Wonder Woman
New York Times bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak, Shout) and artist Leila del Duca reimagine Wonder Woman's origins in this timely story about the refugee experience, teenage activism, and finding the love and strength to create change.Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Amazons. The celebrations are cut short, however, when rafts of refugees break through the Themysciran barrier. Diana tries to help them, but she is swept away by the sea--and from her home--thus becoming a refugee herself.Now Diana must survive in the world outside of Themyscira for the first time; the world that is filled with danger and injustice. She must redefine what it means to belong, to be an Amazon, and to make a difference.Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a story about growing into your strength, battling for justice, and the power of friendship.

Wonder Woman Details

TitleWonder Woman
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 2nd, 2020
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401286453
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Comics, Fantasy, Superheroes

Wonder Woman Review

  • Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestWonder Woman has always been one of my favorite superheroes and I love this interpretation of Diana Prince. Diana is the princess of the Amazon and it's her sixteenth birthday. Like all teenagers, she's painfully awkward and uncertain of her place in her world, but eager to grow up. When she plunges into the sea to save refugees, she ends up accidentally breaking through the veil surrounding Themyscira and ending up in our world instead. Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestWonder Woman has always been one of my favorite superheroes and I love this interpretation of Diana Prince. Diana is the princess of the Amazon and it's her sixteenth birthday. Like all teenagers, she's painfully awkward and uncertain of her place in her world, but eager to grow up. When she plunges into the sea to save refugees, she ends up accidentally breaking through the veil surrounding Themyscira and ending up in our world instead.Her skill with languages helps identify her to a diplomat and a volunteer, who pull her out of the camps and take her to New York, where she ends up staying with a Polish family. There, she immediately begins helping out undocumented immigrants and low income families, while the book-- very neutrally and not at all sanctimoniously-- tackles issues like gentrification, human trafficking, and corruption.I really loved this book a lot. It's aimed at young adults but nothing about it is childish. The art style is polished and the writing is mature. I wouldn't have expected less from Laurie Halse Anderson, though. Tough topics are basically her bread and butter as an audience.Diana is a hard character to write and Leigh Bardugo didn't quite pull it off with her interpretation. This is close to perfect, though. Diana is the perfect blend of kick-butt heroine and naive traveler. She doesn't tolerate sexism and is willing to put everything on the line to defend families and children, but she doesn't know what a merry-go-round is and is flummoxed by homelessness and bad coffee.I also loved the positive themes in this book: bonding together as a community, the greatness of libraries and how they serve as resource hubs for those who are struggling, and the importance of friendship and family ties. I think TEMPEST TOSSED will be an excellent read for anyone who loves Wonder Woman.Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!4 to 4.5 stars
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  • Cadence
    January 1, 1970
    "Diana was trying to help people in the water and couldn't swim. After they were saved she couldn't get back home to her island. She moved to New York and helped feed hungry children and saved kidnapped kids. She also helped a kid who couldn't breathe. At the hospital she talked different languages to help the doctors because she's an Amazon. I want to visit the Statue of Liberty some day in New York City." -Cadee, age 7 almost 8
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  • ♠ TABI ♠
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a simple woman of simple tastes
  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    Written by Laurie Halse AndersonIllustrated by Leila Del DucaOut of all the wonderful DC graphic novels i have had the pleasure of reading, none have done what this did. Tempest Tossed tackled multiple social problems and raised awareness of child trafficking. While most of the novels we read help one overcome their own insecurities and troubles, this one takes Diana away from her home and literally in the place of these children. She was able to witness these problems and come to know that they Written by Laurie Halse AndersonIllustrated by Leila Del DucaOut of all the wonderful DC graphic novels i have had the pleasure of reading, none have done what this did. Tempest Tossed tackled multiple social problems and raised awareness of child trafficking. While most of the novels we read help one overcome their own insecurities and troubles, this one takes Diana away from her home and literally in the place of these children. She was able to witness these problems and come to know that they aren't right. This book is directed for younger readers while the topics are not childish at all. Yet, it goes about bringing awareness to them in an impactful way for these readers. Not only do I think that Anderson nailed the Wonder Woman character, I think she outstandingly created her as an even greater role model for the younger community of readers. I say that because Diana (classic) is this naïve yet determined character. Anderson nailed that for a younger audience and stepped it up by allowing Diana to grow. Tempest Tossed tackled a bunch of different issues like LGBTQ, bullying, acne, cultural differences, loss of family, homelessness, poverty, child trafficking, and even foster care. I mean so many issues are displayed within these pages, but done in a realistic way you could easily overlook one. Diana's earnest sincerity is what this whole novel is based on and I loved every second of it. She is from a world of Amazons that she didn't fit into. She struggled to be like them and when she selflessly helps outsiders, she finds herself trapped in a different world and unable to get back home. The whole time she learns that the world is disgusting and troubled and all she wants to do is make is better. Yet while she is new and feels very alienated, she goes above and beyond to help the community and save the children. This novel is very timely in our society. The reasoning to just be a good person and help out your own community is well enough to allow any young reader to love this book. By allowing them to understand that these issues are real, is a great way to get them to be more productive members of society and fight these issues. So, why not allow an influential character help these young readers grasp these issues? Diana is a perfect example throughout this novel and this twist of her origin story is perfect for readers today. I have never read anything so significant while being able to manage a storyline, character arc, all with a load of social issues attached. Anderson's writing combined with Del Duca's artistry is the perfect mix to modernizing literature to extinguish the stigma around graphic novel reading. Thank you to DC Comics for sending me a copy and the images to use for this review. All my thoughts are my own. Until next Time,Brittany from DauntlesslyReading
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  • Lu
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. An huge thanks to DC Comics for this free copy. TW: children exploitation, harassment, kidnapping, mention of rape and sexual abuse, human trafficking.Princess Diana of Themyscira always felt different and alienated from the Amazons in her island home and she hopes her sixteen birthday will change everything and she will finally feel part of the warrior tribe. But when rafts with refugees break the barrier around her Themyscir I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. An huge thanks to DC Comics for this free copy. TW: children exploitation, harassment, kidnapping, mention of rape and sexual abuse, human trafficking.Princess Diana of Themyscira always felt different and alienated from the Amazons in her island home and she hopes her sixteen birthday will change everything and she will finally feel part of the warrior tribe. But when rafts with refugees break the barrier around her Themyscira, Diana defies her tribe to save and bring them to safety. But she's carried away by the sea, finding herself in the modern world.Stranded in a unfamiliar and dangerous world, away for the first time from her family, traditions and Goddesses, Diana is forced to adapt and learn her place, finding new friends, a found family and discovering the dangers of the modern world. Dangers she's more than ready to fight against.I fell in love with the artwork of Leila del Duca and the beautiful and current plot of Laurie Halse Anderson that reivent Wonder Woman's origin, putting Diana Prince first in a refugee camp and then in the frontline against abuse, sexual violence, children exploitation and refugees' experiences and rights.The characterization is brilliant. Diana is the only person who was born on Themyscira, the only one with a birthday and that and other changes (we could call them puberty) separate her from the Amazons. She feels like an outsider and she's eager to belong and to prove the Amazons she's like them.The reader can feel her desire, her wanting to be really part of the Amazons tribe in her own island, to find her place and when she's, literally, swept away from everything that was familiar to her, Diana is a character able to find her own way, place and strength, to adapt and overcome the difficulties.She's surrounded by strong characters, like Steven and Trevor and Henke and Raissa and her friendship with them helps Diana feel with a purpose and a place, above all when she's involved in the activism. Even if she will never stop looking a way for getting back home, Diana is ready to fight against injustices.Diana's journey is intertwined with important social and political issues. Swept away by the sea and living in a refugees camp, Diana is able to see the disastrous conditions people are forced to live in, the injustices against them, the awful sanitary conditions.When her ability of talk, understand and translate multiple language (thanks to her upbringing in Themyscira) catches the attention of Trevor and Steve (a cute gay couple, both involved in the refugees situation, working at the United Nations), they decide to help her get a Visa and a place to stay in New York with their friend, a Polish immigrant names Henke and her granddaughter Raissa. Involved in their activism, helping families and children, in New York Diana has to face the reality of homelessness, street harassments and the refugees' situations and the danger of human greed and evil.Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a wonderful and intense graphic novel about finding one's strength and place in the world, a found family, love and friendship.
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  • Danielle (always_read_the_end_first)
    January 1, 1970
    Whoa this is a feminist graphic novel perfect for Young Adults and I'm obsessed! This displays sexual harassment, bullying, homeless communities, being of a different country coming to America, loss of family, cultural differences, liberal arts, acne, menstral cycles, child trafficking, socializing, being arrested, public library! being in a park! Ugh I miss socializing right now. When Diana has an epiphany that the world is a disgusting horrible place just by reading a newspaper in a park. It w Whoa this is a feminist graphic novel perfect for Young Adults and I'm obsessed! This displays sexual harassment, bullying, homeless communities, being of a different country coming to America, loss of family, cultural differences, liberal arts, acne, menstral cycles, child trafficking, socializing, being arrested, public library! being in a park! Ugh I miss socializing right now. When Diana has an epiphany that the world is a disgusting horrible place just by reading a newspaper in a park. It will break your heart like it did mine. "Defecting evil is harder than I thought." Diana is reading WAR AND PEACE. Damn this is epic! I need a hoodie that says "Immigration built this nation." This is perfect for young adults and this is coming out June! I love Laurie Halse Anderson's writing style and storytelling. Leila Del Duce is an amazing artist and now I have to check out her other works!
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  • & She Reads
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review Oh crap I freaking loved this and honestly I needed some wonder woman in my life right now Diana is always my favorite her bravery and kindness always inspire me and right now the world could use some Diana Prince Everyone needs to read this the moment it comes out!! The art in this comment was absolutely beautiful and I absolutely loved the story it shows off some things that are actually wrong with our world at this time I received a copy of this via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review Oh crap I freaking loved this and honestly I needed some wonder woman in my life right now Diana is always my favorite her bravery and kindness always inspire me and right now the world could use some Diana Prince Everyone needs to read this the moment it comes out!! The art in this comment was absolutely beautiful and I absolutely loved the story it shows off some things that are actually wrong with our world at this time and Wonder Woman totally kicks ass!
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  • Tabrizia
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and DC Comics for an advanced copy in exchanged for an honest review.It was okay. Although the artwork was good, I felt that the story was a little rushed and was jumpy all over the place. I did like the empowerment message about accepting your flaws and not letting it get the best of you, a similar statement that could be said about the view of the rest of society. The story targeted a lot of important issues: homelessness, refugees, immigration, gentrification, issues that Thank you NetGalley and DC Comics for an advanced copy in exchanged for an honest review.It was okay. Although the artwork was good, I felt that the story was a little rushed and was jumpy all over the place. I did like the empowerment message about accepting your flaws and not letting it get the best of you, a similar statement that could be said about the view of the rest of society. The story targeted a lot of important issues: homelessness, refugees, immigration, gentrification, issues that will appeal and be understood by the younger audience. And it was great how Anderson tied it in with a different telling of Wonder Woman's origin story. I just wished it was better executed.
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  • Heather - hturningpages
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 5/5 donated sandwichesFormat: ebook. I’d like to thank Netgalley for a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. To sum up: This is a retelling of the Wonder Woman origin story by Laurie Halse Anderson, the writer of SPEAK (now also a graphic novel!). Although the beginning of this story felt very familiar, Anderson brings a sensitivity and call to action that feels new and full of hope. I will admit, I haven’t read the original DC Justice comics, but I have absorbed a lot Rating: 5/5 donated sandwichesFormat: ebook. I’d like to thank Netgalley for a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. To sum up: This is a retelling of the Wonder Woman origin story by Laurie Halse Anderson, the writer of SPEAK (now also a graphic novel!). Although the beginning of this story felt very familiar, Anderson brings a sensitivity and call to action that feels new and full of hope. I will admit, I haven’t read the original DC Justice comics, but I have absorbed a lot from pop culture and I loved the 2017 Wonder Woman film adaption. This story starts off with Diana as a girl just about to turn 16 amongst a community of Amazonian women on the hidden island of Themyscira. She is an outsider to this community however because she is the only one not born into womanhood as an Amazonian warrior, and actually thinks of herself as a changeling, or someone of “human-like” identity. In this community, it is her “human” half that sets her apart however because Amazonians are fierce, powerful, and extraordinary warriors; whereas Diana at first glance appears to be an ordinary human teenager with pimples, armpit hair, and a period.On her birthday, Diana attempts to save some humans at the magical border of her island and suddenly finds herself on the outside, in the real world for the first time. The rest of this first installment follows Diana as she navigates the struggles of being a refugee as she tries to find her identity, purpose, friendship, and her way back home.What I loved:I’ve always been drawn to the character of Wonder Woman because of her earnest sincerity to help others. Because she has been sheltered her whole life up to this point in a beautiful utopia, she has this naive but beautiful idea of how the world should be. It is so cool to see her dropped into a world where a lot of us have become desensitized to homelessness and poverty and see her stop and not only take notice but put in a real effort to help people in need. She looks at the world and sees how it could be made better. Diana in this version of WW is just the same. Her courage in the face of adversity is inspiring and her curiosity about the world is infectious to all around her. She is introduced to the world outside during war and turmoil in the middle east and is brought into Greece as a refugee. She then finds her way to Queens, New York, where she stays with a Polish family and meets a parkour enthusiast and community activist teen her own age. Seeing life as a refugee and immigrant through Diana’s eyes is heartbreaking. Every step of the way, she is asking why is this world so broken? Why are there so many without? But in this world, she also finds friendship, community, and a loving host family that shows her how to give back and support her community. I loved that this version of Wonder Woman takes on the important themes of diversity and immigrant life in our culture, the current weaknesses of our social services programs, and the adversity faced by those that are homeless, impoverished, or just in need. I also loved the theme of friendship in this story and their interest in social activism. I am definitely interested in reading more. Who I'd recommend it to: Fans of DC Comics and Wonder Woman stories, social activism, and fans of Laurie Halse Anderson.
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  • Bookishrealm
    January 1, 1970
    This was really good. I’ll be posting a full review closer to the release date in June.
  • Ula
    January 1, 1970
    4 out of 5 🌟Wonder not-yet-a-Woman, a social justice warriorWonder Woman, as every comic character from both DC and Marvel worlds, has been recreated multiple times with a new origin story. Sometimes they are related to each other, and sometimes they built with totally different narration. 'Tempest Tossed' belongs to that second category, the plot is unlike any other iteration of Diana's beginnings. That creates a great opportunity to jump on the Wonder Woman's bandwagon even for readers who don 4 out of 5 🌟Wonder not-yet-a-Woman, a social justice warriorWonder Woman, as every comic character from both DC and Marvel worlds, has been recreated multiple times with a new origin story. Sometimes they are related to each other, and sometimes they built with totally different narration. 'Tempest Tossed' belongs to that second category, the plot is unlike any other iteration of Diana's beginnings. That creates a great opportunity to jump on the Wonder Woman's bandwagon even for readers who don't know DC Universe.Amazons live in Themyscira, a secret island far from civilization, unbeknown to people. Loosely based on Greek mythology, these warriors are the favorite making of the Ancient Greeks' Goddesses. Wonder Woman vel Princess Diana is a teenager, or rather a "changeling", as she's called on her island. Diana has never been outside of Themyscira and amidst the story's events, she gets to know our world and tries to make sense of it.'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' is both hilarious and heartbreaking graphic novel. On the one hand, the book shows teens' problems and challenges of puberty. Diana's learning about our world is full of gags about nowadays slang and technology. And it is funny, like mentioned "changeling" as a way to call teenagers - doesn't that feel true? On the other hand, Diana receives brutal lessons about life on Earth, when she tries to understand social un-justice and poor living conditions that some children experience. I believe that comics would've opened my eyes to the issues I've never thought about as a teen and reading it now, I didn't feel it was forced or cheesy. I enjoy my reading time and I'm looking forward to the next volumes. Thank you Netgalley and the publisher DC Entertainment for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and feelings are my own.
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  • Maggie Carr
    January 1, 1970
    I shared this ARC with my nearly 8 year old who is a Wonder Woman fangirl. She helped me pronounce some of the words I couldn't say correctly and she didn't object when I swapped out the profanity with words she knew that got the point acrossed. We enjoyed the origin portions and Diana's desire to help those who can't always help themselves, not just with strength and agility but also using linguistics and her vast array of languages. In this story her human community (NYC) is also dealing with I shared this ARC with my nearly 8 year old who is a Wonder Woman fangirl. She helped me pronounce some of the words I couldn't say correctly and she didn't object when I swapped out the profanity with words she knew that got the point acrossed. We enjoyed the origin portions and Diana's desire to help those who can't always help themselves, not just with strength and agility but also using linguistics and her vast array of languages. In this story her human community (NYC) is also dealing with food shortages for kids when they aren't in school and child trafficking, each inviting important conversatiom topics for our family while we enjoyed this title.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Wonder Woman's origin stories are always at the top of my TBR stack. This one is a complete treat. I read it in little bits every night to stretch it out. Diana is thrust into the outside world and rises to the challenge of leaving the Utopia of the Amazons for our very challenged civilization as you'd hope she would. Happy sigh. The story includes a diverse cast, beautiful artwork, and I am ordering a paperback copy for our shelves- even though I was gifted an electronic copy to review. Five st Wonder Woman's origin stories are always at the top of my TBR stack. This one is a complete treat. I read it in little bits every night to stretch it out. Diana is thrust into the outside world and rises to the challenge of leaving the Utopia of the Amazons for our very challenged civilization as you'd hope she would. Happy sigh. The story includes a diverse cast, beautiful artwork, and I am ordering a paperback copy for our shelves- even though I was gifted an electronic copy to review. Five stars!
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this graphic novel. I loved the storyline and how it included current events. This graphic novel covers everything from becoming an American citizen to child trafficking. I promise you while they are totally different topics it flows well. The illstrations are bold and vibrant and I loved seeing the teenager Wonder Woman. I really want more and I hope there will be more graphic novels in the future of her.
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  • Fawn
    January 1, 1970
    OUTSTANDING and timely. So much of what the world is facing now is in this beautifully illustrated and powerfully done graphic novel.
  • Erica Deb
    January 1, 1970
    Cool take on Wonder Woman. Very current.
  • Mandy Havert
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this YA version (in advanced reader copy format) of the story was well written and age appropriate. The storyline was a valid origin story for the modern world. Pick up a copy when it is fully published in June.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley, Laurie Halse Anderson, and DC Entertainment for the opportunity to read Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed in exchange for an honest review.First and foremost, I really wanted to read this because I greatly admire Laurie Halse Anderson as a writer, and I was not disappointed.This comic reimagines the origin story of Wonder Woman, known as Diana. While some of the beginning is similar--an exclusive island of all females, Amazons, hidden by a barrier from the rest of the world--t Thank you to NetGalley, Laurie Halse Anderson, and DC Entertainment for the opportunity to read Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed in exchange for an honest review.First and foremost, I really wanted to read this because I greatly admire Laurie Halse Anderson as a writer, and I was not disappointed.This comic reimagines the origin story of Wonder Woman, known as Diana. While some of the beginning is similar--an exclusive island of all females, Amazons, hidden by a barrier from the rest of the world--the twist this takes highlights very serious and real issues in the world today.This volume contains some historical elements as well as exploring issues such as human trafficking, homelessness, war, and immigration. I found the way this was written to be quite educational and appreciated the course our sixteen-year-old protagonist went in this new Wonder Woman beginning. This book also explores important topics to a teenage audience, such as family, friendship, and finding one's place in the world.Also, the art is pretty darn amazing.This is a lovely fresh start!
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  • mad
    January 1, 1970
    A fresh reimagining of Wonder Woman's origin story.(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley. Trigger warning for violence against women and children, including street harassment, human trafficking, and allusions to rape.)Princess Diana's sixteenth Born Day party is well underway when the barrier guarding Themyscira from the human world ruptures, allowing several rafts filled with scared refugees ashore. In keeping with the Five Mothers' decree, Queen Hippolyta is content to ca A fresh reimagining of Wonder Woman's origin story.(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley. Trigger warning for violence against women and children, including street harassment, human trafficking, and allusions to rape.)Princess Diana's sixteenth Born Day party is well underway when the barrier guarding Themyscira from the human world ruptures, allowing several rafts filled with scared refugees ashore. In keeping with the Five Mothers' decree, Queen Hippolyta is content to care for those who make it to shore, nursing them to health, only to send them back into the world they fled - after administering a forgetting serum, of course. But further Amazonian intervention is prohibited until the mysterious "Great Evil of the Universe" returns. So when a raft packed with men, women, and children threatens to capsize at sea, Diana rushes to their aid. Though she's still coming into her powers, this Changeling-Amazon is plenty strong enough to pull the raft to Themyscira ... that is, if the barrier didn't do such an excellent job of shielding it from the outside world, which is where Diana now finds herself. Along with her comrades, Diana eventually winds up in an immigration camp in Greece, where her ability to speak literally every language makes her an emissary of sorts. She quickly catches the eyes of Steve and Trevor Chang (side note: I love love love the recasting of Steve Trevor as a gay couple!), who use their UN connections to get Diana a U.S. student visa and temporary housing in NYC. Diana becomes fast friends with her pseudo guardian, Henke, but Henke's granddaughter Raissa proves harder to win over. Diana loves helping Raissa in her volunteer work - providing free lunches to kids during the summer months, and tending to the community's green spaces - even if it introduces her to some of the harsher realities of life in the human world: street harassment, homelessness, corporate greed, human trafficking, and sexual violence. When one of her young friends goes missing, it's time for Diana to break out the lasso of truth and get to superheroing. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: I love DC's YA imprint, because it makes a nice entry point for relative newbies like myself. But Wonder Woman is a bit of an exception, both for me and as a whole: I'm already familiar with some of DC's Wonder Woman titles (most notably the New 52), and she's such a huge part of popular culture, that I don't think you can help but have some passing knowledge of her mythos. That's not to say I don't love and adore Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed - just for slightly different reasons. For starters, there's the storytelling; it's lovely and urgent and exactly what you'd expect from Laurie Halse Anderson. In keeping with the progressive bent of DC's YA titles, Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed gives Wonder Woman's origin story a fresh spin that incorporates a number of pressing contemporary social issues. Chief among them is the plight of immigrants and refugees, a group that includes Wonder Woman herself. Cut off from her homeland, unable to return, Diana is a young woman without a country or family...at least not one that exists in this world. She's special, sure, but also one of millions: just one face in the huddled masses. Absent her warrior tribe, Diana must learn how best to harness her powers to help lift up others.The theme of alienation also hangs heavy: as the only child born on Themyscira, Diana isn't like her Amazon sisters. She's (comparatively) weak, frail, and prone to mood swings and inexplicable crying fits. Her body frequently betrays her. She's a (shudder) teenager - on an island filled with ageless, immortal warrior women. The indignity of it all! But if she feels like she doesn't quite fit in on Themyscira, Diana is truly out of her element in Greece and NYC, where capitalism is a death cult that reigns supreme. I really enjoyed watching Diana Prince adapt to her new life, making friends, mastering parkour, and beating on street harassers. Raissa and Henke are interesting characters as well, but mostly take a backseat to a young Wonder Woman (as does almost everyone, or so one must assume). The ending is a little improbable, in that the two big bad plotlines converge so neatly, and yet. Maybe it's no so outlandish after all. The one percenters have all but become cartoon villains these days.The artwork is lovely, and I especially loved those scenes set on Themyscira. (Hippolyta & Co., living the dream. Although the scene where she kicked a refugee in the face was unexpectedly harsh and dark. I wonder if we'll get some backstory there?)And the final pages, where Diana and her new family celebrate Henke's boyfriend's naturalization? TEARS. http://www.easyvegan.info/2020/06/09/...
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a free copy of this book from DC Comics for review purposes. These are my honest opinions. Thank you.*Book Review3/5 Stars "A warrior’s strength begins in her heart." -Laurie Halse Anderson, Wonder Woman: Tempest TossedInitial Thoughts & Pacing:Happy Thursday! It’s almost Friday! Hooray! I hope everyone is holding up okay during this pandemic. Here’s my book review for Tempest Tossed. I didn’t have super strong feelings about this book, so I gave it a middle rating of 3 stars.This wa *I received a free copy of this book from DC Comics for review purposes. These are my honest opinions. Thank you.*Book Review3/5 Stars "A warrior’s strength begins in her heart." -Laurie Halse Anderson, Wonder Woman: Tempest TossedInitial Thoughts & Pacing:Happy Thursday! It’s almost Friday! Hooray! I hope everyone is holding up okay during this pandemic. Here’s my book review for Tempest Tossed. I didn’t have super strong feelings about this book, so I gave it a middle rating of 3 stars.This was my first time reading a book by Laurie Halse Anderson, and she focuses heavily on activism and social justice issues: immigration, child trafficking, gentrification, homelessness, etc. It wasn’t exactly my cup-of-tea. Tempest Tossed isn’t a super “fun” read per se since the tone is quite serious due to the heavy topics it handles. Diana experiences refugee camps and what it feels like to be an “outsider” in the USA, seeking for a place to belong.I love Greek mythology, so I found Themyscira, home of the Amazons, to be quite fascinating! But Diana is quickly taken out of that world, so we don’t get to spend much time there. My favorite portion of the story was her time spent with the Amazons. They’re such an amazing group of female warriors!I wished for more of Wonder Woman learning about and developing her powers, but there is very little of her using her powers in this book. In fact, she often feels quite powerless and weak. I understand that the author is trying to depict the struggles and insecurities of adolescence, but in some ways, this version of Wonder Woman doesn’t feel like Wonder Woman. In my opinion, I would’ve enjoyed a little bit more of the crime-fighting, superhero version of the character woven into the story. Not much superhero “action” occurs in this book. There is some excitement near the beginning and end, but the fightable “bad guy” is confined to the final 20-25 pages or so. I feel he should have been more present throughout the novel for the sake of better pacing flow, not just suddenly appearing closer to the end. In my opinion, sequences also progress rather rapidly in the climax with the big “showdown.”Characters & Lack of Romance:The characters in this story are okay. I didn’t feel super connected to every character, but many readers would likely find Diana’s adolescent struggles relatable. I liked the tough character Antiope, the general of the Amazons. But she is not a large part of the story since Diana is separated from the Amazons near the beginning.Some other characters are: Steve and Trevor, UN workers who bring Diana to the USA; Henke, a Polish immigrant friend of Steve; Raissa, Henke’s spunky granddaughter. I liked Henke’s grandmotherly inclinations, and she was very good to Diana.Unfortunately for me, there is no romance for Diana in this book. I’m someone who typically likes at least a hint of romance in novels, but sadly, there is no Chris Pine here.Final Thoughts:I did like the humorous moments that were scattered throughout the book! There is a lot that young Diana doesn’t understand about our modern human world. She doesn’t know what a merry-go-round is, and she is bewildered by JFK airport!Diana has such a good heart, and I do think the author portrays this aspect of her character well. Diana is always seeking to help others before herself.I also think that the book’s title connection to the Statue of Liberty is thoughtful. The final scene does a good job with connecting the themes of the book.It was certainly nice to read a graphic novel for a change. I like the way that these novels can visually tell a story. In my opinion, the illustrations in this particular novel were okay, but perhaps somewhat muted in color. I prefer the vibrant illustration style of Gotham High, one of DC’s other recent releases.Overall, Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is not a story about your typical, powerful Wonder Woman figure. The tone is very serious and less action-driven. I appreciated the themes about family and finding belonging that are conveyed as Diana attempts to find her place in the world. I didn’t particularly love this book, but if you like Laurie Halse Anderson books or social justice themes, you’d probably enjoy this book more than I did! I do understand that every novel is the product of an author’s hard work and effort, and I am thankful for the opportunity to read and review this book early. Happy reading 🙂
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Hmmm… Since the first stories to feature Wonder Woman, it's always had a little bit of liberal politics about it. She was designed to be both eye candy and a corrective against the muscle-men of comics, and to show how girls can have the world at their feet, too. Often we saw an origin story (and if Diana is not the comics character to have the most origin stories I'd be surprised) that showed her seeing the world through virginal eyes, and finding out how wondrously different our existence is t Hmmm… Since the first stories to feature Wonder Woman, it's always had a little bit of liberal politics about it. She was designed to be both eye candy and a corrective against the muscle-men of comics, and to show how girls can have the world at their feet, too. Often we saw an origin story (and if Diana is not the comics character to have the most origin stories I'd be surprised) that showed her seeing the world through virginal eyes, and finding out how wondrously different our existence is to that back on Themyscira. But this book doesn't fit that pattern. For every time it would normally show a lesson, a point, a difference to Diana/Wonder Woman, here it tries to show a lesson to us. And as a result, it's not only the most haranguing, liberal tract, but it kills off every element of the fantastical about this franchise.Diana is trying to have the birthday she wants, full of training in warrior ways, and helping unfledged chicks back to the nest, but our world is not going to allow that. The barrier keeping her island and the world of the Amazons secret is breaking, because we're filling our world with too much grief and the Mediterranean with too many refugee boat people, and the balance is faltering. In saving some young families from drowning, Diana (freshly given the tiara, gauntlets and lasso) leaves her home world for ours, and ends up in a migrant camp. From there two guys (in a gay marriage, of course) whisk her off to New York, where she lives with an elderly Polish immigrant and her sullen granddaughter. And the neighbourhood is full of everything we might recognise from modern, liberal plaints – the wrong kind of housing, homeless, food charities – oh, and the Child Snatcher from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.The problem with this is the lack of entertainment all this provides. Instead we're bludgeoned with moral lessons in left-wing politics, and it was little surprise to see the leads wear sloganeering hoodies before the end, as if we'd not had enough by then. This is so over-simplified and naive – the only straight white male is the baddie, the people Diana has to help are just as much an alien to the USA as she is – heck, even the richly besuited UN diplomats who rescue her fly coach. Now, I'll not sound very convincing at all if I said I liked the politics on offer here, but I should hopefully sound more sensible when I declare this is just wrong. We as this book's audience are being used – as receivers of a certain social-political lesson – and not given nearly enough fun in return. But more importantly, in putting this content in the Wonder Woman fabric, Diana is also being used. She's hardly able to show any powers in this, yet another origin story, and even with her naivety writ large is not the most naive thing about it. Having the world at your feet should never make you look so belittled. One and a half stars.
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a timely and timeless story about having compassion for one another. Your Money Geek thanks DC & NetGallery for providing us with a free copy for review. Read my FULL REVIEW: https://yourmoneygeek.com/review-wond...Wonder Woman’s origins have been revisited and reborn countless times since her comic debut in 1941. Tempest Tossed is the Wonder Woman origin story that the world desperately needs right now. It’s not just a coming-of-age story, it’s a story about immi Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a timely and timeless story about having compassion for one another. Your Money Geek thanks DC & NetGallery for providing us with a free copy for review. Read my FULL REVIEW: https://yourmoneygeek.com/review-wond...Wonder Woman’s origins have been revisited and reborn countless times since her comic debut in 1941. Tempest Tossed is the Wonder Woman origin story that the world desperately needs right now. It’s not just a coming-of-age story, it’s a story about immigration, government corruption, homelessness, and child trafficking.Rather than facing off against gods or supervillains, Diana is faced with the grim reality of the world beyond the oasis of Themyscira. The villains of New York City come with higher stakes — childhood hunger, kidnapping, and morally bankrupt men. Despite being far from Themyscira, the spirit of her family and her culture are present with her in New York City. She looks for signs that she belongs; whether it’s a road sign for Queens or in the way she sees Hestia, the goddess of family and home, in the Statue of Liberty.She feels the presence of the Five Mothers as she lives her day-to-day life. It’s a message that says, even when you’re far from home, your home is always with you. Familiar Wonder Woman characters are given new lives in Tempest Tossed. Steve Trevor has been split into the form of a couple, Steve and Trevor Chang, who works for the United Nations and meet Diana as a refugee fighting to reunite a sick child with their mother.Steve’s plucky and beloved assistant Ette Candy is now Henke Cukierke, a compassionate Polish grandmother who takes Diana in when she moves to New York City. I was amused by this clever name choice, Cukierke is Polish for “candy” and Etta and Henke both mean “home”. In Themyscira, Diana grapples with who she is. She feels limited by the fact that she is a “changeling” and she is disheartened that she lacks the strength of the Amazonians around her. Her strength, however, isn’t physical — her strength is her heart and her drive to do the right thing.That compassion is what drives her to help the refugees that wash ashore on Themyscira, which inadvertently traps her beyond the barrier in the middle of the Mediterranian Sea. Set to the stunning artwork of Leila del Duca and colorist Kelly Fitzpack, Laurie Halse Anderson has outdone herself by tackling serious issues with a deft hand.While some readers might feel that there are too many topics packed into one graphic novel, they are a harsh reminder of what citizens face daily. She introduces Diana, and the reader, to the plights of immigrants with reverence and understanding that the world could use more of. In a sense, Tempest Tossed is a call to arms to use our individual strengths to do something to help our neighbors.
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  • Libriamo3116
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you DC Comics for sending me a free copy of Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed so I could read and review it. ⁣⁣⁣Diana is a young girl living on the island of Themyscira. While her people, the Amazons, seem frozen in time, Diana is a Changeling, the only Amazonian with a Born day, and her body and young mind are constantly shifting. Unsure of herself and her future, yet full of a desire to help others, she reaches her 16th birthday, and all is supposed to stop changing. Just as she receives her Thank you DC Comics for sending me a free copy of Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed so I could read and review it. ⁣⁣⁣Diana is a young girl living on the island of Themyscira. While her people, the Amazons, seem frozen in time, Diana is a Changeling, the only Amazonian with a Born day, and her body and young mind are constantly shifting. Unsure of herself and her future, yet full of a desire to help others, she reaches her 16th birthday, and all is supposed to stop changing. Just as she receives her birthright regalia, the alarm sounds, for humans have arrived on the beach. Discovering quickly that they are Algerian refugees, Diana sees offshore that there are children in trouble, and disobeys the mandates of her culture and mother by jumping into the sea to help them.After helping the drowning children, Diana finds herself in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea with Themyscira nowhere in sight. Unable to return home, she accompanies the refugees to the shores of Greece, and spends time with them in a refugee camp. For Diana, lost in a strange and troubled world, she only wants to find a way home soon, but everywhere she turns, she sees humanity in trouble, and her overriding impulse is to help without hesitation. As her journey away from Themyscira continues, she'll face some of the ugliest parts of human society, but Diana, brave Amazon that she is, stands ready to dash unflinching into the fray for the downtrodden and innocent.I love how this story is overflowing with important social issues and portrayals of their true effects on families and communities. Revamping Wonder Woman's origin story for the modern era, Diana finds herself living amongst some of humanity's most pernicious problems, and she faces them head-on. There are people living as refugees, immigrants, facing food insecurity, experiencing human trafficking, facing gentrification, dealing with unwanted sexual advances, impersonating authority figures, and much more. While this certainly means that Diana's story is more issue-driven than plot or character-driven, it also means Diana learns a lot about her personal strength, her abilities, and her compassionate morality. Rendered in often gripping detail, the artwork is almost always spot-on, with only a few issues and bland frames interspersed with otherwise compelling artwork.I found this to be a crisp, brisk read, though it's also remarkably dense, and it covers numerous social issues with heart while calling Diana and the reader to action. Tempest Tossed is unafraid to ask hard questions, to expose ugliness, and to fight for human dignity and safety. While this approach is laudable, these issues are mature, and I don't recommend this story for children under the age of 12. For all other humans (and Amazons), you must join Diana in her journey of self-discovery and heroism as she seeks purpose and her way home.Story: ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫/5 ⁣⁣⁣Artwork: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 ⁣⁣⁣
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed in exchange for a fair and honest review. Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is the latest DC Graphic Novel focused on reaching a younger audience. Once again we're diving back into the life of Diana and her life on Themyscira. But this is a tale like you've never seen before. This may be another origin story, but this one feels so fresh and alive. It's Diana's tale told through new eyes and perspectives, with the intention of reaching a new audience. I received a copy of Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed in exchange for a fair and honest review. Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is the latest DC Graphic Novel focused on reaching a younger audience. Once again we're diving back into the life of Diana and her life on Themyscira. But this is a tale like you've never seen before. This may be another origin story, but this one feels so fresh and alive. It's Diana's tale told through new eyes and perspectives, with the intention of reaching a new audience. Diana, as you all know, is the Princess of Themyscira. She was the only child on this island of warriors, and she stood out. Yet she always knew that she was destined to do more. More than her current limits would allow, certainly. Given this is Wonder Woman we're talking about, when the moment comes for her to make the biggest decision of her life, she doesn't hesitate. Before she even knows what's happening, she's in the water, saving the humans around her. A moment that changed her life forever. Now, Diana must adjust to the world of humans. It is nothing like she was led to believe. And yet, there is room for her to make a home for herself here. Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed was a delightful and enthralling read, from start to finish. I know that it may be tempting to turn away from another Wonder Woman origin story, but I encourage you all to give this one a try. This tale blends origin story with a coming of age tale to perfection. Here Diana struggles in ways that I've never really seen before, and it made her feel even more human than ever. Which may be a bit ironic, all things considered. Tempest Tossed was written by Laurie Halese Anderson. I'm really hoping that name rings a bell for you. She's the author behind Speak and Shout – and as far as I'm concerned, seeing her writing for one of my favorite comic characters is like a dream come true. Meanwhile, Leila del Duca was behind the artwork for Tempest Tossed, and she did an absolutely amazing job here. She's been behind some of my favorite series, most notable Scarlet Witch, so I'm not surprised that she did an awesome job here. What I loved the most about this graphic novel is that it really captured modern-day plights. Yes, there is war. There's always war, and thus always somebody that needs Wonder Woman. But that's not the only reason the world needs her, as this series did an excellent job of portraying. Realistically, I know that this is a standalone graphic novel, but part of me really wishes that it would become a series. I'd love to see this version of Diana continue moving on in her journey. It'd be fascinating to see more of her daily struggles, as well as the battles she fights outside of war, so to speak. Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Comics
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict...WONDER WOMAN: TEMPEST TOSSED is a fantastic new story featuring Diana coming into her own. She has been raised among the Amazons, always feeling a bit different as the only Changeling. Now, she is 16, and she is excited to enter the world as an adult. On her Born Day, the barrier holes accidentally let in some people and children who are fleeing wars. Diana cannot simply allow them to drown as the other Amazons are doing, and she g See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict...WONDER WOMAN: TEMPEST TOSSED is a fantastic new story featuring Diana coming into her own. She has been raised among the Amazons, always feeling a bit different as the only Changeling. Now, she is 16, and she is excited to enter the world as an adult. On her Born Day, the barrier holes accidentally let in some people and children who are fleeing wars. Diana cannot simply allow them to drown as the other Amazons are doing, and she goes to save them from the ocean. When she does so, the barrier is repaired, and then she is unable to go home.She continues on with the refugees to a camp, where she witnesses the difficulties they face. When an American diplomat and doctor take notice of her and her skills with language, they offer to bring her back to the US where she can study and one day help the refugees. In the US, Diana feels a little lost, but Raissa, a teen with whom she lives, shows her how to help the homeless and the children who need food. Diana begins to again find her way. However, children are going missing due to trafficking, and Diana may get pulled into the fray.What I loved: This book deals with some heavy topics, like refugees, the immigrant experience, child trafficking, and homelessness in a really unique way- through Diana's eyes, as someone who has only known peace and harmony. She explains these issues in ways that are different and really poignant, as well as expressing the need for activism and change.We also witness her personal struggles with identity and growing up that will speak to teenagers who are growing into adulthood but have not yet reached it. Her journey is also touched by the goddesses who created the Amazons, and it was lovely to see their connections to Diana throughout as they appear in spirit form to connect with Diana in the world.The illustrations are really lovely and descriptive, and the text is carefully chosen to clearly impart messages without being confusing or overloading. This graphic novel is really fantastically done from both the writing and illustration perspectives. This is definitely one I would love to see continued.Final verdict: Tackling critical issues head-on, TEMPEST TOSSED is a beautifully composed graphic novel about finding yourself, coming into your strength, and making a difference. Diana's story will speak to readers of all ages in its universality of experience and truths.Please note that I received an ARC. All opinions are my own.
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  • Lost in Book Land
    January 1, 1970
    Welcome Back,Today is an exciting day! It's Tuesday which means book release day! There are so many new releases coming out today that I can not wait to dive into. I have pre-ordered a ton of new books and one of the books on my list is Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed, a book that I was super fortunate to be able to read early! I have been reading a lot of the new DC comics and really enjoying my time with them. This one might be in my top five favorites so far (definitely top two, the other one in Welcome Back,Today is an exciting day! It's Tuesday which means book release day! There are so many new releases coming out today that I can not wait to dive into. I have pre-ordered a ton of new books and one of the books on my list is Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed, a book that I was super fortunate to be able to read early! I have been reading a lot of the new DC comics and really enjoying my time with them. This one might be in my top five favorites so far (definitely top two, the other one in the top two I will be talking about soon)!SPOILERS AHEADDiana is about to turn 16, she has been going through some tough times but now that her birthday is upon her she is excited to be entering into the Amazon Tribe. In the middle of Diana's birthday celebration, people from the outside world break through the barrier into and the Amazons must act fast to get them out and close the barrier. However, in this process, Diana decides to jump in the water and leave the barrier to save people who are drowning. While she is saving the people the barrier closes and Diana is now stuck in the outside world. She finds herself in a war-torn country, living in a refugee camp, trying to help the people the best she can. That is until one day, she meets two gentlemen who notice her helping the people and offer to take her back to NYC with them where she can attend school and make even more differences in the world. Diana agrees to go with them to NYC where she learns more about herself, her people, the outside world, and how she can help everyone with her powers.In all honestly, before reading this I did not know a lot about Wonder Woman. I have seen the movie but that is literally it. So this graphic novel was a whole new thing for me and I enjoyed it so much. I loved the art style, the colors, the characters, and the story. I was utterly hooked by the story of this graphic novel, from start to end. Then once the story ended I wanted more, I found myself sitting in front of my laptop being like no where are the other pages? (Because I just wanted to keep reading anything in this storyline). I am really hoping (fingers crossed) that there will be a second graphic novel in this new series because I can not get enough of this storyline (I have read it three times now).Goodreads Rating: 5 Stars**Thank you so much to the publisher for the ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sasha Zatz
    January 1, 1970
    Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed was a gorgeous, powerful and wise new origin story for Diana - it is not her usual origin story, but it’s one of my favourites yet. When immigrants seeking shelter come close to Theymiscara, Diana is determined to help them - but when she does, she becomes one of them - homeless, and looking for somewhere to belong. This new Wonder Woman story combines Diana’s fierceness and heart with a powerful and heartwrenching story about the refugee experience, creating a story Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed was a gorgeous, powerful and wise new origin story for Diana - it is not her usual origin story, but it’s one of my favourites yet. When immigrants seeking shelter come close to Theymiscara, Diana is determined to help them - but when she does, she becomes one of them - homeless, and looking for somewhere to belong. This new Wonder Woman story combines Diana’s fierceness and heart with a powerful and heartwrenching story about the refugee experience, creating a storyline of activism, found family and finding the strength to fight for real change that is incredibly relevant in today’s society.I am so rarely disappointed by newer Wonder Woman stories, and it’s because of Diana - her fierce love, bravery and personality always shine through, and that shows, especially in this comic. I’ll never get sick of reading about her, because she inspires me to no end. The odds are stacked against her more than ever in Tempest Tossed, but not only does she fight them, she helps others to fight them too. She is stronger and fiercer than ever in this comic, quickly becoming involved in teenage activism and doing everything she can to help those who need it - a superhero, even when she isn’t using her powers. That’s what I love about Diana - while other superheroes fight clear threats and enemies and defend Earth, she has always been one to fight for individuals. This comic tackles some incredibly important topics, and while I can’t speak for how well or accurately they were portrayed, they moved me a lot and shone light on some things I hadn’t previously considered. Diana’s refugee experience doesn’t speak for all, especially since she was quickly aided by iconic gay activist uncles Steve and Trevor, but it was certainly moving and raw. This, as well as the discussion of poverty, class and trafficking, made this comic such a powerful one.A highlight of this comic for me was the friendship that came about between Diana and Raissa was a positive point amongst the darkness. These two fierce teens may have been conflicted about each other at first, but their bravery and passion drew them together until they were best of friends, and I loved watching them become closer and fight together.The art is absolutely gorgeous and emotive. The colour palette of oranges and blues is stunning, and the illustrations are just *chef’s kiss* in every way, no other way to describe it.Overall I loved this fierce comic of survival and friendship, with Diana’s bravery and resolve spearheading it, and would absolutely recommend.
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  • ThatOneCornerReader
    January 1, 1970
    Wonder Woman stories are always fun and empowering to read, and Tempest Tossed does no differently on that front!Diana is the princess of the Amazons, but she feels like an undeservingstranger in the role. When she tries to prove herself by rescuing humans lost at sea, she gets trapped as a refugee in their world. When she lands herself in New York City, she finds herself faced with a world of injustice that needs a change.I thought that Tempest Tossed was a very unique look at the classic heroi Wonder Woman stories are always fun and empowering to read, and Tempest Tossed does no differently on that front!Diana is the princess of the Amazons, but she feels like an undeservingstranger in the role. When she tries to prove herself by rescuing humans lost at sea, she gets trapped as a refugee in their world. When she lands herself in New York City, she finds herself faced with a world of injustice that needs a change.I thought that Tempest Tossed was a very unique look at the classic heroine we all know. I had not been expecting the refugee spin on Wonder Woman, but once it was over, I started wondering why no one else had tried it yet. Everyone does the fish-out-of-water approach, which is accurate, but I thought this was a modern and important take. It turns a symbol that many people look up to into a modern hero for changing times. It was also an interesting story that acted as a dive into problems with society and how they can be fixed (not that I necessarily recommend some of the methods used by our titular heroine unless you have ancient warrior strength).I was thoroughly invested in Diana’s journey. Seeing injustices and problems that I’ve known about through Diana’s eyes was like learning about them for the first time again. This book aims to light a fire in the soul, and it does just that. I may not be a powerful Amazon warrior, but reading this book made me want to go out and make a change in my neighborhood. This is a very inspiring and moving story that highlights the change that anyone can bring to their neighborhood if they pitch in.The art in this book was also well done. I’m not the biggest fan of comic-y style art, but I enjoyed it here. Diana’s character design was very nice and molded itself to the plot well. It had a good mix of the fantastical origins of Diana’s origins and the cityscape of New York.This was a very fun, rousing, crimefighting adventure that I recommend to any fan of Wonder Woman (or anyone looking for a good time!).
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  • Brigitte
    January 1, 1970
    This book was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review, which you can also read on bookstacked: https://bookstacked.com/reviews/book-...Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed modernises Diana’s backstory in order to adapt it to our own troubled times–thus making it more both more relatable and more poignant its readers.Laurie Halse Anderson doesn’t pull any punches in this iteration of Wonder Woman’s origin story, as the reader is thrust into the thick of the Greek refugee crisis a This book was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review, which you can also read on bookstacked: https://bookstacked.com/reviews/book-...Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed modernises Diana’s backstory in order to adapt it to our own troubled times–thus making it more both more relatable and more poignant its readers.Laurie Halse Anderson doesn’t pull any punches in this iteration of Wonder Woman’s origin story, as the reader is thrust into the thick of the Greek refugee crisis a mere 40 pages in. Meanwhile, Leila del Duca’s brings the harsh conditions to life through her vibrant illustrations of both the environment and Diana’s expressions. Her outrage, disgust, and restlessness come through loud and clear.The plot is well structured and well written. Despite the multitude of themes addressed in it, I enjoyed the fast pace. There is a good balance between the action packed sequences and the filler scenes that bring information on both Diana’s inner thoughts, as well as the backstory of the secondary characters. I especially liked Diana’s scenes with Henke, and how her relationship develops with Raissa.However, there were a lot of big themes this book tackled, maybe even too many. Weaving the refugee crisis into Diana’s backstory was incredibly poignant, but there is little time dedicated to it before Diana is whisked off to the USA by Steve and Dr. Trevor. Similarly, the story skirts over teenage activism and its consequences, the impact of gentrification, homelessness and even the subject of human trafficking in order to fit it all in. Of course they all exist simultaneously in our own reality, but gathering them in a single origin story diminishes their impact on the reader.My favourite aspect of this graphic novel was, by far, the characters. Diana is such a well rounded character; she really stood out. She’s dynamic, emotional, naïve and so, so caring, but she still remains a teenager. This also extends to Raissa, who’s maturity and level-headedness are balanced by her reactions when she’s surprised or embarrassed in front of her friends. As for the secondary characters, Henke, Steve and Trevor all shine through; their kindness towards Diana and people in general is absolutely heartwarming. Each brings a specific quality to the story that allows Diana to understand and empathise with this new world.Finally, a few more words on the art. Leila del Duca’s art style is gorgeous. Themyscyra is lush and vibrant. The Amazons are diverse in both size and skin tone but their style stays true to their Ancient Greek origins. My favourite example of this was Diana, who has a prominent nose and unruly, curly black hair: typical Mediterranean features. 'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' brings every location to life: the refugee camp conveys the people’s stark reality, and Queens has an unpolished feeling that brings forth the less palatable aspects of New York City without being overwhelming.'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' by Laurie Halse Anderson and Leila del Duca modernised Diana’s character. A 16yo Diana is already relatable to a younger audience, but everything she faces make this book a moving take on this iconic superhero.
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  • Paige Green
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received an e-arc from the publisher and edelweiss. Thanks! All opinions are my own.Book: Wonder Woman: Tempest TossedAuthor: Laurie Halse AndersonBook Series: Standalone? Not sure but hope for moreDiversity: Immigrants shown and are apart of the narrative, lots of different ethnicities shown as wellRating: 5/5Recommended For...: Graphic novels, DC universe, superhero, female superheroPublication Date: June 2, 2020Publisher: DCPages: 193Recommended Age: 16+ (child abuse mentioned T Disclaimer: I received an e-arc from the publisher and edelweiss. Thanks! All opinions are my own.Book: Wonder Woman: Tempest TossedAuthor: Laurie Halse AndersonBook Series: Standalone? Not sure but hope for moreDiversity: Immigrants shown and are apart of the narrative, lots of different ethnicities shown as wellRating: 5/5Recommended For...: Graphic novels, DC universe, superhero, female superheroPublication Date: June 2, 2020Publisher: DCPages: 193Recommended Age: 16+ (child abuse mentioned TW, child sexual abuse mentioned TW, violence)Synopsis: Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Amazons. The celebrations are cut short, however, when rafts of refugees break through the Themysciran barrier. Diana tries to help them, but she is swept away by the sea--and from her home--thus becoming a refugee herself.Now Diana must survive in the world outside of Themyscira for the first time; the world that is filled with danger and injustice. She must redefine what it means to belong, to be an Amazon, and to make a difference.Review: Holy cow this book was amazing! I've always been a bit of a fan of Wonder Women and I loved what the author did for this book. The character development was amazing, the story was heart pounding, the world building was expertly done, and all of the diversity and inclusion!! I liked how the author even weaved in real world issues like immigration and child trafficking into this story. I loved this so much!My only issue is the length. The book is so short and I want more. I feel like with a longer book the author could have done more for the character development of all the characters but it was damn near perfect as is!Verdict: I definitely recommend this one!
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