Seven Lies
It all started with just one little lie. But we all know that it never ends there. Because, of course, one lie leads to another…Growing up, Jane and Marnie shared everything. They knew the other’s deep-est secrets. They wouldn’t have had it any other way. But when Marnie falls in love, things begin to change.Because Jane has a secret: she loathes Marnie’s wealthy, priggish husband. So when Marnie asks if she likes him, Jane tells her first lie. After all, even best friends keep some things to themselves. If she had been honest, then perhaps her best friend’s husband might still be alive today…For, of course, it’s not the last lie. In fact, it’s only the beginning…Seven Lies is Jane’s confession of the truth—her truth. Compelling, sophisticated, chilling, it’s a seductive, hypnotic page-turner about the tangled, toxic friendships between women, the dark underbelly of obsession and what we stand to lose in the name of love.“A dark, gripping story with one of the most interesting and compelling narrators I’ve ever encountered. Highly recommended!”-Shari Lapena, the New York Times bestselling author of The Couple Next Door

Seven Lies Details

TitleSeven Lies
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 16th, 2020
PublisherPamela Dorman Books
ISBN-139781984879714
Rating
GenreThriller, Mystery

Seven Lies Review

  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    WOW! Seven Lies is a twisted psychological thriller and I could not get enough of it! This book will keep you guessing until the very end. I was shocked at what I was reading at times. This was a fantastic and original plot - highly recommend.How do I even start to explain what it is about? It is a story of love, friendship, obsession, grief and jealously, among other things. Jane and Marnie have been friends forever and Jane wants it stay that way. when Marnie meets Charles the worst comes out WOW! Seven Lies is a twisted psychological thriller and I could not get enough of it! This book will keep you guessing until the very end. I was shocked at what I was reading at times. This was a fantastic and original plot - highly recommend.How do I even start to explain what it is about? It is a story of love, friendship, obsession, grief and jealously, among other things. Jane and Marnie have been friends forever and Jane wants it stay that way. when Marnie meets Charles the worst comes out in Jane. She does not like him at all and is scared of losing her best friend. This is when the lies begin.. and they escalate from there. She is determined to keep her relationship with Marnie as strong as ever, she has nothing else in her life. and she will do anything for her best friend. It is dark and funny and very entertaining.This is Elizabeth Kay's debut novel and I believe that the TV rights are being fought over. I cannot wait to see what she has in store for us next.Thank you Hachette Books Australia for my advanced copy of this book.
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  • Ceecee
    January 1, 1970
    Phew, what a debut! Jane and Marnie have been friends since they met on the first day of Year Seven. They are bound together tightly in a delightful friendship which is strained once Charles enters Marnies life. Charles likes to be the centre of attention and he takes Marnies attention away from Jane. What unfolds in this gripping, tense novel at times beggars belief as Jane tells her seven lies which become increasingly audacious. I love the way the story is written which I think is very Phew, what a debut! Jane and Marnie have been friends since they met on the first day of Year Seven. They are bound together tightly in a delightful friendship which is strained once Charles enters Marnie’s life. Charles likes to be the centre of attention and he takes Marnie’s attention away from Jane. What unfolds in this gripping, tense novel at times beggars belief as Jane tells her seven lies which become increasingly audacious. I love the way the story is written which I think is very original. You feel as if Jane is talking to you, that you are actually having a conversation in which she tell you her truth, which may not necessarily be the truth. I could describe this book as being a bit like a bowl of minestrone as it too has a lot of tasty ingredients. There’s love and grief, friendship and obsession, secrets and lies, jealousy and possession, need and protectiveness, there’s murder and some remorse, chuck in a bit of black humour, a few sinister moments and loads of tension - there’s are several scenes where you could cut the atmosphere with a knife. The two main characters are intriguing. Marnie is light and Jane is twisted and dark, they are so different but perhaps this is what keeps the embers of their friendship alive for so long. There are some excellent descriptions and conversations as Jane’s story emerges and some of it is jaw dropping and astonishing. I love the way the lies are slowly released and the story builds to its breathtaking conclusion. Overall, a fantastic and fast paced read which intrigues you from start to finish and an outstanding debut. Thanks to NetGalley and Little Brown Group for the ARC.
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  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    Another disturbing, gripping, character-driven and impressively well-written debut centered around two close friends dysfunctional, overly obsessive and unhealthy relationship! How far you go for sharing your sacred relationship with your friend? Marnie and Jane grew up together. Jane is dark and intense one who may do anything to protect her friend from the dangerous guys trying to hurt or abuse her! Marnie is the joyful, friendly, easy going person who may be naïve to believe in peoples Another disturbing, gripping, character-driven and impressively well-written debut centered around two close friends’ dysfunctional, overly obsessive and unhealthy relationship! How far you go for sharing your sacred relationship with your friend? Marnie and Jane grew up together. Jane is dark and intense one who may do anything to protect her friend from the dangerous guys trying to hurt or abuse her! Marnie is the joyful, friendly, easy going person who may be naïve to believe in people’s manipulations. Jane told seven lies to her friend starting with her thoughts about Marnie’s husband. She never likes him and she thinks she did something terrible to her at the wedding night. But she is not reliable witness, is she? Because she already told too much lies to her best friend to protect her from the beginning but what if she told them to prevent her what kind of person she really is. This is well-developed, smart and outstandingly nerve bending debut! Jane is the master of manipulation and her narration was original, decisive, cunning and addictive. You know she is batshit crazy from the beginning but you surprisingly connect her easily because the way she tells the story like you’re having a coffee talk and get permission to be in her head to learn more about her inner thoughts were fascinatingly entertaining and thrilling. She reaches our dark sides of personalities and pushes deeper to face with our own inner demons and makes us question what would we do in we were in her shoes! She might be liar, killer, manipulator or delusional. We don’t know it yet. We just have to listen to her story till the end and keep our judgments and opinions to ourselves. I liked the author’s different and creative writing style and I’m looking forward to read more works of her.
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  • Nenia ❤️️ I hate everything you love ❤️️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    I'm all about books about dark family secrets yaaaass
  • Nicki
    January 1, 1970
    Will you walk into my parlour said the spider to the flyJane and Marnie have been inseparable since they met on their first day at secondary school. Their friendship as strong as the threads of a spiders web,even after they both got married in their twenties.But Jane hates Marnie's husband Charles,to her he is a loud,obnoxious bully and is the reason why the threads of her and Marnie's friendship are starting to fray and come apart.Then tragedy strikes and Marnie needs her best friend again,the Will you walk into my parlour said the spider to the flyJane and Marnie have been inseparable since they met on their first day at secondary school. Their friendship as strong as the threads of a spiders web,even after they both got married in their twenties.But Jane hates Marnie's husband Charles,to her he is a loud,obnoxious bully and is the reason why the threads of her and Marnie's friendship are starting to fray and come apart.Then tragedy strikes and Marnie needs her best friend again,the only person that in Jane's mind she ever needs.But Jane has a secret so feeling that she needs to protect herself,she tells the first of her seven lies. Because if Marnie was to ever uncover the truth,their friendship would be blown apart like a spiders web caught in a storm The events of this mesmerising thriller are voiced entirely from Jane's perspective as she takes us through the history of her and Marnies friendship,her feelings of rejection and acrimonious relashionship with her mother when she was younger. Her happiness during her relationship and marriage to lovely Jonathan,her interactions with with her work colleagues,her sister Emma and her mother who is now in a nursing home suffering from dementia. Her interactions with Marnie and Charles and the reasons behind each of her seven lies. The story is written in a way that makes it appear as if Jane is telling her story to you,the reader something that adds a feeling of intimacy to this gripping story. Jane was a complex character who had some very serious mental issues,this woman's narratives and thoughts were seriously chilling and creepy,her one redeemable quality was her concern for her sister who also had serious issues. It was a shame that none of the chapters were voiced by Marnie,it would have been interesting to read her thoughts on Jane and their friendship and have the opportunity to get to know her character better. There was a character named Valerie who was a reporter and had a significant role in this story. I did have mixed feelings about her,one one hand I thought she was nasty and obnoxious but on the other hand,I really really wanted her to succeed in her quest to expose Jane's lies.Seven Lies is a seriously creepy,tightly plotted,gripping debut thriller that had me hooked in from the first page. I really didn't want to put this brilliant book down and didn't want to go to bed until I had finished it but unfortunately my old eyes had other ideas. The story was still playing on my mind before I fell asleep and was the first thing that I thought of after I woke up which,when it comes down to books is something that doesn't happen to me very often. This well written story covers a number of mental health issues which the author has written about with care and sensitivity,it also covers different aspects of stalking,both in person and on social media. A sinister sense of foreboding permeates the pages of this enthralling thriller,a sense that gradually builds as the story unfolds. I really loved this amazing book and look forward to reading more of this author's books in the future. Worth far more than five stars and definitely one of my favourite reads of this year. Very very highly recommended.
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  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    Jane and Marnie have been friends for a long time but Jane does not like Marines husband and this situation leads to lies and deception.Unfortunately I could not relate to the characters in this book and the story didnt hold my interest.Thanks you to NetGalley and Little, Brown Book Group UK for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review. Jane and Marnie have been friends for a long time but Jane does not like Marine’s husband and this situation leads to lies and deception.Unfortunately I could not relate to the characters in this book and the story didn’t hold my interest.Thanks you to NetGalley and Little, Brown Book Group UK for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Fiction Addition Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Seven Lies is a story ultimately of Jane's confession and a narration of telling the truth. But the book is called seven lies and that is exactly what the story tells the tale of... LiesThe seven lies that Jane tells her bestest friend in the whole world.Jane reveals the seven lies and it is only then we begin to understand more about her life. As we were all told as children, one lie leads to another so... when Marnie asks Jane if she likes her new boyfriend - Jane tells her first lie. If she Seven Lies is a story ultimately of Jane's confession and a narration of telling the truth. But the book is called seven lies and that is exactly what the story tells the tale of... LiesThe seven lies that Jane tells her bestest friend in the whole world.Jane reveals the seven lies and it is only then we begin to understand more about her life. As we were all told as children, one lie leads to another so... when Marnie asks Jane if she likes her new boyfriend - Jane tells her first lie. If she had been honest maybe things would be different and he would still be alive to tell a tale.Lots of great creepy moments that would translate into a great movie. The female characters are fantastic, I feel that the male characters needed a little more depth to them.Great twists and turns and a few held breath moments. A story of friendships and how they develop over the decades of life together, how dynamics change when friends become married and have children. How a best friend can be your Mum and Dad and whole family rolled into one and then a husband comes along and changes that relationship...A well written debut novel, touches on obsession, grief and jealousy great narration from Jane. Some missing depth in the other characters. A quick and easy paced book that moved along at a great pace. Great for a beach read, a long train journey or sat curled up while the rain pours down over a weekend. I will watch Elizabeth Kay with interest. Thank you Netgalley for the ARC
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Seven Lies started with a bang and the protagonist voice was genuinely compelling- beautiful writing and an excellent, quirkily dark undertone.I enjoyed it all the way but can't help but feel it didn't pull off the premise- if I was writing a three word review it would be "Almost, not quite"This is almost a story about toxic friendship but not quite.This is almost a story about grief but not quite. This is almost a tense psychological thriller but not quite. I honestly felt that it fizzled out Seven Lies started with a bang and the protagonist voice was genuinely compelling- beautiful writing and an excellent, quirkily dark undertone.I enjoyed it all the way but can't help but feel it didn't pull off the premise- if I was writing a three word review it would be "Almost, not quite"This is almost a story about toxic friendship but not quite.This is almost a story about grief but not quite. This is almost a tense psychological thriller but not quite. I honestly felt that it fizzled out into nothing after promising so much. That didn't mean it was a bad book - indeed there are elements here that are brilliant and clever. Overall though for this reader it just fell short of the mark.Almost. Not quite.On the hugely positive side this is likely an author to Watch. I will definitely read future books.
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  • Pheadra
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so good because it combined an intriguing story, interesting characters and talented writing that grabbed my attention and held it till the end. It is a tale of mental health, obsessiveness, unhealthy relationships and loss. It is sad on so many levels. The character of Jane(the main protagonist) who has some very endearing qualities, but after suffering the loss of her father (when he abandons the family), her mother (to dementia), her husband (to a tragic accident) her sister(to This book was so good because it combined an intriguing story, interesting characters and talented writing that grabbed my attention and held it till the end. It is a tale of mental health, obsessiveness, unhealthy relationships and loss. It is sad on so many levels. The character of Jane(the main protagonist) who has some very endearing qualities, but after suffering the loss of her father (when he abandons the family), her mother (to dementia), her husband (to a tragic accident) her sister(to anorexia) and her best friend Marnie(to life and what it throws at us) unravels into a dangerous, obsessive and compulsive liar. I didn't or rather couldn't keep track of the number of lies she told but like a spider spinning a web that entraps itself, one lie has by necessity lead to another. Without wanting to include any spoilers some of the paragraphs were worth re-reading because they were so poignant- "You extricate yourself from your family and then from your friends, limb by limb, bone by bone memory by memory as your one becomes part of a different two, part of a romantic love. I thought that was it: the final stage. I didn't see that the pattern repeats one last time. That it isn't a thread, but a circle, that one stage feeds into the next, until you end up standing in the spot where you started: that it returns, again, to family. You craft new limbs and new bones and you are not one person any more because, this time you truly are two....your heart is now two hearts and one of them is always somewhere else." A well deserved 5 stars for the writing alone.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    One word came to mind right after I finished this novel 'Diabolical'. It was outrageously wicked and so incredibly clever. Jane and Marnie are the best of friends. They have known each other since school and they were inseparable. But then they both fell in love and married. Secretly, Jane never liked Marnie's husband. But she has lied. As we are told from the synopsis and at the beginning, if Jane had been honest, Marnie's husband may still be alive. The story was told from Jane's point of view One word came to mind right after I finished this novel 'Diabolical'. It was outrageously wicked and so incredibly clever. Jane and Marnie are the best of friends. They have known each other since school and they were inseparable. But then they both fell in love and married. Secretly, Jane never liked Marnie's husband. But she has lied. As we are told from the synopsis and at the beginning, if Jane had been honest, Marnie's husband may still be alive. The story was told from Jane's point of view and she outlines the seven lies. While her friendship is built on love, there are so many secrets and this tale is one of a dark obsession. This had me captivated throughout and it was such a fast paced novel for me, which I LOVE. While I felt I knew what was to come in some parts, I did not see it going in the direction that it did. Such a fantastic novel and one I definitely recommend. Can't wait for more by this author. Thanks so much to Hachette Australia for this advance review copy.
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  • Linda Harris
    January 1, 1970
    Dark and twisted the blurb said ! Well that exactly what it is with ANOTHER Obnoxious character,can't get away from them at the moment !,! A good page turner . Well worth a read
  • A.M.G. ☮Hippie/Fantasia☮
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3.5 / 5So...*deep breath* let's talk about subtlety for a moment, shall we? The dictionary definition(s) read as follows: "delicacy or nicety of character or meaning / acuteness or penetration of mind; delicacy of discrimination / a fine-drawn distinction; refinement of reasoning:". From this, I would like to point out the "acuteness or penetration of mind" part of the definition and expand on that as it pertain to a literary work.The whole point of being subtle, as I'm sure all readers Rating: 3.5 / 5So...*deep breath* let's talk about subtlety for a moment, shall we? The dictionary definition(s) read as follows: "delicacy or nicety of character or meaning / acuteness or penetration of mind; delicacy of discrimination / a fine-drawn distinction; refinement of reasoning:". From this, I would like to point out the "acuteness or penetration of mind" part of the definition and expand on that as it pertain to a literary work.The whole point of being subtle, as I'm sure all readers and writers are aware, is so as to be a mixture of cryptic and expository, to present things in such a way that they're not too hidden but not too obvious either. They are "acute" in the penetration of the mind of the reader, and really get the reader to think in order to understand the many layers of information that the author is presenting to us. It's a middle line that's very thin and difficult to walk, so for any authors that even attempt it, regardless of whether they succeed or not, I think that there's due credit in store.However, it's only the ones who succeed in subtleties that can truly be regarded as geniuses of their genre and of their writing style, and unfortunately, Elizabeth Kay is not one of those geniuses--or, at least, she has not proven herself to be as such in this novel.What do I mean by this? Why, I'm glad you asked!--Tone. Narrative tone and voice. To reveal not only who the narrator/protagonist is, but also what their agenda is (if applicable), what we can expect from their narrative, and, via subtleties, whether they are trying to get the reader to think or perceive things in a certain way. This is something consistent in almost all first person POV narratives, and, in a thriller/drama/mystery, because it is also a limiting element, it increases the tension all the more and is an excellent narrative choice.If done properly, it engages the reader to such an extent that we overlook things like consistencies, sanity, and whether what they're reading is reliable information or not. Those of us who have studied literature, whether academically or otherwise, will be familiar with the unreliable narrator. Not just the term, but as a persona within the literary realm itself, someone that most people will shy away from due to the ambiguity of the content, whereas others are fascinated by this persona and wish to dissect it down to the bone and marrow composition. In any case, it's a tricky person to admit having as your narrator.Now, some try to make an unreliable narrator seem reliable by having them be a neutral party in the story they are telling--i.e. Nick Carraway in The Great Gatsby, whereas others can claim some form of innocence--i.e. Jem from To Kill a Mockingbird--or insanity--i.e. Pi from Life of Pi to make themselves seem reliable--or, at least, to excuse the aspect of their unreliability in narratives that, like it or not, readers just have to take their word for. In the end, perhaps the unreliable narrator does not matter so much since we don't get any other narrative voices anyway. (Some rare instances, like in Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone and The Woman in White do accomplish this, but we're talking here about a master whose mysteries are not diminished by this, but rather aided by it. Don't ask me how he does it, because I don't know; I just appreciate and love it.)But then there are those rare instances of a narrator who doesn't care so much about unreliability, but rather about sympathy. The best example of this is none other than Humbert Humbert from Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, whom I like to particularly point out as a unique narrator that not only engages the reader in a direct dialogue, addressing the reader as "you", but also tries from start to finish to elicit sympathy for the story and for his actions, painting what is basically a twisted obsession as a tragic love story.I bring up Mr. Humbert in particular because he is the character that I kept thinking of while reading through the narrative of this novel. The unreliable narrator, Jane, is similar to Humbert in both of the aforementioned aspects, justifying everything she thinks and does into a love story between friends. If anyone happens to read both books, even back to back, I guarantee you'll feel the similarity of the narrative voice.However, whereas Nabokov was an unquestioned master of subtleties, that is precisely where Ms. Kay fails. Not only are Jane's justifications and thoughts too straightforward and direct, but she literally tries to "guess" what the reader will think and then tell them exactly what to think otherwise. Rather than be clever or elicit the sympathy that she's so obviously going for, I think this diminishes any tension or suspense from the story and thus make the story itself fall...well, rather flat.Now, I'll grant you that I'm not the biggest fan of Lolita--in fact, I tried reading it several times all the way through and each time got bored somewhere in the middle and had to stop--but I will give Nabokov the due credit he deserves as a brilliant writer and master of subtle prose. While Ms. Kay held my attention for the majority of this story though, that's about all I can say. My attention was held, but no excitement encouraged, no tense moments, no sympathy elicited, and no general caring for what happened to the narrator. There was simply no...substance to it besides the premise, and "a dark gripping novel" it most certainly was not.However, despite this, I still round it up to four stars because it is not an average 3-star read for me. Three stars is generally where I cap off something that's completely average and forgettable, generally something I'd forget as soon as (and if) I finish it. While Seven Lies was borderline into that category though, in the end I decided that because it held enough of my attention for me to get through it fairly quickly, I'd sooner round it up than down. Call it a spurt of generosity on my part, perhaps.As for recommendations, I guess I'd recommend it to all fans novels in general, but I'd hesitate to call it a "thriller" or "suspenseful" or anything like that. Take a try at it if you'd like, but I wouldn't say it's a mandatory must-have or anything. Better than average, but only just.
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  • Fay Flude
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, what a book! A very definite 5 star read for me from the incredibly talented Elizabeth Kay.Jane, the main character in Seven Lies, is an extremely dark and complex narrator with hidden glimmers of light and a personality that is absolutely fascinating.She is recounting her relationship with Marnie, whom she confesses is the light to her dark. They met at secondary school and their 12 year old selves bonded in a close and unwavering friendship which led them into their twenties and beyond. Wow, what a book! A very definite 5 star read for me from the incredibly talented Elizabeth Kay.Jane, the main character in Seven Lies, is an extremely dark and complex narrator with hidden glimmers of light and a personality that is absolutely fascinating.She is recounting her relationship with Marnie, whom she confesses is the light to her dark. They met at secondary school and their 12 year old selves bonded in a close and unwavering friendship which led them into their twenties and beyond.Elizabeth Kay's prose is both poetic and profound. With one small word she can convey a lifetime of thoughts, feelings and desires. The plot is original and intriguing. It is tense, dark and at times nail biting.Jane is admitting to each lie with a detachment that is telling but what we don't know for the majority of the novel is WHO Jane is talking to.This is a story about love and the lengths one can go to if that love is twisted out of shape and damaged beyond all recognition. What makes the read so chilling is that some very dark perspectives and reactions are hidden beneath a veneer of normality and respectability as well as breathtaking arrogance.Other characters, such as anorexic sister Emma and a dementia ridden, care home bound Mum enable the reader to delve deeper into Jane's psyche whilst adding to the pervading sense of tragedy, abandonment and loneliness.With a truly fantastic ending, I cannot recommend this book to other readers enough! It deserves to do extremely well upon publication so get reading and reviewing folks!
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  • Fiction Addition Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Seven Lies is a story ultimately of Jane's confession and a narration of telling the truth. But the book is called seven lies and that is exactly what the story tells the tale of... LiesThe seven lies that Jane tells her bestest friend in the whole world.Jane reveals the seven lies and it is only then we begin to understand more about her life. As we were all told as children, one lie leads to another so... when Marnie asks Jane if she likes her new boyfriend - Jane tells her first lie. If she Seven Lies is a story ultimately of Jane's confession and a narration of telling the truth. But the book is called seven lies and that is exactly what the story tells the tale of... LiesThe seven lies that Jane tells her bestest friend in the whole world.Jane reveals the seven lies and it is only then we begin to understand more about her life. As we were all told as children, one lie leads to another so... when Marnie asks Jane if she likes her new boyfriend - Jane tells her first lie. If she had been honest maybe things would be different and he would still be alive to tell a tale.Lots of great creepy moments that would translate into a great movie. The female characters are fantastic, I feel that the male characters needed a little more depth to them.Great twists and turns and a few held breath moments. A story of friendships and how they develop over the decades of life together, how dynamics change when friends become married and have children. How a best friend can be your Mum and Dad and whole family rolled into one and then a husband comes along and changes that relationship... A well written debut novel, touches on obsession, grief and jealousy great narration from Jane. Some missing depth in the other characters. A quick and easy paced book that moved along at a great pace. Great for a beach read, a long train journey or sat curled up while the rain pours down over a weekend. I will watch Elizabeth Kay with interest. Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.
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  • Anbolyn
    January 1, 1970
    A complete waste of my time.
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    This book sadly just wasn't for me. It had so many plotlines and the author clearly wanted to comment on a lot of things (eating disorders, sexual assault, siblings, parental relationships, dementia, early widowhood etc) but they were just random and didn't sit alongside the main story at all. The book was overly ambitious and as a result of wanting to encompass so many things, it failed at being a mystery/suspense at all. I also thought there was too much done to make our narrator Jane feel This book sadly just wasn't for me. It had so many plotlines and the author clearly wanted to comment on a lot of things (eating disorders, sexual assault, siblings, parental relationships, dementia, early widowhood etc) but they were just random and didn't sit alongside the main story at all. The book was overly ambitious and as a result of wanting to encompass so many things, it failed at being a mystery/suspense at all. I also thought there was too much done to make our narrator Jane feel like she was the deadly creepy type if she could have showed us rather than telling us that would have been fine. But her progression into this character didn't feel real, her final act would have been ridiculous and no way would she have gotten away with it. The biggest gap in this book was the journalist, are we expected to believe a woman who dug so much into this just walks away like that? Why on earth wouldn't Marnie go to her after once she knew the real story? This part was so incredibly far-fetched that it was amusing, then frustrating. The journalist character she constructed had more grit in her to just walk away and it is a "oh I'm jealous you've kept long-term friends" thing. I'll be doing a review on my YouTube channel for the month of November talking more about this book and where it fell for me as I do feel bad writing this review here. Review video can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LwjD...Overall it just wasn't for me, the character development was lacking, too much wanted to be done and the plot was uninteresting and weaved in with more uninteresting characters.
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  • Miriam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Jane and Marnie have been inseparable since they were twelve years old. In their twenties, they both married handsome young men. Years later, Jane and Marnie are still best friends - and both men are dead......Publishing industry employee Elizabeth Kay has turned her hand to writing and has written her debut novel Seven Lies about obsessive friendships and how poisonous they can become when jealousy slowly seeps in. It did take me quite a while to engage with this book and it was well over half “Jane and Marnie have been inseparable since they were twelve years old. In their twenties, they both married handsome young men. Years later, Jane and Marnie are still best friends - and both men are dead......”Publishing industry employee Elizabeth Kay has turned her hand to writing and has written her debut novel “Seven Lies” about obsessive friendships and how poisonous they can become when jealousy slowly seeps in. It did take me quite a while to engage with this book and it was well over half way by the time Jane’s voice got into my head and I became fully invested in the story. Focusing heavily on female friendships and covering sensitive issues like dementia, grief, miscarriage and anorexia, this story contained a lot of things for you to think about and I thought all the sensitive and emotional areas were written very sympathetically. I particularly felt endeared to Jane’s sister, Emma, with her eating disorder and truly felt Jane’s concerns. To be honest, not a great deal happens and the story is intensely slow, with the narrative being told solely through Jane, in a unique and at times quite chilling voice. However, she does have a remarkable way of making you think she is talking directly to you and that is a part of the ingenious plot around the ‘seven lies’. Jane is remarkably unrealiable as a narrator but she knows she is and so do you, as each lie is explained along the way. A story of when friendship becomes an obsession, it is well worth a read and I would happily read more by Elizabeth in the future and I wish her well with her debut novel. 3 stars
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    When it is snowy and cold outside (and my car is buried under 2ft of ❄ ), superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book and many more today. LOLI requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸.It all started with When it is snowy and cold outside (and my car is buried under 2ft of ❄️ ), superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOLI requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸.It all started with just one little lie. But we all know that it never ends there. Because, of course, one lie leads to another...Growing up, Jane and Marnie shared everything. They knew the other's deepest secrets. They wouldn't have had it any other way. But when Marnie falls in love, things begin to change. Because Jane has a secret: she loathes Marnie's wealthy, priggish husband. So when Marnie asks if she likes him, Jane tells her first lie. After all, even best friends keep some things to themselves. If she had been honest, then perhaps her best friend's husband might still be alive today...For, of course, it's not the last lie. In fact, it's only the beginning...Seven Lies is Jane's confession of the truth--her truth. Compelling, sophisticated, chilling, it's a seductive, hypnotic page-turner about the tangled, toxic friendships between women, the dark underbelly of obsession and what we stand to lose in the name of love.What a fabulous book!!! I inhaled it in one fell swoop - I don't have any life-long friends but I can see how this dynamic would work with one little lie starting it all off. But is Jane's truth the actual truth? Or Marnie's? Well, I am not going to give you one tiny clue about what happens in this incredibly written book - you will have to take it to the beach and find out for yourself. Be sure to pack lots of sun screen as you will be there until you finish it. Can I call it? FIRST BEACH READ OF 2020!!!!As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🌊 🏖️🐚👙🐟
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  • Latkins
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe Ive read too many psychological thrillers, but I found this one a bit disappointing. Narrated by Jane, she details her long friendship with Marnie, from their meeting at school to the present day, when theyre in the late 20s. From the beginning she reveals that shes told Marnie seven lies, and each section reveals one more. You know from the outset that Jane hates Marnies husband Charles, and also that Charles is dead. So its quite easy to guess whats going to happen. Once youre about Maybe I’ve read too many psychological thrillers, but I found this one a bit disappointing. Narrated by Jane, she details her long friendship with Marnie, from their meeting at school to the present day, when they’re in the late 20s. From the beginning she reveals that she’s told Marnie seven lies, and each section reveals one more. You know from the outset that Jane hates Marnie’s husband Charles, and also that Charles is dead. So it’s quite easy to guess what’s going to happen. Once you’re about halfway through, it’s also easy to guess who the book is addressed to, so there were no real surprises at the end. I was unconvinced by Jane and Marnie’s friendship, which provides the backbone of the book – other than Jane herself, and perhaps her younger sister Emma, none of the characters were very well-realised to me. The male characters in particular, Charles and Jonathan, were rather stereotypical with no depth. Kay does write well about family relations, between Jane and Emma and also between Jane and her mum, who has dementia. This is one of those books that’s frustrating to read at first, because it’s full of portents, and hints that something dramatic has happened, without telling you what it is, and yet making it easy to guess. Many times I thought ‘just get on with it!’. So when it does describe what happened, it’s a bit of a let-down. If you take away the forced suspense, which is no suspense at all really, it’s a rather boring tale of a woman with a pretty boring life. It’s not a bad book, but not quite the suspenseful read it’s billed as being.Spoiler AlertThere were a few things which I thought were a bit silly. Firstly, the journalist – she had pretty much no evidence, so why was Jane so rattled by her? And why did she spend so much time on this one story? Secondly, the bit with Jane’s mum in the home when she mentions the key and her mum knows what she’s done. I didn’t understand that, as Jane told her that she didn’t have the key at the time… so why did she think that she did have the key when she mentioned it?
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Some books absolutely deserve a round of applause, and THIS is one of them. A golden thread of pure anticipation runs through the entire story, hemming its edges and forming discernible patterns by adding and subtracting specially targeted stitches to create the perfectly formed tapestry that is Seven Lies.It consists of a candid monologue, flawlessly directed, and the measured and effective delivery of these seven acts was astonishingly good.Wave upon wave of revelation rips through the pages Some books absolutely deserve a round of applause, and THIS is one of them. A golden thread of pure anticipation runs through the entire story, hemming its edges and forming discernible patterns by adding and subtracting specially targeted stitches to create the perfectly formed tapestry that is Seven Lies.It consists of a candid monologue, flawlessly directed, and the measured and effective delivery of these seven ‘acts’ was astonishingly good.Wave upon wave of revelation rips through the pages to crash upon its intended audience of one with a powerful and unsettling roar. In fact, there were a couple of places where my eyebrows physically couldn’t get any higher, and that’s only because they were still attached to my face. Yes, it was that good. It possessed an addictive quality that left me hungry for more from this author and was utterly, utterly brilliant. BRAVO.(I received a digital copy of this title courtesy of the publisher via Netgalley, which it was my pleasure to voluntarily read, review, and HIGHLY recommend!)
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  • Mags Schofield
    January 1, 1970
    Amazingle sensitive writing by Elizabeth Kay. This book made me cry.Jane and Marnie are both flawed. Jane; as the narrator, had me shouting at the screen. If only her actions matched her sensitive thoughts. She is human. Very human with all her flaws. Coping with the tragic early death of her husband, and 'losing' her mother to dementia, she also has a sister suffering from anorexia. All of these things combine to lead to her warped, thinking and behaviour.At times I cried, especially when we Amazingle sensitive writing by Elizabeth Kay. This book made me cry.Jane and Marnie are both flawed. Jane; as the narrator, had me shouting at the screen. If only her actions matched her sensitive thoughts. She is human. Very human with all her flaws. Coping with the tragic early death of her husband, and 'losing' her mother to dementia, she also has a sister suffering from anorexia. All of these things combine to lead to her warped, thinking and behaviour.At times I cried, especially when we read about her mother's dementia, having recently lost my mother to the same condition.At times I shouted at many of the characters, unable to understand their words, thoughts or actions.At times I held my breath, fearful of what was going to happen.This is so beautifully written that I was totally invested in the characters and the outcome.Thank you Elizabeth Kay and Pigeonhole.
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  • Carol - Reading Writing and Riesling
    January 1, 1970
    A very disconcerting read
  • Catherine Rickard
    January 1, 1970
    This.was a great psychological thriller that kept me guessing until the end. Jane is one twisted character that I was surprised to find I felt sorry for at times. I enjoyed this book and recommend!
  • my bookworm life
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of my stand out favourites of the year so far, everything ticked my boxes and it was such a gripping and entertaining read!. What an amazing and slick debut this one is! i got stuck into it so quickly and it just held my attention so firmly all the way throughout. There were so many moments that were straight out of a brilliant thriller film or tv drama, and so many moments that honestly made me gasp. This is one of those thrillers that got me from the first page and kept me guessing This is one of my stand out favourites of the year so far, everything ticked my boxes and it was such a gripping and entertaining read!. What an amazing and slick debut this one is! i got stuck into it so quickly and it just held my attention so firmly all the way throughout. There were so many moments that were straight out of a brilliant thriller film or tv drama, and so many moments that honestly made me gasp. This is one of those thrillers that got me from the first page and kept me guessing what was possibly going to happen all the way along, the reveals and twists are so well done, just so slick and weaved in so well!. I was lucky enough to be sent a proof copy of this one and the lay out of that copy just added to my enjoyment even more so, it came with little tabs at the side and each tab was titled 'Lie 1' , 'Lie 2' etc all the way to 7 , and then at the start of each one a little blurb from the main characters narrative, this added such a cool element and i really enjoyed it. I read quite a lot of thrillers, so when i read one that has so much atmosphere and is written so well, it really excites me, and makes me one happy bookworm!I highly recommend this one to any thriller fans, it is twisty, it has bags of tension, the characters are brilliant,the main narrator is excellent!!, and it has a really good ending that wrapped it all up so well.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    What can I say about Jane? Her childhood friend, Marnie means the world to her, and Marnie's husband, Charles, not so much. Jane actually loathes him and we may or may not ever understand why. Is it because Jane tragically lost her own husband? Does she resent Marnie's happiness? Or it there something aobut Charles that only Jane can see?Jane, who may well deserve top billing in the unreliable narrator department.tells her tale by sharing the details of seven lies she has told and why she told What can I say about Jane? Her childhood friend, Marnie means the world to her, and Marnie's husband, Charles, not so much. Jane actually loathes him and we may or may not ever understand why. Is it because Jane tragically lost her own husband? Does she resent Marnie's happiness? Or it there something aobut Charles that only Jane can see?Jane, who may well deserve top billing in the unreliable narrator department.tells her tale by sharing the details of seven lies she has told and why she told them. When Jane reveals each lie, we start to understand more and more about her life, and there were certainly some major surprises. There was more than one time I wanted to look away, but I kept reading as this fast paced plot barreled towards the conclusion. A twisted tale and one I throughly enjoyed reading.I received a DRC from Pamela Dorman Books through Edelweiss +.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Im really sorry, but, I didnt like this book at all.Jane has told 7 lies and as she reveals each lie, the book uncovers more about her, her childhood and her relationships. Its a clever premise and had it been a tighter read with more interesting characters, Id probably have enjoyed it. Unfortunately, I found it a slog to get through with a disappointing ending.Im grateful to have had the opportunity to preview, thanks to NetGalley and the publishers and I very much hope the author finds her I’m really sorry, but, I didn’t like this book at all.Jane has told 7 lies and as she reveals each lie, the book uncovers more about her, her childhood and her relationships. It’s a clever premise and had it been a tighter read with more interesting characters, I’d probably have enjoyed it. Unfortunately, I found it a slog to get through with a disappointing ending.I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to preview, thanks to NetGalley and the publishers and I very much hope the author finds her audience, it’s just not me.
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  • Caroline Kerdouci
    January 1, 1970
    What an impressive debut Seven Lies is. Thought provoking, often profound and beautifully written l was absolutely gripped by the storyline. To be able to conjure up a character like Jane Black, the narrator, and bring her to life so convincingly is what makes this one of my favourite reads of this year so far.Jane has seven lies she needs to divulge in what is a chilling and dark thriller that I found so engrossing. She is such a fascinating and intriguing character with an incredibly dubious What an impressive debut Seven Lies is. Thought provoking, often profound and beautifully written l was absolutely gripped by the storyline. To be able to conjure up a character like Jane Black, the narrator, and bring her to life so convincingly is what makes this one of my favourite reads of this year so far.Jane has seven lies she needs to divulge in what is a chilling and dark thriller that I found so engrossing. She is such a fascinating and intriguing character with an incredibly dubious moral compass and seems entirely driven by her need to control situations especially in relation to her best friend Marnie, whom she’s known since the first day of secondary school. It is her obsessive love for her friend that propels the narrative forward, the reader unsure for the majority of the time who is on the receiving end of Jane’s confessions. I love that kind of ambiguity. Lies beget lies and Jane’s levels of deceit know no bounds. When she feels threatened by the arrival of Charles into Marnie’s life and their subsequent marriage, she will do whatever it takes to maintain her number one spot and it makes for some jaw dropping reading.Whilst some readers may find Jane a totally unsavoury character I really developed a soft spot for this woman who is clearly troubled and lonely. (what that says about me as a person is up for debate!) Whether her unbalanced state of mind is due to extreme grief and strained complicated relationships with both her mother and sister is up for the reader to decide. Jane is a bit of a Jekyll and Hyde character in my opinion but I prefer not to dwell wholly on her shortcomings. The author in her writing wants to expose every side of human nature, warts and all, proving our personalities are multi dimensional, some traits/characteristics more or less dominant depending on our upbringings, exposure to stress or tragedy etc. She does this beautifully with many astute observations on life in general which are poetic and profound and so I didn’t find it impossible to have some empathy for our protagonist. On balance whilst you wouldn’t want Jane as your friend, I do think Marnie’s own treatment of her at times borders on callousness, picking her up and putting her down like an unwanted toy, purely on a whim. Bizarrely, I saw Marnie as a spoilt, privileged woman who thought herself so much better than her friend Jane. Maybe if this story was told from Marnie’s perspective also I would have a different opinion of her character entirely. Obviously with only Jane retelling her story there will always be that element of bias, her own memories distorted to suit her own version of the truth.Exploring themes of obsessive love, loss and mental health Seven Lies has a plot that is taut and very well constructed with the question of whether or not Jane’s lies will be exposed constantly in the balance. By adding journalist Valerie into the equation will all wrongs be righted or will Jane’s behaviour continue to go unchecked? Maybe some readers will be disappointed with the ending but for me it was absolutely perfect and I cannot wait to see what this author will deliver next!! I cannot recommend this thriller highly enough and I will most definitely be spreading the word to all book lovers. My thanks as always to the publisher and Netgalley for giving me the opportunity to read.
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  • Veronika Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    I would have given this 5 stars but it took me quite a while to get into. I could not identify at all with either of the main characters - Jane with her obsession with Marnie - and of course Marnie herself. I've probably never been the sort of person who has known this kind of friendship. I still see people from school (though my friends now are not the ones who were my best friends then). We've grown apart over the years and in some cases I don't even like them much. But I know people who are I would have given this 5 stars but it took me quite a while to get into. I could not identify at all with either of the main characters - Jane with her obsession with Marnie - and of course Marnie herself. I've probably never been the sort of person who has known this kind of friendship. I still see people from school (though my friends now are not the ones who were my best friends then). We've grown apart over the years and in some cases I don't even like them much. But I know people who are still best friends with their schoolmates but they give each other room to breathe. Jane has an expectation of friendship that goes beyond normal. Everything in her life revolves around her best friend. She also has issues with her mother who always favoured her younger sister Emma, now anorexic (though we are never really sure what triggered it). Jane's mum suffers with early onset dementia and Jane visits her once a week. Out of duty? Not sure why. Their issues are unresolved but Jane makes no effort to resolve them. When she tells her mother about the sad or cruel things that have happened, she seems to do it out of spite. There was no need to tell her at all.The one part that I didn't get is how Jane switches her love temporarily to her husband Jonathan, but can't understand when Marnie falls in love and gets married. Jane hates Marnie's partner Charles with a vengeance. He's a bit of an arrogant prat but that's Jane's version as she sees it. Charles has replaced her in Marnie's life and Jane is insanely jealous. People get married Jane, and putting their family first becomes the new 'normal'.The writing and emotions portrayed are wonderful and beautifully written but I still struggled to find sympathy for Jane. She has no empathy with any of the other characters such as her sister Emma and at the end I felt there were a couple of strands left unresolved such as the introduction of journalist Valerie. But we do get to discover who Jane is 'talking to' and that part will have you holding your breath till you gasp out loud.A great story though and many thanks to The Pigeonhole, my fellow Pigeons and the author for making this such an enjoyable read.
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  • Ali Kennedy
    January 1, 1970
    The writing in this book is incredibly insightful and accomplished. The author has a way of describing things that made me just stop and think oh yeeeahhh thats so true.The plot is mainly driven by the characters; namely Jane our narrator and her best friend Marnie. I felt like I was on a rollercoaster with them - one minute hating Jane and feeling sorry for Marnie and then vice versa. Both women are so flawed but incredibly complex, realistic characters. There are some other supporting The writing in this book is incredibly insightful and accomplished. The author has a way of describing things that made me just stop and think “oh yeeeahhh that’s so true”.The plot is mainly driven by the characters; namely Jane our narrator and her best friend Marnie. I felt like I was on a rollercoaster with them - one minute hating Jane and feeling sorry for Marnie and then vice versa. Both women are so flawed but incredibly complex, realistic characters. There are some other supporting characters such as their respective husbands, and Jane’s mother and sister. We only really get to know a bit about her sister Emma but the supporting characters are all viewed through how they impact on Jane rather than in their own right so you don’t really get to know them too well.Without spoiling anything, the ending was interesting and satisfying but has left me wanting to revisit these characters. I was left with a few questions about their friendship though.. things like why Marnie wasn’t at Jane’s wedding if she was so important to her and then why Jane doesn’t call Marnie in a time of need.I read this through The Pigeonhole so perhaps the daily installments kept me intrigued as it is an intense book to read in long sittings.I cannot wait to read more from this author as her style is so beautiful. Thanks to The Pigeonhole for bringing this author to my attention!
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  • Naomi (aplace_inthesun)
    January 1, 1970
    Seven Lies is a story about Jane and her pre-occupation (obsession) with her friend Marnie. That and her seething hatred for Marnie's husband Charles. Jane and Marnie meet during high school and though it doesn't appear to be anything out of the realms of ordinary friendship, Jane's narrative soon flags that there is something amiss and irregular about it all. And the end result is Charles is dead, and but for Jane he would have lived. Marnie just doesn't know it.This book starts with a gallop Seven Lies is a story about Jane and her pre-occupation (obsession) with her friend Marnie. That and her seething hatred for Marnie's husband Charles. Jane and Marnie meet during high school and though it doesn't appear to be anything out of the realms of ordinary friendship, Jane's narrative soon flags that there is something amiss and irregular about it all. And the end result is Charles is dead, and but for Jane he would have lived. Marnie just doesn't know it.This book starts with a gallop and promises to be a a great thriller. It's such a great premise. For mine, I lost a focus a little in the middle but then a great last third left me shaking my head.I tried to put my finger on what I struggled with in the middle of this book. Apart from the fact that Charles was an ass, I found Jane to be a tad inconsistent as a protagonist. On the one hand she's visiting her mother with dementia and checking on her sister who has an eating disorder, and mourning the lost love of her life. The next minute she is this sneaky, evil narcissist. I wasn't convinced of either persona and I couldn't work out what aspects of Jane's history led her to the point where she was making these confessions. Was she looking for praise or sympathy? Was she sorry or gloating? I felt much the same way about the multitude of circumstances dealt with in the book - the dementia, eating disorders, toxic relationships, loss and grief. It seemed like there was alot of moving parts that were loosely tied together. The strength of this book for me was the attempt to unravel Jane by Valerie the blogger/journalist. There's a bit of a power struggle between the pair as to who is the more devious and you get the sense Jane was really looking over her shoulder. This head to head, and a sound ending helped make this book memorable as well. In all, this was an enjoyable read that I'm glad I stayed with.Thank you to Hachette Australia for providing me a free copy of the book to provide and opinion on.
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