The Spinster Diaries
Our heroine, a moderately successful TV writer in L.A., wants her life to be as sunny and perfect as a Hollywood rom-com: a cool job, a wacky best friend, and lots of age-appropriate hot guys just dying to date her. Instead, she’s a self-described spinster who is swimming in anxiety and just might have a tiny little brain tumor. So she turns to an unlikely source for inspiration: the eighteenth-century novelist and diarist Frances Burney, who pretty much invented the chick-lit novel.A semi-autobiographical unromantic comedy, The Spinster Diaries is a laugh-out-loud satire of both the TV business and the well-worn conventions of chick lit―as well as the true tale of the forgotten writer who inspired Jane Austen to greatness. It's an endearing and refreshingly honest testament to how one person’s life can reach out across the centuries to touch another’s.

The Spinster Diaries Details

TitleThe Spinster Diaries
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 14th, 2020
PublisherProspect Park Books
ISBN-139781945551734
Rating
GenreFiction, Romance, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

The Spinster Diaries Review

  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw the author had written for amazing shows like Parenthood, Gilmore Girls and Dawson's Creek I was 100% IN! Unfortunately ... this book just didn't do it for me, at all :( The main character was so so negative ... I couldn't stand her, I tried .... really. I didn't laugh out loud, not once. I have a pretty incredible sense of humor, I enjoy the use of a word that rhymes with duck ... but it's just thrown around in this book almost as though it's for shock factor? Didn't do it for me. Th When I saw the author had written for amazing shows like Parenthood, Gilmore Girls and Dawson's Creek I was 100% IN! Unfortunately ... this book just didn't do it for me, at all :( The main character was so so negative ... I couldn't stand her, I tried .... really. I didn't laugh out loud, not once. I have a pretty incredible sense of humor, I enjoy the use of a word that rhymes with duck ... but it's just thrown around in this book almost as though it's for shock factor? Didn't do it for me. This book left me feeling blah, dragged down ... The concept is good - the book, not so much.Thanks to Publishers Group Canada for my review copy!
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  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think that this was a cute book, nor did I find it humorous (actually, it was very depressing most of the time).Written in the first person (diary form), this was supposed to be a semi-autobiographical book. If this is true, then I really feel sorry for this author.If you like books that drone on about author Miss Francis Burney (Google--->"Frances Burney, also known as Fanny Burney and later as Madame d'Arblay, was an English satirical novelist, diarist and (sic)playwright.") and her un I don't think that this was a cute book, nor did I find it humorous (actually, it was very depressing most of the time).Written in the first person (diary form), this was supposed to be a semi-autobiographical book. If this is true, then I really feel sorry for this author.If you like books that drone on about author Miss Francis Burney (Google--->"Frances Burney, also known as Fanny Burney and later as Madame d'Arblay, was an English satirical novelist, diarist and (sic)playwright.") and her unending history (actually most of this book was about her). Also, the fact that this supposed "spinster" rambles on about her health, especially her brain tumor, and has no end -no conclusion whatsoever...then this book will be to your liking.ARC supplied by the publisher.
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  • Julie Douglas
    January 1, 1970
    My friend Gina from high school wrote this book... and it is like curling up to have a long chat with her. It is just as funny and smart as she is! Bravo, Gina!❤️
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I was pretty excited to read this book, expecting a light hearted and fun story about a perpetually single modern woman (much like myself). Instead I found the book to be dry and droll and generally uninteresting. It started strong with the immediate introduction of the brain tumor but quickly devolved into a mundane self dialogue, often repeating things multiple times or going off on (mild not wild) tangents of little interest to me. I did find the parts about Fanny mostly interesting but overa I was pretty excited to read this book, expecting a light hearted and fun story about a perpetually single modern woman (much like myself). Instead I found the book to be dry and droll and generally uninteresting. It started strong with the immediate introduction of the brain tumor but quickly devolved into a mundane self dialogue, often repeating things multiple times or going off on (mild not wild) tangents of little interest to me. I did find the parts about Fanny mostly interesting but overall this book just didn't do it for me. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing me with a copy of this book to review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Edna Axelrod
    January 1, 1970
    For a book that will divert you from the travails of the present day, dive into this entertaining romp through late 18th century England and early 21st century Hollywood. Two talented writers - British Frances Burney and her modern LA. fan - deal with the remarkably similar issues that confront intelligent working women of different eras. A fast-paced 213 pages, it could be devoured in a day, but you’ll probably want to stretch out the fun.
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  • Lian Dolan
    January 1, 1970
    Wanna be a TV writer? Novelist is Gina Fattore has written for some of your favorite shows like Parenthood and Gilmore Girls, so she has the credentials to take you indie the side of a middle-aged, mildly neurotic TV writer with a serious health issue and obsession with an 18th century British novelist. Sound Good? It did to me. I love the inside TV stuff and the historical piece of this novel. A thoughtful, funny look at two women writers.
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  • Sigrid A
    January 1, 1970
    This is a thoroughly enjoyable novel, written in the form of a diary (or Journaling for Anxiety- TM). It sort of draws on Bridget Jones, but the character is much more self-aware and perceptive. She spends a lot of the time worrying about whether or not to have a brain tumor removed and obsessing over Fanny Burney, but it's awritten in such a wry, observant way, that it all seems both funny and moving. I received an ARC of this novel from Edelweiss in return for an honest review.
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  • Angela (Scentofapage)
    January 1, 1970
    I was actually pretty excited to pick up this title as it sounded like it would be pretty humorous even though the MC was dealing with a pretty heavy topic (brain tumor). Unfortunately, this book missed the mark for me. I found the writing in the first half of the book pretty manic. The second half of the book went too far in to the details of a show she was writing. At that point I found myself not caring how the story even ended.
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  • Terry94705
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t read many comic novels but this was fabulous. The protagonist slaves over her 6 part miniseries about Fanny Burney while struggling with her compounding health issues. Laugh out loud funny in some parts; tiptoeing towards the tragic in others. But I most enjoyed her depiction of the world of television writers. We all have ideas about how novelists work, but I had no clue as to the organization of the collective effort that results in television. Her take on it was very smart and funny.I I don’t read many comic novels but this was fabulous. The protagonist slaves over her 6 part miniseries about Fanny Burney while struggling with her compounding health issues. Laugh out loud funny in some parts; tiptoeing towards the tragic in others. But I most enjoyed her depiction of the world of television writers. We all have ideas about how novelists work, but I had no clue as to the organization of the collective effort that results in television. Her take on it was very smart and funny.I’m not sure I’ve seen any of the shows she’s written, and I don’t know how autobiographical this is, but I totally appreciated the humor, irony and values in her book.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    The best thing about this semiautographical novel is ....Franny Burney, an author I'll bet most have missed (I know I have). That's not fair to the narrator (or Fattore) but honestly, this book was a discovery of two writers. I suspect many will grow weary of the narrator's fretting and neurosis but she's got a brain tumor. Benign or not, that's gonna set your world on it's side. I liked the details of her work on the tv show. It can be sort of annoying at times but it's also entertaining. Thank The best thing about this semiautographical novel is ....Franny Burney, an author I'll bet most have missed (I know I have). That's not fair to the narrator (or Fattore) but honestly, this book was a discovery of two writers. I suspect many will grow weary of the narrator's fretting and neurosis but she's got a brain tumor. Benign or not, that's gonna set your world on it's side. I liked the details of her work on the tv show. It can be sort of annoying at times but it's also entertaining. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. I'm off to find some of Burney's work.
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    So funny, so eccentric, so comfortable in its own neurotic skin... just a delightful journey into the mind of a TV writer who has a teeny little brain tumor, an obsession with the mother of chick-lit, Frances Burney, and no problem with life as a self-described spinster.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Well-written and somewhat funny at times, but the some elements got boring really quick. In nearly every chapter, we get:*comments about Shoe Girls, the younger women who work with the main character and who care about their appearance more than she does*"I am a spinster, isn't spinsterhood great, this really awesome British writer from the 1700s was a spinster too and I'm going to model my life on hers!"*complaining about the TV industry and about trying to sell a script or a series idea (about Well-written and somewhat funny at times, but the some elements got boring really quick. In nearly every chapter, we get:*comments about Shoe Girls, the younger women who work with the main character and who care about their appearance more than she does*"I am a spinster, isn't spinsterhood great, this really awesome British writer from the 1700s was a spinster too and I'm going to model my life on hers!"*complaining about the TV industry and about trying to sell a script or a series idea (about the author from the 1700s)*fretting about whether or not to get brain surgery to remove a benign tumor that might cause further health complications; an entire year's worth of fretting; about a TUMOR in her BRAIN; and not knowing whether or not to have SURGERY... Like... Why not get it removed ASAP?!Despite these repetitions and minor annoyances I had with the main character, I still quite enjoyed this. It's written like a diary, and there are plenty of cultural references to keep you entertained. The parts about the British writer from the 1700s (Fanny Burney) were interesting, but I could have done without the Woody Allen-ness of it all.(I received a copy from the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review.)
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  • Read Dream
    January 1, 1970
    This book was cute and well-written, but wasn't my favorite. The main character, a writer, is diagnosed with a benign brain tumor. She struggles with the diagnosis through most of the book. It is written in first person, similar to a diary. It is almost as if she is having a conversation with you, or with herself. I think we would be friends. I received ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Vivian
    January 1, 1970
    Like many others that have read this, I was so looking forward to reading it but... All I can say is this was a "hot mess!" Is it non-fiction masquerading as fiction or fiction masquerading as a pseudo-memoir? By the time I had read 30% of the book (digital review copy folks), I was tired of the repetitive phrases and descriptions and ready to scream enough already. Sadly, it didn't get any better or at least it didn't get any better in this reader's opinion.
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  • Lise
    January 1, 1970
    Rather strange book. Thought the style a bit manic at first but eventually settled into it. But then nothing happened. None of the story lines were resolved. None. Not one.I wonder if this was the author's diary entries, and she just published them as a book. But I thought it was a novel? All in all, very strange. If you read this review before reading the book, don't bother reading the book. Unless you don't like endings, then this is the perfect book for you.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the concept of this book. However, I was unable to become interested in it. I tried to engage with the characters, but the novel was just not my cup of tea. I thought the cover was really cute. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the advance read.
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  • Noreen Trotsky
    January 1, 1970
    I had been looking forward to this book and AI just had a hard time getting through it even though it was short. This book was supposedly humorous, I did not find it as such and I have a very good sense of humor. I found it depressing.
  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this book, and now know more about Frances Burney. Can't help but wonder how the brain surgery turned out though, after all the angst about it. Question: Why did no one have names?
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This book was all over the place.
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