Your New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era
Shirley Temple tap dancing at the Kiwanis Club, Stevie Nicks glaring at Lindsey Buckingham during a live version of “Silver Springs,” Frank Ocean lyrics staking new territory on the page: this is a taste of the cultural landscape sampled in Your New Feeling is the Artifact of a Bygone Era. Chad Bennett casually combines icons of the way we live now—GIFs, smartphones, YouTube—with a classical lover’s lament. The result is certainly a deeply personal account of loss, but more critically, a dismantling of an American history of queerness. “This is our sorrow. Once it seemed theirs, but now it’s ours. They still inhabit it, yet we say it’s ours.” All at once cerebral, physical, personal, and communal, Your New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era constructs a future worth celebrating.

Your New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era Details

TitleYour New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 14th, 2020
PublisherSarabande Books
Rating
GenrePoetry

Your New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era Review

  • Dominic
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Sarabande Books for gifting me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. For me, reading a book of poetry is like methodically combing through a great record. Each poem, like a song on a tracklist, works as a piece of the whole--with all the peaks of movement and moments of silence, the motifs (here: birds, cell phones, lots of weather), and an outtro: "how it / becomes / birdsong / if we / cut out / its tongue." It's terribly sad that musicians in 2019 have to fear the death of Thank you to Sarabande Books for gifting me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. For me, reading a book of poetry is like methodically combing through a great record. Each poem, like a song on a tracklist, works as a piece of the whole--with all the peaks of movement and moments of silence, the motifs (here: birds, cell phones, lots of weather), and an outtro: "how it / becomes / birdsong / if we / cut out / its tongue." It's terribly sad that musicians in 2019 have to fear the death of the album.The upcoming January release, *Your New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era*, written by Chad Bennett and published by @sarabandebooks, lulled me like a startling new LP. Read over the course of one day in three hypnotic sittings, this debut collection of poetry made me think about spaces, particularly queer spaces and how to claim them--but also the space between the reader and the writer.First of all, these poems perhaps repeatedly engage with a relationship between the speaker and another man (or men). The showpiece poem, for me, was a list poem called "Silver Springs," about the marks we leave on each other (and about, of course, Stevie Nicks): "13. In fact if people hate poetry, and mostly they do, people hate / poetry because it, like humiliation, pretends but refuses to go away" and "20. For one blue decade I addressed myself to one person / only, and maybe I am still."Second, these poems engage in a vibrant conversation with other, mostly queer texts, from Gertrude Striein to Roland Barthes to Frank Ocean. It was obvious to me that these writers have, in some way, altered the poet irrevocably; their presence all over this collection proves (and does not try to hide) the perpetual impact other texts have on the work writers create. These poems experiment with their ideas as if trying on clothes, and even dare to forge new structures. Ultimately the book creates an effect teetering between a surrealist wet dream and coffee-soaked gloomy Sunday daydream.If the album is dead--oh god, please no--at least the poetry collection is alive as ever.
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