A Dangerous Kind of Lady (Longhope Abbey, #2)
A desperate situation calls for dangerous deeds…Proud heiress Arabella Larke has little respect for rules and no time for scruples, not when she faces marriage to a man she loathes and fears.Determined to save herself, Arabella comes up with a plan: a fake engagement with her childhood nemesis, Guy Roth, Marquess of Hardbury, recently returned home after years away. To Arabella’s surprise, Guy has become strong, honorable, and unexpectedly attractive…but he refuses to even hear her plan.After leaving England to escape his corrupt, controlling father, Guy has vowed never to do anyone’s bidding again—certainly not Arabella’s. To Guy’s surprise, Arabella has become intriguing, quick-witted, and unexpectedly attractive, but he has enough drama trying to gain custody of his younger sisters, and he wants nothing to do with her dubious schemes.Until Arabella shows up at his house one night, and Guy finds himself entangled to a dangerous degree…

A Dangerous Kind of Lady (Longhope Abbey, #2) Details

TitleA Dangerous Kind of Lady (Longhope Abbey, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 7th, 2020
PublisherInner Ballad Press
Rating
GenreRomance, Historical Romance, Historical

A Dangerous Kind of Lady (Longhope Abbey, #2) Review

  • Talia Hibbert
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could be more coherent about this book, but YOU KNOW ME. Reading excellent romance melts my brain cells. All I can say is that I've been waiting for this book forever (because Mia Vincy writes the hilarious regency romcoms of my heart) and it exceeded expectations. What a bloody epic romance. Not the tragic kind with a bad ending, but the neverending feels kind with a beyond satisfying ending that makes you want to hug yourself and squeal for the rest of the day. There is an incredible, I wish I could be more coherent about this book, but YOU KNOW ME. Reading excellent romance melts my brain cells. All I can say is that I've been waiting for this book forever (because Mia Vincy writes the hilarious regency romcoms of my heart) and it exceeded expectations. What a bloody epic romance. Not the tragic kind with a bad ending, but the neverending feels kind with a beyond satisfying ending that makes you want to hug yourself and squeal for the rest of the day. There is an incredible, memorable heroine who I related to so strongly, and whose personal arc is a really great commentary on a particular kind of misogyny. There's a hero who grows so beautifully and fantastically walks the line between frustrating sexy prat I want to smack and genuinely nice guy who just keeps fluffing it up. The book has serious Persuasion feels, except they are childhood enemies. In short, it's perfect and divine and you should read it if you want to be happy.
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    I've given this an A- at AAR, so 4.5 stars rounded up.While A Dangerous Kind of Lady is the third published book in Mia Vincy’s  Longhope Abbey  series, it’s actually the second in the series chronologically .  If you’ve read the author’s début, A Wicked Kind of Husband, (which is chronologically book three) you’ll already have met Arabella and Guy Roth, Marquess and Marchioness of Hardbury as a happily married – even besotted – couple.  But knowing that’s how they end up is, as any dedicated I've given this an A- at AAR, so 4.5 stars rounded up.While A Dangerous Kind of Lady is the third published book in Mia Vincy’s  Longhope Abbey  series, it’s actually the second in the series chronologically .  If you’ve read the author’s début, A Wicked Kind of Husband, (which is chronologically book three) you’ll already have met Arabella and Guy Roth, Marquess and Marchioness of Hardbury as a happily married – even besotted – couple.  But knowing that’s how they end up is, as any dedicated romance reader will know, not the point; the fun is in the getting there, in the emotional journey the characters take to find love and happiness.  A Dangerous Kind of Lady is their ‘origin’ story, and tells how the fiercely independent, sharp-tongued Arabella, betrothed to Guy Roth since childhood, becomes un-betrothed, re-betrothed, un-betrothed again (sort of) and then marries him anyway.  All while falling in love along the way of course.When the book opens, Guy has recently returned to England following an eight year absence and has assumed the title – Marquess of Hardbury – he inherited on the death of his father around a year earlier.  It’s widely believed that Guy left England in a sulk after the woman he was in love with spurned him (not only did she sleep with someone else, she then went on to become a much sought-after courtesan), but the truth is more complicated. The old marquess was obsessed with controlling his son’s every move, and leaving the country was the only way Guy could assert his independence.  Now Guy is at last free to live his own life, one of the first things he does on his return is end his engagement to Arabella Larke.The end of the betrothal doesn’t actually bother Arabella all that much – in fact, she’d be celebrating if it wasn’t for the fact that her father is so bent on marrying her off that he doesn’t particularly care who the groom is.  Lord Sculthorpe, a handsome war hero who gives Arabella the creeps every time she so much as thinks of him, is about to propose any minute, and as Mr. Larke has threatened to cut Arabella off if she doesn’t get married, she’s desperate to find a way to avoid Sculthorpe without losing everything.  To buy herself some time, she asks Guy to pretend their betrothal is back on, just for a few weeks, but  Guy refuses to hear her out,  certain she’s trying to manipulate him into marriage.  After all, she never made a secret of her desire to be a marchioness, and her insufferable pride must have been dented when he ended their engagement.  Guy’s refusal to help leaves her with only one option; to accept Sculthorpe’s offer and then jilt him as soon as she can.  But she’s reckoned without her father’s determination to get her off his hands; rather than the spring wedding Arabella had intended, he insists she and Sculthorpe will be married within the month.  Utterly repelled by Sculthorpe and his fixation on her virginity, Arabella decides that while she may have to become his in law, she doesn’t have to become his in spirit or give him any more of herself than necessary.  And there’s one thing she doesn’t have to give him if she doesn’t want to.You can read the rest of this review at All About Romance .
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  • OLT
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't all that fond of Vincy's Beastly Earl, but this Dangerous Lady has my vote and is up there with the first Vincy book I read, A WICKED KIND OF HUSBAND. When A BEASTLY KIND OF EARL was released next, it did not appeal and I was thinking perhaps she was one of those one-book wonders. But no. This new one, third to be published but, apparently, chronologically #2 of the Longhope Abbey series, has me back to fan-girling the author.At times I became frustrated with the heroine here and her de I wasn't all that fond of Vincy's Beastly Earl, but this Dangerous Lady has my vote and is up there with the first Vincy book I read, A WICKED KIND OF HUSBAND. When A BEASTLY KIND OF EARL was released next, it did not appeal and I was thinking perhaps she was one of those one-book wonders. But no. This new one, third to be published but, apparently, chronologically #2 of the Longhope Abbey series, has me back to fan-girling the author.At times I became frustrated with the heroine here and her debilitating pride and stubbornness and thought maybe this was only a 4-star book, but those scenes in the Reading Room at about 70% clinched it for me at 5 stars. (And, no, I'm not going to tell you about what happens. You really have to be there.) And, of course, I have to admit that the romance, when the bumpiness of its trajectory was not exasperating me, was downright swoony at time.Two stubborn people, both with daddy issues but not the same daddy issue, our H and h had been betrothed when young by their parents. The H, Guy, as he grew older, was having none of that, partly because he was not interested in the h that way but mostly because he was not interested in being controlled by his father in any aspect of his life. As a matter of fact, he takes off for 8 years for parts unknown to get away from everyone.Now back in England, he makes it perfectly clear that he has no intention of honoring that betrothal to our heroine, Arabella Larke. It must be said that Arabella has a different kind of daddy issue. Her twin brother died young, leaving her with the emptiness that many surviving twins have described at the loss of their close sibling. But the worst part is that her father makes her feel guilty at being the surviving twin. She is good for nothing, in his opinion, and nothing she does pleases him.Since Guy refuses to marry her, her father has arranged her engagement to the horrendous yet handsome Lord Sculthorpe, a superficially pleasant peer who manages to give off some serious creepy vibes when around Arabella. Her father threatens to cut her off financially and more or less disown her if she doesn't go through with this engagement.Arabella, who is a strong, managing, planning kind of woman, needs to find a way out of this. The best she can come up with, unfortunately, is to enlist Guy's help. If he could only agree to a fake betrothal for a period of time, perhaps all could be well in her life. Unfortunately, her pride and stubbornness and lack of transparency in her actions and in the way she tries to request his help and also the fact that Guy himself resists her at every turn, not really listening to her and assuming the worst about her, cause her plans to go awry.The H and h go along at cross purposes for most of the book. It could be frustrating at times to watch this when all it would have taken, perhaps, was a little more truth and honesty and real conversation. But then the hard-earned HEA wouldn't have been quite the triumph that it was here. Along the way to their happiness, there are many romantic moments, funny moments, sexy moments, serious and dramatic moments, and lots of interesting secondary characters to keep the reader's interest up.I'm guessing somewhere along the way in Vincy's series, we will have Guy's sister Freddie's story to enjoy. Now that this book has me convinced that Vincy is one of the best new HR authors releasing romances, I'll be looking for every new one that she releases.
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  • Jultri
    January 1, 1970
    I love a good enemies-to-lovers story and this promised to be a scorcher. Vincy's debut was sensational, but unfortunately her second book (which confusingly is #3 in the Longhope Abbey series) didn't quite match its predecessor's high standard. This one (allocated as book #2 in the series although written after #3) is definitely better, but is let down by the heroine's frustratingly tight-lipped behaviour. The betrothal of Arabella Larke and Guy Roth had been arranged by their respective father I love a good enemies-to-lovers story and this promised to be a scorcher. Vincy's debut was sensational, but unfortunately her second book (which confusingly is #3 in the Longhope Abbey series) didn't quite match its predecessor's high standard. This one (allocated as book #2 in the series although written after #3) is definitely better, but is let down by the heroine's frustratingly tight-lipped behaviour. The betrothal of Arabella Larke and Guy Roth had been arranged by their respective fathers since childhood, much to the ire of the parties concerned. The head strong and highly competitive Arabella has been a thorn in Guy's side for almost as long as he can recall, and the animosity between them has not subsided one bit upon his return back to England after an absence of eight years to take over his late father's title of Marquess of Hardbury.“When a woman marries, she gives everything to her husband—her property, her body, her very safety. If I must give so much power to a man, I should prefer one who will not abuse it. Who respects me for who I am and takes me as an equal partner.” “He would need to be brave, too.” She shot him a look. “True. Terrifying men is one of my more notable talents.” “Maybe you should not try so hard to terrify them.” “I do not try at all. I achieve it with the greatest ease.”Arabella clasped her hands. “I am exceedingly sweet and demure. And if anyone says otherwise, I shall strike them with my crop.”Arabella has never been thrilled by her father's first choice of husband for her, but she has recently discovered that the alternative is even worse than the coolly, arrogant Guy. She doesn't have to like him in order to need him, and she needs him to remain as husband-in-waiting for a while longer, while she puts in place one of her elaborate schemes. Unfortunately, Guy has never been cooperative when it comes to Arabella. Nevertheless, they slowly realise, that they really have been fighting the imposing shadows of their dominant fathers more than each other.“I don’t need you to rescue me,” said her pride, which did not know how to thank him. “Don’t be absurd. I’m not rescuing you,” he said, mimicking her. “I’m helping you rescue yourself.”Guy is a great character, ultimately decent and noble and so refreshingly straight forward in his thinking to her complex cognitive processing.“What is your scheme? I confess I haven’t the wits to keep up with you. I have only my principles to guide me, and my desire for you so addles my mind I hardly know what to think.”How easily he revealed his weaknesses, so sure of his strength that it diminished him not at all to reveal his flaws.Arabella is spirited which is admirable, but her misplaced pride and stubborn refusal to confide in Guy frustrated me. I really didn't get her fear of Sculthorpe (view spoiler)[, who was a creep in terms of his preference for virgins but otherwise did not display any sadistic tendencies to elicit such a reaction from her. I also did not get why Arabella's threat to expose Sculthorpe as a woman-beater should frighten him into retreat, as society and the law readily turned a blind eye to such happenings in those days, especially since he was a peer (hide spoiler)]. Her internal dialogue was all over the place at times, perhaps deliberately to reflect how her predicament had affected her usually razor-sharp and rational mind. I think, Vincy left it a bit late to explain Arabella's character. I think, I would have been less frustrated with her, if I had known her back story earlier, but I guess that's how Guy was feeling also - perplexed by her contradictory behaviour and not understanding her motivations until much later. Arabella's dialogue with her deceased twin was poignant and well done. I do love her mother who was equally as fierce and clever as Arabella, although in a less overt way. And I liked that Guy recognised this and had a healthy respect for Lady Belinda.Lady Belinda did not move an inch. “You will not see my daughter in this agitated state and with another man’s blood on your hands.” “To be fair, some of this blood might be mine.” “Why do I not find myself comforted?In the hallway, Guy paused to consider Lady Belinda’s odd parting speech. He did not possess the subtlety of thought displayed by Arabella and her mother. But he suspected he was learning fast.All in all, a very enjoyable book elevated by the great writing and bantering that is becoming Vincy's style. I look forward to the next book. Will it be Freddie's book? Why shouldn’t I, too, have a chance to sow my wild oats?” What a load of nonsense! But Arabella clearly had no intention of explaining, so Guy didn’t waste his breath pressing for more. Instead, he said, “Women don’t have oats to sow. Women are the field, so to speak, in which the oats are sown.” She did not sigh, but she gave the impression of having sighed. “Let us not debate metaphors. You understand my point. But speaking of that, you will take care to avoid sowing any oats in this field.” “There will be no oats.” “If you say so. So long as the plow enters the field, I am unconcerned as to whether there are any oats. Only that if there are oats, they do not, in fact, enter the field.” Guy hardly knew whether to laugh or groan. “Arabella, you and I have never been friends, but I have always respected your abilities. So please understand that I speak with the utmost respect when I say: You are dreadful at seduction.” She was proud, and desire and pride could not coexist. Desire was the great leveler, turning emperors into beggars and paupers into kings.“Looking at you is like looking at the night sky. So vast and varied and infinite, the view changing depending on where one stands, or the hour or the season. One can only ever see a tiny bit of it at a time, unbearably, voraciously, insatiably aware that however wondrous the view, there is always so much more.”“I cursed you, you know,” came his low voice in her ear. “I cursed you so long and hard it’s a wonder you don’t have a cloud of locusts swarming around your head. “You started thinking, didn’t you? You and that brilliant diamond mind of yours. But thinking is like walking: If you begin in the wrong place, facing the wrong way, you’ll head in the wrong direction, and end up falling off the edge of the world.”
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  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    Vincy has promise, but I am not a devoted fan yet......The total lack of communication, the stubbornness and pride of the hero and heroine and the inability to listen to anybody ruined this romance for me as did the author's horrible attempt at creating interesting villains. Her bad guys leave much to be desired and again the two villains in this tale were ridiculous and the Baron's portrayal and demise was unbelievably stupid and unnecessary to the plot. Really what was the point? This virgin w Vincy has promise, but I am not a devoted fan yet......The total lack of communication, the stubbornness and pride of the hero and heroine and the inability to listen to anybody ruined this romance for me as did the author's horrible attempt at creating interesting villains. Her bad guys leave much to be desired and again the two villains in this tale were ridiculous and the Baron's portrayal and demise was unbelievably stupid and unnecessary to the plot. Really what was the point? This virgin worship/obsession and slut shaming in historicals has become a bore, it's archaic. Readers condemn so much but still zip it over this nonsense. A good writer would not pull this crap and should be able to craft a good story without it! As far as the premise I would have enjoyed a more straight forward romance, but that is just a personal observation, many readers I admit really love the angst of the "big miss", but not me, not at all. I also thought the end rather insipid with the heroine watching and longing for the hero and his family across the square after she bolted and the make-up scene and speech just fell flat. There were some lovely moments throughout the book and Vincy's writing talent is on the cusp of being rather better than her contemporaries and once she stops relying on plot devices and cliche cartoon villains and archetypes her books will become gold.I almost didn't read just because of the "content warning". I would prefer that if an author feels the need to explain content or placate sensitive readers, place it in author notes at the back of the book and place some sort of symbol or some "code word" to alert sensitive readers to a contents page that can be ignored or searched out if that is what the reader prefers. Inserting a warning right before Chapter One is off putting JMHO. What I imagined might be after reading "the content note" was much worse than the incidents in the book. So I ask what is the point?
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  • Em Wittmann
    January 1, 1970
    Will provide review for this BRILLIANT book when audio version is available.
  • Ali
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this third novel from Mia Vincy, and was pleased that in tone it more resembled the first than the second. I adored Arabella and all her sharp edges, and she reminded me of Leigh from Laura Kinsale’s The Prince of Midnight.
  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this yesterday in the afternoon, and I couldn't put it down. I stayed up till like 2am reading and now, understandably, I look like a sleep deprived zombie. But the unputdownableness (ha, try saying this five times in a row!) of this book doesn't make it perfect.Arabella intrigued me in A Wicked Kind of Husband and I was quite happy when I found out she'll be getting her own story. She is an interesting heroine, but I'm not sure whether she'll be up to everyone's taste. She's a I started reading this yesterday in the afternoon, and I couldn't put it down. I stayed up till like 2am reading and now, understandably, I look like a sleep deprived zombie. But the unputdownableness (ha, try saying this five times in a row!) of this book doesn't make it perfect.Arabella intrigued me in A Wicked Kind of Husband and I was quite happy when I found out she'll be getting her own story. She is an interesting heroine, but I'm not sure whether she'll be up to everyone's taste. She's always plotting and scheming and thinking ten steps ahead, but it is her way of getting control of her life in a situation where she has little choice. I found that most admirable about her. That for all her manipulation, she really tried to make life better and easier for others, even if her actions painted her in a bad light. Which doesn't mean she doesn't feel things deeply, but she hides it rather too well. And I found that most frustrating about her. The confrontation between her and her father was quite unsatisfying, and I did not accept her father's SUUUUUPER lame apology for all the humiliation and mistreatment that we witness throughout the book. The confrontation serves as a catalyst for a pretty dumb decision Arabella makes in the final 7% of the book, which I must say, totally kicked me out of the story and ruined all the good work she accomplished in opening herself and trusting other people, or at least trusting our hero, Guy. God, how I hate the I'm-leaving-you-for-your-own-good trope. This trope needs to die out! Please, no more!! Guy was a sweetheart, when he didn't have his head stuck up his own ass, where it spent like a loooooot of time. He'd start pulling it out a little bit, but then he'd decide that he liked the interior of his posterior and choose to spend a little more time there. Sorry for the gross visual. Granted, Guy wanted to get to know Arabella, he wanted to understand her, but he was also reluctant to give up his preconceived notions of her character in general, of what he thinks he wants, of what his plans were and so on. He struggles between his prejudice, his desire for Arabella and what he learns of Arabella during the house party (because of course there is a house party), and I actually quite like the tension this created. There is something about the trope where the hero grossly misjudges the heroine that really appeals to me.It was so cute to see how he liked spening time with and getting to know his little sister.I thought a lot about how to rate this book, because I had a good time reading it. I love how Arabella and Guy clashed, they had great chemistry, but the fact is that the story blows hot and cold for too long. With the addition of the much hated trope, the final declarations of their feelings feel rushed and out of place, which makes me an unhappy reader.
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  • Born to Lurk
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by the author herself***Quotes are taken from the ARC version of the book and may differ upon publicationThis book right here is exactly why I love historical romance. Mia Vincy can simply do no wrong for me, and this series only continues to get better and better. Boy, I read this with a constant grin on my face."How long would she be haunted by this strange nostalgia for a future she could never have?"Guy Roth has finally returned to claim the title of Marquess of Hardbury, ARC kindly provided by the author herself***Quotes are taken from the ARC version of the book and may differ upon publicationThis book right here is exactly why I love historical romance. Mia Vincy can simply do no wrong for me, and this series only continues to get better and better. Boy, I read this with a constant grin on my face."How long would she be haunted by this strange nostalgia for a future she could never have?"Guy Roth has finally returned to claim the title of Marquess of Hardbury, after 8 years of absence. And Arabella, his ex-fiancee was ready to lay some proposition. When I met Arabella, I was so intrigued. She came across as a prideful, ruthless, cunning, and a little manipulative. And she is all that, and more and once you get deeper into her life, you'd know what made her so. I love the distinct connection they share together. They are obviously opposites but somehow they have what the other needed."Behind her eyes lay a whole solar system, to be discovered the the man who was brave enough or foolish enough to look"I love the dialogue. It definitely made my heart flutter and for someone who reads a lot, it felt good to read something that's heartwarming. I loved the way their bond developed virtually from mutual dislike to this strong love connection. "Arabella, you and I have never been friends, but I have always respected your abilities. So please understand that I speak with the utmost respect when I say: You are dreadful at seduction."The cameos were phenomenal-Mrs DeWitt and Holly. There were scenes that can be triggering to some, and Miss Vincy, I believe had handled this situation very delicately. Overall, this is a brilliantly penned romance and I can't wait for you to read this!"I regret only that I am not what you want in a wife. Because you are everything I desire in a husband."
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  • Head in the clouds
    January 1, 1970
    One of THE best historical romances I have read in a long long time. It has heart and soul and also depicts what I think is a healthy way to overcome obstacles in a relationship and they COMMUNICATE! There is a meandering path to get to where they end up but they learn from each encounter and reflect and then act differently - what else do you need?! Not to mention the humour - these two are hilarious together and absolutely perfect for each other.
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful!Mia Vincy has returned to me the love of historical romance. Sure, it's not perfect, but her novels aren't ridiculous with 30 dukes or "lady" who visits brothels. When her heroine makes mistakes, she does it in character for a lady of her time. It has love, romance and a bit of adventure.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book and I am so glad I did! Mia Vincy has captured the tortured souls of Arabella and Guy. Promised to each other at birth, both of them fight it every step of the way. Guy returns after an 8 year absence, and once again, he an Arabella are thrown in the same orbit. The banter between the two is great. They both want a family- she wants to recapture the family she had before her twin brother’s death; Guy wants to create the family he never had. This I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book and I am so glad I did! Mia Vincy has captured the tortured souls of Arabella and Guy. Promised to each other at birth, both of them fight it every step of the way. Guy returns after an 8 year absence, and once again, he an Arabella are thrown in the same orbit. The banter between the two is great. They both want a family- she wants to recapture the family she had before her twin brother’s death; Guy wants to create the family he never had. This book twisted my heart. There were times I wanted to strangle Arabella for the things she said! She built such a wall around herself. But their HEA does happen and one finds themself cheering for them!
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  • Mclaudia
    January 1, 1970
    Sadly, while the author's writing is as strong as ever, this book didn't work for me. It's hard to say why -- perhaps I've never truly cared for the heroine or the hero, so the ups and downs of their relationship (mostly downs) bored me. Perhaps the plot felt too... circular? I barely know because this book seems to have been erased from my memory as soon as I finished it, making no lasting impression. My least favorite of the series so far.
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  • Pgchuis
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this novel from the author.This was well-written and some of the banter between the heroine, Arabella, and the hero, Guy, was very entertaining. At other times it was more like unkind sniping. While I liked both Arabella and Guy, they did spend the entire novel seeking out new and more complicated ways to misunderstand each other or tell each other only part of the truth or say the opposite of what they really meant, and it got quite tiring. There were a number of dastardly I received a copy of this novel from the author.This was well-written and some of the banter between the heroine, Arabella, and the hero, Guy, was very entertaining. At other times it was more like unkind sniping. While I liked both Arabella and Guy, they did spend the entire novel seeking out new and more complicated ways to misunderstand each other or tell each other only part of the truth or say the opposite of what they really meant, and it got quite tiring. There were a number of dastardly secondary characters, and endless scheming and lying and threatening, which again became rather exhausting. Many of the actions taken by characters seemed extremely unlikely (Clara and Sculthorpe) or positively impossible for an honourable man in such society (Arabella's father and even Guy).Still, if you just go with the plot and accept everything that happens, this is a fun story.
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  • Cleo B
    January 1, 1970
    I cannot say I loved this book for its quality - frankly I didn't notice. I was too in love with the fact that in Arabella I felt so seen. She is proud, clever, scheming, loving, and scared of rejection in a way that echoed so deeply with me that I just adored this book. That aside, it's actually a really good book.1. We see a love story where there is no insta-love... boy, oh boy, is there no insta-love. Both our leads see the other, acknowledge attractiveness and then detest each others' perso I cannot say I loved this book for its quality - frankly I didn't notice. I was too in love with the fact that in Arabella I felt so seen. She is proud, clever, scheming, loving, and scared of rejection in a way that echoed so deeply with me that I just adored this book. That aside, it's actually a really good book.1. We see a love story where there is no insta-love... boy, oh boy, is there no insta-love. Both our leads see the other, acknowledge attractiveness and then detest each others' personalities.2. Our leads have so many preconceived notions, which actually do make sense, even as they make you want to bash your head against a wall, and then we watch as they slowly slowly work through them and learn3. Our heroine is what many would call a shrew. She is not tamed. She finds a man who understands when to laugh at her outrageousness, when to back her, and when, very rarely, to urge her to reconsider some of her more violent tendencies.4. Very limited angst-for-the-sake-of-angst, such that the issues our leads deal with are real, and they genuinely overcome them (instead of the usual heroine solves hero's problems by being a faux-counsellor)5. Unexpected funny moments which just make everything. No context spoiler: (view spoiler)[ Kidnap the vicar!! (hide spoiler)]6. I loved the reversal of having (view spoiler)[ the love scene right up front (but not for insta-love reasons, see Point 1) (hide spoiler)] after which we watch them slowly fall in loveRead it. Just read it.
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  • Viper Spaulding
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal regency romance!I haven't enjoyed a regency romance this much since the last book by this author. The characters are divinely developed, with layers upon layers of charisma and introspection. The plot is complex and intriguing, the supporting cast is diverse and fully-realized, and the underlying message (that women's rights were so negligible as to relegate aristocratic women to a hothouse form of slavery) is just pronounced enough to make its point. The author's exquisite use of lan Phenomenal regency romance!I haven't enjoyed a regency romance this much since the last book by this author. The characters are divinely developed, with layers upon layers of charisma and introspection. The plot is complex and intriguing, the supporting cast is diverse and fully-realized, and the underlying message (that women's rights were so negligible as to relegate aristocratic women to a hothouse form of slavery) is just pronounced enough to make its point. The author's exquisite use of language to portray Arabella's true feelings makes this book required reading for any fan of the genre.Guy and Arabella are fire and ice together! Promised to each other from infancy, they each wanted to defy their controlling fathers by choosing their own matches. Circumstances beyond their control, partnered with society's rigid protocols, spin their hate you/need you dynamic wildly out of control. Throughout it all, their banter is deliciously, wickedly hilarious while at the same time their interactions inadvertently give them insights into each other's secret thoughts and priorities.The first seduction is absolutely fraught with tension, filled with manipulative intent and battleground strategies, yet leaving each of them feeling as though they won the battle but lost the war. Arabella's pride is her only form of self-defense, and what seems to be a game of chicken is really just a desperate plan to avoid complete ruination and destitution. What she sacrifices, both physically and emotionally, to free herself from a fate truly worse than death was as heartbreaking as it was horrifying.There are so many highlight-worthy passages in this book! This author is uniquely gifted with prose, with dialogue, with character development, and with conveying the simplest feelings as profound philosophy. I took much longer than usual to read this book because so many passages begged to be read again and again, to be relished and absorbed completely before moving onto the next scene.Arabella and Guy are each heroic in their own way, devoted to their friends and family despite what other people may think. The completely innovative solution to the problems that kept them apart was surprisingly simple and wholly effective. It perfectly cleared out all the what-ifs and what-abouts that clouded their motives and cast doubt on their future stability. The HEA was victorious, glorious, and beautifully satisfying.If you haven't read any of Mia Vincy's books yet, you're really missing out. This one is every bit as good as the first two; perhaps even the best of the three. If you read historical romances at all, you owe it to yourself to read this one. I voluntarily reviewed an ARC of this book.
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  • Ilze
    January 1, 1970
    Caz's excellent review really says it all.
  • Silvia (roomforbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 CWs: at the beginning of the book THIS BOOK SLAYED ME
  • Norah Gibbons
    January 1, 1970
    My book not a review copy. Love the book. love the series. It's the perfect escape read right now when everything is going to 💩 I loved the banter, the characters are well written both main and supporting. Lots of growth in the hero and heroine and it helped me with my reading slump
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  • Disco
    January 1, 1970
    My hopes for this were high after “A Wicked Kind of Husband” by this author. I liked it, but it was more depressing than funny, whereas AWKoH had a better balance of the two.
  • Rs
    January 1, 1970
    I guess "A wicked kind of husband" will always be my favourite by Mia Vincy...the hero came across as weak, dependent and confused. i prefer stronger heroes...Hero - 2Heroine - 3Story - 3.5 uniqueHumor - 3Writing - 3.5
  • Mayo
    January 1, 1970
    Tiresome refusal to communicate.
  • Rose Blue
    January 1, 1970
    A TOP PICK at Roses Are Blue: https://wp.me/p3QRh4-1gQGuy Roth, now the Marquess Hardbury, spent the first twenty years of his life under his father’s thumb. His father decreed who he would marry, what his activities were, how he cut his hair, and even what he wore. After all those years of having no freedom, as well as suffering his first heartbreak in love, Guy left home and traveled the world for eight years, only returning after his father’s death. Guy has become his own man, stronger physic A TOP PICK at Roses Are Blue: https://wp.me/p3QRh4-1gQGuy Roth, now the Marquess Hardbury, spent the first twenty years of his life under his father’s thumb. His father decreed who he would marry, what his activities were, how he cut his hair, and even what he wore. After all those years of having no freedom, as well as suffering his first heartbreak in love, Guy left home and traveled the world for eight years, only returning after his father’s death. Guy has become his own man, stronger physically, more experienced, and determined to live his life the way he wants to. He longs for a settled home with a comfortable wife, certainly not the woman his father wished him to marry. As children, he and Arabella were always competing, and at odds with each other. She’s just the kind of woman he will not spend his life with.Arabella Larke is about to be forced into an engagement she doesn’t want – all because Guy has returned, and announced that he won’t honor his and her fathers’ agreement that they marry. She has no desire to marry Guy either, as their childhood was full of competition and one-upmanship. However, if she can convince Guy to agree to a temporary fake engagement, she’ll have time to arrange a real marriage, one more palatable to her, to another neighbor, who is currently out of the country. Guy is seemingly not the amiable gentleman he once was, as he bluntly brushes Arabella off, telling her that he will not even listen to her scheme, as he believes that she is trying to genuinely force him into marrying her.In addition to finding an amiable wife, Guy is working toward gaining guardianship of his two younger sisters. His deceased father put them legally into the care of one of his crooked cronies. When Arabella tries again to speak to him, this time to warn him that his sister may be in jeopardy, he once more dismisses her, telling her that he has the situation under control. Only – he doesn’t. When Guy learns that his sisters and their guardians are to be guests at the Larke home for a houseparty, culminating in Arabella’s engagement ball, he knows he has no choice but to attend. He is reluctant to face Arabella again, because, despite their mutual antagonism, they shared a brief, yet intense, physical interlude, which makes Guy question her motivation even more. My, oh, my – the goings on at the houseparty -- engagements, broken engagements, schemes, intended entrapment, and surprising passion! A DANGEROUS KIND OF LADY is by no means an easy read, but it is intense, compelling, and powerful. Arabella and Guy are such strong characters, each in their own way. Guy’s initial brushing off of Arabella was his way of asserting his independence from his obsessive father. He was determined to not follow any edict that his father issued. He soon begins to see glimpses of the real person behind Arabella’s icy exterior, as well as discovering how she constantly helps people without making it known. As Guy allows himself to let his own guard down, his true character is revealed, showing him to be caring, playful, passionate and willing to meet Arabella more than halfway. But she has to be willing….Arabella is so very complex. The death of her brother when they were children had a devastating effect on her, but it changed her father completely. No longer the loving parent, he belittles Arabella, making it obvious that he wished it were she who perished instead of his son. In order to help Arabella cope, her mother encouraged her to be strong and tough. This led to Arabella building walls around herself so high that it was impossible for anyone to get close. She became cold, arrogant, prideful, and wielding a wicked tongue which could tear one to pieces. She learned to rely only on herself, never asking anyone for help. Somewhere underneath all that is a tender heart that only wants to be loved for herself, someone strong enough to accept her as she is without wanting to change her. Arabella genuinely broke my heart, as time and time again, she sabotaged herself with her words, as she then withdrew even further when she realized she let Guy in just a little bit. I wonder how she could possibly resist, when he says things like: “When I touch you,” he said, hypnotic and heavy, “I imagine leaving a trail of stars, all the colors in the world, exploding from my touch, like a thousand fireworks flying up from your skin.” Swoon!I love A DANGEROUS KIND OF LADY, and I can say that is the best book I have read this year. Mia Vincy’s writing is stellar, her characters complicated, yet totally sympathetic. I simply did not want to put this book down, with its twists, compelling storyline, and heartbreaking situations. This is not a light read, but one to become immersed in for those readers who long for depth and emotion. Most highly recommended.
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  • Kristi Hudecek-Ashwill
    January 1, 1970
    "I remember how you like to be touched," he murmured.She closed her eyes and took a shuddering breath. Guy clenched his fists so tightly his fingers ached."Yes." She released the word on a sigh. "Yes."Her eyes snapped open, stormy with longing and fear, passion, and hope. "But the risks of...We can't...""We won't."He waited. She said nothing."Talk to me, Arabella," he urged. "Tell me what you would like." When she finally spoke, her soft words flickered between them like a flame. "I would like t "I remember how you like to be touched," he murmured.She closed her eyes and took a shuddering breath. Guy clenched his fists so tightly his fingers ached."Yes." She released the word on a sigh. "Yes."Her eyes snapped open, stormy with longing and fear, passion, and hope. "But the risks of...We can't...""We won't."He waited. She said nothing."Talk to me, Arabella," he urged. "Tell me what you would like." When she finally spoke, her soft words flickered between them like a flame. "I would like to be touched."~~~I hope that isn't considered a spoiler. That is my favorite scene of the book and there are many scenes like that throughout the story. They're just so raw, gritty, and pulled at my heart strings. I usually read books for the heroes and Guy Roth didn't let me down, but for once, I was more interested in Arabella Larke, the heroine. This is an enemies-to-lovers trope, something else I'm not too keen on, but this took my breath away. Guy and Arabella were promised to each other as children and knew each other as children, but as they became adults, Guy had other ideas and left for eight years. Meanwhile, Arabella lived her life and "colored outside the lines". She was sensible, didn't know how to flirt, and had no interest in being docile or subservient. She's so misunderstood and men run from her. She's witty, sarcastic, schemes, and even though she's got friends, she's really very alone. My heart broke for her on more than one occasion. Her father gets on her all the time for not being able to keep a man while her mother stays silent. It was just sad.Guy--Lord Hardbury--comes back from his travels and runs into Arabella at a ball that was held in his honor. She has a proposition for him, but he refuses to listen. He wants nothing to do with her. She's a part of the past he wants to bury. He resented his controlling father and she was a part of that. The only thing he wanted to do was secure his sisters in his own guardianship rather than Sir Walter Treadgold's, as his father directed. Arabella is now betrothed to a man she does not like. He revolts her and with the way he talks about certain aspects of her, I can see why. The guy is obsessed. Not wanting to give him any sort of satisfaction, she approached Guy in the most scandalous of ways. He practically laughs in her face, but she is adamant.As the book unfolds, more is revealed about both Guy and Arabella. He treats her with disdain a lot, but he didn't understand her. She refuses to ask anyone for help, but her desire to rob Sculthorpe (her intended) of his fantasy made her go to Guy on the matter and from there, the book really takes off. Arabella and Guy begin to learn about each other and they find that neither is as bad as the other thinks. I guess this is sort of the way it goes with this trope, but this was surprisingly sweet, in a heated kind of way. The attraction between these two is viable and undeniable, but to feel them fall in love was magnificent. She didn't want to admit it. She wanted him to be happy and to be able to choose his own bride and it wasn't her. She didn't want to force him into anything. He wanted to choose his own bride and wanted her to choose her own husband, but he soon learned that it wasn't going to be that easy for her. Her attitude, the walls she erected around herself, her snarkiness, the way she put off men--none of that was going to work in her favor, but he never felt obligated.This book is off the charts with feels, some great kisses, a couple of pretty steamy scenes, and it was just an all-around great feel-good romance. I loved the characters, their motives, the slight mystery toward the end that left me surprised, and a beautiful ending. I loved everything about this book. Just everything. There wasn't even one bad scene and no fluff. This is part a series, but can easily be read as a stand-alone novel. I will say it was nice to see Cassandra DeWitt from A Wicked Kind of Husband, although she didn't play a major part in the book. She was a good friend to Arabella and the Luxborough's from A Beastly Kind of Earl were mentioned. I like it when characters from other books make appearances, but also enjoy that they didn't overshadow the main characters or the story overall.Solid five stars!*I received a free copy of this book and voluntarily left a review.
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  • Nazmin
    January 1, 1970
    A Dangerous Kind of Lady is the third book to be released in Mia Vincy’s Longhope Abbey series. It is actually listed as book 2 which is a little confusing but it takes place roughly the same time as the other two books so it can be read as a standalone. Arabella Larke is an heiress but in order to gain her birthright her father is insisting she marry which leaves her little choice but to wed a man she loathes. She comes up with a desperate plan - a fake engagement with her childhood adversary a A Dangerous Kind of Lady is the third book to be released in Mia Vincy’s Longhope Abbey series. It is actually listed as book 2 which is a little confusing but it takes place roughly the same time as the other two books so it can be read as a standalone. Arabella Larke is an heiress but in order to gain her birthright her father is insisting she marry which leaves her little choice but to wed a man she loathes. She comes up with a desperate plan - a fake engagement with her childhood adversary and once [reluctant] betrothed, Guy Roth, Marquess of Hardbury who has recently returned from abroad after many years. She hopes to buy herself some time. Their parents had pushed for their marriage when they were young which Guy rebelled against. Arabella is surprised to find that Guy has grown into a strong, honourable and very attractive man but if he would only listen to her plan!Guy Roth endured years under the thumb of his cruel and controlling father before escaping and has vowed never to be subject to anyone’s machinations again. He certainly does not want to listen to Arabella who was to him, a symbol of his father’s plots. He has enough on his plate trying to gain custody of his younger sisters now that he is back without getting embroiled in Arabella’s selfish scheming.But as they get to know another again each discover that their previous prejudice’s may have been unjustified, and they spent years misjudging the other. Could their perfect match have been right in front of them all this time?I really enjoyed this book and came to like Arabella very much. Arabella is not your typical heroine. She is prickly, proud, abrasive, speaks her mind and is always plotting– definitely not all sweetness and light. But as you read, you discover that she is fair, loyal, lonely and desperately trying to find a place she can belong. Her schemes are all invariably to benefit someone else. Her relationship with her father is strained to say the least and she craves acceptance. She is multi layered and I was really rooting for her to overcome her insecurities and trust in Guy. Guy is a swoonworthy hero. He starts with all his misconceptions about Arabella colouring his attitude towards her and suspects her motives; but he gradually realises that there is much more beneath her snippy exterior. Once he opens his eyes, he does all he can to help Arabella and get her to place her trust in him. [Which is difficult since Arabella takes a long time to let down her defences]. His perseverance and realisation that Arabella really is the one for him is wonderful to see unfold. His actions at the end of the novel that allowed Arabella a choice in her life was refreshing and showed how noble he is. From an unlikely start this couple are shown to be truly made for each other.I love Mia Vincy’s books, and this certainly did not disappoint. Arabella and Guy go through a real journey to their HEA but at no point do you feel they behave out of character and the reader understands their reasoning. The secondary characters are realistic and play their part. Special mention must go to Arabella's mother. I won this book as a prize in a contest. It is not an ARC and there were no obligations to leave a review, but I truly thought this story deserves recognition. I definitely recommend this and the other books in the series.
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  • Teresa Wadhwani
    January 1, 1970
    I was highly anticipating this book because I loved “A Wicked Kind of Husband” so much and it did not disappoint. I still think AWKOH was better just because I’m partial to marriage of convenience and Joshua and Cassandra were such awesome characters, but Arabella and Guy are a close second. Mia Vincy’s signature witty dialogue, complex characters who do a lot figuring stuff out to realise that they are perfect for each other, and beautiful proses are all here. It took me less than 2 days to fin I was highly anticipating this book because I loved “A Wicked Kind of Husband” so much and it did not disappoint. I still think AWKOH was better just because I’m partial to marriage of convenience and Joshua and Cassandra were such awesome characters, but Arabella and Guy are a close second. Mia Vincy’s signature witty dialogue, complex characters who do a lot figuring stuff out to realise that they are perfect for each other, and beautiful proses are all here. It took me less than 2 days to finish it! *******Kind of Spoilers********This definitely is an enemies to lovers story where our heroine, Arabella is promised to Guy as infants but because of daddy issues both have reason to refuse the match. Arabella is always trying to win her father’s approval and love, while Guy is trying to escape his father’s control. And because of that, Guy never sees past his prejudice and sees Arabella as a symbol of what he’s escaping, never truly seeing her as a kind and wonderful woman that she is. Arabella isn’t without her faults either, and I’m not complaining but just saying that this makes for such complex characterisation that the conflict that keeps our main couple from getting together believable. Prideful, proud and independent she never wants to show her vulnerability or ask for help. This is where people can get frustrated but I totally relate so I get all the angst that she feels and repeatedly does things to push Guy away. However, their attraction is undeniable so be ready for lots of sweet but angsty roller coaster moments Secondary characters were a delight as well, I especially love the “I love dead things” Matilda. But more importantly Arabella friends all make an appearance and the mentioning of Cassandra and her strange marriage makes me want to read her story again. Also, Can’t wait for her other friend, Juno’s book! All in all, loved and enjoyed it and I think whoever loved Mia Vincy’s A Wicked Kind of Husband will not be disappointed.
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  • Penelope
    January 1, 1970
    oh i love this heroine. arabella is acerbic, smart, cunning, cutting, self-deprecating, and fucking funny. she schemes and plans and maneuvers people to her will and they are better for it. guy was not worthy of her and i disliked him for not seeing how great she was from the jump. he grew and got over himself a bit and proved himself. she's a secret marshmallow that deserves it all and i'm glad she got it.i tried to note the overlapping connections between this book and the others but i read th oh i love this heroine. arabella is acerbic, smart, cunning, cutting, self-deprecating, and fucking funny. she schemes and plans and maneuvers people to her will and they are better for it. guy was not worthy of her and i disliked him for not seeing how great she was from the jump. he grew and got over himself a bit and proved himself. she's a secret marshmallow that deserves it all and i'm glad she got it.i tried to note the overlapping connections between this book and the others but i read those so long ago i barely remember. can be read as stand alone but the others are wonderful as well so do yourself the favoredit! came back to say that i also loved (most) of the side characters. guy's sister freddie, arabella's mom, and the possible other woman who surprise surprise has layers herself. just a book full of fully realized people
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  • Laura_sommeils
    January 1, 1970
    You know that feeling when you finish a book and the feeling of the story was so satisfying it felt like when it's winter and you wake up warm in your bed and feel surrounded by the warmth of the blakets? Well, that's how I felt about this one.I loved the two main characters, and I loved how even though they became more vulnerable with each other, they didn't change who they are. And as they re-learned the other they came to love and take comfort in that person. And it wasn't a smoot sailing of You know that feeling when you finish a book and the feeling of the story was so satisfying it felt like when it's winter and you wake up warm in your bed and feel surrounded by the warmth of the blakets? Well, that's how I felt about this one.I loved the two main characters, and I loved how even though they became more vulnerable with each other, they didn't change who they are. And as they re-learned the other they came to love and take comfort in that person. And it wasn't a smoot sailing of it, building that trust and vulnerability in which you understand why the characters opened up or didn't and how it felt exactly right when they did. And how that makes you believe in them making it and in their HEA. This book was a delight to read and I think I'll probably re-read it pretty soon, because I devoured this book and I want to experience this story all over again.
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  • Noelani
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Wow. Great book. An absolute delight. The dialogue was quick and clever, collective nouns were in abundance, and the characters well formed.Arabella’s betrothed, Guy, comes back from an 8 yr absence to declare he does not want her. No matter to her, except her father is waiting in the wings with another that might have to do if she can’t enlist the help of her ex-betrothed to stall for time. Guy comes home with 3 goals: 1) spurn everything related to his father (including his chosen b 4.5 stars. Wow. Great book. An absolute delight. The dialogue was quick and clever, collective nouns were in abundance, and the characters well formed.Arabella’s betrothed, Guy, comes back from an 8 yr absence to declare he does not want her. No matter to her, except her father is waiting in the wings with another that might have to do if she can’t enlist the help of her ex-betrothed to stall for time. Guy comes home with 3 goals: 1) spurn everything related to his father (including his chosen betrothed, Arabella) 2) Gain custody of his sisters 3) Eventually marry a sweet amiable wife. A solid plan, if it weren’t for Arabella.A great series.My only complaint is the caricatures of characters that I find in this novel, but the writing and plotting was so well done it was easily overlooked.
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  • MrsMascara
    January 1, 1970
    Just gorgeous, I love this writers work.We had the clever, proud and formidable Arabella, who because of her gender is ignored by her Papa, and her accomplishments ignored. Trained as a child to be as perfect as possible, by her mother, who thinks that is the way to make her father learn to value her, after her twin brother died. She uses her pride to keep her kind and humorous side hidden from everyone.Guy, Lord Hardbury is determined to break his betrothal to her, as he doesn’t want to fulfil Just gorgeous, I love this writers work.We had the clever, proud and formidable Arabella, who because of her gender is ignored by her Papa, and her accomplishments ignored. Trained as a child to be as perfect as possible, by her mother, who thinks that is the way to make her father learn to value her, after her twin brother died. She uses her pride to keep her kind and humorous side hidden from everyone.Guy, Lord Hardbury is determined to break his betrothal to her, as he doesn’t want to fulfil his over controlling father’s wishes.Arabella needs him to pretend to be engaged to save her from an unwanted match with a lecherous and controlling Lord.Reading how Arabella learns to be herself, and believe that she is loveable s beautiful and heart wrenching and lovely.Everything I want from a romance.
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