesis, Lord Ballentine? Or that he would be willing to hand over the reins for an outrageous price—a night in her bed. Lucie tempts Tristan like no other woman, burning him up with her fierceness and determination every time they clash. But as their battle of wills and words fans the flames of long-smouldering devotion, the silver-tongued seducer runs the risk of becoming caught in his own snare. As Lucie tries to out-manoeuvre Tristan in the boardroom and the bedchamber, she soon discovers there’s truth in what the poets say: all is fair in love and war…

A Rogue of One's Own (A League of Extraordinary Women, #2) Details

TitleA Rogue of One's Own (A League of Extraordinary Women, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 1st, 2020
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139781984805706
Rating
GenreRomance, Historical Romance, Historical, Historical Fiction, Adult

A Rogue of One's Own (A League of Extraordinary Women, #2) Review

  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    In the name of literature Gods: I truly deeply hardly fell in with this book! What a sizzling, tempting chemistry! I pour down cups of water several times on my Ipad during my read because Lucie and Tristan’s extremely passionate, scandalous love story and growing intimacy can put any ereaders into fire. ( I cannot imagine how I survive if I read the hardcopy. The pages may turn into ashes after several chapters later and I could give my ugliest cries not to read the rest of the story!) So we ha In the name of literature Gods: I truly deeply hardly fell in with this book! What a sizzling, tempting chemistry! I pour down cups of water several times on my Ipad during my read because Lucie and Tristan’s extremely passionate, scandalous love story and growing intimacy can put any ereaders into fire. ( I cannot imagine how I survive if I read the hardcopy. The pages may turn into ashes after several chapters later and I could give my ugliest cries not to read the rest of the story!) So we have impeccably told historical story-line about women rights, feminism movement, class differences, rights of equality. We have gutsy, brave, fiery, doer, risk taker, independent, smart heroine and observant, great thinker and strategist, planner, logical, flirty, seducer hero. Everybody needs to wear something fire-proof before getting them closer because from the beginning of the book: their sexy and hilarious banters, their opposites and undeniable attraction definitely makes your heart pumping harder. Turn on your AC and drink something ice cold when you read their dialogues. But I cannot make any suggestions about panties you wear because I’m so sure their killing chemistry will melt them in any second and you may find yourself surfing at Victoria Secret’s homepage to get 6 panties for $35 deal! And we have unputdownable, exciting, heart stealing, gripping pacing! You want to read more and get lost in their world: breathing hard as if you have already finished 5K marathon, sweaty, hands clenching because some of the characters make you so furious especially a woman character starring with “C” ( small spoiler)! And you want to start crying so hard at the ending because you want to read more about this amazing couple and you wish the author may write entire series dedicated them. (They deserve at least 2 more books) Let’s a take a quick look to the plot: Lucie is ready to buy shares of London’s major publishing house, thanks to her financial support of Oxford suffragists group. So she may orchestrate a coup in Parliament for Women’s Property Act by using the resources of publishing company. But her long-time nemesis Tristan Ballentine has other plans. He just bought the half shares of the company which makes them reluctant partners and which puts Lucie into Daenerys Targaryen’s mental situation at the last episodes of GOT! (she turns into fuming mad dragon lady!) Tristan bought shares with financial support of very dangerous man for using the company as a get-away plan to help himself and his mother who is threatened to be institutionalized by his father. His callous father demands him to make a proper marriage in three months and give him the heir his family needs. But Tristan is ready to kill two birds with one stone and offers a tempting offer to Lucie, the woman he desires for nearly two decades. He offers her to give the control of publishing company shares in expanse of an indecent proposal. (At least is not married like Demi Moore’s character and Tristan is way too much hotter than Mr. Redford- at least I visualized him hotter after Mr. Wilde’s highly praising-) He wants to spend one night with her. But will one night be enough to distinguish their burning desire! Nope, I’m not so sure!Overall: I LOVE IT! I LOVE IT! I LOVE IT! So far Beach Read and this book are my favorite romance reads of the year!I'm one of the luckiest cow in the literature universe to have a chance to get this ARC!Special thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for sharing this AMAZING ARC in exchange my honest review.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 STARSI loved it. Almost as much as the Bringing Down the Duke. I am delighted with Evie Dunmore's characters and her writing style is excellent. I really wanted to give this one 5 Stars but there were just a few things within the story that took some luster off. So much interesting research about the women's suffragist movement. It's too bad so many women today have little knowledge about the sacrifices that so many women have made over the years to make our lives better. I can't wait for th 4.5 STARSI loved it. Almost as much as the Bringing Down the Duke. I am delighted with Evie Dunmore's characters and her writing style is excellent. I really wanted to give this one 5 Stars but there were just a few things within the story that took some luster off. So much interesting research about the women's suffragist movement. It's too bad so many women today have little knowledge about the sacrifices that so many women have made over the years to make our lives better. I can't wait for the next book in the series. I'm assuming that Hattie is up next. This was an ARC from NetGalley, so I won't be including any quotes in this review. Even though I really really wanted to. ;)If you like well researched Regency/Victorian Romances Evie Dunmore is an excellent addition to your list of authors. Looking forward to reading many more of her books.
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  • Lacey (Booklovers For Life)
    January 1, 1970
    Hello yes I NEED this so desperately. I'll pretty much read anything by Evie Dunmore after loving her debut!
  • Chanel Cleeton
    January 1, 1970
    Evie Dunmore has done it again! A Rogue of One’s Own is as extraordinary as the women who encompass Evie’s passionate and formidable league of suffragettes. A swoonworthy romance fueled by electric chemistry, compelling characters who leap off the page and into readers’ hearts, and a fascinating and richly detailed period in history make this another sensational read. A Rogue of One’s Own is a must-read for historical romance lovers. I can’t wait for the next one!
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  • Lily Herman
    January 1, 1970
    Help! I've fallen and I can't get up...because this book WRECKED ME TO MY CORE.Oh? My? GOD??? I thought Evie Dunmore's Bringing Down the Duke was a dynamite historical romance, and then she had the A-U-D-A-C-I-T-Y to write A Rogue of One's Own, which is true perfection in my eyes. How could she?!As far as characters go, Lucie is a wonderfully self-actualized and multidimensional protagonist, and I had a lot of fun piecing together Tristan's whole deal as well. There were so many good quotes in h Help! I've fallen and I can't get up...because this book WRECKED ME TO MY CORE.Oh? My? GOD??? I thought Evie Dunmore's Bringing Down the Duke was a dynamite historical romance, and then she had the A-U-D-A-C-I-T-Y to write A Rogue of One's Own, which is true perfection in my eyes. How could she?!As far as characters go, Lucie is a wonderfully self-actualized and multidimensional protagonist, and I had a lot of fun piecing together Tristan's whole deal as well. There were so many good quotes in here about love and what it means to be wanted versus needed; I ate it all up. And the feminism? Y'all, the FEMINISM. Be still, my political heart. Love us a romance novel that gives us sizzling ballroom glares and a lesson on mass appeal versus radical activism.And I said it when I reviewed Bringing Down the Duke, but it bears repeating: Dunmore is a goddamn sorcerer when it comes to creating long-simmering intensity between her characters. There's not a goddamn knife on Earth sharp enough to cut through all of Lucie and Tristan's tension during the entirety of this book. And don't even get me started on the banter, because this is absolutely Bitches Who Love Good Dialogue™-approved.I'm Very Upset™ that we have to wait until Fall 2021 for the third book (Ah! My girl Hattie is getting her due!), but I'll for sure be counting down the days.
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  • Stephanie Thornton
    January 1, 1970
    Evie Dunmore's debut novel Bringing Down the Duke was the perfect blend of romance, history, and extraordinary women. I wouldn't have thought it possible, but A Rogue of One's Own lifts that banner even higher, with a whip-smart suffragette heroine and a charming scoundrel of a leading man, this fresh take on historical romance is definitely one of my favorite reads of the year!
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  • Laci Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Please continue Annabelle and Sebastian's story one day! I was so hooked. Can't wait for this.
  • Tears Of Venus, but humans call me Mina
    January 1, 1970
    I am willing to give an organ or two to get my hands and eyes on this book. Do I really need the silly heart than only beats for Henry Cavill, Lana Del Rey, fictional characters and unhealthy food? I am willing to give an organ or two to get my hands and eyes on this book. Do I really need the silly heart than only beats for Henry Cavill, Lana Del Rey, fictional characters and unhealthy food?
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t know how I’d feel about this one given how the love interest was portrayed in book one but I must say I do think this is my favorite so far in the series! “A Rogue of One’s Own” finds Lucie eager to manage her role in the cause to help her fellow women when her plans go awry at the hands of Lord Ballantine her longtime foe who is recently back from India and not shy about living up to his scandalous reputation and with a bargain struck to have sole control over the publishing company it I didn’t know how I’d feel about this one given how the love interest was portrayed in book one but I must say I do think this is my favorite so far in the series! “A Rogue of One’s Own” finds Lucie eager to manage her role in the cause to help her fellow women when her plans go awry at the hands of Lord Ballantine her longtime foe who is recently back from India and not shy about living up to his scandalous reputation and with a bargain struck to have sole control over the publishing company it is unclear which of the two will come out on top. This book has every kind of trope I adore and I loved every second. Lucie is headstrong and not shy about fighting for the right for women to have a voice and embracing the “spinster” title she has been given by abandoning all roles women are expected to fall in to as wife and mothers and I saw a lot of myself in her as the plot moved along and I think that’s another reason I loved her so much. She talks a big game and is very much the warrior she needs to be when taking on this fight and at the same time she is very awkward and shy but that doesn’t stop her from going after what she wants even if the circumstance is less than ideal. Ballantine is another character who is easy to love and it was no surprise they allude to him being the inspiration for another character I adore from classic literature. With all the makings of a swoon worthy love interest I never felt like I was seeing a repeat of a character design though the similarities were certainly there. Where this book works best is the back and forth between these two who manage to harmonize and their soft moments are some of my favorite especially when you start to piece together the smaller details that lay in their shared histories and the resolution to those feelings that have been buried behind war and a duty to women’s suffrage and I couldn’t think of a better ally for Lucie. If each book follows this pattern of being better than the last I dare say I may have a new favorite series and the fact that it is a contemporary is a shock to us all! **special thanks to the publishers and netgalley for providing an arc in exchange for a fair and honest review**
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow at AAR.
  • Kari Ann Sweeney
    January 1, 1970
    I adored Dunmore's debut, Bringing Down the Duke, and was anxious to get my hands on the latest installment. I wasn't disappointed. A ROGUE OF ONE'S OWN is just as wonderful, perhaps better. She is a smart, gutsy suffragette who demands attention and refuses to compromise. He is a logical, charming, seducing scoundrel who is also a bit misunderstood. They knew each other as children and I loved how that history was woven throughout the story. Plus- there is a charming cat that plays a humorous a I adored Dunmore's debut, Bringing Down the Duke, and was anxious to get my hands on the latest installment. I wasn't disappointed. A ROGUE OF ONE'S OWN is just as wonderful, perhaps better. She is a smart, gutsy suffragette who demands attention and refuses to compromise. He is a logical, charming, seducing scoundrel who is also a bit misunderstood. They knew each other as children and I loved how that history was woven throughout the story. Plus- there is a charming cat that plays a humorous and sweet role. I loved how Dunmore blended romance, history and business. The writing was fierce and compulsively readable- full of wit and banter. So much so that I keep rereading my favorite sections- the juicy bits and the snappy, swoon worthy conversations. I only wish I could have read it slower because now I have to wait for the next in the series.
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  • TheYALibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know about this one Lord Ballentine seems like a total perverted creep in the last book buuuuttttt I love Lucie so much so I most likely will end up reading this anyway...
  • Dísir
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounding up‘A Rogue of One’s Own’ is Evie Dunmore’s sublime offering to contemporary women readers who have always scrabbled for brave, against-the-grain heroines righteously pushing for justified causes—count me in there. Meticulously researched and so unusual in pitching a narrative smack in the middle of a time period where a minority of passionate women who wouldn’t just standby and pay lip service to women’s rights, it’s easy to like Dunmore’s story just for the fascinating mix of 3.5 stars rounding up‘A Rogue of One’s Own’ is Evie Dunmore’s sublime offering to contemporary women readers who have always scrabbled for brave, against-the-grain heroines righteously pushing for justified causes—count me in there. Meticulously researched and so unusual in pitching a narrative smack in the middle of a time period where a minority of passionate women who wouldn’t just standby and pay lip service to women’s rights, it’s easy to like Dunmore’s story just for the fascinating mix of politics, societal norms and business dealings alone. In spite of this being a romance, the star of the show really, is Lucie Tedbury, a character so admirably ahead of her time: she is intentionally fashioned so that she soundly resonates with the woke, highly feminist crowd of contemporary society, and serves at the same time, as a reminder of how far we’ve come in 2 centuries. Her struggles and her indefatigable fight for women’s rights inevitably raise the comparison of how we live today—not to say that inequality has been fully stamped out—as women’s rights to vote or even to matriculate (all the things she stands for) aren’t quite called into question any more in the civilised world (we can only hope). The fear of compromising these values that have defined Lucie for a majority of her life emerges later in the book, and perhaps this is probably the most poignant bit that would be met with empathy and nods of understanding—again, probably amongst a particular demographic today that still devours romantic fiction and wants that escape from drudgery. Independent, fiercely well-spoken and so, so sharp a sword in the midst of blunt blades, Lucie carries the narrative single-handedly almost, even if ‘A Rogue of One’s Own’ is nonetheless, a historical romance. Pinning Tristan Ballentine down is a lot harder in contrast, in the way he seems to vacillate between the ‘useless’ fool who does things without a care and the sharply manipulative, intense, almost-crazed man with single-minded drive to get what he wants. Admittedly, I’m not a fan of the ‘virgin and rake’ trope that’s still rampant in historical fiction and the irony is that it’s within this feminist historical romance that this has been written into—more so with an ending that felt a bit rushed and somewhat unconvincing because I could never quite take a shine to Tristan at all.If I came to ‘A Rogue of One’s Own’ for the sake of its fascinating blurb, I stayed for Lucie to the end. My enthusiasm waned slightly especially when I couldn’t quite buy into a pairing that didn’t feel quite like one that I could root, but all things considered given its highly contemporary and debatable subject matter, Dunmore has written something definitely too unique not to be memorable. *ARC by the publisher via Netgalley
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  • Isabel
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for this arc.This was just as cute as book #1 in this series. It for me didn't have as much humor as the first book. Which I laughed a lot out loud of. Lucie is an amazing woman, and I love how confident and how committed she is to the cause. She is an amazing narrator. I loved how the publishing world was somewhat shown in this and how poetry was added in. It added some character for Tristan as well as Lucie and Cecily. I actually really found myself loving Tristan and fi Thank you to Netgalley for this arc.This was just as cute as book #1 in this series. It for me didn't have as much humor as the first book. Which I laughed a lot out loud of. Lucie is an amazing woman, and I love how confident and how committed she is to the cause. She is an amazing narrator. I loved how the publishing world was somewhat shown in this and how poetry was added in. It added some character for Tristan as well as Lucie and Cecily. I actually really found myself loving Tristan and finding him a very engaging character. A scoundrel for sure, but funny and amusing. His banter with Lucie was good. How he was as a person too was great, and seeing him with his father and mother showed good depth to him. The history between Lucie and Tristan as well was good. But omg, he colored her hair and I would strangle him. How could you Tristan? All in all, it was a good book for me. I can really tell that Evie Dunmore is gonna continue being a hit for me. While this book wasn't as funny as the previous one, this one had more depth and I fell even more in love with the gallery of people we were introduced to. I can't wait for book number three.
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  • Paulina (aspiringliterati)
    January 1, 1970
    Another half a night wide awake devouring this UTTER BRILLIANT GEM OF A BOOK.RTC!!!!!!!!! I would die for them.Also, THE CAT. My goodness. I cannot.
  • Isabel Ibañez
    January 1, 1970
    OMG I LOVED THIS BOOK! So this author will forever be an “auto-buy” for me. If you’re in the middle for a regency with sparkling with and fantastic romance, I highly recommend you read this one!
  • Inquisitive Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    BRINGING DOWN THE DUKE was one of my favorite books from last year, and hands down the best historical romance I've ever read. As you can imagine, Evie Dunmore's second novel was high on my anticipated reads of 2020. After reading it, however, I wasn't entirely sure how to feel about it. There were some things I really liked, and some that I didn't. I loved reading about the suffragist movement (Dunmore truly nails this aspect of a "feminist historical romance"), and the hero and heroine also ha BRINGING DOWN THE DUKE was one of my favorite books from last year, and hands down the best historical romance I've ever read. As you can imagine, Evie Dunmore's second novel was high on my anticipated reads of 2020. After reading it, however, I wasn't entirely sure how to feel about it. There were some things I really liked, and some that I didn't. I loved reading about the suffragist movement (Dunmore truly nails this aspect of a "feminist historical romance"), and the hero and heroine also had great chemistry. But I'm not a huge fan of the "virginal maiden falls for the womanizer" trope, which this book inherently falls into. I will say, Dunmore doesn't spend too much time focusing on this aspect, so I did appreciate that, but the hero proved mostly unlikeable until the end (at least in my opinion). Nonetheless, as far as historical romances go, this was still a fun and interesting read, if only for the history of the suffragettes. I know Dunmore is capable of writing some serious magic, so I will definitely continue reading all her future books, even if this one wasn't a particular favorite.Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for the free book in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of my most anticipated books this year, so many thanks to Berkeley and Edelweiss for an eARC in exchange for an honest review.Dunmore has blown me away again! I didn't think she could top last year's sensational debut, Bringing Down the Duke, but this newest installment in the League of Extraordinary Women was such a compelling story that I was dealing with good book hangover for a good two days after I finished it.Where Annabelle's story focused on education and the roadblocks wome This was one of my most anticipated books this year, so many thanks to Berkeley and Edelweiss for an eARC in exchange for an honest review.Dunmore has blown me away again! I didn't think she could top last year's sensational debut, Bringing Down the Duke, but this newest installment in the League of Extraordinary Women was such a compelling story that I was dealing with good book hangover for a good two days after I finished it.Where Annabelle's story focused on education and the roadblocks women faced in achieving formal education equal to that of men, Lady Lucie's struggle is with marriage and the struggle for women to gain some sort of autonomy and legal status within marriage. The problem specifically is with the legal concept of coverture which held that once a woman married she was under the legal authority of her husband and her person, property, and children were "covered" and subsumed into his identity. In practical terms, this meant that a husband could do pretty much anything short of killing his wife and be completely within the law. Lucie has seen the slow death of her mother's spirit from a young age and it's a primary motivation for her to refuse to marry and devote herself to the cause of women's rights and suffrage. Dunmore doesn't shy away from the price that she pays as a result of her decision. Lucie is a warrior, but it's a hard road and she faces ridicule and social ostracism. This all sounds rather grim, but Dunmore layers all of this in so skillfully that Lucie bursts from the pages as such a full realized person who struggles, tries, schemes, and finds a way to adapt and succeed. She is magnificent and I loved her.She struggles the most with her attraction to Tristan, Lord Ballentine, who at first glance seems to embody all the traits of male privilege and excess that Lucie despises. When he challenges her for control of a publishing house, sparks fly and they both do their fair share of scheming to get the better of the other. I don't want to spoil too much because the release date is in September, but one of the joys of this book is how Tristan slowly reveals himself to be as victimized by the patriarchal system as Lucie is.This is just a brilliant story and I wouldn't hesitate to classify it as historical fiction as well as romance because the attitudes and personalities are so true to the period. Dunmore's world is gritty, and heartbreaking, and joyful all at once. Even female relationships and friendships are rendered with emotional truth and honesty. Annabelle and Lucie have one "discussion" that made me gasp because it's so unusual in these series to see women change and have to readjust their relationships with other women. But Lucie and Tristan are front and center and how they negotiate their relationship and their business partnership is at the heart of this book.Finally, I really loved all the little literary in-jokes/references to Wilde, Tennyson, Alcott and of course Ballentine Books. It's a witty read in many places.I hope Dunmore continues to write at this level--it's a pinnacle of what historical romance should be and her characters are still in my head days later.
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  • bibz reads
    January 1, 1970
    More feminist steamy romance? Yes please.
  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I honestly loved it even more than Bringing Down the Duke. But now I'm wishing I hadn't read it so early because I now have that much longer to wait for the next one.
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Even better than the first!That's right. I didn't think my love for Bringing Down the Duke would be topped but Dunmore has done something, few in my opinion, manage to do. She wrote an even better sequel. I loved everything about this book. Once again, Dunmore takes us deep into the British Women's Suffrage movement and gives us a glimpse of what our favorite lady suffragists (Annabelle, Hattie, Lucie, and Catriona) have been up to in their fight for women's equal rights. This time, we follow Lu Even better than the first!That's right. I didn't think my love for Bringing Down the Duke would be topped but Dunmore has done something, few in my opinion, manage to do. She wrote an even better sequel. I loved everything about this book. Once again, Dunmore takes us deep into the British Women's Suffrage movement and gives us a glimpse of what our favorite lady suffragists (Annabelle, Hattie, Lucie, and Catriona) have been up to in their fight for women's equal rights. This time, we follow Lucie the strong, independent, complex leader of the group in her journey to further the cause, help the abused and oppressed, and amend the Marriage Property Act. She's got some brilliant plans beginning to unfold when an unexpected handsome rogue gets in her way. What's a lady to do?"When a woman happens to acquire a rogue of her own, she might as well make good use of him"This book has it all. Intrigue, twists, fight for rights, fashion, poetry, and let us not forget some amazing steam. But all that said, I think what struck me most about this book and I mean deep down in my little feminist soul - was the writing - such wonderful writing. Dunmore brilliantly handles the topics of love and equality. All is fair in love and war, right? Contra mundumThank you so much to NetGalley and Berkley for an ARC of this book.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this book. I loved this book! All of the supporting characters were complex and had so many layers. As a fan of A Duke of One’s Own (A League of Extraordinary Women #1), it was nice to see the Duke of Montgomery and Annabelle again. I thought that Evie Dunmore did a great job of exploring Lucie’s struggles as she tries to juggle her desire to fight for the cause and the conflicting ability to be happy with a man. The jealousy that Lucie feels Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this book. I loved this book! All of the supporting characters were complex and had so many layers. As a fan of A Duke of One’s Own (A League of Extraordinary Women #1), it was nice to see the Duke of Montgomery and Annabelle again. I thought that Evie Dunmore did a great job of exploring Lucie’s struggles as she tries to juggle her desire to fight for the cause and the conflicting ability to be happy with a man. The jealousy that Lucie feels for the life Annabelle leads was very realistic. The friendship between Lucie, Hattie, Annabelle, and Catriona were beautifully written. I also loved how this book really places the reader into the world of London and Oxford. Dunmore does a great job of providing the historical context to show the importance of what Lucie is fighting for when she fights for women’s rights. I thought that Tristan was also a great match for Lucie, and I liked that this book did not follow typical tropes of the historical romance genre. Tristan’s love of writing poetry and his callbacks to contemporary poets really helped the book feel like it was taking place in the late 1800s. Lady Lucie is a member of the women’s suffrage movement. She was kicked out by her family and was only able to survive with the inheritance money she received from her aunt. Lucie’s new mission is to purchase 50% of a publishing house that prints women’s magazines. Her plan is to use the publishing house to print information that supports the women’s suffrage movement as well as the amendment for the Married Women's Property Act. However, her old nemesis Lord Tristan Ballentine returns from the war and ruins her plans. Tristan has loved Lucie since he first saw her when they were children. Lucie is afraid that getting involved with a man will impact her ability to fight for the cause.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Evie Dunmore is one of my new favorite authors. I read Bringing Down the Duke last summer and I loved it but I have to say I loved A Rogue of Ones Own more.Lucie is such a firecracker. The leader of the Oxford chapter of the suffragist movement, surrounded by three close friends she is determined to see the marriage act amended to give women independence and is determined to live her life a spinster..Tristan is a rogue and a war hero who has been in love with Lucie since they were children but h Evie Dunmore is one of my new favorite authors. I read Bringing Down the Duke last summer and I loved it but I have to say I loved A Rogue of Ones Own more.Lucie is such a firecracker. The leader of the Oxford chapter of the suffragist movement, surrounded by three close friends she is determined to see the marriage act amended to give women independence and is determined to live her life a spinster..Tristan is a rogue and a war hero who has been in love with Lucie since they were children but hides his feelings behind snark and pranks after she unknowingly broke his young heart.When they end up co owners of a London Publication House they are thrown together into an enemies to lovers situation with both their reputations on the line.I loved Lucie and Tristan’s witty banter and how Tristan truly listened to her point of view. I love how He taught her how to have fun and let go a little and how she opened his eyes to issues he never considered. They made such a great team.
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  • Shar // sunsnacksseries
    January 1, 1970
    Historical Fiction has never been my go-to genre. In fact, I haven't read much of it at all, so I really took a chance with this one, especially after hearing the hype over the first book in this series.I see why people really enjoy Evie Dunmore! A Rogue of One's Own had compelling characters, a lot of wit and banter, and swoon-worthy moments. I love morally gray/anti-heroes, and Tristan is definitely that. Lucie is very headstrong, determined and brave, which are attributes I always look for in Historical Fiction has never been my go-to genre. In fact, I haven't read much of it at all, so I really took a chance with this one, especially after hearing the hype over the first book in this series.I see why people really enjoy Evie Dunmore! A Rogue of One's Own had compelling characters, a lot of wit and banter, and swoon-worthy moments. I love morally gray/anti-heroes, and Tristan is definitely that. Lucie is very headstrong, determined and brave, which are attributes I always look for in a heroine.It's crazy to see how much things have changed for women since the Victorian Age, and yet how many things are the same.The beginning was a bit slow for me, but overall, this was a lovely read and I will definitely be checking out more books from this author.Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Cindy ✩☽♔
    January 1, 1970
    Excited for more of this series!But someone please remind me, who is this Lord? I can't remember anything about him lol
  • Tabor
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review4.5 stars. This book, my goodness. THIS BOOK WAS SO BLOODY GOOD. Better than the first one and so good, I just spent a lazy Saturday morning finishing it because I simply could not put it down. The sequel to Bringing Down the Duke follows the perspective of the hard-working and determined Lucie Wycliffe, who turns her nose up at Annabelle Archer's marriage to the Duke of Montogomery because it has distracted her from the Caus I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review4.5 stars. This book, my goodness. THIS BOOK WAS SO BLOODY GOOD. Better than the first one and so good, I just spent a lazy Saturday morning finishing it because I simply could not put it down. The sequel to Bringing Down the Duke follows the perspective of the hard-working and determined Lucie Wycliffe, who turns her nose up at Annabelle Archer's marriage to the Duke of Montogomery because it has distracted her from the Cause —the women's suffrage movement in England. However, Lucie, who dismisses the prospect of marriage and the allure of a gentleman, quickly finds her attention taken up by Tristian Ballentine, an ex-military officer, and rogue. Having recently returned from Afghanistan, Tristian's father, the Earl of Rochester, has set his devices upon his second son, who is now the first heir after the death of his brother. His father demands that Tristian put a stop to his ways, settle down, and threatens him with a marriage proposal. Feeling rebellious, Tristian decides to focus his attention on Lucie, who he has always carried a torch for and foils Lucie's plans for the movement by purchasing a share in a major publishing house. Furious, Lucie initiates a battle of wills with Tristian, who propositions her, and offers to sell his shares in the publishing house if she spends one night with him. Lucie wrestles with the decision to take the deal and move the Cause forward while ultimately ignoring the attraction she feels towards Tristian. There is so much that I love about Dunmore's series. For one, I like that she works within the limitations of society and considers these romances in light of how society would have viewed these illicit affairs. It isn't just a throwaway line about the scandal, but instead, Dunmore often incorporates a sense of the repercussions and what measures were in place to protect a woman's virtue, such as Lucie's neighborhood and even her maid. Sure, it does get forgotten later on, but Dunmore takes some care to infuse the story with a sense of the risks. She also pays close attention to the political nuances of a woman's place during this time and introduces historical information in wonderful and eye-opening ways. Lucie's character development was truly the strong point of this novel. I truly marvel at how Dunmore started her off as being bitter about Annabelle's marriage to show Lucie's fears and sets up her trepidation of starting a romance with a handsome rogue. As the story progresses, Lucie opens herself up to vulnerability in a touching way and it makes her relationship seem very realistic as she wrestles with the question of being devoted to the Cause versus being happy. I was really impressed with how Dunmore resolved this story as it felt true to Lucie's character and her motives at the start of the book while also showing how she had grown to trust other people. Superb!2021 seems very far away and I cannot wait until we learn what happened to Hattie at the Pre-Raphaelite exhibition...
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  • Kendra Cusworth
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsA Rogue of One’s own follows Lady Lucie and Tristan Ballentine, two people who grew up together but soon turned into enemies. Since then, Tristan has become a war hero and Lucie has championed the Cause with the women suffrage movement. In order to get information to women secretively, Lucie buys half of the London Print only to find out that Tristan Ballentine owns the other half. Tristan and Lucie had loads of chemistry and it was so fun to watch it play out. They weren’t ever really 3.5 starsA Rogue of One’s own follows Lady Lucie and Tristan Ballentine, two people who grew up together but soon turned into enemies. Since then, Tristan has become a war hero and Lucie has championed the Cause with the women suffrage movement. In order to get information to women secretively, Lucie buys half of the London Print only to find out that Tristan Ballentine owns the other half. Tristan and Lucie had loads of chemistry and it was so fun to watch it play out. They weren’t ever really friends growing up but they did have a lot of history and learning those stories was one of my favourite parts of the book. It was also a brilliant way of forcing each of them to undergo some changes and listen to the other person’s side of the story. Also, the things Tristan would say would often make me smile or laugh. Evie Dunmore’s second novel in her A League of Extraordinary Women was highly, and I mean highly anticipated for me. I read Bringing Down The Duke in less than 24 hours. It became an instant obsession, and instant favourite for me. Dunmore captivated me with two characters who needed to be together but absolutely couldn’t. There was longing and yearning and so, so much heartbreak. Unfortunately, those are the same categories where this installment fell flat for more. The romance didn’t even kick in until the 55-ish% mark and there wasn’t really any yearning or longing. I don’t at all think that it is a bad book or a bad romance, but when it comes to me and romance, I absolutely need longing and yearning. Also something to note, this book moves much slower than its predecessor. Again, not a bad thing, but just something to prepare yourself for. However, I really enjoyed this book regardless. It was a lot of fun being back in this setting and seeing some of the same characters. I really loved what Dunmore did with Ballentine—a character who shows up in the first novel who I really didn’t like at the time. Ballentine’s backstory made his character much deeper and likable. He is by no means a favourite of mine, but I did come to like him and enjoy reading about him. Lucie was an interesting protagonist. I loved hearing about her passionate feminist work, that was probably my favourite part of the book. She’s very confident and strong-minded and it was really refreshing to read in her POV. I would definitely recommend this book! especially if you enjoyed the first one. But you just have to keep in mind that it does move a bit slower than the first and it also doesn’t have that same epic romantic feel.
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  • Kaylee Gwyn (literarypengwyns)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars IGTV REVIEWLast fall when I read Bringing Down the Duke, I immediately decided that I would do whatever I needed to do to gain early access to the next installment in The League of Extraordinary Women series. Turns out I just had to repeatedly send emails to the publisher and continually gush about the first book in the series. So when my eARC of 𝐀 𝐑𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐎𝐰𝐧’𝐬 𝐎𝐰𝐧 was granted, I started to panic...... what if I don’t love it as much as the first? What if I’m crazy and should take ba 4.5 Stars IGTV REVIEWLast fall when I read Bringing Down the Duke, I immediately decided that I would do whatever I needed to do to gain early access to the next installment in The League of Extraordinary Women series. Turns out I just had to repeatedly send emails to the publisher and continually gush about the first book in the series. So when my eARC of 𝐀 𝐑𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐎𝐰𝐧’𝐬 𝐎𝐰𝐧 was granted, I started to panic...... what if I don’t love it as much as the first? What if I’m crazy and should take back all of my promises to “LOVE THIS BOOK NO MATTER WHAT” that I made in those emails to publishers.⁣⁣Well, I can confirm that I did love it and definitely recommend it to everyone who read the first book (and even to those of you who didn’t because YOU DON’T NEED TO READ THE FIRST ONE TO ENJOY THIS INSTALLMENT.... although I totally think you’ll also love the first book.... wow I’m droning on now).⁣⁣Our main heroine is Lady Lucy, who is leading the Oxford section of the Suffragette movement. We were introduced to Lucy in Bringing Down the Duke and having her star in this one was so fun. She is almost one track minded about “the cause” and her entire life revolves around it AND SHE IS HAPPY THAT WAY, OKAY!? I’m formally putting it forth for consideration that Lady Lucy is our resident enneagram 8 in this group of women. ⁣⁣ANYHOOOOOO she decided (with the rest of the Oxford Suffragettes) to buy stock in a publishing house so they can print pro-suffrage information in ladies magazines helping secure the vote. Problem? Lord Tristan Ballantine. He grew up with Lucy and has harbored a crush for her for, well, forever, and has gained a reputation as a war hero and all around ROUGE. He also just bought EXACTLY HALF of the publishing house for his own plan (to save his mother from being institutionalized by his dastardly father) and now neither Lucy nor Tristan have full control and are having to learn to work together and battle it out for their causes.⁣⁣A Rouge of One’s Own is a classic enemies to lovers trope that is highly satisfying. LOTS OF STEAMY SOUP to be had in this story, and also, an adorable cat named Boudicca (I don’t even like cats, I KNOW, but I loved this one). You may think the build up is slow at first, but its entirely worth it and helps to make the eventual relationship not seem cheap or rushed.⁣⁣I already cannot wait for book three in the series and hope you all pick this one up and enjoy it as much as I did. 𝐀 𝐑𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐎𝐧𝐞’𝐬 𝐎𝐰𝐧 is set to publish on September 1st. Thank you to @netgalley and @berkleyromance for the eARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Erin Arkin
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Lucie and Tristan's story! Full review to come.
  • Jillian Doherty
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this story even more than Bringing Down the Duke - and I Loved Bringing Down the Duke! The suffragette cause continue!~ To fight for women's equality but with very different, and yet still very impassioned characters. For history lovers, those who the enjoy immersive storytelling with illustrative Oxford elegance, and of course any reader who devours well-crafted, slow-burning protagonists - who find their way beyond adversity into unexpected triumph. Plus! Yay for book number three co I enjoyed this story even more than Bringing Down the Duke - and I Loved Bringing Down the Duke! The suffragette cause continue!~ To fight for women's equality but with very different, and yet still very impassioned characters. For history lovers, those who the enjoy immersive storytelling with illustrative Oxford elegance, and of course any reader who devours well-crafted, slow-burning protagonists - who find their way beyond adversity into unexpected triumph. Plus! Yay for book number three coming Fall 2021!Galley borrowed from the publisher.
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