Designing Your Work Life
From the authors of the #1 New York Times best seller Designing Your Life ("Life has questions. They have answers" --The NYT)--a job-changing, outlook-changing, life-changing book that shows us how to transform our work lives and create a dream job that is meaningful without necessarily changing the job we have.Dysfunctional Belief: I'm stuck in a lousy situation (and there's nothing I can do about it).Reframe: I'm stuck in a lousy situation (and I'm finding the problems and the solutions).Bill Burnett and Dave Evans successfully taught graduate and undergraduate students at Stanford University and readers of their best-selling book, Designing Your Life ("The prototype for a happy life." --Brian Lehrer, NPR), that designers don't analyze, worry, think, complain their way forward; they build their way forward. In Designing Your Work Life, Burnett and Evans show us how design thinking can transform our present job and our experience of work in general by utilizing the designer mindsets: Curiosity. Reframing. Radical collaboration. Awareness. Bias to action. Storytelling.Dysfunctional Belief: Good enough isn't good enough.Reframe: Good enough is GREAT--for now. Burnett and Evans show us how, with tools, tips, and ideas, to enjoy what we have and to live in a state of "good enough, for now," one of the strongest, most effective reframes there is, and how this idea, once understood and accepted, can make new possibilities available, giving us the energy to enjoy the present moment and allowing us to begin to prototype possible futures. And if we want to quit? Burnett and Evans show us how to use the job we have to get the job we want (in another company), and show us as well, the art and science of quitting (leave the campsite better than we found it), using the power of the quit design to reframe how we finish our current job and get a better one. They write, as well, about how the work world is changing as the automation of work increases (hello Alexa, artificial intelligence, drones, and robots); how thinking like a designer can make us flexible, and ready to adapt to change . . .

Designing Your Work Life Details

TitleDesigning Your Work Life
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 25th, 2020
PublisherKnopf Publishing Group
ISBN-139780525655244
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Business, Psychology

Designing Your Work Life Review

  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Given my feelings about the first book, it seems unlikely that I would choose to read this one, and yet here we are, and I really can't say that this one was much better than the first, although to be fair, my perspective has changed a lot since reading the first one.I have to say it. This one is just as bougie as the first. The authors underestimate how many people struggle with basic survival (even employed people) and don't seem to understand privilege in the least. The book has a socially Given my feelings about the first book, it seems unlikely that I would choose to read this one, and yet here we are, and I really can't say that this one was much better than the first, although to be fair, my perspective has changed a lot since reading the first one.I have to say it. This one is just as bougie as the first. The authors underestimate how many people struggle with basic survival (even employed people) and don't seem to understand privilege in the least. The book has a socially conservative tone that assumes a mostly white, mostly male, christian, and heteronormative world where no one experiences bias, glass ceilings, microaggressions, etc. These are profound problems in a book that assumes anyone, anywhere can change anything about their work life. It makes me think badly about Stanford, compared to other elite schools that are certainly more woke than where these guys are coming from.I am so frustrated by all of that.That said, some of their concept are useful. My favorite was BDO - best doable option - and I intend to introduce that one to colleagues who bemoan having to make imperfect choices and who cling to options that are purely theoretical.The what-do-you-make discussion was helpful as well. I did the exercise for that one with the sliders representing money, impact, and expression. Turns out, I have a very low need for expression, but I feel frustrated by what I'm doing in terms of impact...and I'm already working on that without needing this book to tell me to do that. The visual, however, was really satisfying to have.The brief discussion about StrengthsFinder was good too. It prompted me to revisit my results.Overall, not a book I'm going to recommend, even though it does have small bites that I found worthwhile. For people who have tons of resources and privilege, but who are lost AF, this book may have some insight.Also, I can't shake the feeling that a lot of the stories in it sound fake...
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    I got this out of the library because I found Burnett and Evans's earlier book helpful in imagining how I might like my life to look as I moved toward retirement. Because I am pretty happy at how things are working for me, this book is not essential for me. But if I was younger, and particularly if I was thinking about changing jobs, the exercises and strategies contained here would be very helpful. I like the ideas of reframing and curiosity around being bored or feeling out of place: What did I got this out of the library because I found Burnett and Evans's earlier book helpful in imagining how I might like my life to look as I moved toward retirement. Because I am pretty happy at how things are working for me, this book is not essential for me. But if I was younger, and particularly if I was thinking about changing jobs, the exercises and strategies contained here would be very helpful. I like the ideas of reframing and curiosity around being bored or feeling out of place: What did I learn today? What did I initiate? Who did I help? Likewise, considering money, impact, and expression as each important rather getting stuck on one or another. And remembering that autonomy, relatedness, and competence all play a part in work satisfaction. There are full chapters on staying, quitting, moving on, and being your own boss, all with exercises and strategies. An easy read but very practical for those thinking about how to thrive at work in these changing days.
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  • Rich
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure I'm the best reader for this book. Topics like money v. meaning, mind-set, and power and politics--roughly the first half of the book--were more useful to me than topics like quitting, moving on, and being one's own boss. Like Bill and Dave's previous book, Designing Your Life, Designing Your Work Life is great and full of helpful ideas and activities. I found dysfunctional beliefs and corresponding reframes most helpful and again I've been given new ways of thinking about relevant I'm not sure I'm the best reader for this book. Topics like money v. meaning, mind-set, and power and politics--roughly the first half of the book--were more useful to me than topics like quitting, moving on, and being one's own boss. Like Bill and Dave's previous book, Designing Your Life, Designing Your Work Life is great and full of helpful ideas and activities. I found dysfunctional beliefs and corresponding reframes most helpful and again I've been given new ways of thinking about relevant problems at work. Between both books, I found DYL more helpful based on my circumstances, but DYWL is another must-read for anyone looking for tools and ideas to help them thrive.
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  • Kirstin Swartz
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this up because of the title and the subject had epitomes of what I enjoyed most about Sarah Knights Get Your Sh*t Together. Designing Your Work Life is all about re-framing your way of thinking and focusing on what you can do to make your life even just a little bit better; how to make it good enough, for now. This is a great book for younger full time workers who are struggling with their current work lives and need expert advice and guides on how to stay positive and motivated at I picked this up because of the title and the subject had epitomes of what I enjoyed most about Sarah Knight’s “Get Your Sh*t Together.” Designing Your Work Life is all about re-framing your way of thinking and focusing on what you can do to make your life even just a little bit better; how to make it good enough, for now. This is a great book for younger full time workers who are struggling with their current work lives and need expert advice and guides on how to stay positive and motivated at work, or even see if the work that you are doing is what you should be doing.
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  • Stevo Brock
    January 1, 1970
    This book was Stevo's Business Book of the Week for the week of 3/8, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet and Stevo's Novel Ideas. How to visualize and build a work-life that is productive, engaged, meaningful, and more fun.Find more Business Books of the week on my Goodreads Listopia page at https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/9..., and find many more recommended books on my Amazon Influencer page at https://www.amazon.com/shop/stevo4747.
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  • Savannah Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    The best toolkit out there for people looking to find purpose at work.
  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I highly recommend this book for people wanting a mid-career reboot or for college graduates trying to find the right job
  • Trina
    January 1, 1970
    I don't normally read this type of book, nor am I looking to change jobs, but it was still interesting and I learned a few good tips.
  • Csimplot Simplot
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book!!!
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