Inheritors
Spanning more than 150 years, and set in multiple locations in colonial and postcolonial Asia and the United States, Inheritors paints a kaleidoscopic portrait of its characters as they grapple with the legacies of loss, imperialism, and war.Written from myriad perspectives and in a wide range of styles, each of these interconnected stories is designed to speak to the others, contesting assumptions and illuminating the complicated ways we experience, interpret, and pass on our personal and shared histories. A retired doctor, for example, is forced to confront the horrific moral consequences of his wartime actions. An elderly woman subjects herself to an interview, gradually revealing a fifty-year old murder and its shattering aftermath. And in the last days of a doomed war, a prodigal son who enlisted against his parents' wishes survives the American invasion of his island outpost, only to be asked for a sacrifice more daunting than any he imagined.

Inheritors Details

TitleInheritors
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 14th, 2020
PublisherDoubleday Books
ISBN-139780385545372
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Cultural, Japan, Asia

Inheritors Review

  • BookMonkey
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 5🍌Growing up a young Monkey in the United States, history -- and especially World War II -- was presented in black and white. When it came to the Pacific side of World War II, we learned almost nothing beyond Pearl Harbor, kamikaze pilots, possibly Iwo Jima. And, of course, the atomic bombs. As a student, I pictured the brave scientists working feverishly in their secret labs during the Manhattan Project; I pictured the Enola Gay flying over the Pacific on its spiritual mission; I pictur Rating: 5🍌Growing up a young Monkey in the United States, history -- and especially World War II -- was presented in black and white. When it came to the Pacific side of World War II, we learned almost nothing beyond Pearl Harbor, kamikaze pilots, possibly Iwo Jima. And, of course, the atomic bombs. As a student, I pictured the brave scientists working feverishly in their secret labs during the Manhattan Project; I pictured the Enola Gay flying over the Pacific on its spiritual mission; I pictured the mushroom cloud rising into the sky. It was only when I read John Hersey's Hiroshima as a high school student that it dawned on me the bombs actually landed on people. I don't blame my young Monkey-self for that simplistic worldview, but rather the schools, textbooks, and teachers -- indeed the very way that history was taught in America, where the US was seen as a historic force of unimpeachable good and Japan was seen as a land of cherry blossoms, samurai, and ramen.Asako Serizawa’s thought-provoking, daring, and altogether remarkable debut collection of interconnected stories challenges these received ideas, stereotypes, and misunderstood or little known aspects of a war that engulfed the entire Asia-Pacific region for nearly a decade and led to 36 million deaths. Not a traditional collection of disparate short stories, the 13 pieces in INHERITORS converse and combine to illustrate how the events of World War II in the Pacific shaped the fate of a single Japanese family across multiple generations in Japan and the United States. A family tree at the beginning of the book, along with the epigraph from Theodor Adorno ("Yet the fully enlightened earth radiates disaster triumphant"), offers one roadmap for navigating the text.The central stories, set in Asia (primarily Japan) during World War II and the American Occupation of Japan (1945-1952), explore topics such as the unspeakable atrocities of Japan in East and Southeast Asia; the American air raids of Japan that destroyed dozens of cities and killed hundreds of thousands of civilians, especially the March 1945 firebombing of Tokyo; military sex slavery, as well as the state-sanctioned prostitution houses set up for American servicemen after Surrender; and the nascent Japanese Communist movement that stirred among the ruins under the iron fist of General MacArthur and the American Occupation. Other stories are set in the United States, including two that follow a Japanese-American woman who visits Japan more than 50 years after the war in search of her family history. Whether depicting a Japanese soldier who believes in the righteousness of his mission, a philosophical doctor who regrets his participation in wartime atrocities, or a young boy whose life is irrevocably altered by the 1945 firebombing of Tokyo, Serizawa treats her characters and her subject with nuance, intelligence, and extraordinary compassion, crafting not only an indictment of war and nationalism but also an attempt at understanding how ordinary people can find themselves supporting horrible national policies or even committing horrible acts. And in doing so the book forces readers to ask these questions of themselves -- incredibly relevant in our modern world for obvious reasons. But Serizawa is up to something even more in INHERITORS. In the final two stories, we are vaulted into the United States of the near future (the latest story in the timeline takes place in 2035). Juxtaposed with the stories that precede it -- and read in the context of Adorno’s epigraph -- these pieces deliver a stark warning for the future while casting a backwards light on the rest of the collection that tempted me to start over and read the whole thing again. Other GR reviewers have commented on the wide range of styles and settings of these stories, as well as the difficulty of some of the pieces, and that is indeed one of the collection's notable traits. It's a bold choice: the wide range had the effect of keeping me slightly off-balance from story to story while compelling me to grapple with each story and character on their own terms and in relation to the collection as a whole. But beyond the thematic and formal concerns, what makes this a 5🍌 book for me is that these stories are almost invariably beautifully executed and extraordinarily moving -- the book affected me at a visceral level, leaving me time and time again with an aching chest and prickling scalp (my personal barometer of literary experience). Not a novel, not a traditional collection of short stories, not historical fiction (indeed, in an author's note Serizawa takes to task the very concept of historical fiction), INHERITORS stands out as an ambitious piece of literature. And like the characters haunted by the memory of war throughout the book, I too will be haunted by the memory of reading it.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Inheritors is an ambitious debut book and that is a good thing. It spans 150 years—five generations of a Japanese family, starting in 2013 and ending in the imagined future of 2035. The setting changes from occupied Japan to the United States, but the theme is consistent: the trauma of war doesn’t end when a peace treaty is signed. Rather, it continues to affect the people involved and future generations.Sometimes spellbinding, other times obtuse, the stories can be uneven in their presentation. Inheritors is an ambitious debut book and that is a good thing. It spans 150 years—five generations of a Japanese family, starting in 2013 and ending in the imagined future of 2035. The setting changes from occupied Japan to the United States, but the theme is consistent: the trauma of war doesn’t end when a peace treaty is signed. Rather, it continues to affect the people involved and future generations.Sometimes spellbinding, other times obtuse, the stories can be uneven in their presentation. The best ones are those that drill down to moral dilemmas: an ordinary housewife who sacrifices herself as a sort of “comfort woman” so that she and her husband can survive. A woman whose memory is fading who eventually reveals a 50-year-old murder. A doctor, now retired, who lost touch with his humanity in undertaking wartime actions.The book shifts the spotlight – typically reserved for the European point of view – to colonial and postcolonial Asia and grapples with the fallout of war and displacement: the devastation, the trauma, the sacrifices, the legacies of loss, and the quest for adaptation and understanding. This is a fine book about that sheds light on the ways that war survivors and successive generations selectively experience and remember and relay the aftermath. Certainly it is well worth reading.
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  • Kendra
    January 1, 1970
    A stunning and magnificent book about World War II in Japan and America that everyone should read. Serizawa's writing is beautiful, brash, and wholly enthralling as she charts the emotions and reactions and relationships that touch on one Japanese family over many generations. Serizawa's tiny details, a sense or proportion, and the ability to write unflinchingly about horror and trauma make this book outstanding.
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  • Jessica Haider
    January 1, 1970
    Inheritors by Asako Serizawa is a collection of interconnected stories that span over a century from the turn of the 20th century to the near future. Most of the stories focus on members of a Japanese family and center of impact of World War II. We see characters living in Japan before the war and during the war and their descendants living in America. We see how families are torn apart and people are forced to take on roles that they didn't want to such as working in a brothel for American sold Inheritors by Asako Serizawa is a collection of interconnected stories that span over a century from the turn of the 20th century to the near future. Most of the stories focus on members of a Japanese family and center of impact of World War II. We see characters living in Japan before the war and during the war and their descendants living in America. We see how families are torn apart and people are forced to take on roles that they didn't want to such as working in a brothel for American soldiers. Each story was told from the perspective of a different character and in a different style, giving each story its own distinct feel. It was interesting and heartbreaking to read about the impact of WWII from the Japanese perspective. We often hear WWII stories from the viewpoint of the victor (the Allies), so getting this take was different and an emotional journey. What to Listen to While Reading (or during reading breaks)-The Hanging Garden by the Cure-Cities in Dust by Siouxsie and the Banshees-Ikiru by MYKOOL-One Day in Japan by aekasoraI received an advanced review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • M.H.
    January 1, 1970
    The Inheritors, while contemplative and personal, is really a commentary about the Twentieth Century and what that means for humanity now. Like punctuated snapshots in a a family album, it is told from the perspective of various members of a Japanese and Japanese-American family in the form of loosely connected short stories. It marks a rise of hope and progress (thanks to things like increased democracy, opening of cultures, and scientific advances) at the beginning of a new century, that is in The Inheritors, while contemplative and personal, is really a commentary about the Twentieth Century and what that means for humanity now. Like punctuated snapshots in a a family album, it is told from the perspective of various members of a Japanese and Japanese-American family in the form of loosely connected short stories. It marks a rise of hope and progress (thanks to things like increased democracy, opening of cultures, and scientific advances) at the beginning of a new century, that is interrupted, marred, and stained by racism, abuses of technology, the horrors of war, and the terrible moral choices forced by conflict and protectionism. But though the themes are global and explosive, the stories are quiet. They are individual experiences, held close to the chest, like thoughts and memories that one carries to their grave.The stories in the past are not quite historical fiction, and later ones are not quite speculative, but they all have a tangible immediacy and ring with truth. And they all dare to ask the question: did it have to happen that way? Was it predictable? Avoidable? And perhaps more importantly, can we make better choices now for future generations?
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  • Caity
    January 1, 1970
    All together this is a gripping narrative. There is a family tree in the start of the book but as you read the stories and see the families’ perceptions of each other and how they fit together or how far apart their stories are it paints a very different picture. The stories are from different perspectives spanning the generations and geography, and vary greatly in writing style. This variance in writing style was in my opinion both the greatest strength and weakness of the book. Some of the sto All together this is a gripping narrative. There is a family tree in the start of the book but as you read the stories and see the families’ perceptions of each other and how they fit together or how far apart their stories are it paints a very different picture. The stories are from different perspectives spanning the generations and geography, and vary greatly in writing style. This variance in writing style was in my opinion both the greatest strength and weakness of the book. Some of the stories were harder follow because of their format and this may be particularly true for readers without much background knowledge of the historical events depicted in the stories. However, as the book continues and the way the stories are intertwined becomes more apparent many of the more confusing details are clarified. The different styles also add a lot of depth to the stories helping to highlight the different personalities and the time period in which the stories are told. I most enjoyed the stories that were told by the characters reminiscing later in life as it showed both their history and the ways these stories were buried over time. Overall the book presents a heart wrenching and thought provoking narrative that was fascinating to read.
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  • W. Benson Cartwright
    January 1, 1970
    More than just a collection, Asako Serizawa's brilliant book Inheritors functions almost as a body of stories, with each piece contributing to create a larger, living organism. Set in the US, Japan, and China, the stories follow the lives and decisions of one family during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Heavily steeped in the Second World and its aftermath, this collection looks at the consequences of our daily decisions, how a small or large choice may lead to the end of one life, on More than just a collection, Asako Serizawa's brilliant book Inheritors functions almost as a body of stories, with each piece contributing to create a larger, living organism. Set in the US, Japan, and China, the stories follow the lives and decisions of one family during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Heavily steeped in the Second World and its aftermath, this collection looks at the consequences of our daily decisions, how a small or large choice may lead to the end of one life, only to spur a new, different life, even within the same person. Each story swirls and blooms anew in the stories that follow and preceded it, radiating out to create greater meaning and depth within the whole. Extremely relevant now, the book explores and interrogates the means by which we justify our actions and decisions and how we find ways to live with their consequences, especially when those decisions and actions were not what we would have expected from ourselves. This marvelous, stunning book asks us to not only look at what we ourselves have inherited, but what we leave as an inheritance to those who come after. Inheritors truly is a vital read, an absolutely one-of-kind book that will explode through your life and leave you reeling long after you finish.
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  • Malorie
    January 1, 1970
    Inheritors is such a unique collection of stories. In the opening of the book, you are given a family tree, and it is immediately apparent how these stories interconnect to make a whole. Even with this knowledge, the way that each of these stories unfolds is surprising in its interconnectedness, in the way that pain and trauma from war and colonialism can impact generations, in the way that, after 150 years, individuals and culture still grapple with the ramifications of a postcolonial world. Ea Inheritors is such a unique collection of stories. In the opening of the book, you are given a family tree, and it is immediately apparent how these stories interconnect to make a whole. Even with this knowledge, the way that each of these stories unfolds is surprising in its interconnectedness, in the way that pain and trauma from war and colonialism can impact generations, in the way that, after 150 years, individuals and culture still grapple with the ramifications of a postcolonial world. Each of the stories is centered on an individual within this family tree, though the stories are not necessarily told from the perspective of that individual. It follows an old woman's loss of herself, parents' loss of a son and the gaining of another son, the first son's plight after his life was destroyed, and the adopted son's struggle with identity. It goes on from this, weaving a picture more complete than most novels I have read. And that is the thing, this is a collection of stories, but because they are so interconnected it felt like reading a novel. Each of the stories is in a different style, and a different perspective, but they flow together seamlessly to create a transgenerational viewpoint that encompasses these tragedies of war, but also the simple and human needs of day to day life. It filled me with so much empathy, and for that I am grateful.
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    'We're not separate from our histories.'This is a brave and bold debut from Japanese-born Asako Serizawa. In a series of inter-connected stories that follow various generations of the same family, moving back and forwards in time, it's more a novel than stories. Covering a period of something like 150 years, and moving between the US - to where one member of the family emigrated - and Japan, the characters in each generation find themselves addressing the same questions of identity and history: 'We're not separate from our histories.'This is a brave and bold debut from Japanese-born Asako Serizawa. In a series of inter-connected stories that follow various generations of the same family, moving back and forwards in time, it's more a novel than stories. Covering a period of something like 150 years, and moving between the US - to where one member of the family emigrated - and Japan, the characters in each generation find themselves addressing the same questions of identity and history: How are we shaped by the past, and who controls the narrative of history? The book covers many issues that define US, Japanese and Korean relationships, and it isn't afraid to tackle some weighty issues head-on. But it is always in terms of family, as the title refers. One particular section ('Pavilion') involves two brothers discussing Borges' short story 'The Garden of Forking Paths' and this is, I think, vital to understanding the structure and intent of the book. One of them, describing a novel that is part of the short story, comments on the concept of 'diverging, converging, crisscrossing, or simply running parallel across a vast, endless labyrinth of time'. As Serizawa weaves her story in a non-linear fashion the reader has to pay attention to the relationships between characters and this idea of crisscrossing stories. The final couple of sections move us into the future of the mid 2030s, with the next generation of the family coping with a very different world.Indeed, for me, these last two sections didn't quite sit as well as the rest of the book, ending with a sort of sci-fi feel that slightly jarred against what had been, until then, a wonderfully crafted book. Despite this, however, Serizawa has announced herself as a writer worth watching, and this is a terrific, intelligent kind of book that fully deserves to be read. Can't quite give it 5 stars, but a notable 4.5 stars for sure. Enjoyable and thought-provoking.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    "The Inheritors" is a masterful collection of short stories surrounding a family as they suffer, progress, and grow from the early 20th century until the near future. The stories cover a variety of time periods, but special attention is given to World War II and its ensuing effects.Emotional, intelligent, and at times utterly heart-rending, this collection brings the reader into its world of 20th century Japan with ease. The stories are told in a variety of formats from an interview by a journal "The Inheritors" is a masterful collection of short stories surrounding a family as they suffer, progress, and grow from the early 20th century until the near future. The stories cover a variety of time periods, but special attention is given to World War II and its ensuing effects.Emotional, intelligent, and at times utterly heart-rending, this collection brings the reader into its world of 20th century Japan with ease. The stories are told in a variety of formats from an interview by a journalist to personal recollections to entries in a journal. Each story helps you not only connect with the characters it includes but provides context and backstory to everyone else in the family tree. I will say that because the stories are not presented chronologically, it is necessary to use the family tree diagram in the front of the book to help ground yourself in each piece. This is a collection that spans thousands of miles in geographic distance while exploring concepts as far-reaching as identity, culture, climate change, and war. I would recommend "The Inheritors" to anyone with an interest in World War II, Japan in general, sweeping generational family sagas, or even just particularly well-rendered short story collections.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Inheritors caught my interest due to the blurb, and despite being a bit more literary than I typically go for, I found this an interesting read, highlighting the stories of a family across the generations in both Japan and the US through all the hardships they experienced. I feel like it’s not something that was taught enough in school, apart from the late 19th century immigration and Wo I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Inheritors caught my interest due to the blurb, and despite being a bit more literary than I typically go for, I found this an interesting read, highlighting the stories of a family across the generations in both Japan and the US through all the hardships they experienced. I feel like it’s not something that was taught enough in school, apart from the late 19th century immigration and World War II.And while it’s not a linear narrative, and thus it did feel a little jarring, even with the guide at the beginning, I enjoyed how each section felt distinct due to the different styles, and how these vignettes (as that’s what it reminded me of) delved into such impactful topics, despite the fact that there wasn’t a ton of page time for every person’s story. I especially liked the interview that unveils a long-hidden murder, and how poignantly that was conveyed. I enjoyed this book, and liked trying something a bit outside my comfort zone. If you love family-oriented stories, then I think this is worth giving a try.
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  • Shana
    January 1, 1970
    ***Thank you, NetGalley, for the ARC***I wasn't sure what to make of this book at first. Each individual story connects to the others as it spans the period right before WWII through an imagined post-2020 world, and the perspectives encompass various branches of the same family tree. It's a bit discombobulating at times to try to make sense of where each person/story fits in, and I'm sure that I missed a lot in my confusion, but what I was still able to get a lot out of it. The Japanese perspect ***Thank you, NetGalley, for the ARC***I wasn't sure what to make of this book at first. Each individual story connects to the others as it spans the period right before WWII through an imagined post-2020 world, and the perspectives encompass various branches of the same family tree. It's a bit discombobulating at times to try to make sense of where each person/story fits in, and I'm sure that I missed a lot in my confusion, but what I was still able to get a lot out of it. The Japanese perspective of this time is one that isn't often accessible to those of us in the US unless we truly search it out, and I appreciated the wider scope of knowledge and experience Serizawa provides. Though fiction, I still learned quite a bit, such as about Unit 731 in Pingfang and the atrocities that took place there. All throughout, Serizawa also allows her characters to show tremendous depth of varied emotion around what they're experiencing. In doing so, she lets the reader imagine themselves in similar situations and wonder how they might conduct themselves, which is a valuable moral exercise in troubled times.
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  • Nuha
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to DoubleDay Books and NetGalley for the Advanced Reader's Copy!Available July 14th 2020When we think of Japan, we are often thinking of a sanitary, clean cut nation; maybe we just think of sushi or the bright and colorful anime world. We don't think about Japan's complicated history, its own internal and external wars and the lingering effects of colonialism. Asako Serizawa's "Inheritors" is a tour de force through modern Japanese history, often drawing on aspects of Japanese culture Thank you to DoubleDay Books and NetGalley for the Advanced Reader's Copy!Available July 14th 2020When we think of Japan, we are often thinking of a sanitary, clean cut nation; maybe we just think of sushi or the bright and colorful anime world. We don't think about Japan's complicated history, its own internal and external wars and the lingering effects of colonialism. Asako Serizawa's "Inheritors" is a tour de force through modern Japanese history, often drawing on aspects of Japanese culture that we don't see in the mainstream. With a variety of narrative styles, Serizawa's collection of stories is surprisingly cohesive. From a simple tragic tale of a father leaving his family to a heart-wrenching and horrifying account of a true Japanese comfort woman, Serizawa shows the underside of Japan. The realities that Serizawa brings to life should be embraced and acknowledged as a part of history. A well written, emotive collection!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The Inheritors by Asako SerizawaAvailable July 14, 2020The Inheritors is a beautifully written collection of connected short stories centered around a family through multiple generations and countries. Told from multiple perspectives, each with a distinct voice and style, The Inheritors is a fascinating look at how our actions can have an impact on future generations. Much of the book centers around the second World War and its effect on not only the citizens of Japan, but on the Koreans who wer The Inheritors by Asako SerizawaAvailable July 14, 2020The Inheritors is a beautifully written collection of connected short stories centered around a family through multiple generations and countries. Told from multiple perspectives, each with a distinct voice and style, The Inheritors is a fascinating look at how our actions can have an impact on future generations. Much of the book centers around the second World War and its effect on not only the citizens of Japan, but on the Koreans who were forced to work there by the Japanese. Family, love, grief and patriotism are all examined throughout the collection and some stories are more difficult emotionally than others. This was a fascinating collection of short stories and I highly recommend it. Thank you to Netgalley and the Publisher for the opportunity to read and review this title. All opinions and mistakes are my own.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Asako Serizawa’s Inheritors tells the story of a Japanese family caught up in history and questions of identity from the early 1900s to a few decades from now, always wondering what might have been if different decisions were made. Even though it’s made up of linked short stories, I found this book to be a slow burn—most of the “action” happens off the page and we generally see our characters wrestling with feelings of survivor’s guilt, regret, and anger...Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Asako Serizawa’s Inheritors tells the story of a Japanese family caught up in history and questions of identity from the early 1900s to a few decades from now, always wondering what might have been if different decisions were made. Even though it’s made up of linked short stories, I found this book to be a slow burn—most of the “action” happens off the page and we generally see our characters wrestling with feelings of survivor’s guilt, regret, and anger...Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.
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  • Sarah Salisbury
    January 1, 1970
    Told in various prose styles along a non-linear timeline, "Inheritors" is a fascinating collection of short stories chronicling the history of an extended family from the late 19th century to the 2030s. Though it could be a bit difficult to follow at times due to its unconventional style, "Inheritors" compelled me to consider perspectives on events in Japanese history that otherwise would have been foreign to me. (It has a particular focus on World War II and the vignettes that dealt with WWII w Told in various prose styles along a non-linear timeline, "Inheritors" is a fascinating collection of short stories chronicling the history of an extended family from the late 19th century to the 2030s. Though it could be a bit difficult to follow at times due to its unconventional style, "Inheritors" compelled me to consider perspectives on events in Japanese history that otherwise would have been foreign to me. (It has a particular focus on World War II and the vignettes that dealt with WWII were especially eye-opening.) I appreciated its sweeping scope and stark beauty, and found myself learning much from its humanistic and often bleak portrayals of Japan's turbulent recent history. It was a bit slow and dense at times, but I would still highly recommend "Inheritors."
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    Hmm...I'm not sure what I just read and yet I liked it! Is this a collection of short stories on the same topic with some of the same characters or is it a novel of intertwined stories? I will say that not being able to see the family chart at the beginning of the kindle version was a definite impediment. It's beautifully written from a perspective I have never read before. It's real and raw and engaging. It's also confusing as all heck and yet I just wanted to keep reading it. When I finished I Hmm...I'm not sure what I just read and yet I liked it! Is this a collection of short stories on the same topic with some of the same characters or is it a novel of intertwined stories? I will say that not being able to see the family chart at the beginning of the kindle version was a definite impediment. It's beautifully written from a perspective I have never read before. It's real and raw and engaging. It's also confusing as all heck and yet I just wanted to keep reading it. When I finished I was still not sure who everyone was and how they were connected!! I am now going to search for a review and summary to try to figure it all out.
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  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    My son gifted me with a Bound Galley of Serizawa's upcoming debut collection of interconnected short stories following five generations of a Japanese family from 1913 to 2035. Most of the stories are quite engrossing, particularly the seven set in the years immediately preceding and following World War II, but two or three are overwrought and maddeningly obtuse, requiring, perhaps, a better grasp of other works of literature than I have at my fingertips. Overall, a very satisfying and worthwhile My son gifted me with a Bound Galley of Serizawa's upcoming debut collection of interconnected short stories following five generations of a Japanese family from 1913 to 2035. Most of the stories are quite engrossing, particularly the seven set in the years immediately preceding and following World War II, but two or three are overwrought and maddeningly obtuse, requiring, perhaps, a better grasp of other works of literature than I have at my fingertips. Overall, a very satisfying and worthwhile collection that I am happy to recommend. I was left wondering what happened to Mai and whether Ayumi's three American-born children produced any offspring.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    These interconnected short stories is multi generational family epic about a place and time that isn't usually delved in literature. WWII historical fiction is usually on the European side and most forget there was an Asian side to this time period as well. These short stories are well crafted and have distinctive voices as member of the same (but distant) family, tell their stories. Spanning 150 years, histories are rewritten and identities are erased. If you loved Homegoing, Pachinko or Olive These interconnected short stories is multi generational family epic about a place and time that isn't usually delved in literature. WWII historical fiction is usually on the European side and most forget there was an Asian side to this time period as well. These short stories are well crafted and have distinctive voices as member of the same (but distant) family, tell their stories. Spanning 150 years, histories are rewritten and identities are erased. If you loved Homegoing, Pachinko or Olive Kitteridge, you will love this as well.I received an arc from the publisher but all opinions are my own.
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  • Cat Chapman
    January 1, 1970
    Inheritors is one of those books that's like a puzzle meant to be figured out, studied, and meditated upon. Predicated on a family tree spanning over a century of lifetimes, each of the short stories is assigned to a member of a generation, but they aren't always told from their perspective. The setting may change, whether it be a homestead in occupied Japan or contemporary United States, but Serizawa's prose retains a philosophical rhythm throughout.ARC provided by Doubleday through my place of Inheritors is one of those books that's like a puzzle meant to be figured out, studied, and meditated upon. Predicated on a family tree spanning over a century of lifetimes, each of the short stories is assigned to a member of a generation, but they aren't always told from their perspective. The setting may change, whether it be a homestead in occupied Japan or contemporary United States, but Serizawa's prose retains a philosophical rhythm throughout.ARC provided by Doubleday through my place of work, Oxford Exchange bookstore in Tampa, FL.
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