The White Rose Resists
Inspired by the incredible true story of a group of ordinary men and women who dared to stand against evil The ideal of a new Germany swept up Sophie Scholl in a maelstrom of patriotic fervor--that is, until she realized the truth behind Hitler's machinations for the fatherland. Now she and other students in Munich, the cradle of the Nazi government, have banded together to form a group to fight for the truth: the White Rose. Risking everything to print and distribute leaflets calling for Germans to rise up against the evil permeating their country, the White Rose treads a knife's edge of discovery by the gestapo.Annalise Brandt came to the University of Munich to study art, not get involved with conspiracy. The daughter of an SS officer, she's been brought up to believe in the f�hrer's divinely appointed leadership. But the more she comes to know Sophie and her friends, the more she questions the Nazi propaganda.Soon Annalise joins their double life--students by day, resisters by night. And as the stakes increase, they're all forced to confront the deadly consequences meted out to any who dare to oppose the Reich.A gripping testament to courage, The White Rose Resists illuminates the sacrifice and conviction of an unlikely group of revolutionaries who refused to remain silent-no matter the cost.

The White Rose Resists Details

TitleThe White Rose Resists
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2020
PublisherKregel Publications
ISBN-139780825446481
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, War, World War II, Romance

The White Rose Resists Review

  • Jocelyn Green
    January 1, 1970
    This is a perfect novel. I can't think of a single thing I would have changed.The White Rose Resists is one of the best books I've read. It's important, eye-opening, full of drama and emotional power, and still manages to inspire hope by the end. The pace is excellent, the characterizations deeply human, the prose brilliant. It made me cry but it wasn't overwrought. The novel strikes that elusive balance between action and reflection. In other words, the plot moves along but not so quickly that This is a perfect novel. I can't think of a single thing I would have changed.The White Rose Resists is one of the best books I've read. It's important, eye-opening, full of drama and emotional power, and still manages to inspire hope by the end. The pace is excellent, the characterizations deeply human, the prose brilliant. It made me cry but it wasn't overwrought. The novel strikes that elusive balance between action and reflection. In other words, the plot moves along but not so quickly that it sacrifices space in which the characters can react to it, respond and and develop accordingly. It also manages to portray evil without being as graphic as some of the other WW2 novels I've read. The author's choices of how to blend fiction with fact made this story highly readable, thoroughly compelling, and completely her own.Amanda Barratt is one of the most gifted authors I know. She is a force. I am officially in awe of her abilities. The last time I was this stunned at the end of a novel, it was The Seamstress by Allison Pittman.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    Endorsement: Woven with bittersweet delicacy, Barratt’s intimate voice wraps you so tightly and holds you so closely you are surprised at an outcome history already taught you. A monument to courage and conviction, The White Rose Resists blends Barratt’s hallmark of immersive research with a lovely poetic resonance. This staggering look at love and danger, hope, treachery and unfathomable bravery is delicately handled in Barratt’s deft, assured and masterful voice. The novel is a formidable and Endorsement: Woven with bittersweet delicacy, Barratt’s intimate voice wraps you so tightly and holds you so closely you are surprised at an outcome history already taught you. A monument to courage and conviction, The White Rose Resists blends Barratt’s hallmark of immersive research with a lovely poetic resonance. This staggering look at love and danger, hope, treachery and unfathomable bravery is delicately handled in Barratt’s deft, assured and masterful voice. The novel is a formidable and bold portrait of impossible courage in a time of sheer evil, yet in Barratt's intelligent care, we are left with the most potent sense of shimmering hope. This book deserves to be on every shelf, at the centre of every book club conversation and on the tips of every reader's tongue for years to come.
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  • Amanda Geaney
    January 1, 1970
    When author Amanda Barratt asked for early readers for her new release, The White Rose Resists, I responded immediately. I had just finished reading A Promise for Tomorrow (her contribution to The Heart's Stronghold novella collection) and I previously enjoyed My Dearest Dietrich (2019). In my mind, I could expect another well-crafted story and that's just what she has delivered.I gravitate to historical fiction because stories make learning fun! Through her novel, Barratt introduced me to two h When author Amanda Barratt asked for early readers for her new release, The White Rose Resists, I responded immediately. I had just finished reading A Promise for Tomorrow (her contribution to The Heart's Stronghold novella collection) and I previously enjoyed My Dearest Dietrich (2019). In my mind, I could expect another well-crafted story and that's just what she has delivered.I gravitate to historical fiction because stories make learning fun! Through her novel, Barratt introduced me to two historical figures—Hans and Sophie Scholl—and showed how their passive resistance to the Nazi regime left an indelible mark on German society. Days after I finished reading I couldn't stop thinking about the Scholls and the ultimate sacrifice they were willing to make for their fellow man. I decided to read it again; then I asked my son and husband if they had ever heard of them. It's that sort of book... one you want to discuss with others.  For me, Barratt struck the perfect balance between fact and fiction. She explains in her author's note how Kirk Hoffmann and Annalise Brandt were fictional characters—inspired by people she encountered while researching the White Rose. While I'll remember Hans and Sophie Scholl for their brave stand against tyranny, Kirk and Annalise were memorable in their own right due to the hope their faith brought to this tale. Love conquers all. I've read 38 books so far this year and The White Rose Resists is a true standout! Whether you enjoy non-fiction titles like The Hiding Place and Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl or prefer historical novels by authors like Melanie Dobson, Sarah Sundin, Susan Meissner, and Jennifer Chiaverini, this is a must-read title for YOU!My Favorite Quotes: "I’m ashamed of the fearful thoughts crowding in, eclipsing all else. If I give into my fear, I’ll be no better than the rest. Buckling beneath the oppressing hand of the Reich out of cowardice."“In the end, it comes down to the worth you ascribe to freedom. What price you’re willing to pay.”"The laughter of childhood is a casualty of war."“Anxiety is like hunger. The longer it gnaws at you, the more used to it you become, though it doesn’t make enduring it any easier."“It takes effort to feel hate. Indifference is easy.”"It’s humbling, this daily, childlike reliance, but faith has given me courage outside of myself."I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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  • Paula Shreckhise
    January 1, 1970
    This is not your typical WWII novel. This is a behind-the-scenes look at some idealistic youth in Germany under an oppressive dictator and how they become disillusioned and try to wake the average man to action. Ms. Barratt has thoroughly researched the true story of The White Rose drawing on the leaflets, letters, diaries and interviews with people contemporary to the events. She seamlessly adds a few fictional characters into the mix to flesh out the story. Throughout the novel, she shows hope This is not your typical WWII novel. This is a behind-the-scenes look at some idealistic youth in Germany under an oppressive dictator and how they become disillusioned and try to wake the average man to action. Ms. Barratt has thoroughly researched the true story of The White Rose drawing on the leaflets, letters, diaries and interviews with people contemporary to the events. She seamlessly adds a few fictional characters into the mix to flesh out the story. Throughout the novel, she shows hope, faith and courage of ordinary people. The White Rose Resists brought me to tears again at the injustice that was wrought during the Hitler regime. I was in awe at the lengths that these souls went to in order to bring truth to their fellow countrymen. The story is told in turns by the members of The White Rose. Sophie Scholl: “ There is purpose in this. In death, as in life. Someday perhaps my story will be told, and others will remember. That to witness wrong and stay silent is as much a crime as committing evil oneself. That youth does not exempt one from responsibility. That freedom is a gift.”I am reminded of the many examples in the Bible that God reserves a remnant even when things look bleak. And that He is with that few in spite of the overwhelming odds. Notable Quotes:Sophie:“How can we expect righteousness to prevail if there is hardly anyone willing to sacrifice themselves for a righteous cause.”Kirk:“The laughter of childhood is a casualty of war. Childhood itself is stolen by war’s cruel hand.”Sophie: “Freedom looks like this sunshine. Freedom to live without fear, to speak one’s beliefs without glancing around and behind.”Tension permeated the pages as Sophie, her brother, Hans and their friends put their plans into action. Ms. Barratt captures the heartache as the characters try to protect each other, then take responsibility for their actions. Sophie: “In spite of my exhaustion, the risk of discovery, the nagging anxiety, I wouldn’t go back to doing nothing. Pain is better than emptiness.”Annalise: “Even the greatest darkness can be breached by the flame of a single candle.”It was my privilege to read such an accomplished book. Ms. Barratt truly brings the past to life. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher on behalf of the author. I was not required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own.*
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  • Heidi Chiavaroli
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose Resists is that rare and powerful story that rips your heart apart at the same time that it inspires you to live for something greater. With a lyrical and skillful voice, Amanda Barratt tells the amazing true story of the German students who dared to use their voices in a culture of oppression. This novel will have readers turning pages late into the night, it will have their own blood surging and boiling with a need for justice. Most of all, it will remind them of what is truly i The White Rose Resists is that rare and powerful story that rips your heart apart at the same time that it inspires you to live for something greater. With a lyrical and skillful voice, Amanda Barratt tells the amazing true story of the German students who dared to use their voices in a culture of oppression. This novel will have readers turning pages late into the night, it will have their own blood surging and boiling with a need for justice. Most of all, it will remind them of what is truly important, and spur them on to live more fully. A beautiful masterpiece of a novel!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Amanda Barrett sets a high bar of excellence in this stirring tribute to the real life heroes of the White Rose resistance group, a group of German college students during WWII. Ms. Barrett's impeccable attention to detail and expert research brings to light a story of which I had little prior knowledge. Hans and Sophie Scholl's message that one cannot stand innocently by to the injustice and evils in our world is compelling. Beautifully written, this expertly crafted tale will change its reader Amanda Barrett sets a high bar of excellence in this stirring tribute to the real life heroes of the White Rose resistance group, a group of German college students during WWII. Ms. Barrett's impeccable attention to detail and expert research brings to light a story of which I had little prior knowledge. Hans and Sophie Scholl's message that one cannot stand innocently by to the injustice and evils in our world is compelling. Beautifully written, this expertly crafted tale will change its readers with its message of hope and action, amidst tragedy and evil. One for the keeper shelf!One of many quotes I highlighted:"If I do not fight against, aren't I as good as fighting for?"I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher and was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are mine.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    2020 Top Pick! Author Amanda Barratt displays a masterful touch with a powerful story. This beautiful novel relates the tale of Sophie and Hans Scholl, their real-life collaborators, and two winning fictional characters, who pit their youth and passion against the unforgiving Reich. The first person, present tense POV pulls readers into the story and allows them to watch events unfold through their own eyes. Barratt’s deft hand with details brings history to life without overpowering the rich em 2020 Top Pick! Author Amanda Barratt displays a masterful touch with a powerful story. This beautiful novel relates the tale of Sophie and Hans Scholl, their real-life collaborators, and two winning fictional characters, who pit their youth and passion against the unforgiving Reich. The first person, present tense POV pulls readers into the story and allows them to watch events unfold through their own eyes. Barratt’s deft hand with details brings history to life without overpowering the rich emotions at the heart of this novel. And that ending . . . perfection! 5+++ stars! A winner! Can’t wait to share this with my students!Best Quote: “Someday perhaps my story will be told, and others will remember. That to witness wrong and stay silent is as much a crime as committing evil oneself. That youth does not exempt one from responsibility.” ~Sophie Scholl
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  • MJSH
    January 1, 1970
    "Faith is trusting through the darkness, but sometimes I ask how and come up empty."Amanda Barratt is a master storyteller who weaves beautifully crafted fiction into heart-rending history to produce a thought-provoking and soul-stirring story of unspeakable tragedy and hope. She pens such unique and unforgettable historical fiction with attention to detail that will bring you into the heart of her characters, both historical and fictional, and have you living in their shoes. I knew nothing abou "Faith is trusting through the darkness, but sometimes I ask how and come up empty."Amanda Barratt is a master storyteller who weaves beautifully crafted fiction into heart-rending history to produce a thought-provoking and soul-stirring story of unspeakable tragedy and hope. She pens such unique and unforgettable historical fiction with attention to detail that will bring you into the heart of her characters, both historical and fictional, and have you living in their shoes. I knew nothing about the White Rose student movement in Munich during WWII prior to reading this book but experiencing the students' passion and sacrifice for freedom through the author's poignant words has given me a new focus in perspective. This is a book that will stay with you long after you've finished the last page; echoes of "if an opportunity presented itself, would you risk your own life to save another?" will continue to resound in your spirit once you get to know Hans, Alex, Kirk, Sophie, Annalise, and Willi. The White Rose Resists has a very different feel and tempo from the author's previous book My Dearest Dietrich but is equally captivating. Told from first person present perspectives of Sophie (historical figure), Annalise and Kirk (fictional characters), the plot has a passionate - almost reckless - urgency, fire and abandon that can only come from university students in 1942 Munich. Sophie's brother Hans, with his like-minded friends, Sophie, and Annalise, forms White Rose to stand up against the inhumane atrocities through printed pamphlets. There is also a relatively large secondary character cast which is mostly made up of actual historical figures who were a part of White Rose or helped with some type of resistance during the war. Even in the midst of darkest evil, death, and suffering, the author infuses hope into each character and encounter. Yes, the fate of Sophie and Hans is known, but you will not be able to stop the tears from flowing or heart from breaking when they bravely meet their sentence.With poetic, melodic voice and meticulous research, Amanda Barratt puts forth another must-read, faith-based historical fiction that is absolutely riveting. This is definitely on my Top 10 for The Best Books of 2020.I received a copy of the book from Kregel Publications/author and was under no obligation to post a positive review. All comments and opinions are solely my own.
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    There are some books that come along that simply require reflection and muse, that take your breath away while reading, and that leave a mark on your mind and heart that a lesson is meant to be heard. I got all of that and more from this amazing book.The character development is so incredibly well done, and you really feel as if you know them as your neighbors. These young students are amazing...risking all to tell the truth no one else will tell. It provokes the reader to think about what one w There are some books that come along that simply require reflection and muse, that take your breath away while reading, and that leave a mark on your mind and heart that a lesson is meant to be heard. I got all of that and more from this amazing book.The character development is so incredibly well done, and you really feel as if you know them as your neighbors. These young students are amazing...risking all to tell the truth no one else will tell. It provokes the reader to think about what one would do and what one would be willing to risk in telling the truth. For me,the start and development of the story was a bit slow in the beginning. My mind that is affected by neuro disorder had a bit of a difficult time following the different people in short time spans. As the book progresses,the reader spends more time with each character...this actually helps the book really build into the fantastic read that it is. It is pure genius once you realize how well the story is told...and how it has to be told.The fact that so much real detail and facts are in this book makes it powerful,the way the author writes and weaves those facts into this book makes a spectacular, heart wrenching story! There is an obvious faith and truth theme through the book...and the eternal fight of good versus evil. A book truly written for the times in which we live.The first book by this author set the bar very high for this one, but that was not a problem. Once again,she exceeded my expectations. I really do not feel any review is quite going to do this book justice, but I am thrilled I read it. It will not soon be forgotten...and much to ponder and absorb.I received this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    "The day of reckoning has come, the reckoning of the German youth again the most heinous tyranny our nation ever had to suffer. In the name of all German youth, we demand of Adolf Hitler's state the return of personal freedom, the most precious good of the German people, of which he has cheated us in the most wretched manner."A manifesto of sorts; defining the demands of "The White Rose", a student resistance movement, who against all odds, fought a regime of terror with the only means they had "The day of reckoning has come, the reckoning of the German youth again the most heinous tyranny our nation ever had to suffer. In the name of all German youth, we demand of Adolf Hitler's state the return of personal freedom, the most precious good of the German people, of which he has cheated us in the most wretched manner."A manifesto of sorts; defining the demands of "The White Rose", a student resistance movement, who against all odds, fought a regime of terror with the only means they had available; their words. Did they accomplish their purpose? Perhaps the fact that we are still honoring them with our words is a fitting tribute to their legacy. Amanda Barratt has written these brave young men and women back to life within the pages of her book; carefully peeling back the layers of their humanity, their conscience, their determination, their sanctity of life, and ultimately their ineffable courage in the face of dire consequences. And even then . . . "I don't regret my conduct. I believe I have done the best I could for my country and my conscience. I'm ready to stand before God only with the regret that I didn't do more."What an outstanding example of historical fiction. I received a copy of this book from the author and publisher. The opinions stated above are entirely my own.
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  • Kailey
    January 1, 1970
    I’m having trouble finding the words to describe this book. It was that good! I enjoyed it immensely. It is such a powerful story about young people standing up against injustice. I truly cared for these characters, including the fictional ones. This book even made me cry a few times, which is really hard to do. I hadn’t heard of The White Rose group before this, but now I want to know more about these brave young people. I highly recommend this book!I received a complimentary copy from the publ I’m having trouble finding the words to describe this book. It was that good! I enjoyed it immensely. It is such a powerful story about young people standing up against injustice. I truly cared for these characters, including the fictional ones. This book even made me cry a few times, which is really hard to do. I hadn’t heard of The White Rose group before this, but now I want to know more about these brave young people. I highly recommend this book!I received a complimentary copy from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.
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  • Stacey Ulferts
    January 1, 1970
    I had the privilege of reading an ARC of The White Rose Resists: A Novel of the German Students Who Defied Hitler by Amanda Barratt. Since I was only vaguely familiar with the actual events, I did a little research on my own before starting. I wanted to have the students’ faces in my mind while reading. Having done so, the story ceased to be just words written on a page. The events came alive as I read and I was right there with them joining in as they questioned what they had been raised to bel I had the privilege of reading an ARC of The White Rose Resists: A Novel of the German Students Who Defied Hitler by Amanda Barratt. Since I was only vaguely familiar with the actual events, I did a little research on my own before starting. I wanted to have the students’ faces in my mind while reading. Having done so, the story ceased to be just words written on a page. The events came alive as I read and I was right there with them joining in as they questioned what they had been raised to believe about right and wrong. I did a lot of soul searching along with them. It is easy for someone to think how they might act in a given situation but quite another when actually faced with that situation. This book isn’t just written, it is beautifully crafted in a hopeful, heartbreaking, haunting way. I had to stop reading at one point because I couldn’t see through my tears. This book is just so real. Told through several characters’ eyes, I was captivated from the very first page. Yesterday would have been Sophie Scholl’s 99th birthday, a fact that was all the more poignant while reading her story. Even though I knew the ending, I kept hoping it would change. Because of Amanda Barratt's masterful use of actual quotes and excerpts from letters and diaries to achieve realness, I know The White Rose Resists is one book that won't ever leave me.I was trying to think who I would recommend this to and I have decided the answer is simply...everyone.
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  • Jeanne Alfveby Crea
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose Resists by Amanda Barratt exemplifies historical fiction at it's finest! Taking a true tale of heroism and bravery fueled by conviction, the author tells a gripping story that stayed with me long after I was finished reading. "It's astonishing how we've all believed and fought for and trumpeted these ideals (as Hitler youth) thinking they're for our own good. When, in reality, they only serve to further the aims of those in power". This line from the book reminds us of the continu The White Rose Resists by Amanda Barratt exemplifies historical fiction at it's finest! Taking a true tale of heroism and bravery fueled by conviction, the author tells a gripping story that stayed with me long after I was finished reading. "It's astonishing how we've all believed and fought for and trumpeted these ideals (as Hitler youth) thinking they're for our own good. When, in reality, they only serve to further the aims of those in power". This line from the book reminds us of the continual need for people of every generation to think for themselves, to discover the truth, and to stand up for the truth, no matter what. When I read such an excellent work of historical fiction, it always makes me want to delve into the real events even more, which is why I am grateful that the author provides highly recommended books for further reading at the end. I will be looking into those for sure. Amanda Barratt has an absolutely beautiful style of writing and combined with her impeccable research, I couldn't help but be pulled into this spellbinding story that was hard to put down. I won't soon forget the story of university students Hans and Sophie Scholl and their friends who fought with absolute conviction-no matter what the cost- to speak out against the evils of Hitler and Nazi Germany against humanity. I highly recommend The White Rose Resists as an excellent choice for lovers of historical fiction.I received a complimentary copy from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.
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  • Jennifer K
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose Resists is one of the most powerful and well written books that I have read this year! Barratt’s beautiful writing carries the reader to 1940’s Munich as if one were there. This touching story of friends bound together by the desire for their countrymen to hear truth is thoroughly researched and woven together wonderfully. Amidst the suffering of World War II, bravery and hope are still present and this inspiring historical fiction emerges. I am so grateful that I heard about the The White Rose Resists is one of the most powerful and well written books that I have read this year! Barratt’s beautiful writing carries the reader to 1940’s Munich as if one were there. This touching story of friends bound together by the desire for their countrymen to hear truth is thoroughly researched and woven together wonderfully. Amidst the suffering of World War II, bravery and hope are still present and this inspiring historical fiction emerges. I am so grateful that I heard about the lives of these ordinary university students who changed the world. This memorable story will remain with me forever. All I can say is read everything Barratt writes! I was given a copy of this book by the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    'Show me what to do. You, O Lord, are my only solace.'I have studied the Holocaust for decades and when I saw the subject of Amanda Barratt's newest book, I knew this would be interesting. The books is not directly a Holocaust related book, but indirectly.'What worth do you ascribe to freedom?Amanda Barratt gives us the true story of Sophie Scholl and some of her fellow compatriots who acted to renounce Hitler and his ideas for Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. These young college students wrote a 'Show me what to do. You, O Lord, are my only solace.'I have studied the Holocaust for decades and when I saw the subject of Amanda Barratt's newest book, I knew this would be interesting. The books is not directly a Holocaust related book, but indirectly.'What worth do you ascribe to freedom?Amanda Barratt gives us the true story of Sophie Scholl and some of her fellow compatriots who acted to renounce Hitler and his ideas for Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. These young college students wrote and mailed/passed out leaflets in direct opposition to the Nazi regime.'What little I have to offer, I will give. No matter the cost.'Barratt tells their story with writing so stellar it grabs your mind and refuses to let go. I knew the outcome of Sophie Scholl's story before reading this book, and yet Barratt makes Sophie's life and her friends' lives come so alive! She puts you 'in' their lives. You feel their pain, their fear, their determination to try and make Germany a better place, a place free of a tyrant's rule, a place where lives mattered and not just lives that tyrant thought were worthy.'Our instincts for evil have been nurtured. Once, acts of violence were condemned. Now, they're condoned. As long as the targets those deemed deserving.'Incredibly well written and heartrendingly told, this book will stay with you. It's not a quick read. It takes time to absorb. While it is based on fact, parts are fictionalized but Barratt stays totally true to the facts. This book is impeccably researched and well worth reading. Bravo!*My thanks to Kregel Publications for a copy of this book via Net Galley. The opinions in this review are expressly my own.
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  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    You will not want to miss out on this powerful story! When I first heard that Amanda Barratt was going to write a book about Sophie Scholl and her brother Hanz, I was supper excited! I had read her previous book My Dearest Dietrich and loved it. I just knew that if anyone could write about the White Rose Resistance, it would be Amanda Barratt.Let me just say that this story is phenomenal. My simple words could never do it justice. This story is powerful and one that not only needed to be told, b You will not want to miss out on this powerful story! When I first heard that Amanda Barratt was going to write a book about Sophie Scholl and her brother Hanz, I was supper excited! I had read her previous book My Dearest Dietrich and loved it. I just knew that if anyone could write about the White Rose Resistance, it would be Amanda Barratt.Let me just say that this story is phenomenal. My simple words could never do it justice. This story is powerful and one that not only needed to be told, but should never be forgotten. I knew the over view of the White Rose Resistance. But I didn’t have an in depth intimate understanding. Reading this book, I felt like I lived it right along side the characters. To read this book is to experience it.(I receive complimentary books from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including Netgalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own.)
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Amanda Barratt clearly loves historical research- so do I. So that rather guaranteed that I would like this book. I loved the way she wrapped it up. These were real people that died for a cause they believed in. Very inspiring to think of their sacrifice. Author did not just report history, she made it come alive with characters that felt so very real. Even though it dealt with a sad part of history, it gave hope. It makes you ask, "what would I be willing to die for?"Advance Copy provided by #N Amanda Barratt clearly loves historical research- so do I. So that rather guaranteed that I would like this book. I loved the way she wrapped it up. These were real people that died for a cause they believed in. Very inspiring to think of their sacrifice. Author did not just report history, she made it come alive with characters that felt so very real. Even though it dealt with a sad part of history, it gave hope. It makes you ask, "what would I be willing to die for?"Advance Copy provided by #NetGalley
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  • Kelly Bridgewater
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous storyI have read A LOT of World War II stories. One of my two favorite genres to devour. I have read plenty of stories which show the plight and hurt of the Jewish people. I have read the plight of the soldiers who have done the hurting. But I have always wondered why no one actually stood up to the soldiers and Hitler. Anyone could see the harm he was causing to people. I heard a lot of good news about Amanda Barratt's first novel, My Dearest Dietrich, but I haven't read it YET. When I Fabulous storyI have read A LOT of World War II stories. One of my two favorite genres to devour. I have read plenty of stories which show the plight and hurt of the Jewish people. I have read the plight of the soldiers who have done the hurting. But I have always wondered why no one actually stood up to the soldiers and Hitler. Anyone could see the harm he was causing to people. I heard a lot of good news about Amanda Barratt's first novel, My Dearest Dietrich, but I haven't read it YET. When I read the synopsis for The White Rose Resists, I knew it was the missing piece in my World War II information. I really couldn't wait to see what some Aryan college students who do to defy Hitler. Barratt's writing is a delight. The words flow easily from the page to my imagination. I love how she allowed the characters to be normal people who didn't set out to do something extraordinary; they saw an injustice and wanted to fix it. Admirable. There is some romance. There is some moments of breath catching. There is moments of sighing in relief because they didn't get caught. I can't wait to add this story to my physical shelf with all my other World War II novels. Definitely original and unpredictable. I can't wait to see what else Barratt researches and allows to come alive for readers. Something to keep an eye out for. I received a complimentary copy of The White Rose Resists by Amanda Barratt from Kregel Publishing, but the opinions stated are all my own.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose Resists is an incredibly timely story of heroism and courage in the face of impossible odds - I cannot think of a better time for the world to revisit the story of Sophie Scholl and the students who mounted a passive resistance to the Nazi regime. Even as a student of World War II history, from the privilege of time and distance it is all too easy to wonder how average citizens could standby - even embrace - the socio-political horror wrought by Hitler. Amanda Barratt's novel prov The White Rose Resists is an incredibly timely story of heroism and courage in the face of impossible odds - I cannot think of a better time for the world to revisit the story of Sophie Scholl and the students who mounted a passive resistance to the Nazi regime. Even as a student of World War II history, from the privilege of time and distance it is all too easy to wonder how average citizens could standby - even embrace - the socio-political horror wrought by Hitler. Amanda Barratt's novel provides excellent, thought-provoking insight into the twin traps of blindness and complacency and how one small group of German students awoke and declared, "no more."It's impossible to read this story now, in light of current events sweeping the country, and not ask and examine oneself for the hard answers: how would I respond, what would I do? Would I rest in the illusory safety of privileged protection, or would I risk everything like the Scholl siblings and their friends for the chance to speak truth to power. Most of the novel is split between three points-of-view: Sophie, Annalise (daughter of an SS officer), and Kirk (son of a Lutheran pastor). Barrett's characterizations are compassionate and thoughtfully rendered. I do feel Barrett's narrative was strongest from her original characters' viewpoints (Annalise and Kirk), though I understand the limitations that would have placed on the narrative, particularly when one can drawn from the detailed records of Sophie's interrogation and trial. There is a fourth viewpoint, but it appears so briefly that although impactful it seems inserted rather than wholly organic to the storyline.That aside, I cannot stress enough that this novel's message is timelier than ever. Barratt has clearly done her research and her portrait of these "bright young things" with their lives ahead of them is poignant and heartbreaking, though still laced with hope. There are no easy answers here, and Barratt doesn't shy from an honest portrayal of the emotional toll of war and rebellion. Sophie, Annalise, Kirk, and the rest of the White Rose have a choice: to ignore evil or face it head-on. The cost of their actions, their bravery in facing the machine of Nazi bigotry is a call to action resounding through history, for "to witness a wrong and stay silent is as much a crime as committing evil oneself." Read and be inspired, challenged, and committed to learn from the past in order to do - and BE - better in the present.
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  • Lisa Hudson
    January 1, 1970
    WHAT PRICE, FREEDOM?“In the end, it comes down to the worth you ascribe to freedom. What price you’re willing to pay.”It is a rarity when a World War II historical fiction novel comes along that takes my breath away with the depth and breadth of it. THE WHITE ROSE RESISTS is such a novel. It was inspired by the true story of a group of German young people who made a conscious choice to take a stand against evil during WWII. At many different times, it made me stop and evaluate my life and my com WHAT PRICE, FREEDOM?“In the end, it comes down to the worth you ascribe to freedom. What price you’re willing to pay.”It is a rarity when a World War II historical fiction novel comes along that takes my breath away with the depth and breadth of it. THE WHITE ROSE RESISTS is such a novel. It was inspired by the true story of a group of German young people who made a conscious choice to take a stand against evil during WWII. At many different times, it made me stop and evaluate my life and my commitment to God.Normally, a novel this size only takes me a day or two to read depending on what is going on in my life. I took my time with this so it was more like three or four days of reading because I was so emotionally involved with the characters. Barratt’s writing style is so fluid that it makes me feel as if I was one of the young adults caught up in the Resistance, too! Her main characters have become MY FRIENDS, and I wish I had known about them sooner! She made me FEEL their struggles of righteous indignation and wonder what I would have done had I been in their situation. Would I have been one of the ones that “abandoned it all for the sake of the call?” Early in the book she mentioned the Confessing Church pastors were sent to Dachau. I have personally been there, seen the documentaries, viewed all the displays, walked the grounds, and visited the barracks. I stood in the gas chamber and had the door closed and locked behind me. It is a feeling I will never forget. My experiences made reading this novel so much more real and important to me. We must NEVER forget the sacrifices made by those who gave their lives in the battle for our freedom!Here is another favorite quote that helped the students then and can certainly help us all now: “This morning, before I left, my mutter told me God goes with us everywhere. And that even if we aren’t where we want to be, He can use us for good. I thought it might comfort you to know that as you return to Berlin.”This novel has been added to my Top 20 Most Influential Books List. I was provided a complimentary copy of this novel by Kregel Publications & NetGalley. The opinions expressed here are completely my own and without influence.
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  • Kelly Hodgkins
    January 1, 1970
    Amanda Barratt’s novel “The White Rose Resists” is inspired by true events that take place during World War Two in Germany. It is as eye opening as it is heartbreaking, thoroughly captivating and harrowing.Annelise and Kirk are added, as fictional characters, to a cast of real-life heroes who stand up against the Nazi regime through their leaflets which dispute the government’s war propaganda and share the true horror of the treatment of Jews and those who fight back.“My footsteps on the cobbles Amanda Barratt’s novel “The White Rose Resists” is inspired by true events that take place during World War Two in Germany. It is as eye opening as it is heartbreaking, thoroughly captivating and harrowing.Annelise and Kirk are added, as fictional characters, to a cast of real-life heroes who stand up against the Nazi regime through their leaflets which dispute the government’s war propaganda and share the true horror of the treatment of Jews and those who fight back.“My footsteps on the cobblestones are too loud. My heart drums inside my ears. What if I’m stopped? Searched? They’ll read the words we’ve written to rouse our deaf countrymen and call it sedition. It will mean arrest. Imprisonment. I can’t think beyond that. If I do, I might stop walking altogether.” - From “The White Rose Resists” by Amanda BarrattMy school education focused a lot of our time on World War Two but from the Allies perspective and to read about how the Germans felt, trapped in their homeland, silenced and abused, helpless to aid friends and neighbours is fascinating and chilling. I had never seen this side before.“My vater is one of the few Confessing Church pastors remaining—a dwindling group of dissidents who refuse to bend to Reich Church policies. A crucifix, rather than a portrait of Hitler hangs on the chapel wall, a Bible, not a copy of Mein Kampf, rests on the altar in the run-down building Vater rents for services.“ - From “The White Rose Resists” by Amanda BarrattAs one can imagine, the Nazi government does not respond kindly to what amounts to treason in their eyes and the ending is so sad. Whilst the impact of these brave young activists lives on, the loss of their lives is tragic.Despite the pain and the anguish, the book is one of hope. It is filled with Christian insights and the belief that good overcomes evil. The leading characters each have a deep faith born of wrestling well with God over the atrocities of war. As we face COVID-19 around the world, I was encouraged by their testimony that through all this we will triumph,It is beautifully written, keeping me hooked on every word from the start. This is one that will live with me for a long while. It’s a five out of five on the enJOYment scale!
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  • Suzie Waltner
    January 1, 1970
    There are some books that move you and challenge you, leaving an indelible impression. The White Rose Resists is one of them.I’d never heard of the White Rose Resistance until this book. After reading it, I will not forget about these young people who dared to stand up for their beliefs in the midst of tyranny.With a fictional story steeped in research and historical facts, Amanda Barratt pulls readers into the horrors of World War II Germany, the sacrifice made by a handful of young people to t There are some books that move you and challenge you, leaving an indelible impression. The White Rose Resists is one of them.I’d never heard of the White Rose Resistance until this book. After reading it, I will not forget about these young people who dared to stand up for their beliefs in the midst of tyranny.With a fictional story steeped in research and historical facts, Amanda Barratt pulls readers into the horrors of World War II Germany, the sacrifice made by a handful of young people to take a stand and now waver no matter the cost, and the thread of hope that one day, the war would end.The White Rose Resists is an emotional story of courage and honor of love and sacrifice. It is a story I will not soon forget. And it a story everyone should read. “Someday perhaps my story will be told, and others will remember. That to witness wrong and stay silent is as much a crime as committing evil oneself.”Disclosure statement: I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book and was not required to write a positive review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Yannick Tricia
    January 1, 1970
    This book is inspired by the true story of Sophie and Hans Scholl and the members of the White Rose (Christoph Probst, Alexander Schmorell, Willi Graf…)A group of student during world war 2 who didn’t agree to the Nazi ideology. They realized that what Hitler was doing was wrong and that the consequences will be devastating for Germany , they hope that the german people will open their eyes. They illegaly made leaflets and send them to people… they decided to leave some in their university and i This book is inspired by the true story of Sophie and Hans Scholl and the members of the White Rose (Christoph Probst, Alexander Schmorell, Willi Graf…)A group of student during world war 2 who didn’t agree to the Nazi ideology. They realized that what Hitler was doing was wrong and that the consequences will be devastating for Germany , they hope that the german people will open their eyes. They illegaly made leaflets and send them to people… they decided to leave some in their university and it is where they get caught and imprisonned…Even though they did not survive they fought for justice, for human rights.It is an inspiring story, they were brave and bold. It was not easy to read their story, I feel for them and for all the sufferings of the jewish people.I received a copy of this book and this is an honest review.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I’m speechless. How to find the right words to describe a novel that is so rich in detail and words that resonate within you even after you put it down. I found I wanted to devour it but instead I savored it as I had to give it time to digest and question myself. Do I have the mettle to stand up for freedom and especially for my belief in God? I pray so. Ms. Barrett has crafted a story of outstanding mastery that weaves together the true story of The White Rose and a fictional couple Kirk a Wow! I’m speechless. How to find the right words to describe a novel that is so rich in detail and words that resonate within you even after you put it down. I found I wanted to devour it but instead I savored it as I had to give it time to digest and question myself. Do I have the mettle to stand up for freedom and especially for my belief in God? I pray so. Ms. Barrett has crafted a story of outstanding mastery that weaves together the true story of The White Rose and a fictional couple Kirk and Annalise. You will be swept away on a journey that is heartbreaking but at the same time gives you hope, as they face death with dignity and the knowledge that they will be with their Savior who gives them strength. Sophia is an example of qualities we all need to dig deep to find within ourselves. I was truly blessed to read this as it is not just entertainment but is a book containing knowledge and wisdom. I wish my words could encourage everyone to pick this up and read and every school library to purchase it. Exceptional and needs a category of ten stars in my estimation. I received a complimentary copy from the author. The honest review and opinions are my own and were not required.
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  • Emily Yager
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fantastic read about German Students who stood up against injustice. Amanda Barratt weaves this true story with a lyrical style and delicacy unexpected for the subject matter as she weaves fact with fiction.This has to be one of the most powerful reads that I've read in awhile. There is a lot that will tug at your heartstrings a bit while your cheering on the resisters and everything they are trying to accomplish. Bravery and courage in the face of horrific evil. Dramatic yet a powerfu This is a fantastic read about German Students who stood up against injustice. Amanda Barratt weaves this true story with a lyrical style and delicacy unexpected for the subject matter as she weaves fact with fiction.This has to be one of the most powerful reads that I've read in awhile. There is a lot that will tug at your heartstrings a bit while your cheering on the resisters and everything they are trying to accomplish. Bravery and courage in the face of horrific evil. Dramatic yet a powerfully emotional read. This is one everyone should read at least once.
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  • Schuyler
    January 1, 1970
    Few books make me cry. This book did. As Annalise Brandt struggles with the pressure to marry and produce Aryan children, and Hans and Sophie Scholl meet by night to write leaflets resisting Hitler's overreach of power, The White Rose Resists provides an exciting adventure, real historical moments, and important questions about courage to grapple with. Barratt's telling of the story, especially in the intense later scenes, made me think about eternity, the preciousness of life, and how I would w Few books make me cry. This book did. As Annalise Brandt struggles with the pressure to marry and produce Aryan children, and Hans and Sophie Scholl meet by night to write leaflets resisting Hitler's overreach of power, The White Rose Resists provides an exciting adventure, real historical moments, and important questions about courage to grapple with. Barratt's telling of the story, especially in the intense later scenes, made me think about eternity, the preciousness of life, and how I would want to encourage my family to be brave for Jesus. It touched my heart deeply. I enjoyed her beautiful remembrance of the Scholls and the gripping climactic moments (no spoilers). Even if you know what's about to happen, this will still put you on the edge of your seat. This is an important book on courage for young people wrestling with conviction, men and women looking to know their history better, or readers wishing to evaluate their own response to oppression. We must never be silent. I received a copy from the author.
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  • Joanne Sher
    January 1, 1970
    Amanda Barratt has taken a true (but mostly unknown outside Germany) story of incredible bravery and sacrifice and turned it into an compelling, heart-rending, suspenseful, hopeful narrative that will keep you turning pages anxiously and eagerly all the way to the incredibly satisfying end. College students in Germany during World War II generally followed their Fuhrer - but a few saw the corruption, death, and evil of this regime and, despite serious risk, tried to spread the truth about Hitler Amanda Barratt has taken a true (but mostly unknown outside Germany) story of incredible bravery and sacrifice and turned it into an compelling, heart-rending, suspenseful, hopeful narrative that will keep you turning pages anxiously and eagerly all the way to the incredibly satisfying end. College students in Germany during World War II generally followed their Fuhrer - but a few saw the corruption, death, and evil of this regime and, despite serious risk, tried to spread the truth about Hitler, his policies, and God. Sophie Scholl was one of them - and her story, expanded upon by Barratt, had me on the edge of my seat, rooting for, crying with, and praying for these incredibly real, believable, brave young people.A powerful story of hope and strength in the midst of the worst of circumstances. Highly recommended.
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  • Erin Laramore
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars for this WWII historical fiction. This book brought to light a movement that I'd not heard of before - the White Rose. This book is based on the actual lives of brother/sister duo Hans and Sophie Scholl, and their effort as college students to educate their fellow German citizens on what Hitler was really doing. Having not heard about any German resistance during WWII, I found this fascinating, particularly because of their youth. Because of the subject matter, this book was a bit "hea 4.5 stars for this WWII historical fiction. This book brought to light a movement that I'd not heard of before - the White Rose. This book is based on the actual lives of brother/sister duo Hans and Sophie Scholl, and their effort as college students to educate their fellow German citizens on what Hitler was really doing. Having not heard about any German resistance during WWII, I found this fascinating, particularly because of their youth. Because of the subject matter, this book was a bit "heavier" than what I'm used to reading, though it's not TOO heavy. As the White Rose group was fighting against the racism prevalent in the era - seeking a pure Aryan race, there were a lot of conversations and sentiments that were particularly reminiscent of what's happening in the US right now after the recent death of George Floyd. I was able to relate a lot to how the group was feeling. Belonging to the race that is claiming superiority, but wanting to broadcast that it's not at all superior. I appreciated the differing viewpoints throughout the book and the fact that Ms. Barratt combined some of the outlying members of the White Rose to be represented in her fictional characters of Annaliese Brandt and Kirk Hoffman. The other viewpoint was Sophie Scholl, whose journals offered insight to the author on her thoughts, feelings and character. I think it is difficult to write about real-life historical figures, but I believe Ms. Barratt did an admirable job in this instance. One of the things I love most about historical fiction is the ability to teach me something different or to see a different perspective of well known historical events. This book did both of those things and I loved learning about this group who fought back against their own countrymen with the written word. I would strongly recommend this one to any fans of historical (particularly WWII) fiction. Special thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an e-copy of this book. I was under no obligation to write a positive review and the thoughts contained herein are my own.
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  • Michelle Kidwell
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose ResistsA Novel of the German Students Who Defied Hitlerby Amanda BarrattIndependent Publishers GroupKregel PublicationsChristianPub Date 26 May 2020I am reviewing a copy of The White Rose Resists through Independent Publishers GroupKregel PublicationsSophie Scholl and Annalise Brandt are brave women who are willing to stand up for what they believe even at the cost of their lives.At first the idea of a New Germany had Sophie Scholl in a maelstrom of patriotic fervor. But when she The White Rose ResistsA Novel of the German Students Who Defied Hitlerby Amanda BarrattIndependent Publishers GroupKregel PublicationsChristianPub Date 26 May 2020I am reviewing a copy of The White Rose Resists through Independent Publishers GroupKregel PublicationsSophie Scholl and Annalise Brandt are brave women who are willing to stand up for what they believe even at the cost of their lives.At first the idea of a New Germany had Sophie Scholl in a maelstrom of patriotic fervor. But when she realizes the truth behind Hitler's machinations for the fatherland. Now she and some of the other students in Munich, the cradle of the Nazi goverment came together to form a group to fight for the tru itth: the White Rose. The group risks everything in order to print and distribute leaflets that ask for Germans to rise up up against the evil that has taken hold of their country, the White Rose treads a knife's edge of discovery by the Gestapo.Annalise Brandt was attending to the University of Munich to study art she had no intention to get wrapped up in a conspiracy. Annalise was after all the daughter of an SS officer who had been brought up to believe that the Fuher's leadership was divinely appointed. But as she learned more from her friends, the more she questions the Nazi Propoganda.Before long Annalise joins the ranks of her friends, student by day, resister by night. When the stakes increase. They are all forced to confront the deadly consequences meted out to any who dare to oppose the Reich.I give The White Rose Resists five out of five stars!Happy Reading!
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  • Denice
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose Resists by Amanda BarrattSynopsis : The ideal of a new Germany swept up Sophie Scholl in a maelstrom of patriotic fervor - - that is, until she realized the truth behind Hitler's machinations for the fatherland. Now she and other student's in Munich, the cradle of the Nazi government, have banded together to form a group to fight for the truth: the White Rose. Risking everything to print and distribution leaflets calling Germans to ride up against the evil permeating their country The White Rose Resists by Amanda BarrattSynopsis : The ideal of a new Germany swept up Sophie Scholl in a maelstrom of patriotic fervor - - that is, until she realized the truth behind Hitler's machinations for the fatherland. Now she and other student's in Munich, the cradle of the Nazi government, have banded together to form a group to fight for the truth: the White Rose. Risking everything to print and distribution leaflets calling Germans to ride up against the evil permeating their country, the White Rose threads a knives edge of discovery by the Gestapo.My thought's : I have to begin by saying, this book about Sophie Scholl was a page turner, remarkable story line and intriguing. the book isn't just about Sophie, but about a group of friends. The author is able to make you feel like you are part of the book. What a remarkable group of young people whom had the courage to stand up for what they believed in. To go against the most horrible man in history. To know what might happen to them if they were caught. They stood on their beliefs, with God as their anchor.Thinking through this book, I don't know if I would have been able to do what they did. Would I be able to stand up for what I believe and know that no matter how hard thing's got God is with me and has a plan for everything.Recommend : I will recommend this book to friend's and family though Amazon, Bookbud, Netgalley, Barnes and Noble, Facebook, Goodread and my blog.Rating : 5 out of 5Disclaimer : I received this complimentary e-book copy from the author and publisher for a honest review. All thoughts and feelings are mine.
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