The Lions of Fifth Avenue
In nationally bestselling author Fiona Davis's latest historical novel, a series of book thefts roils the iconic New York Public Library, leaving two generations of strong-willed women to pick up the pieces.It's 1913, and on the surface, Laura Lyons couldn't ask for more out of life--her husband is the superintendent of the New York Public Library, allowing their family to live in an apartment within the grand building, and they are blessed with two children. But headstrong, passionate Laura wants more, and when she takes a leap of faith and applies to the Columbia Journalism School, her world is cracked wide open. As her studies take her all over the city, she finds herself drawn to Greenwich Village's new bohemia, where she discovers the Heterodoxy Club--a radical, all-female group in which women are encouraged to loudly share their opinions on suffrage, birth control, and women's rights. Soon, Laura finds herself questioning her traditional role as wife and mother. But when valuable books are stolen back at the library, threatening the home and institution she loves, she's forced to confront her shifting priorities head on . . . and may just lose everything in the process.Eighty years later, in 1993, Sadie Donovan struggles with the legacy of her grandmother, the famous essayist Laura Lyons, especially after she's wrangled her dream job as a curator at the New York Public Library. But the job quickly becomes a nightmare when rare manuscripts, notes, and books for the exhibit Sadie's running begin disappearing from the library's famous Berg Collection. Determined to save both the exhibit and her career, the typically risk-adverse Sadie teams up with a private security expert to uncover the culprit. However, things unexpectedly become personal when the investigation leads Sadie to some unwelcome truths about her own family heritage--truths that shed new light on the biggest tragedy in the library's history.

The Lions of Fifth Avenue Details

TitleThe Lions of Fifth Avenue
Author
ReleaseAug 4th, 2020
PublisherDutton Books
ISBN-139781524744618
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, New York, Mystery

The Lions of Fifth Avenue Review

  • Christina Kline
    January 1, 1970
    Fiona Davis is at the top of her form in this captivating historical novel about a family who lives inside the stone fortress known as New York Public Library in the early years of the twentieth century. The matriarch, Laura Lyons, finds herself drawn to a bigger life and must ultimately figure out a path that includes both her family and her larger ambitions. Many years later, her granddaughter, Sadie Donovan, a curator at the library, learns more than she ever could have imagined about her fam Fiona Davis is at the top of her form in this captivating historical novel about a family who lives inside the stone fortress known as New York Public Library in the early years of the twentieth century. The matriarch, Laura Lyons, finds herself drawn to a bigger life and must ultimately figure out a path that includes both her family and her larger ambitions. Many years later, her granddaughter, Sadie Donovan, a curator at the library, learns more than she ever could have imagined about her family history. In the past as well as the present day, a series of thefts roil the library. With her trademark blend of fact and fiction, Davis has written a memorable, atmospheric page turner.
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  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    Set in the beautiful and historic New York Public Library, The Lions of Fifth Avenue is a dual timeline tale about two women living 80 years apart who both must deal with the theft of valuable books from the library’s collection. While investigating the missing books, each woman makes discoveries that may alter her life forever. Readers will eat up the details about the superintendent’s apartment in the library (in earlier eras they were able to live in the library!) and other less-known tidbits Set in the beautiful and historic New York Public Library, The Lions of Fifth Avenue is a dual timeline tale about two women living 80 years apart who both must deal with the theft of valuable books from the library’s collection. While investigating the missing books, each woman makes discoveries that may alter her life forever. Readers will eat up the details about the superintendent’s apartment in the library (in earlier eras they were able to live in the library!) and other less-known tidbits about this iconic and historic building. I am a huge fan of Fiona Davis, and this is her best book yet.For more reviews, check out my Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/thoughtsfro... and my newsletter: https://www.cfapage.net/subscribe.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I’m impressed that Fiona Davis can keep churning out novels at this pace while maintaining this level of quality. Davis sticks to her standard format of dual female narrator/dual timeline and focusing on a specific piece of architecture/site of historical significance in New York City. This time we get the New York Public library, pretty much the ideal settling for an historical novel in Manhattan. We meet Sadie in 1993, a curator at the library who has mysterious connections to some of the inst I’m impressed that Fiona Davis can keep churning out novels at this pace while maintaining this level of quality. Davis sticks to her standard format of dual female narrator/dual timeline and focusing on a specific piece of architecture/site of historical significance in New York City. This time we get the New York Public library, pretty much the ideal settling for an historical novel in Manhattan. We meet Sadie in 1993, a curator at the library who has mysterious connections to some of the institution’s history, and Laura in 1913, a wife, mother, and aspiring journalist whose family lives in the library. Did you hear that? They LIVE. IN. THE. LIBRARY, in an apartment on site that truly did exist at the time as housing for the library superintendent and his family. There are significant (and perhaps connected) book thefts in both timelines, and then we’re off to the races, as Davis lets us get to know both women while unfolding each era’s mystery and its relationship to the protagonists. Davis wrote a winning character in Sadie, a driven and likable—if awkward—gal. Laura is tougher to get behind. While we can all sympathize with her desire to pursue a career of her own when that would have been next to impossible for a woman of her station, Laura actively makes choices over and over again that worsen her situation and make her a less sympathetic character.It’s much easier to root for Sadie. Her flaws aren’t the kind that would gall many readers. If anything, they only serve to make her more relatable. While I often felt bad for Laura and wanted the best for her, she’s somewhat of a naïf (not one of my favorite character traits in novels) and alarmingly impulsive and—later—defensive. Laura continuously makes poor decisions, and ones that directly and often negatively impact the lives of others in her orbit. The side characters aren’t particularly well developed. In most cases that’s probably a blessing, though there a few cases in which I would really have liked to see more. The library and its history though...Those are practically a third protagonist, and Davis does a much better job with the buildings and books in question than she does with most of the human characters.Still, these complaints are minor, and as she has each time before, Davis gave us another delightful historical mystery. In terms of setting, this was among her best, and the plot concludes itself nicely (but not too nicely) in the end. This one isn’t quite on par with Chelsea Girls or The Dollhouse, but it’s a fun read sure to please Davis fans such as myself as well as library enthusiasts. *I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • MaryBeth's Bookshelf
    January 1, 1970
    Fiona Davis is back with a new novel set to debut in July! I was lucky enough to receive a review copy from Dutton Books in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much Dutton Books! I absolutely loved this book!There is nothing I love more than a good historical fiction novel set in New York City! Add in an apartment in the New York City Public Library, a dual story line, and a little mystery and I am totally hooked!New York City 1913: Laura Lyons is living with her husband and two children Fiona Davis is back with a new novel set to debut in July! I was lucky enough to receive a review copy from Dutton Books in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much Dutton Books! I absolutely loved this book!There is nothing I love more than a good historical fiction novel set in New York City! Add in an apartment in the New York City Public Library, a dual story line, and a little mystery and I am totally hooked!New York City 1913: Laura Lyons is living with her husband and two children in the famed New York City Public Library apartments. Laura is a woman ahead of her time and as she pursues her Journalism degree at Columbia she becomes friends with a group of women known as The Heterodoxy Group. This group of women encourage Laura and other women to speak up and fight for what is rightfully theirs.New York City 1993: Sadie Donovan works as a curator at the New York City Public Library and quickly finds herself sucked into a scandal when books from the library begin disappearing. When Sadie discovers a connection between the stolen items and her grandmother, Laura Lyons, she sets out to find the truth.Davis has outdone herself with this novel. She has clearly done her research and weaved an amazing story with strong female characters. I absolutely loved this book and I'm completely obsessed with seeing the hidden apartments within the New York Public Library!!
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  • Lynda Loigman
    January 1, 1970
    Fiona Davis has done it again! Readers will love this fast-paced and intricately plotted story, set in the NYC Public Library building. David combines meticulous research with beautifully drawn characters for her best book yet!
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, Fiona Davis has written an interesting novel whose setting is located in one of New York City’s landmark buildings. The Lions of Fifth Avenue immerses the reader into the history of the venerable New York Public Library. The intertwined fictional stories of two main characters, Laura and Sadie, take place nearly one hundred years apart. In 1913, Laura’s husband was superintendent of the library. Laura, her husband, and their young son and daughter actually lived in an apartment locat Once again, Fiona Davis has written an interesting novel whose setting is located in one of New York City’s landmark buildings. The Lions of Fifth Avenue immerses the reader into the history of the venerable New York Public Library. The intertwined fictional stories of two main characters, Laura and Sadie, take place nearly one hundred years apart. In 1913, Laura’s husband was superintendent of the library. Laura, her husband, and their young son and daughter actually lived in an apartment located at the top of the building. Laura’s husband was working on the manuscript of his novel in his spare time. Laura writes a popular column for the library’s newsletter. She voluntarily contributes the column, but she longs to have a career of her own in a time when women are expected to stay home and raise their families. When valuable books are stolen from the library, the family's lives are changed forever.Sadie is the granddaughter of Laura. In 1993, Sadie is a dedicated, enthusiastic librarian who lands a position overseeing the priceless Berg Collection of first editions and other memorabilia which will soon be the focus of a highly anticipated exhibit. When some of the priceless books are discovered to be missing, Sadie knows that she must do everything she can to restore them to the collection. In the process of her investigation, she learns that there was a similar situation during Laura’s time at the library. What happened then and were the missing books found? Sadie thinks that finding out what happened at that time may help her now.This is an interesting and informative story that provides a close up look at the New York Public Library. The characters’ stories involve secrets, mystery, family relationships, love, and the early days of the fight for women’s rights.Thank you to NetGalley, Dutton (an imprint of Penguin Random House), and author Fiona Davis for giving me an opportunity to read the ARC of this novel.
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  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    Fiona Davis is an author that can intertwine time, place and characters into one big coherent puzzle. She is so talented in creating strong female characters who rise above all expectations and she is excellent at creating book boyfriends. This novel allows the reader to explore the New York Public library from the inside. At the same time the reader can celebrate the love for reading and books in general.I loved the two main female characters Laura And Sadie and rooted for them the whole wayI a Fiona Davis is an author that can intertwine time, place and characters into one big coherent puzzle. She is so talented in creating strong female characters who rise above all expectations and she is excellent at creating book boyfriends. This novel allows the reader to explore the New York Public library from the inside. At the same time the reader can celebrate the love for reading and books in general.I loved the two main female characters Laura And Sadie and rooted for them the whole wayI also adored the double meaning in this title! The lions protect the library from the outside and the Lyons from the inside!Can’t wait to share this one with readers in July!!
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  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    FULL REVIEW WILL BE ON JULY 28.A library is a home for everyone, and the New York Public Library was home to the superintendent and his wife.Jack and Laura Lyons lived in the library in 1913. How fun would that be? Their granddaughter now works in the library.When rare books go missing like they did in 1913, the mystery and intrigue ramps up.Historical fiction fans and those who have visited the New York public library will be fascinated with this book and again get to enjoy the pull-in writing FULL REVIEW WILL BE ON JULY 28.A library is a home for everyone, and the New York Public Library was home to the superintendent and his wife.Jack and Laura Lyons lived in the library in 1913. How fun would that be? Their granddaughter now works in the library.When rare books go missing like they did in 1913, the mystery and intrigue ramps up.Historical fiction fans and those who have visited the New York public library will be fascinated with this book and again get to enjoy the pull-in writing style of Fiona Davis.This book was given to me by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    This part historic fiction, part mystery centers around grandmother and granddaughter, and their ties to the New York City Public Library. Jumping between 1913 and 1993 and told in both voices, each woman becomes embroiled in a case of stolen rare books, jeopardizing their families, jobs, and reputations. For those who enjoyed By Its Cover by Donna Leon.
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  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    This book is phenomenal. Definitely in the top 10 I’ve read this year. This book is set in two different times, with alternating chapters. The main portion is set in 1914 where we meet Laura Lyons, the wife of a man named Jack who works for the New York Public Library. They also LIVE in the library, in an apartment which is just such a cool setting for the book. They’re trying to solve why books are going missing, and Laura is trying to become a journalist at Columbia university. The other porti This book is phenomenal. Definitely in the top 10 I’ve read this year. This book is set in two different times, with alternating chapters. The main portion is set in 1914 where we meet Laura Lyons, the wife of a man named Jack who works for the New York Public Library. They also LIVE in the library, in an apartment which is just such a cool setting for the book. They’re trying to solve why books are going missing, and Laura is trying to become a journalist at Columbia university. The other portion is set in 1993 where we follow Sadie a curator at the New York Public Library, who is also trying to solve a mystery about books going missing from the collection. She discovers many things from the past along her search. There were so many plot points I never got bored. Between the mystery, historical elements, feminist icons, and LGBTQ+ representation this one is a homerun on all aspects. I was never bored, and it was definitely the most unique historical fiction I’ve ever read. I highly recommend you read it once it’s available. Thank you to Dutton books for the arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Selene
    January 1, 1970
    The Lions of Fifth Avenue takes the reader to two different time periods; the first being 1913-14, and the second is 1993. In 1913, Laura Lyons lives in an apartment tucked away in the main branch of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue. She resides there with her husband Jack, the library superintendent, and her two young children, Harry and Pearl. Laura dreams of becoming a journalist, and gets accepted into the Columbia University School of Journalism’s one-year graduate program. She i The Lions of Fifth Avenue takes the reader to two different time periods; the first being 1913-14, and the second is 1993. In 1913, Laura Lyons lives in an apartment tucked away in the main branch of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue. She resides there with her husband Jack, the library superintendent, and her two young children, Harry and Pearl. Laura dreams of becoming a journalist, and gets accepted into the Columbia University School of Journalism’s one-year graduate program. She is one of the few women in the program. Fast forward to 1993; Sadie Donovan is a librarian at the very same library where the Lyons family lived. She gets a temporary promotion as curator of the Berg Collection, which is to feature works and artifacts of American and English Literature. This library is not a lending library, but a research library, where books and manuscripts are only borrowed inside its walls.As Laura becomes more involved with reporting on the progressive women’s movement happening in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, she struggles with her role as a wife and mother. She questions her position in the family and realizes she wants more out of her life; she doesn’t want to live in the shadow of her husband, who is pursuing a career as a writer and spends every moment of his free time working on his manuscript. Laura struggles with the guilt she feels over leaving her children regularly to pursue her stories, and this guilt contrasts with the exhilaration she feels knowing she might just be making a difference in the lives of women everywhere.The two time periods are tied together by a series of book thefts. As it turns out, Sadie Donovan is related to Laura Lyons; she is her grandmother. The story unfolds as the characters in their respective time periods attempt to solve the mystery of these valuable and rare stolen books and return them to the library. As one would suspect, the two time periods are inextricably tied to one another, and it is through a series of discoveries and events that the reader finally learns what happened. Although I found certain aspects of the plot and characters a bit predictable, I still could not turn the pages fast enough as I learned about each nuance of the mystery. My accurate predictions did not detract from the enjoyment of reading the book.I quickly became engrossed in every aspect of the story as the author’s characters came to life. The vivid descriptions of the NYPL piqued my curiosity. I identified with the characters’ positions as they grappled with their choices and motivations. The author dedicated the book to “librarians everywhere,” and it’s clear that Ms. Davis has done her research. The reader learns the importance of librarians and the role they play in preserving history and disseminating information to knowledge-hungry patrons. My hope is that readers of this book gain a new appreciation for the work of the librarian; it’s not just about checking books out. As a librarian myself, I thank the author for portraying the profession in a positive light, and I’m confident that librarians reading the book will also be grateful. Having finished the book, I wonder if my next read can even come close to how wonderful this book was! Fans of Fiona Davis’s other books will not be disappointed, and for those who never read one of her books, you’ll want to grab her other titles as well.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow.
  • Sherrie Howey
    January 1, 1970
    In 1913, Laura Lyons lives in an apartment at the New York Public Library, with her daughter, son and husband Jack, who is the superintendent of the library. When not working within the library, Jack devotes all his time to writing his book. Laura wants to be more than a housewife and is accepted into the journalism program at Columbia.In 1993, Sadie Donovan works at the New York Public Library and is the granddaughter of Laura Lyons, a fact that she has not disclosed to her employer. Aside from In 1913, Laura Lyons lives in an apartment at the New York Public Library, with her daughter, son and husband Jack, who is the superintendent of the library. When not working within the library, Jack devotes all his time to writing his book. Laura wants to be more than a housewife and is accepted into the journalism program at Columbia.In 1993, Sadie Donovan works at the New York Public Library and is the granddaughter of Laura Lyons, a fact that she has not disclosed to her employer. Aside from their family history, there is a connection between Laura and Sadie as it relates to missing books. I always learn from Fiona's books; in this case I had not heard of the feminist group Heterodoxy and looked it up to learn more. So interesting to find out more about this group and that Helen Keller was one of the speakers at their meetings.The characters are very well developed and the author has done a terrific job with her research of the New York Public Library. I love how she connects two different time periods in her novels and know that readers will enjoy this book as much as they have enjoyed her other books. Be sure to read this book when it is released in July!
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  • Shania
    January 1, 1970
    New York City, unsolved mysteries, books, family secrets 🤫📚🦁First of all, I’d like to say that this cover is GOREOUS! Fiona Davis centres all her books around historic buildings in NYC and this one focuses on the Fifth Avenue branch of the New York Public Library. As a book lover, this was definitely the selling point for me. I think every readers dream is to live in a library and in this book, that was a reality for the Lyons family in 1913. Meanwhile, precious and valuable books are being stol New York City, unsolved mysteries, books, family secrets 🤫📚🦁First of all, I’d like to say that this cover is GOREOUS! Fiona Davis centres all her books around historic buildings in NYC and this one focuses on the Fifth Avenue branch of the New York Public Library. As a book lover, this was definitely the selling point for me. I think every readers dream is to live in a library and in this book, that was a reality for the Lyons family in 1913. Meanwhile, precious and valuable books are being stolen out from under their noses and the Lyons are under scrutiny.Fast forward to 1993, Sadie is getting a large collection ready for display and books are going missing once again, and there’s an interesting connection to what took place back in 1914.I loved the dual timeline aspect of this book. I did find myself interested in both storylines and they both had enough going on, I was always happy to go back to each one. One thing I particularly liked about this book was the feminist happenings in 1913 NYC. Laura loved being a wife and mother but she wanted more, which was very forward thinking for that time. I also loved learning about the Heterodoxy Club (which was real) and Dr. Amelia Potter’s role in changing healthcare in NYC (again, based on a real female physician from the early 20th century). These were unexpected components of the books but I found it so interesting. We all know how hard women had to fight to break out of the mold society had created for their roles, and I loved seeing Laura be purposeful in achieving her goals. Thank you to NetGalley and Dutton Books for providing me with an advance e-ARC. If you love books, historical fiction, and NYC, pick this one up on August 4th 😊
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  • Amber ♡
    January 1, 1970
    Fiona Davis is one of my favorites and this one did not disappoint! Alternating between two time periods in New York City, this is a story of love, loss, family, and courage. In 1913 Laura Lyons, her husband Jack, and two children live in an apartment inside the main branch of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue. Laura is pursuing a journalism degree, while her husband Jack is the superintendent of the library. Forward to 1993, Sadie Donovan is a librarian at The New York Public Library Fiona Davis is one of my favorites and this one did not disappoint! Alternating between two time periods in New York City, this is a story of love, loss, family, and courage. In 1913 Laura Lyons, her husband Jack, and two children live in an apartment inside the main branch of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue. Laura is pursuing a journalism degree, while her husband Jack is the superintendent of the library. Forward to 1993, Sadie Donovan is a librarian at The New York Public Library where the Lyons family lived. She becomes curator of the Berg Collection, a special collections department with rare books and artifacts. The two time periods are intertwined by a series of book thefts- unique books and folios that have gone missing. As the story unfolds, both Laura and Sadie discover more about themselves and the ties that bind them together. As a librarian myself, I loved the research that was put into this book! I never knew the NYPL had apartments for rent, how cool. One thing I would have changed- (view spoiler)[ I really wanted Harry to reconnect with his family! I can’t imagine what Laura must have felt leaving for London never knowing what became of him. I was hoping before Pearl passed that her and Harry would see each other, even just for a brief time. (hide spoiler)] Overall excellent read as usual! Good choice for book clubs as well.
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  • Bridgit Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    I don't typically read historical fiction, but I am so glad I read The Lions of Fifth Avenue. Davis' descriptions of the New York Public Library were so immersive, and I felt like I was actually there, browsing the rare book collections. I enjoyed reading from both Laura and Sadie's perspectives, and the dual timelines made the reading experience feel even more fast-paced. Davis did a great job of propelling the story along with a great mystery, while also discussing serious topics such as sexis I don't typically read historical fiction, but I am so glad I read The Lions of Fifth Avenue. Davis' descriptions of the New York Public Library were so immersive, and I felt like I was actually there, browsing the rare book collections. I enjoyed reading from both Laura and Sadie's perspectives, and the dual timelines made the reading experience feel even more fast-paced. Davis did a great job of propelling the story along with a great mystery, while also discussing serious topics such as sexism in the workplace. I cannot wait to read more from Davis in the future! Thank you to NetGalley & Penguin for my free e-book ARC.
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  • Kelsea
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first Fiona Davis read, and I picked it up because it has a fantastic premise (also, Lions in the title -- NGL that was part of it). I do want to note that I'm not typically a historical fiction reader.The Lions of Fifth Avenue, as I've said, has such a great concept (what avid reader doesn't dream of living in a library?). It's told in dual POV, 80 years apart, which is always a risky choice. In this case, I'd say it worked pretty well in holding my interest. It was fun uncovering t This was my first Fiona Davis read, and I picked it up because it has a fantastic premise (also, Lions in the title -- NGL that was part of it). I do want to note that I'm not typically a historical fiction reader.The Lions of Fifth Avenue, as I've said, has such a great concept (what avid reader doesn't dream of living in a library?). It's told in dual POV, 80 years apart, which is always a risky choice. In this case, I'd say it worked pretty well in holding my interest. It was fun uncovering the mystery and I enjoyed the similarities in events that happen to both Laura and Sadie (her descendant). There are some great ideas incorporated in both storylines.On the other hand, some of the development (especially character & romance) felt a bit rushed, which may be in part because each storyline had limited space (half a book) in which to play out. I think if the whole story had been one POV and timeline instead of two, there would've been a bit more room for that development.Overall, the story is an interesting one if you're looking for something that's fun and not too heavy a read. Thank you Dutton Books for sending me a free advanced e-galley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jamie Jones Hullinger
    January 1, 1970
    So I read an early Fiona Davis and her newest. Pretty certain she is a go to author for me now. I love that she sets a delicious and compelling story around a building. Dual stories and past and relatively present. There is always a mystery. Are some elements predictable? Yes. Is this formulaic? It is very. However, the story is still so compelling. I am fascinated and obsessed with most of the buildings she chooses so I figure I can't go wrong!
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    I think Fiona Davis and Beatriz Williams are side by side as far as my favorite historical fiction authors. This was lovely and I will be purchasing a finished copy when it comes out. ARC received from Netgalley.
  • Sue Boahn
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Loved,loved,loved this book!!! I always look forward to a new book by Fiona, and this one was absolutely divine!!! What more could an avid book reader ask for - a story that takes place in the New York Public Library, stolen valuable books, a tale beginning in 1913 that weaves its way into 1993, mystery, intrigue, love and, of course, lots of books! Just marvelous! This book comes out in July 2020. Buy it, read it, and enjoy!!!
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  • Amy Poeppel
    January 1, 1970
    I love this latest novel by Fiona Davis! She weaves together the stories of Laura (1913) and Sadie (1993), two women who are connected for very different reasons to the New York Public Library. There's intrigue, disappointment, hope, romance, and so many surprises. A wonderful read full of wonderful characters.
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  • Christina (‪‬ ‪a_politicallyreadgirl‬)
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully well written. I always enjoy her characters, the research, the alternating timelines, and how the book itself comes to life. Bravo.
  • Susan Cordeiro
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very enjoyable book. I have read others by this author and liked them all. This novel takes place in 2 time periods, but it is not confusing to follow. I loved the setting of the New York Public Library. A good book group novel for discussion!Thank You NetGalley and the publisher
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  • Rebecca Minnock
    January 1, 1970
    Going from New York City in 1913 to 1993, and based in the New York Public Library, Davis's latest offering - The Lions of Fifth Avenue - is spellbinding! Back in 1913, rare books went missing whilst the Lyons family were in residence at the Library. Fast forward to 1993, books are once again going missing, and there is a clear link to what happened all those years ago.The cast of characters, the plot, the intrinsic link between past and present were just superb, and I think this is probably my Going from New York City in 1913 to 1993, and based in the New York Public Library, Davis's latest offering - The Lions of Fifth Avenue - is spellbinding! Back in 1913, rare books went missing whilst the Lyons family were in residence at the Library. Fast forward to 1993, books are once again going missing, and there is a clear link to what happened all those years ago.The cast of characters, the plot, the intrinsic link between past and present were just superb, and I think this is probably my favourite Fiona Davis so far! 
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  • ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Fiona Davis’s novels are page-turning mysteries seeped in an obvious love and admiration of New York City history. This most recent is no exception, and is in fact my favorite so far. I believe they are all fun and worth reading, but as a former special collections librarian this one definitely holds a special place in my heart. This mystery follows two rare book thieves in the New York Public Library, one in 1913 and the other in 1993. These thefts complicate the lives of two connected women: L Fiona Davis’s novels are page-turning mysteries seeped in an obvious love and admiration of New York City history. This most recent is no exception, and is in fact my favorite so far. I believe they are all fun and worth reading, but as a former special collections librarian this one definitely holds a special place in my heart. This mystery follows two rare book thieves in the New York Public Library, one in 1913 and the other in 1993. These thefts complicate the lives of two connected women: Laura Lyons, a budding journalist, mother, and wife of the New York Public Library’s superintendent and, decades later, Laura’s granddaughter Sadie Donovan, the new curator of the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. When items begin disappearing from the library Sadie aims to see if these thefts are connected, and along the way discovers the secrets of her famous grandmother. I loved the time setting for both story lines — Laura’s whirlwind introduction to bohemian NYC is a delight, and traveling back to the 1990’s for Sadie’s mystery feels jarringly familiar but different all the same. Each woman feels convincingly real and unique, and for historical fiction fans I appreciated the glimpse into women’s professional and personal aspirations during the Progressive era through Laura’s studies at Columbia and participation in the very real Heterodoxy club. In addition, both settings offer an interesting glimpse into the New York Public Library’s history, and archives and special collections libraries in general. If you’re someone who loves books (and you probably are, reading this), you’ll love the details about living, yes living, in the library as well as day-to-day aspects of archives and special collections work. Is it accurate? Not really, but this is fiction. But I never felt like anything was so glaringly wrong to draw me out of the story. The focus is on the mystery, not librarian accuracy, and frankly I’m thankful the author didn’t bog us down with details and have us watch Sophie write grants or process finding aids. Instead, we run along and follow what’s interesting, and what matters: Laura discovering her true interests and passions, and Sophie solving this mystery and finding the current thief irregardless of the professional consequences. I stayed up late to finish this, something I almost never do now in my perpetually overworked and exhausted state, and it was a treat.
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  • Susan (LoftNine)
    January 1, 1970
    ⁣I received this e-ARC from Netgalley and Dutton Books in exchange for my honest review.⁣⁣Fiona Davis does it again with her latest page turner of a novel, The Lions on Fifth Avenue. ⁣⁣If you’re a stranger to her books, Davis weaves incredible tales around historical New York City landmark buildings with incredibly rich, meted out characters. In this book, Davis makes the New York Public Library come alive as it loans itself as a character to the characters and storyline of this novel. And, whil ⁣I received this e-ARC from Netgalley and Dutton Books in exchange for my honest review.⁣⁣Fiona Davis does it again with her latest page turner of a novel, The Lions on Fifth Avenue. ⁣⁣If you’re a stranger to her books, Davis weaves incredible tales around historical New York City landmark buildings with incredibly rich, meted out characters. In this book, Davis makes the New York Public Library come alive as it loans itself as a character to the characters and storyline of this novel. And, while the library has no voice of its own, it’s existence and valuable contents make it an integral character in this mystery.⁣⁣This story, told in two different time periods by two different generations of the same family, surrounds two separate strings of New York Public Library book thefts which occur eighty years apart. Davis winds us through one family’s extensive and extended history with the NYPL as well as its inner workings, and the intricacies of the building while creating mystery and scandal. The storyline also focuses on the growth of women and changes in career, marriage, and family throughout the decades. ⁣⁣The thought, research, and creativity put into this book make it fascinating. Davis slowly hands out pieces of the puzzle as she takes us on the journey of the two women telling this tale. At the end, she ties the story together with a beautiful bow. ⁣⁣An absolutely enjoyable book that held my interest and had me turning pages until the very end. ⁣⁣Pub date: July 21, 2020⁣⁣#TheLionsofFifthAvenue #NetGalley
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  • Mo Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.All opinions are my own.4.5 starsI've read all of the author's previous books, and I love how she combines the old with the new and includes places and/or people that actually existed once upon a time.I really, really enjoyed this book. What's not to like about a multi-POV, multi-timeline mystery set in a library?I didn't really like Jack's character, but sadly I think that was probably accurate for the time I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.All opinions are my own.4.5 starsI've read all of the author's previous books, and I love how she combines the old with the new and includes places and/or people that actually existed once upon a time.I really, really enjoyed this book. What's not to like about a multi-POV, multi-timeline mystery set in a library?I didn't really like Jack's character, but sadly I think that was probably accurate for the time period.If I could change anything about the book, I would have wanted more time with Pearl, or an opportunity for her to tell more of her story in her own words.I flew through this book and finished in one day, because the writing was easy to read and the story flowed very well. I didn't want to put it down!I would recommend this book to anyone else who is an avid historical fiction reader.
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  • Diane Standish
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to #edelweiss and #dutton for the opportunity to read and review this book. I have enjoyed every book written by Fiona Davis and this was no exception. I read it in one day.The story follows two timelines, 1913 when Laura Lyons wants to be one a journalist, while being married with two children. Her husband is superintendent of the NYPL, and they live in the seven room apartment in the building. As she tries to create her own identity, she struggles as women did to be accepted in the work Thanks to #edelweiss and #dutton for the opportunity to read and review this book. I have enjoyed every book written by Fiona Davis and this was no exception. I read it in one day.The story follows two timelines, 1913 when Laura Lyons wants to be one a journalist, while being married with two children. Her husband is superintendent of the NYPL, and they live in the seven room apartment in the building. As she tries to create her own identity, she struggles as women did to be accepted in the working world. Fast forward to 1993 , Sadie Donovan is curator of the Berg collection at the library. She is Laura's granddaughter, but because of a a scandal in her family's past, she doesn't tell her supervisor. When rare books start to disappear, Sadie has to find the thief before her job is in jeopardy. Another excellent book by the author. Highly recommend
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  • Addie Yoder
    January 1, 1970
    One day I am going to go to NYC just to visit all of the buildings from Fiona Davis's books. Her books always give me a need to see and experience these incredible spaces. Her stories only create a more personal connection to those places and I think that's what the true magic is of her books. This story of the New York Public Library is a book lovers happy place. There is mystery, a strong heroine and such a strong sense of place that you can't help but feel like you are in the library with the One day I am going to go to NYC just to visit all of the buildings from Fiona Davis's books. Her books always give me a need to see and experience these incredible spaces. Her stories only create a more personal connection to those places and I think that's what the true magic is of her books. This story of the New York Public Library is a book lovers happy place. There is mystery, a strong heroine and such a strong sense of place that you can't help but feel like you are in the library with the books. She captured what every book lover feels about the library and historical books and this is one that friends will pass on to each other and book clubs will gush over.
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  • America Grelinger
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for my ARC. Fiona Davis never disappoints and I was pleased to see she did it again. The historical accuracy kept me intrigued throughout as I longed to visit the library and see for myself where the superintendent lived! I thoroughly enjoyed the character development and the mystery which was both in the present as well as the past. Davis weaved the history of the family so smoothly together that one just assumed the resurrection of the dead which you know cannot happen.. Thank you to NetGalley for my ARC. Fiona Davis never disappoints and I was pleased to see she did it again. The historical accuracy kept me intrigued throughout as I longed to visit the library and see for myself where the superintendent lived! I thoroughly enjoyed the character development and the mystery which was both in the present as well as the past. Davis weaved the history of the family so smoothly together that one just assumed the resurrection of the dead which you know cannot happen....but at times I thought well, maybe....nah, it cannot be! Thanks for another book that challenged my sleuthing skills.
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