A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor (An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, #2)
April May and the Carls are back in the much-anticipated sequel to Hank Green's #1 New York Times bestselling debut novel, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing.The Carls disappeared the same way they appeared, in an instant. While they were on Earth, they caused confusion and destruction without ever lifting a finger. Well, that’s not exactly true. Part of their maelstrom was the sudden viral fame and untimely death of April May: a young woman who stumbled into Carl’s path, giving them their name, becoming their advocate, and putting herself in the middle of an avalanche of conspiracy theories. Months later, the world is as confused as ever. Andy has picked up April’s mantle of fame, speaking at conferences and online about the world post-Carl; Maya, ravaged by grief, begins to follow a string of mysteries that she is convinced will lead her to April; and Miranda infiltrates a new scientific operation . . . one that might have repercussions beyond anyone’s comprehension. As they each get further down their own paths, a series of clues arrive—mysterious books that seem to predict the future and control the actions of their readers; unexplained internet outages; and more—which seem to suggest April may be very much alive. In the midst of the gang's possible reunion is a growing force, something that wants to capture our consciousness and even control our reality. A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is the bold and brilliant follow-up to An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. It’s a fast-paced adventure that is also a biting social commentary, asking hard, urgent questions. How will we live online? What powers over our lives are we giving away for free? Who has the right to change the world forever? And how do we find comfort in an increasingly isolated world?

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor (An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, #2) Details

TitleA Beautifully Foolish Endeavor (An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 7th, 2020
PublisherDutton
ISBN-139781524743475
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Contemporary, Young Adult, Adult, Audiobook, LGBT, New Adult, Adult Fiction, Novels

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor (An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, #2) Review

  • Ariel
    January 1, 1970
    MY MOST ANTICIPATED READ OF 2020!! TEACH ME HOW TO BE A BETTER ONLINE CITIZEN, HANK!
  • Tucker (TuckerTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    this cover is a foolish endeavor and there is nothing beautiful about it| Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram this cover is a foolish endeavor and there is nothing beautiful about it| Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram
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  • Sara ❀
    January 1, 1970
    AND NOW WE HAVE A coVER TOO OMH Y GGFdsgnGBZFSBDfzugbsflghbWE HAVE A RELEASE DATE! I REPEAT!!! WE HAVE A RELEASE DATE !!!!!!!
  • Camille
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 WOW WOW WOW! I was ever so lucky to get an advanced pdf of this book from Hank (coolest moment of my life ngl) Anywho, this was a great continuation and conclusion to this story. I was on the edge of my seat throughout this entire book! It was action packed and hard hitting. All in all this book was really good, and I may even like it more than the first. It was great being able to see into other characters perspectives and learn more about them. Now can everyone pleeeaase read it asap so i 5/5 WOW WOW WOW! I was ever so lucky to get an advanced pdf of this book from Hank (coolest moment of my life ngl) Anywho, this was a great continuation and conclusion to this story. I was on the edge of my seat throughout this entire book! It was action packed and hard hitting. All in all this book was really good, and I may even like it more than the first. It was great being able to see into other characters perspectives and learn more about them. Now can everyone pleeeaase read it asap so i we can talk about it!!!
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  • Kinga
    January 1, 1970
    I need it NOW!!!
  • Isabelle | Nine Tale Vixen
    January 1, 1970
    A pre-emptive apology to all other 2020 releases because THIS just skyrocketed to the top of my Most Anticipated list.I know it's never going to happen, but I would love to see the pre-first/-second pass versions of this book and see how the final version was revised. A pre-emptive apology to all other 2020 releases because THIS just skyrocketed to the top of my Most Anticipated list.I know it's never going to happen, but I would love to see the pre-first/-second pass versions of this book and see how the final version was revised.
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  • Rida Imran
    January 1, 1970
    I JUST THIS ON HANK'S INSTAGRAM. THIS HAS A TITLE, A SYNOPSIS AND A RELEASE DATE. EXCITED IS A VERY A SMALL WORD FOR WHAT I AM FEELING RIGHT NOW. BRB SCREAMING.
  • Emily Polson
    January 1, 1970
    Hank Green’s A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor picks up in the aftermath of his first book, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. Following the shocking death of April May, her friends navigate a world that is reeling from the sudden disappearance of the aliens known as “Carls” and the collective dream landscape they took with them. The first book offered a gripping look at one woman’s experience with first contact and viral fame, but the sequel is far more ambitious in its scope. It dives right into the Hank Green’s A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor picks up in the aftermath of his first book, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. Following the shocking death of April May, her friends navigate a world that is reeling from the sudden disappearance of the aliens known as “Carls” and the collective dream landscape they took with them. The first book offered a gripping look at one woman’s experience with first contact and viral fame, but the sequel is far more ambitious in its scope. It dives right into the mystery of the Carls’ purpose for coming to earth and the myriad ways humans attempt to understand and intervene with this purpose. April’s friends try to parse conspiracy theories, a secretive offshore research lab, and an underground reality game to understand what happened to their friend, what the heck the Carls’ existence means, and what to do about those using the void left in a post-Carl world to attain dangerous levels of power and influence. Just as the sequel ramps up the story’s sci-fi elements, it also ramps up the character studies by splitting the narration into five points of view. In the first book, April May constructs her identity around the myth of the lone hero, but the sequel’s five complex and flawed protagonists unravel this concept by each driving a critical element of the plot and its probability toward the novel’s racing climax. Together, they create something so much bigger and more interesting—and far less predictable—than what any one of them could do alone. This makes sense, because while the first book was April’s story, the sequel is just as much her friends’ story and the larger story of humanity on the brink. Each of the narrators’ lives is intimately connected to a network of side characters, without whom they wouldn’t succeed in taking story-altering action time and again.The book decentralizes the narrative power further by using Tweets, podcast transcripts, news articles, YouTube video scripts, chat forum conversations, and more to piece together its world. Thus in form, as well as plot, A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor warns against the consolidation of human power and makes a persuasive case for collaboration in both storytelling and problem solving. That goes for large-scale systemic issues as well as small interpersonal ones. It’s a story about alien interference, catastrophic greed, and the fragility of human society. But it’s also about recognizing privilege, building community, and learning how to be kinder to the important people in our lives. The stakes are high in the novel, but they’re high in the real world, too. This entertaining story presents stinging social commentary on how existing power structures endanger our survival, and the way our ability to humble ourselves in partnership with others might be what saves us from our own worst tendencies. In that sense, Hank Green’s A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor does what all the best novels do: offers a temporary escape into a compelling fictional narrative, before dropping you back into reality with a greater understanding of its systems, empathy for the struggles of people whose lived experience differs from yours, and a renewed sense of urgency to be an active force for good in the beautifully foolish endeavor that is humanity.***Thank you to Dutton for the review copy! Opinions are all my own.***
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  • BrittainX
    January 1, 1970
    HAND IT OVER, HANK!
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    OMG WHAT, THERE’S GOING TO BE A SEQUEL!?!?!?
  • Monica (Tomes Project)
    January 1, 1970
    1) An Absolutely Remarkable Thing - ★★★★★- December 2019A SYNOPSIS AND A COVER. We are blessed. An Absolutely Remarkable Thing was one of my favorite books of 2019, so I'm extremely excited about this sequel. 1) An Absolutely Remarkable Thing - ★★★★★- December 2019A SYNOPSIS AND A COVER. We are blessed. An Absolutely Remarkable Thing was one of my favorite books of 2019, so I'm extremely excited about this sequel.
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  • Rox
    January 1, 1970
    I love the title. I love the cover. Wooo. I AM READY. I have absolutely no idea what to expect. I guess it's time I start making my own theories?? Do ya'll have theories of what's going to happen?
  • Mollie
    January 1, 1970
    I can't wait!!!!!!! Counting down the days till realse! The first one was magnificent. I wrote a review if you want to read that =)
  • Gretal
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't supposed to have access to this, and they told me not to review it until publication date, but I'll say I enjoyed it.
  • val 👏👏👏
    January 1, 1970
    i can't get this book soon enough challenge
  • Andrea M. Gamble
    January 1, 1970
    AH the cover is to die for. I’m beyond excited. I’m already in love!!!
  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    (20/12/19) Hank just read the first chapter for his vlogbrothers video and I need time travel to be an option so I can go to July 7th and know what happens next! (19/12/19) We already had a title and a synopsis and a release date, but now we also have a book cover and... How many sleeps until July 7th? (20/12/19) Hank just read the first chapter for his vlogbrothers video and I need time travel to be an option so I can go to July 7th and know what happens next! (19/12/19) We already had a title and a synopsis and a release date, but now we also have a book cover and... How many sleeps until July 7th?
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    We have a cover! And a synopsis! And a release date! I'm so excited!
  • ShittyreviewsbyGloria
    January 1, 1970
    AAAAAAAAAAA I'M SO EXCITED FOR THIS BOOK
  • Avalon
    January 1, 1970
    AHHHHHHHH!!!!!!
  • Helia (Rose Quartz Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    This title is gorgeous and I. CAN'T. WAIT.
  • Izzy
    January 1, 1970
    We got a cover!! Those colors 😍 Omg I can not wait for this to come out hurry up July!
  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know if my body is ready, but I need this nonetheless. I adore the cover that was recently revealed.
  • Sarka
    January 1, 1970
    Spoiler-Free Review!I have had this book on preorder the moment it was available. I must admit that I have really enjoyed An Absolutely Remarkable Thing (the first book in the series) and it was a 5 out 5 stars read for me so that was the reason why I couldn't wait to read the sequel. First thing I feel like I have to mention here, is that the book picks up right where we have left off in the book one and counts on you being already familiar with the characters and the world, so please definitel Spoiler-Free Review!I have had this book on preorder the moment it was available. I must admit that I have really enjoyed An Absolutely Remarkable Thing (the first book in the series) and it was a 5 out 5 stars read for me so that was the reason why I couldn't wait to read the sequel. First thing I feel like I have to mention here, is that the book picks up right where we have left off in the book one and counts on you being already familiar with the characters and the world, so please definitely read the AART before diving into the sequel. Now, because I don't want to potentially ruin the plot for anyone I will make this as spoiler-free as possible. We are again following a group of young people that are at the forefront of a revolution and yes Carl makes an appearance. For those who are not familiar with Carl it is basically an alien-like artificial intelligence. Carl goes by pronouns they/them and is the force that fundamentally shakes up the world as we know it. The book definitely explores very similar themes to AART - power, influence, social media, social hierarchy, feminism, patriarchy, humanity, the concept of what is good and bad. I thought that all of this was explored in a very clever way in the first book and that was one of the reasons why it became one of my favourites in the first place. As expected the second book definitely did not disappoint and took that exploration even further. Another aspect I really loved about this book, as well as the first one, was the use of articles, interviews, video transcriptions and other fun bits that added value to the narrative. They were all skillfully done and I enjoyed going through them.In terms of the characters, we definitely see them grow as the narrative unravels. They change a lot as they have to adapt to new situations and for some of them, it was quite a big jump from what we witnessed in the first installment which was great. I remember feeling like I needed closure after how An Absolutely Remarkable Thing ended so it was satisfying to see the story get the end it deserved 🙌5/5
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  • Lay
    January 1, 1970
    A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is a carefully crafted story of fame, power, alien robots and all the ways in which humanity might be doomed. April and her friends try to navigate their new world and its mysteries while the dangers that they thought to have passed with the disappearance of the Carls are stronger – and closer- than they suspected. It might just be the rare case of the sequel that is better than the original and I know I’ll be returning to this story time and time again.Part advent A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is a carefully crafted story of fame, power, alien robots and all the ways in which humanity might be doomed. April and her friends try to navigate their new world and its mysteries while the dangers that they thought to have passed with the disappearance of the Carls are stronger – and closer- than they suspected. It might just be the rare case of the sequel that is better than the original and I know I’ll be returning to this story time and time again.Part adventurous scavenger hunt, part heist story: A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor manages to be even more action-packed than the previous book. It widens the scope in interesting ways, interrogating the consequences of concentrated power on a global scale. It does so through the smallest possible lens: individuals. Every character tells their own story in the post-Carl world, letting different perspectives and experiences take centre stage chapter after chapter. They’re connected by the shared loss of April, but equally isolated in their grief – an aspect that helps explore the social isolation caused by (or maybe despite) the social internet.Despite a bigger focus on politics and economics, both things I know too little about, the pacing was impeccable and I felt very safe in Green’s hands. There was not a moment of boredom or a less-than-stellar middle in sight. Every twist was unexpected but delightful and I was turning the pages eager to see which new places the story would take me next.The multiple POVs added depth and nuance and all characters had distinct voices, which certainly is an impressive feat when juggling five of them. I loved the multimedia aspect, including tweets and news articles rooted the story firmly in our contemporary digital culture whilst also showing the importance of collective storytelling and perspective.All throughout A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor, similar to April’s tiers of fame in book one, there are character’s observations about money, fame and power, often in lists. To me, those moments were hugely enjoyable and I’ve marked them all. They’re certainly food for thought and didn’t break my reading flow if anything the listicles made the musings about how humans look for meaning easier to grasp.I enjoyed that characters who in An Absolutely Remarkable Thing were pushed to the sidelines by April now got to explore their own stories. Their parts of the bigger puzzle beautifully highlight their unique perspectives, strengths and weaknesses. The way their adventures intertwine and collide with each other was masterfully done, a complex web of individual and collective reconciliation with how to live in the current world. Additionally, I think Green’s ability to give each of the POV characters distinct voices deserves to be applauded, it shows just how well he knows these characters and their inner lives and manages to clearly communicate that.It’s impossible for me to pick a favourite character because they’re all so wonderfully flawed and human, but Miranda Beckwith holds a special place in my heart. A material scientist, she gets swept up in April May’s orbit in An Absolutely Remarkable Thing and functions mostly as a nerdy sidekick, but A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor allows her true brilliance to shine as she navigates both her research and a medium-sized identity crisis. All whilst casually being a total badass who saves the world!A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is such a huge book about all of humanity whilst also being about just tiny, fragile humans and I love that. It’s funny and weird, but it’s written with so much love, hope and despair for humanity, it hurts my heart. Somehow it manages to be both hilarious and magical, whilst also providing interesting and nuanced analyses of our current society and our digital culture. All while saying what needs saying but also being hopeful. I think that’s the point, though. Humanity may be doomed and always will be, so hope truly might be a foolish endeavor. But it’s also beautiful and necessary and so, so human.This book is for you if……you enjoy hopeful contemporary science-fiction that explores what being human looks like in the age of digital media, has enough mysteries to keep you guessing for days and adds loveable, nuanced characters into the mix to help you imagine people, and the world, complexly.…you find yourself worried about the state of the world and are looking for an escape that simultaneously discusses the issues of power and fame whilst also sending you on a weird and wonderful adventure.
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  • Cayley Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Before I get into reviewing this book I want to say that it is over 450 pages long and I read it in 36 hours. That information alone should send the message that a Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is riveting and compelling and certainly a solid narrative. I love Hank because he is so intentional. His videos and his life and certainly this novel are dense with the weight of choice and ideas and ambition and intentionality. There is not one half-baked idea in this text. Every little thing is on purpo Before I get into reviewing this book I want to say that it is over 450 pages long and I read it in 36 hours. That information alone should send the message that a Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is riveting and compelling and certainly a solid narrative. I love Hank because he is so intentional. His videos and his life and certainly this novel are dense with the weight of choice and ideas and ambition and intentionality. There is not one half-baked idea in this text. Every little thing is on purpose. And that can be awesome and compelling, but it can also be a little nail on the head overwhelming. This book is also wildly ambitious. It needed to follow up An Absolutely Remarkable Thing which, in itself, is no small task, but the plot of this book, without giving too much away, is not just about the fate of April, but also humanity and our collective consciousness and future and economy. So… big stuff. I will say that I think the first book was more immersive than this one. Partly because the depth of the universe building and the natural mystery of the Carls in aART was, in itself, very fascinating. But also because April May’s character and her narration was so compelling. April is flawed and her perspective and personality was so clear through her narration. It was really really great. I think this is where aBFE loses some points - because it is narrated through so many different perspectives and they don’t always offer much beyond next steps in the plot. The voices of these characters for the most part sounded extremely similar… which felt flat after the dynamic narration of April throughout the first novel. Additionally the plots of some of the characters, as is always the case with a book multiple narrators, at times felt unimportant and uninteresting. I wasn’t as drawn into Andy’s economic shenanigans or his deep dive into Altus as I was with Miranda’s espionage. The plot also didn’t move forward when certain characters were telling their bits, which felt frustrating and counter-intuitive to the idea of the book as something these characters wrote to explain the story to the world. All of that said, this book was still very, very good. Without a doubt ABFE has changed the way I view the social internet and its economy. Likely forever. Its critiques and commentary were pointed and sharp. The message is in no way unclear. “Even in a world without Altus, the most sophisticated software in existence is tasked with figuring out how to keep you from leaving a website. That software knows all of your weaknesses. What that software wants to do is make us into people who’re easier to predict. These algorithms are already programming society. And the question that we now have it ask is, what happens when they realize it?” What does that mean for us? For humanity? In a world where the dystopia already exists in the algorithms that run Twitter and TikTok and in the corporations that run Amazon and Netflix? Where our culture is, or certainly could be, controlled by the few and power is being concentrated more and more every day?In Hank’s perspective, it means we choose humans. We find meaning and value in ourselves and in our real connection to others. It means there is hope, and a hope that acknowledges the reality of our current situation, making it even more important and real.The truth is that for me I don't yet know what this book means. I have been thinking about it ever since I finished it last night and I think I will continue thinking about it for a long time. I don't know what to do with my new perspective... but the fact that this novel was so able to open my eyes to a new way of seeing the world is a truly remarkable thing. And perhaps my own realization and acceptance of these ideas paired with my knowledge that I will never stop being part of the push to a less shitty dystopia for us all... that is the Beautifully Foolish Endeavor.
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  • Millie
    January 1, 1970
    Contains spoilers for An Absolutely Remarkable Thing I've been looking forward to this since I read An Absolutely Remarkable Thing in 2018! I gave AART 5 stars upon a recent reread because... I just loved it. ABFE continues the story of Carl in a bit of a different way. AART used an alien invasion as the backdrop to an exploration of fame, social media, and the power of influence. ABFE is about 100 pages longer for starters, and much bigger in scope. Instead of exploring power at an individual Contains spoilers for An Absolutely Remarkable Thing I've been looking forward to this since I read An Absolutely Remarkable Thing in 2018! I gave AART 5 stars upon a recent reread because... I just loved it. ABFE continues the story of Carl in a bit of a different way. AART used an alien invasion as the backdrop to an exploration of fame, social media, and the power of influence. ABFE is about 100 pages longer for starters, and much bigger in scope. Instead of exploring power at an individual level, Green uses Carl to show the future of Big Tech capitalism, and the power imbalances that come along with it. It feels more important. It's both less personal (exploring all of humanity instead of just April May) and more personal (let's be honest, most of us aren't social media influencers, but we could live to see this future.)In that way, the books are very similar: using fun sci-fi to show how power can be misused.It seems to be a clear critique of capitalism and concentrating power in the hands of few white men individuals. We love to see it. The plot was pretty fast-paced, with a load of plot twists that I didn't see coming, and yet made perfect sense (a rare but beautiful combo.) I really got the sense whilst reading that this was a well-planned out and deliberate plot.HOWEVER, it's not perfect. Often I felt as if there was maybe a bit too much going on? I kept forgetting about things as we switched perspectives and it felt as if Green just added another thing every time he needed the characters to be somewhere (view spoiler)[ e.g. The Book of Good Times, the white rock stuff, Bex, The Thread, the entire fact Carl had a brother??? etc. (hide spoiler)] It was just a lot, which made it a bit slow just before the climax as we caught up with every single character. Also, some characters from AART were almost completely discarded (view spoiler)[ I loved Robin but we only really got one good scene with him! (hide spoiler)]That seems like a lot of criticisms but really I am just being pedantic: I had high expectations for this book following AART.The ending was *chefs kiss*. It was exactly what I wanted from Hank Green right now: hopeful and bright and emotive. Honestly I have no idea how he stays so positive about the human race but I'm glad he does. Ultimately, ABFE was a satisfying conclusion to April May and Carl's story. Don't go in expecting exactly the same thing as AART, but do expect to come out feeling fragile and pensive and, most of all, hopeful.4 stars.
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get my copy of a Beautifully Foolish Endeavour about a week before the release date thanks to the magic of pre-orders and something known as a 'release window'. I count myself very lucky in many ways. I was lucky to have found An Absolutely Remarkable thing when I did. I picked it up at my local library in my hometown in February 2020 during my college reading week. I sat down on the floor in the corner and started it there, took it home, and finished it in about five hours I was lucky enough to get my copy of a Beautifully Foolish Endeavour about a week before the release date thanks to the magic of pre-orders and something known as a 'release window'. I count myself very lucky in many ways. I was lucky to have found An Absolutely Remarkable thing when I did. I picked it up at my local library in my hometown in February 2020 during my college reading week. I sat down on the floor in the corner and started it there, took it home, and finished it in about five hours. I remember thinking to myself: "I am so lucky that I only have to wait til July. " (or june, I suppose) Hank delivers everything I hoped this sequel would be and more. If you thought AART had outdone itself on the worldbuilding oh BABY just you wait, the mystery only goes deeper, and the action only gets wilder, and somehow in the midst of all these incredible feats and worldwide crisesesseses the characters all remain beautifully human. (I know who i relate to, but I won't broadcast that on the internet cause it's a callout in it's own right) Every character contradicts themselves, they pitch their own inner wants against what they know they must do for the sake of humanity--and this much doesnt end even when most stories would say that it should. I think there's something to be said for seeing yourself in a character's bad traits, and not having it be a condemnation. I love the doubt, I love imperfect characters, I love human flaw, and I love Hank Green's commitment to imagining people complexly.I laughed out loud, I teared up, I gasped, I theorized alone in my bedroom, and I left it thoroughly satisfied. 6/5 cant wait for my friends to get their copies
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  • Emmy Brett
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent excellent book, both on its own and for the current moment. You’d think that a piece of fiction that deals with the dangers of capitalism, social media, undersupervised science, and general societal unrest would end up getting bogged down in the process, but Green keeps things moving at such a pace that you never really have a chance to realize how much he’s managed to pack into such a short period of time, or how thoroughly and eloquently he’s managed to address each point. This is an excellent excellent book, both on its own and for the current moment. You’d think that a piece of fiction that deals with the dangers of capitalism, social media, undersupervised science, and general societal unrest would end up getting bogged down in the process, but Green keeps things moving at such a pace that you never really have a chance to realize how much he’s managed to pack into such a short period of time, or how thoroughly and eloquently he’s managed to address each point. Hank manages the tremendous feat of maneuvering from a compelling action story about aliens to a well developed, often moving argument for the ongoing existence of humans on a planet that we seem incapable of caring for. Both from a writing standpoint and an ideas one, this book blows the first out of the water (and I loved the first one!)Plus, the *minor, minor spoiler ahead* choice to expand the narrator from just April May to include secondary characters from the first book is a great one that allows us more opportunities to explore perspectives on the issues discussed; it’s also to Hank’s credit that not a single character feels underdeveloped or weakly positioned to take over the narrative.TLDR: An excellent summer read, at all times and especially at this time, that makes a surprisingly moving argument for why humans should keep it up, even in the midst of all of our messiness and bad decision making.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Wow Hank. One of my key points of critique in my review of An Absolutely Remarkable Thing in 2018 was Hank’s novice writing style, and I was blown away by how far he’s come along in just one more book. His writing style is still very “webby”, he is very much a product of the internet, but I absolutely felt that his skills developed so much more in A Beautifully Foolish Endeavour. I felt that he’d reached a better balance of the literature of writing, rather than writing a novel the same way one Wow Hank. One of my key points of critique in my review of An Absolutely Remarkable Thing in 2018 was Hank’s novice writing style, and I was blown away by how far he’s come along in just one more book. His writing style is still very “webby”, he is very much a product of the internet, but I absolutely felt that his skills developed so much more in A Beautifully Foolish Endeavour. I felt that he’d reached a better balance of the literature of writing, rather than writing a novel the same way one might write a Tumblr post. I was really impressed by how much the writing style had improved book on book; really impressed. I loved this book, from beginning to end. It wasn’t totally unpredictable, but I didn’t lose any enjoyment from anticipating the conclusion. I loved the journey, I loved the adventure, I loved the different format, I loved the way the characters weaved in and out of each other’s respective spaces. I found the character development and motivations a lot more satisfying in this book than compared to AART. Whereas in the first book I just wasn’t satisfied with why the characters were the way they were, I felt Hank had shown much more than he told this time around. This is absolutely one of those books I’ll always wish I could experience again for the first time, as with AART. I loved this book.
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