Cursed
Fairy tales take a weird twist in this anthology compiling stories from an all-star cast of fantasy writers, including stories from Neil Gaiman, Charlie Jane Anders and Alison Littlewood.Here in this book you'll find unique twists on the fairy tale conceit of the curse, from the more traditional to the modern - giving us brand new mythologies as well as new approaches to well-loved fables. Some might shock you, some might make you laugh, but they will all impress you with their originality.

Cursed Details

TitleCursed
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherTitan Books
ISBN-139781789091502
Rating
GenreFantasy, Short Stories, Anthologies, Fairy Tales, Horror, Fiction

Cursed Review

  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    Snow did not find him charming. When she looked into his dark, dark eyes she saw not the fizzy delight of charm but the flicker of a tongue through sharp teeth. Christina Henry, As Red As Blood, As White as SnowLast year, this editing duo released the Wonderland anthology, which I raved about. It was a gorgeous collection and I had so much fun with it that, when I had the opportunity to read and review this new anthology, I jumped at the chance. Im an absolute sucker for dark fairytale Snow did not find him charming. When she looked into his dark, dark eyes she saw not the fizzy delight of charm but the flicker of a tongue through sharp teeth.— Christina Henry, As Red As Blood, As White as SnowLast year, this editing duo released the Wonderland anthology, which I raved about. It was a gorgeous collection and I had so much fun with it that, when I had the opportunity to read and review this new anthology, I jumped at the chance. I’m an absolute sucker for dark fairytale retellings and many of the authors in this lineup positively excel at the craft.Cursed kicks off, after a quick poem from Jane Yolen, with the story As Red as Blood, As White as Snow by Christina Henry, and if you know me, you already know Christina is one of my favorite retelling authors of all time. She has designed a solid portion of her writing career around taking old stories and giving them new life — typically complete with some sort of social commentary that is always so eloquently woven in — and this was no exception. It was easily my favorite story in the anthology and I would honestly urge you to pick this book up even if only for this story’s beautiful prose and ruthless examination of the evils of “Prince Charming” types.Luckily, the good times didn’t stop there; while nothing else in Cursed was quite able to beat out that first story for me, I was so happy to see how many incredible stories this collection contained! A lot of anthologies are severely hit-and-miss, but Marie O’Regan & Paul Kane clearly know how to choose ’em when it comes to short stories. Among others, I loved Catriona Ward’s incredibly unique twist on one of my favorite tropes (but I can’t tell you what it is!) in At That Age, the gorgeously melancholy, haunting vibes of Jen Williams’ necromancing Listen, and James Brogden’s grotesque, horribly unsettling Skin.The forest is dark but I know the way. I have been here before. There is a path soon, pebbly and worn, but my fingers and toes are like needles and pins. If I stay here, stray here too long, will I become one of them forever?— Jane Yolen & Adam Stemple, Little RedWhile these were the stand-out favorites of mine, I genuinely enjoyed almost every single story in this collection. I will admit that the stories grew a little less interesting for me in the end, with the last few not catching my eye as well, but they weren’t enough to hinder me from being wholly blown away by the overall caliber of Cursed’s offerings. I have so many new authors on my reading list thanks to these short stories, and I know this is the sort of collection I’ll be recommending for a long time — and revisiting time and time again.Thank you so much to Titan for providing me with a review copy in exchange for an honest review!Content warnings for (view spoiler)[violence, death, infant/child abuse and death, body horror, self-mutilation, various mental illnesses (hide spoiler)] (no specific story spoilers)
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I just wanted to state even though I gave this book as a whole 3 stars. There was 4 stories within this collection that I would whole heartedly give 4 stars each and they are: As Red As Blood, As White As Snow by Christina Henry, Wendy, Darling by Christopher Golden, Fairy Werewolf vs. Vampire Zombie by Charlie Jane Anders and New Wine by Angela Slatter. These four stories in particular I loved and definitely feel they deserve 4 stars.
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  • Zoë ☆
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come on Friday!! Thank you so much to Titan Books for sending over a review copy! :)
  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    On the whole, I really liked this anthology. There's a lot of great stories in here filled with originality and fun ideas. Some shine brighter than others, and you can see a more detailed review of my thoughts in my percentage updates. But I'd definitely recommend to anyone who likes fairy tales, urban fantasy, and just weird stuff.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    A nicely strong fantasy compilation, with many a fine new piece set alongside recent classics of the short form. The theme is really well maintained, and explored from so many aspects this is bound to have much to appeal.For a full round-up of contents, please go to:-http://www.thebookbag.co.uk/reviews/i...
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  • Asha - A Cat, A Book, And A Cup Of Tea
    January 1, 1970
    Content warnings: A lot of death, blood and body horror, throughout. Vivid descriptions of self-harm in Little Red. Implied sexual assault/stalking in Look Inside. Baby death in Wendy, Darling. Strong authorial misogyny in Skin and Look Inside.This collection of short stories really ended up surprising me, as the stories I was looking forward to werent necessarily the stories I ended up enjoying the most. I was pretty meh by the names pulled out for the cover; I dont tend to like MR Careys Content warnings: A lot of death, blood and body horror, throughout. Vivid descriptions of self-harm in ‘Little Red’. Implied sexual assault/stalking in ‘Look Inside’. Baby death in ‘Wendy, Darling’. Strong authorial misogyny in ‘Skin’ and ‘Look Inside’.This collection of short stories really ended up surprising me, as the stories I was looking forward to weren’t necessarily the stories I ended up enjoying the most. I was pretty meh by the names pulled out for the cover; I don’t tend to like MR Carey’s writing, and I find Neil Gaiman’s overt zaniness much less palatable than I did in my teens. I was really looking forward to Jane Yolen’s and Margo Lanagan’s stories, and the rest of the authors I was going into without any experience of their other work. I found that strangely, the anthology ended up being heavily weighted to have the most impressive stories (to me) at the beginning, and I struggled to connect to the latter half.Let’s start with the standouts! I adored the first story in the collection, Christina Henry’s ‘As Red As Blood, As White As Snow’, which mashes up Snow White and Bluebeard in a wonderfully creepy, fairy tale feeling way. I also unexpectedly really liked Neil Gaiman’s ‘Troll Bridge’, and ‘At That Age’ by Catriona Ward, both of which slide ancient folklore into modern life in a deliciously atmospheric way. ‘Listen’ by Jen Williams starts as though it will be the story of the Pied Piper, but instead does something really inventive and clever with the idea of a curse that lasts longer than the giver intends. ‘Henry and the Snakewood Box’ really surprised me – as I say, I’m not a fan of MR Carey generally, but I thought the voice of this story was really good fun, and it offered an interesting take on morality. ‘Again’ by Tim Lebbon was a really sweet and thoughtful story about whether immortality is a blessing or a curse.There were, as I’ve mentioned, some that didn’t work for me. ‘The Black Fairy’s Curse’ by Karen Joy Fowler is a Sleeping Beauty riff that leans on one of the worst writing clichés for me, and though it was lyrical, it didn’t really have enough body to it. ‘Faith and Fred’ by Maura McHugh just bored me, as did ‘Haza and Ghani’ by Lilith Saintcrow (a take on Hansel and Gretel that for me, struggled to get its plot across). ‘Fairy Werewolf vs Vampire Zombie’ by Charlie Jane Anders was so aggressively quirky I felt like Zooey Deschanel was shoving emoji cupcakes at me the entire time I was reading it. I wanted to, but didn’t love Margo Lanagan’s story, ‘The Girl from the Hell’, largely because I genuinely didn’t know what was going on, and Jane Yolen and Adam Stemple’s ‘Little Red’ suffered both from the fact that I don’t like Little Red Riding Hood as a story, and it contained graphic depictions of self harm.There are also some real problems with a couple of the stories from a female reader’s perspective. ‘Skin’ by James Brogden was wonderfully atmospheric, but weirdly and overwhelmingly misogynistic – the curse is given by a woman for a good reason, but she ends up having to take on the emotional labour for the pain she’s caused the man she cursed, and though the writing was good, I can’t get over the sexism. It echoes every abusive relationship I’ve ever heard about, in that the man, who has become terrifying, tells the woman ‘you’re the reason I’m a monster’ and SHE AGREES. And the narrative voice AGREES that she is the monster here. And then she forgives him and appeases him sexually. It’s a disgusting sentiment and one I cannot believe no one involved in this anthology thought to question it. I also found ‘Look Inside’ by Michael Marshall Smith to be unfortunately sexist – given that it’s about a woman whose home is invaded by something supernatural, and she’s upfront in the first few lines about the fact that it has impregnated her, she seemed remarkably unconcerned. The tone felt totally wrong, and it felt deeply weird as a storyline for a male author to narrate from a female voice. I enjoyed the concept of both ‘Skin’ and ‘Look Inside’, but this casual sexism/male-author-obliviousness ruined both stories for me.So of the 18 stories (not counting the opening and closing poems) in this collection, I thought five were fantastic, six were just not for me personally, two were very problematic, and the remaining five were enjoyable but perhaps not the kind of thing that will stick with me. But there’s a really interesting mix of fairy tale, horror, and urban fantasy, and with the exception of ‘Skin’ and ‘Look Inside’, I think it’s a really well put together collection! I’ve been dithering for about ten minutes as to how many cats it gets, because my instinct is somewhere between 3.5 (which feels a bit harsh for an anthology that I, on the whole, enjoyed) and 4 (which feels too high given the strength of the issues I had) – but I don’t want to get into .75 ratings, so let’s go for a qualified 4 cats out of five (but skip ‘Skin’)!
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  • Lizabeth Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to love this collection, I really did. Some top names in fantasy, a publishing company that has a talent for interesting and intriguing collections. Sadly I found myself bored to tears, struggling with almost every short story in here. I finally gave up about halfway through the book, not willing to continue through the pain. I will give you the reviews of the stories that I did finish.The basic premise of the twenty short stories and poetry was a focus on curses, both classic and I wanted to love this collection, I really did. Some top names in fantasy, a publishing company that has a talent for interesting and intriguing collections. Sadly I found myself bored to tears, struggling with almost every short story in here. I finally gave up about halfway through the book, not willing to continue through the pain. I will give you the reviews of the stories that I did finish.The basic premise of the twenty short stories and poetry was a focus on curses, both classic and modern. The best that I can say about this is that it was a free ARC from my monthly book swap at the Martin County Library before they were closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 2.5 out of 5."Castle Cursed" by Jane Yolen.A poem invoking the essence of Sleeping Beauty. Evocative. Poetry is not my thing, other than story based ones such as Poe or the ancient Roman and Greek classics. 3.5 out of 5."As Red as Blood, as White as Snow" by Christina HenryPrince Charming, as many in the court called him, wanted to marry Snow White, having worked compulsion magic on all in the court to ease his way. Only Snow and her beloved stepmother are unaffected. Snow is trapped nonetheless, going with her new husband to his own country. A lot of potential here that would've been better served in a longer version. Frankly this was more like a working overview than a completed story. Lost the buildup too quickly. 3 out of 5."Troll Bridge" by Neil GaimanJack is just seven years old the first time he meets the troll under the old railway bridge, the creature ready to eat the boy's life. But as Jack quickly explains, he hasn't actually lived enough to make him worthy. A bargain is made. Jack will live and experience all he can, then return to the face the troll. Sad and strange, lonely and just a tiny bit satisfying in an unexplainable way. 3.5 out of 5."At That Age" by Catriona WardJohn is dealing with tragedy in his family when he meets a new pair of twins at his school. The temporary respite from grief turns twisted. I didn't care much for this one at all. I understand that trying to fully flesh out a short story is a real art, but I found Ward's story to be more a scribble of an idea. 2.5 out of 5."Listen" by Jen WilliamsErren traveled across the world, forced to play music that brings the dead back to dance and reveal the cruel secrets of the living they left behind. All due to a moment's weakness and longing by Erren. Time passes as she desperately wishes for a final release. Now this is more like it. Williams has woven a mystical, magical world that still leaves so much to the imagination. 4 out of 5."Henry and the Snakewood Box" by M. R. CareyHenry Mossop isn't too bright, but he is good-hearted and lonely. The demon in the box considers him perfect. Henry makes wishes that are small, but have unseen consequences for others that Henry knows nothing about. Until he uses one of his wishes for understanding. There is so much humor in this tale despite the seriousness of the events. I enjoyed the demon's level of snark. If this ever becomes an animated feature, Robert Downey Jr. MUST be the voice of the demon! 4.5 out of 5."Skin" by James BrogdenHannah is shocked to find her ex following her home. She's even more shocked by his ravaged features. Could she have unwittingly caused it? Okay, that was gross. It also reminded me of an old CSI episode in which models, frantically searching for perfection, tore at any imperfections of their flesh. A weird and unsatisfying tale. And a little gross as well. 2.5 out of 5"Faith & Fred" by Maura McHughWhile renovating Caldwere Farmhouse, Owen finds two skulls encased in a metal cage, accompanied by a card wtih "Here be Faith & Fred. Keep them homestead, Lest they wail." Afraid the discovery could ruin any possible buyers, Owen bribes his contractor to not call the police, to forget all about them. I honestly loved this, but poor Owen didn't seem to catch the possible option in "You, or another" in regards to staying as the skulls' caretaker. There is so much that could've been explored here. 4 out of 5.While reading, or trying to read, "The Black Fairy's Curse" by Karen Joy Fowler, I gave up. I have absolutely NO doubts that this book could appeal to some fantasy readers, but I'm not one of them.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    Curses theyre a staple of Fantasy fiction, arent they? From Snow Whites cursed apple in the Brothers Grimms fairy tales (1812) to Guy Endores The Werewolf of Paris (1933), stories about deals with a unexpected cost or the unexpected price victims have to pay for their misdeeds have been a staple of the genre for hundreds of years.It may therefore be a little difficult, if not intimidating, therefore, to come up with an anthology of new/recently published fiction that looks at curses with a Curses – they’re a staple of Fantasy fiction, aren’t they? From Snow White’s cursed apple in the Brothers Grimm’s fairy tales (1812) to Guy Endore’s The Werewolf of Paris (1933), stories about ‘deals with a unexpected cost’ or the unexpected price victims have to pay for their misdeeds have been a staple of the genre for hundreds of years.It may therefore be a little difficult, if not intimidating, therefore, to come up with an anthology of new/recently published fiction that looks at curses with a fresh eye. However, Marie and Paul have done well. This is a cracking collection of stories.There are 18 stories here and 2 pieces of poetry by Jane Yolen bookending the collection. 13 of these are new to this collection.What impressed me most here is the range of stories included. Some are written as fairy tale (Christina Henry’s take on Snow White, for example), some contemporary (Christopher Fowler’s Hated). There’re stories that are amusing (M R Carey’s take on what can happen when you are granted a demon’s wishes, Henry and the Snakewood Box, Charlie Jane Anders’s magical tavern tale Fairy Werewolf vs. Vampire Zombie) and those that are definitely not (James Brogden’s Skin is a memorable story that digs deep into body-horror.)Some, such as Maura McHugh’s Faith & Fred ( a story of two screaming skulls found in an old house) are deceptively easy to follow and lure you into a sense of familiarity (often mistaken), whilst some are deliberately and discordantly odd (Jen Williams’ Listen). There’s nasty and nice and tales of good and evil, all of which seem to cover the remit admirably. Some of the characters are victims, others are most definitely not.There’s also some unusual takes on traditional fairy tales – Neil Gaiman’s Troll Bridge deals with those elusive creatures in the title, Christina Henry’s As Red as Blood, As White as Snow and Karen Joy Fowler’s The Black Fairy’s Curse are both more adult takes on the traditional Snow White story, Christopher Golden’s Wendy, Darling is an alternate reimaging of Peter Pan and Alison Littlewood’s The Merrie Dancers is Hans Christian Andersen’s The Red Shoes given a makeover. Little Red by Jane Yolen and her son Adam Stemple is a new take on the Red Riding Hood fairy story.In the end, the collection delivers a strong set of stories and gave me what I would anticipate from such a book. Each story is different from the one before it, which meant that I went from one story to the next, never quite knowing what to expect.Whilst there are big hitters that will sell the book (Neil Gaiman, naturally, Christopher Golden, Charlie Jane Anders) it was the surprises that the lesser-known authors provided that will keep you reading. I particularly enjoyed Lilith Saintcrow’s Haza and Ghani, a chilling tale of sisterly revenge that fans of Game of Thrones will enjoy – not something I was expecting to type in this review!In summary, Cursed is a superior collection that I think you will enjoy enormously and will keep thinking about after you have finished. It may introduce you to some authors you may not have read before, and also remind you how good some of the better-known authors are. I suspect that you will probably want to read more of some of these authors afterwards, and the editors provide a very useful aide-memoire at the end of the book for you to use to go and discover more. It is a sign of the quality of this book that after reading this I went and bought more – which I guess is what an author wants!
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  • Paperbacks
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really difficult review to write because Cursed really was a book of 2 halves for me, I was both enraptured and non plussed at times. The first part of the book was definitely stronger insofar as the types of story I found enjoyable and that's the balance I have to make, because with 20 short stories and poems its going to be impossible to please every reader with every story. This was actually a strength though as no matter what your reading preference there will be something here for This is a really difficult review to write because Cursed really was a book of 2 halves for me, I was both enraptured and non plussed at times. The first part of the book was definitely stronger insofar as the types of story I found enjoyable and that's the balance I have to make, because with 20 short stories and poems its going to be impossible to please every reader with every story. This was actually a strength though as no matter what your reading preference there will be something here for you. I'm a traditional fantasy girl at heart so some of the more contemporary tales dragged a little with maybe a DNF or two, but some of the high fantasy tales were instant re-reads. Each author really did fulfil the brief though and I very much enjoyed how diverse the ideas were, be it taken from existing mythology or through an entirely fresh approach.I have to say that the start was so strong with Christina Henry's "As Red as Blood, As White as Snow" it remains I think my favourite of the collection, it felt like a completely rounded story with all the boxes ticked and is actually a tale I feel I would love to read as a full length novel, I have to also give kudos to Henry for not making the Step mother evil, which is such an outdated viewpoint. "Henry and the Snakewood Box" was another stand out and I enjoyed how it flipped with ingenuity, I've not read any M.R. Carey before but I think I might off the back of this. I also loved how Jen Williams was able to weave such weariness and resignation into her storytelling, giving the reader a true sense of the toll of the curse in "Listen."  I found myself unexpectedly liking "New Wine" when I started I felt that it was too contemporary with a heavy dose of angst, but actually it really pulled me in with a sense of foreboding.There are a lot of tough topics covered most of which you would expect to find in an anthology of this type, by which I mean darker malevolent twists but there are some truly dark stories which some readers may find troubling. I always struggle with depictions of child loss, so I found "Wendy Darling" a tough read, and those that are triggered by self harm may want to give "Little Red" a miss as it's depiction is pretty graphic. I also struggled with the depiction of what can be deemed as a controlling relationship in "Skin" that even after being treated abysmally by her ex partner the protagonist still felt that she was the one that needed to atone for the curse she placed upon him, maybe there was a point there, if there was it didn't translate well.I've also tried the website mentioned repeatedly in Charlie Jane Anders's "Fairy Werewolf Vs Vampire Zombie" and i'm kind of gutted there isn't a comedy page set up!I'm not going to call out the stories that weren't for me, the writing and ideas are sound in their execution, and for the most part I found lots to enjoy in many of the tales. Editing this type of collection must be much like a band preparing an album playlist, keeping the rhythm and pulse steady in order to keep people listening to the end, and for the most part this was achieved. The diversity across the stories must have made this quite tough to put together so on that basis a good job was done.Because there were so many stand out stories I feel that it's fair to give this collection 4*
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  • Amy Walker
    January 1, 1970
    Anthology books can be a gamble. The very nature of compiling a book with a dozen or more different authors, with varying styles and takes on a certain subject means that there could very easily be some parts of a book, perhaps even a majority, that won't quite be to your taste. Luckily, readers seemed to have dodged this curse (see what I did there?) with Cursed: An Anthology of Dark Fairy Tales.The brilliant duo of Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane have once again produced a collection of short Anthology books can be a gamble. The very nature of compiling a book with a dozen or more different authors, with varying styles and takes on a certain subject means that there could very easily be some parts of a book, perhaps even a majority, that won't quite be to your taste. Luckily, readers seemed to have dodged this curse (see what I did there?) with Cursed: An Anthology of Dark Fairy Tales.The brilliant duo of Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane have once again produced a collection of short stories and poems that not just manage to entertain, but make some bold choices. As the name of the book suggests, there are some stories in this collection that have their roots in the world of fairy tales, and are intriguing reinterpretations of classic stories, whilst some others do something completely different and bring the magic and horror of curses into the modern world.'As Red As Blood, As White As Snow' by Christina Henry is the first story in the anthology, and draws upon the tale of Snow White as inspiration. If you're at all familiar with Henry's work you'll know that she has a history of taking stories that you know and twisting them into new and interesting tales, such as Red Queen, Alice, and Lost Boys, and this story is no exception. It completely flips two of the central characters, making Prince Charming into a truly frightening villain, whilst the character of the 'wicked' stepmother is actually a caring figure out to help the heroine.'Haza and Ghani' by Lilith Saintcrow takes the well known Hansel and Gretel and gives it an Indian twist, having the twins run away from home instead of being abandoned, and finding refuge a temple to the Flayed God rather than a witch's home. Despite these differences the story manages to stay true to the themes of the original whilst giving readers something new. Similarly, 'Wendy, Darling' by Christopher Golden uses the character of Wendy Darling from Peter Pan as the basis for what proves to be an incredibly dark and haunting story that also seems to draw upon imagery from the legend of la llorona.It's not just re-imagined fairy tales on offer here, however, as some of the stories in the collection are completely original and set in more recognisable, modern worlds.'Hated' by Christopher Fowler takes a very modern look at what a curse could be in the modern world, and how it could affect someone and change their life. It's probably one of the most subtle stories in the book, and doesn't push magic or mysticism in your face. It shows how one tiny thing could go on to alter your life in huge ways.'Henry and the Snakewood Box' by M.R, Carey takes a somewhat lighthearted approach to the idea of curses, and mixes in some interesting notions about the inner workings of the universe and how time can change. 'Faith and Fred', on the other hand, is a much more haunting story, and would fit right at home in an anthology about ghosts and hauntings, packing in some seriously creepy moments.These aren't the only stories in Cursed: An Anthology of Dark Fairy Tales by a long shot, and there are some others that I haven't even mentioned that stand out too. The book is packed with great tales, and some amazing authors. Whatever style that you enjoy, or writers that you like, is sure to be met here. The book has something for everyone, and continues the tradition of Titan producing some of the best anthology books around.
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  • Cora Tea Party Princess
    January 1, 1970
    Book Review: Cursed: An Anthology of Dark Fairy Tales edited by Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane5 Words: Something beautifully haunting for everyone.I loved this anthology so much. I generally have a great love for anthologies because of the scope - there tends to be something for everyone and there are a wide range of styles. They are a great way to discover new authors or find something different from an author you love.When I saw that Christina Henry was contributing to this anthology of dark Book Review: Cursed: An Anthology of Dark Fairy Tales edited by Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane5 Words: Something beautifully haunting for everyone.I loved this anthology so much. I generally have a great love for anthologies because of the scope - there tends to be something for everyone and there are a wide range of styles. They are a great way to discover new authors or find something different from an author you love.When I saw that Christina Henry was contributing to this anthology of dark fairy tales, I was sold, because she is a master at twisting fairy tales and making them Dark. The second story in the anthology, I have to admit that As Red As Blood, As White As Snow was my favourite of the bunch.Weirdly for an antholgy, there wasn't a single piece that I didn't like. They're all awesome. I loved the styles, the darkness, the humour. I thought it was fantastically curated and loved the order of the stories. I liked that it wasn't just retellings too - there are plenty of brand new fables to get stuck in to. Collectively, this anothology is beautiful and haunting. Individually the stories are gruesome and dark and twisted and horrific. It's truly excellent.This is collection to give you goosebumps and a thrill. It's perfect for fans of fairy tales and fantasy and horror.
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  • Rebeca F.
    January 1, 1970
    This is a lovely collection of dark fairy tales under the subject of curses, quite diverse, there are some modern and others more traditionally woven, but most were really different retellings, if they were even retellings at all, interesting and compelling, twisted and pitch black. I originally was interested in it because of Henry's story, which I was so surprised to discover was a retelling of Snow White/ Bluebeard into a delicious little tale. But there were many other stories I liked even This is a lovely collection of dark fairy tales under the subject of curses, quite diverse, there are some modern and others more traditionally woven, but most were really different retellings, if they were even retellings at all, interesting and compelling, twisted and pitch black. I originally was interested in it because of Henry's story, which I was so surprised to discover was a retelling of Snow White/ Bluebeard into a delicious little tale. But there were many other stories I liked even more. I also adored Listen; Wendy, Darling; Fairy werewolf vs Vampire zombie and I think my favorite was Again by Tim Lebbon, which was probably the less dark one of the pack, but just my style. Overall this is a pretty solid anthology, beautiful and haunting.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Do you like anthologies? Let me be more specific. Do you like twisted anthologies? Witches, retells of dark fairy tales and new ones that give something dark, this way comes a whole new meaning? Want Alice going down the looking glass look like a walk in the park? Well, dear friends, if you aren't reading Titan's anthologies? You have don't have a reading life. Just go stick yourself in a corner and call it a day. You are reading wrong. You aren't reading at all. I'm not sure what you are doing Do you like anthologies? Let me be more specific. Do you like twisted anthologies? Witches, retells of dark fairy tales and new ones that give something dark, this way comes a whole new meaning? Want Alice going down the looking glass look like a walk in the park? Well, dear friends, if you aren't reading Titan's anthologies? You have don't have a reading life. Just go stick yourself in a corner and call it a day. You are reading wrong. You aren't reading at all. I'm not sure what you are doing with yourself? But you aren't living. And coming from someone who doesn't have a life, period? Well. That is saying something. From Hex Life to Wonderland and now Cursed? Just put it on auto buy, kids. You won't find or do better than Titan.Full Review on Novellives.Com
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Middling anthology. No stand outs. Its very difficult to review an anthology of short stories. Normally there are some stand out stories that stay with you long after youve read them. And then the majority of them are pleasant distractions. Unfortunately there are no stand out tales in here. There is nothing that I will come back to and nothing I will think about after the closure of the book. The theme of the stories is Curses and Fairytales. Some are very clearly linked some are tenuous. And Middling anthology. No stand outs. It’s very difficult to review an anthology of short stories. Normally there are some stand out stories that stay with you long after you’ve read them. And then the majority of them are pleasant distractions. Unfortunately there are no stand out tales in here. There is nothing that I will come back to and nothing I will think about after the closure of the book. The theme of the stories is Curses and Fairytales. Some are very clearly linked some are tenuous. And to describe any in detail will give the game away. But suffice it to say this is a book that causes no ruffles and fleeting enjoyment.
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  • Alejandra
    January 1, 1970
    I had not read short stories in a while, so I picked this one up and remembered why I havent read short stories for a while. It is just not my thing. I need more to be able to engage fully with a book. But hey, thats just me.That being said, there are a couple good ones in this compilation. My favourites were Neil Gaimans and MR Careys. Quirky, odd and sinister.All in all its a quick read, but not my cup of tea.Moving on. I had not read short stories in a while, so I picked this one up and remembered why I haven’t read short stories for a while. It is just not my thing. I need more to be able to engage fully with a book. But hey, that’s just me.That being said, there are a couple good ones in this compilation. My favourites were Neil Gaiman’s and MR Carey’s. Quirky, odd and sinister.All in all it’s a quick read, but not my cup of tea.Moving on.
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  • Pamela Scott
    January 1, 1970
    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...So I love fairytales, dark fairytales, fairytale, retellings and short stories. So my enjoyment of this collection was a given. I wouldnt expect anything less. Some of my favourite writers have stories in Cursed including Paul Kane, Neil Gaiman, James Brogden and Tim Lebbon. You know what to expect with such high calibre writers, dark delights. I also enjoy the work of Jane Yolen, . What impressed me was the depth and range of stories. They were all very https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...So I love fairytales, dark fairytales, fairytale, retellings and short stories. So my enjoyment of this collection was a given. I wouldn’t expect anything less. Some of my favourite writers have stories in Cursed including Paul Kane, Neil Gaiman, James Brogden and Tim Lebbon. You know what to expect with such high calibre writers, dark delights. I also enjoy the work of Jane Yolen, . What impressed me was the depth and range of stories. They were all very different even though they shared similar tropes and themes. Some of the stories are retellings and some are original. The best stories were Troll Bridge by Neil Gaiman, At That Age by Catriona Ward, Henry and the Snakewood Box by M.R Carey and Skin by James Brogden. There’s something to delight every fantasy / fairytale / horror fan.
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  • Lorin✨
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. *thank you to Titan books for providing me with an ARC copy for review!*Such an interesting selection! I have lots of updates rating every story in this collection, so you can find my favourites there. I think that this was excellently put together, there is genuinely something for every reader in this one. If youre a fan of weird, dark tales, Id definitely pick this one up. 3.5 stars. *thank you to Titan books for providing me with an ARC copy for review!*Such an interesting selection! I have lots of updates rating every story in this collection, so you can find my favourites there. I think that this was excellently put together, there is genuinely something for every reader in this one. If you’re a fan of weird, dark tales, I’d definitely pick this one up.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    This is a collection of re-imagined and some new age fairytales and folk tales. Overall, I quite enjoyed it- think Bros Grimm for this generation. I will admit, though, there were some that I got to the end of and wasn't quite sure I understood entirely. Still, it was a good read, the stories aren't overly long and there is always a lot happening.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Some stories were stellar and worth 4 stars, while others were less good and were only 3 stars, so this whole book was probably 3.5 stars for me. Some stories were good, some were confusing, and some seemed unfinished. I did read an ARC, so maybe things got polished in the final printing.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Some of these were great, others head-scratching, a couple complete duds. I was beyond disappointed that Neil Gaiman's piece was one from his own anthology of short stories published years ago.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Some of these were very clever. Skipped one because it just felt like you knew how it ended from the first 3 pages. But overall, very enjoyable.
  • Alexis Stankewitz
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good anthology! I love fairytale retellings, especially darker ones which this is. I liked most of theses, which is usual for an anthology collection.
  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    A great collection of work. My favourites from this collection include Christina Henrys As Red as Blood, as White as Snow, Jen Williams Listen & Tim Lebbons Again. A great collection of work. My favourites from this collection include Christina Henry’s “As Red as Blood, as White as Snow”, Jen Williams’ “Listen” & Tim Lebbon’s “Again”.
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    My full review:https://setthetape.com/2020/03/03/cur...
  • Sharon Sargent
    January 1, 1970
    Varied selection of dark, and not-so-dark fairy tales of good curses, bad curses, and the in between.
  • Doreen
    January 1, 1970
    3/15/2020 3.5 stars. Full review tk on the 17th at TheFrumiousConsortium.net.
  • Céline (lumierewhispers)
    January 1, 1970
    4 🌟Dark, creepy and fascinating - if you're looking for a quick read about curses and dark magic, you'll be pleased with Cursed. Not all the short stories included are retellings of classic fairy tales, in fact I believe a few of them to be original stories (my favorite is the one about a malevolent genie), but they were all incredibly imaginative and chilling. Totally recommend this one for a cold, dark autumn evening. 4 🌟Dark, creepy and fascinating - if you're looking for a quick read about curses and dark magic, you'll be pleased with Cursed. Not all the short stories included are retellings of classic fairy tales, in fact I believe a few of them to be original stories (my favorite is the one about a malevolent genie…), but they were all incredibly imaginative and chilling. Totally recommend this one for a cold, dark autumn evening.
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