The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright
You’ve met Mrs Bright. She’s that nice woman who lives three doors down and always smiles at you in the mornings. She’s planning her thirtieth wedding anniversary with her husband. She wants to travel, read endless books and take beautiful pictures. She’s been waiting for this forever. For the past twenty-nine years, Kay Bright’s days have had a familiar rhythm: she works in her husband’s stationery shop, cooks for her family, tries to remember to practice yoga, and every other month she writes to her best friend, Ursula, and Ursula replies. Kay could set her calendar by their letters: her heart lifts when the blue airmail envelope, addressed in Ursula’s slanting handwriting, falls gently onto the mat. Ursula is the only one who knows Kay’s deepest secret, something that happened decades ago that could tear Kay’s life apart today. Ursula has always been the person Kay relies on. Knowing she will hear from Ursula is like being sure the sun will rise tomorrow. And now Ursula has stopped writing. Three missing letters doesn’t sound like a lot, but Kay gets out her shoebox of notes from her best friend, in case there’s something she overlooked. Ursula seems fine, but the further back she goes, the more Kay begins to question every choice she has made in her life. Which might be why, at ten o’clock one morning, Kay walks out of her yellow front door with a just a rucksack, leaving her wedding ring on the table... An emotional and heart-warming novel for anyone who knows it’s never too late to look for happiness. Fans of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, A Man Called Ove and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry will fall in love with this feel-good and moving story that shows you that the best friendships truly last forever.

The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright Details

TitleThe Missing Letters of Mrs Bright
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 9th, 2020
PublisherBookouture
Rating
GenreWomens Fiction, Contemporary

The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright Review

  • Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*
    January 1, 1970
    EXCERPT: The photo was a little crumpled around the edges, but - please excuse my lack of modesty - there was no denying the quality. It was a tight headshot in black and white of three pretty young women: Rose on the left, smiling and looking sideways at Bear next to her; me on Bear's right, looking simultaneously pleased and harassed. Setting up the camera timer and making sure everyone stayed in the right place was a bit stressful. With film, you couldn't keep trying again and again until you EXCERPT: The photo was a little crumpled around the edges, but - please excuse my lack of modesty - there was no denying the quality. It was a tight headshot in black and white of three pretty young women: Rose on the left, smiling and looking sideways at Bear next to her; me on Bear's right, looking simultaneously pleased and harassed. Setting up the camera timer and making sure everyone stayed in the right place was a bit stressful. With film, you couldn't keep trying again and again until you got it right. You had to get everything in place, then hold your breath and hope. The photo was from the one visit to Australia that Rose and I took together, during our gap year, when we were still in our teens. When everything in life was there to be looked forward to, and it was too early for us to have made any mistakes. Before I met Richard, or David; before I got pregnant and crashed out of my degree. I looked again at our unlined, hopeful faces. So beautiful, so young. ABOUT THIS BOOK: You’ve met Mrs Bright. She’s that nice woman who lives three doors down and always smiles at you in the mornings. She’s planning her thirtieth wedding anniversary with her husband. She wants to travel, read endless books and take beautiful pictures. She’s been waiting for this forever.For the past twenty-nine years, Kay Bright’s days have had a familiar rhythm: she works in her husband’s stationery shop, cooks for her family, tries to remember to practice yoga, and every other month she writes to her best friend, Ursula, and Ursula replies. Kay could set her calendar by their letters: her heart lifts when the blue airmail envelope, addressed in Ursula’s slanting handwriting, falls gently onto the mat.Ursula is the only one who knows Kay’s deepest secret, something that happened decades ago that could tear Kay’s life apart today. Ursula has always been the person Kay relies on. Knowing she will hear from Ursula is like being sure the sun will rise tomorrow.And now Ursula has stopped writing. Three missing letters doesn’t sound like a lot, but Kay gets out her shoebox of notes from her best friend, in case there’s something she overlooked. Ursula seems fine, but the further back she goes, the more Kay begins to question every choice she has made in her life. Which might be why, at ten o’clock one morning, Kay walks out of her yellow front door with a just a rucksack, leaving her wedding ring on the table...MY THOUGHTS: This was an enjoyable read. I laughed, and I shed a few tears. And I remembered a similar exit from my first marriage to my 'practice husband' as I now affectionately call him. So yes, this read brought back memories, some good, some bad, but the thing that struck me most was how well Beth Miller has captured the emotions, how she has transferred them onto paper without, at any point, making them seem trite or hackneyed. She has written with flair and humour, unafraid to dissect a marriage, to examine the relationships between a mother and daughter, between lifelong friends. She had me wondering, at times, if Kay really knew what she was doing, what she ultimately wanted, if she had really thought this through. Ultimately this is a story about love, about friendship, about loss, and about not losing sight of the things that matter to you. It is beautifully written; sad, funny and inspiring. This is the second book I have read by this author, and I am developing a real liking for her work. 😢❤😂.5#TheMissingLettersOfMrsBright #NetGalley Some of my favourite lines from The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright:'You go through life, you make choices they lead to other choices, and before you know it, you're in a place you wouldn't have started from.''I enjoy speaking English very much, but sometimes it is too English. Italian is the language of romance.'THE AUTHOR: have been told that I write like a tall blonde, so that's how I'd like you to picture me.I've published three novels, with one more about to be born, in January 2020. I've also published two non-fiction books. I work as a book coach and creative writing tutor.Before writing books, I did a lot of different jobs. I worked in schools, shops, offices, hospitals, students' unions, basements, from home, in my car, and up a tree. OK, not up a tree. I've been a sexual health trainer, a journalist, a psychology lecturer, a PhD student, a lousy alcohol counsellor, and an inept audio-typist. I sold pens, bread, and condoms. Not in the same shop. I taught parents how to tell if their teenagers are taking drugs (clue: they act like teenagers), and taught teenagers how to put on condoms (clue: there won't really be a cucumber). I taught rabbis how to tell if their teenagers are druggedly putting condoms on cucumbers.Throughout this, I always wrote, and always drank a lot of tea. I'm now pretty much unbeatable at drinking tea.DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Bookouture via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright by Beth Miller for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review and others are also published on Twitter, Amazon and my webpage https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...
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  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    This was a heart warming story about the power of friendship and the mother daughter relationship. Kay is fed up! Now that the nest is empty she has packed up and is leaving her husband Richard who is never wanting to do anything or go anywhere. Everyone is shocked most of all Richard and her children Stella and Edward. Kay’s first destination is Australia where she plans to check in on her longtime penpal friend Bear, Who she unexplainably has not heard from in months. A heartwarming This was a heart warming story about the power of friendship and the mother daughter relationship. Kay is fed up! Now that the nest is empty she has packed up and is leaving her husband Richard who is never wanting to do anything or go anywhere. Everyone is shocked most of all Richard and her children Stella and Edward. Kay’s first destination is Australia where she plans to check in on her longtime penpal friend Bear, Who she unexplainably has not heard from in months. A heartwarming occasionally humorous journey of discovery that takes Kay from the UK to Australia to Venice and then back again. This was a feel-good story filled with likable somewhat quirky characters. The story was told from the perspectives of both Kay and her daughter Stella, this was clever it really added another layer to the story that would not have been there had the story been only from Kay’s point of view. We were also privy to the correspondence between Kay and Bear through the years. I liked and cared about both these characters and really wanted nothing but the best for them. I also liked how the author subtly implied that daughters tend to mirror their mothers (whether they want to or not). The book also really touched on the strength of friendship and the power of standing up for one’s self.The book also had me asking myself some questions. Does a woman need to leave her husband in order to find her self? I’d like to think not, and I am saying this as a happily divorced woman. How strongly did Kay express to her husband that she wanted to go and do these things, could they have possibly gone to Australia together? Or maybe she didn’t want to go with him? I mean she could’ve gone by herself and not left him? And then there is a question as to why Kay didn’t just give Bear a phone call? I mean I know that’s not how they communicated,but.... still. This book has also been compared to Eleanor, Ove, and Harold Fry. I loved all three of these books. While I think this book could probably be pigeonholed into the same category I didn’t think it was as quirky or as emotional. Having said this I did think this was a good book that can stand on its own 2 feet or on its own spine if you will.This book in emojis. 👭 ✉️ 🐨 🍝 💪🏻*** Big thank you to Bookouture for my gifted copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ***For more of my reviews and bookish thoughts please visit my blog
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  • Jayme
    January 1, 1970
    Book synopsis: “You’ve met Mrs. Bright. She’s that nice woman who lives three doors down and always smiles at you in the mornings. She’s planning her thirtieth wedding anniversary with her husband. She wants to travel, read endless books and take beautiful pictures. She’s been waiting for this forever.”At least, that is what you thought she was doing.In reality, Kay Bright has been going through the motions of being a happy wife and mother, while wondering what her life might’ve been like if she Book synopsis: “You’ve met Mrs. Bright. She’s that nice woman who lives three doors down and always smiles at you in the mornings. She’s planning her thirtieth wedding anniversary with her husband. She wants to travel, read endless books and take beautiful pictures. She’s been waiting for this forever.”At least, that is what you thought she was doing.In reality, Kay Bright has been going through the motions of being a happy wife and mother, while wondering what her life might’ve been like if she had made some different decisions along the way. The only friend who knows what decision she questions most, is Ursula (Bear), the friend she confides in through an “old fashioned” handwritten letter sent every other month. She counts on Ursula’s reply. So, when Ursula’s letters stop arriving, Kay decides to leave behind her husband(for good!) and a life that feels stagnant, and go talk with Ursula in person, instead of by Airmail, to sort it all out. Told in the alternating perspectives of Kay, a woman wanting to REDISCOVER her younger self, and her daughter, Stella, a young woman JUST discovering her adult self, the story is one filled with wry humor and observations. I enjoyed both women equally. Both handled their challenges with much more maturity and diplomacy than anyone I know would! Perhaps that is why everything worked out so neat and tidy? 🤔Or, maybe it’s just because this is fiction! Recommended by the publisher for fans of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, A Man Called Ove, and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (three of my favorites in the literary fiction genre) I just HAD to request this! Would I agree with the comparison? Well, ALL three of THOSE books made me cry and this one did NOT. So, yes that is the right audience for the book, and yes, I can recommend it, but, this book, though enjoyable, did not pack the same emotional punch for me, as those it was compared to. 4 stars, but probably not one I will be talking about for years to come, which is what it takes from me, in this genre, to earn 5 stars...Another buddy read with DeAnn! Thanks for reading this one with me!Thank You to Netgalley, Bookouture, and Beth Miller for the digital ARC I received in exchange for a candid review! This book will be released on Jan. 9, 2020.
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  • DJ Sakata
    January 1, 1970
    Favorite Quotes:My rational brain pointed out that this was kind of irrational, and my irrational brain said, ‘Yeah, so?’It was a folded piece of yellowing paper, and in my childish writing, with hearts dotting the i’s, I had written at the top: ‘Things to do by the time I am thirty.’ This was underlined twice in red biro. The date: 5 June 1982… Teenage Kay must have assumed she’d better get everything done by thirty; for afterwards, there’d be nothing but senility and the grave.Once again, I’d Favorite Quotes:My rational brain pointed out that this was kind of irrational, and my irrational brain said, ‘Yeah, so?’It was a folded piece of yellowing paper, and in my childish writing, with hearts dotting the i’s, I had written at the top: ‘Things to do by the time I am thirty.’ This was underlined twice in red biro. The date: 5 June 1982… Teenage Kay must have assumed she’d better get everything done by thirty; for afterwards, there’d be nothing but senility and the grave.Once again, I’d have to amend my mental list of the top ten things I wished I’d never seen.I looked at him, appraising him with an objective eye. There were always little things one didn’t like about one’s boyfriends. You tended to overlook them, prioritise other things as more important. Leon, for instance, had patches of awful acne on each cheek, and treated any mild suggestion that he speak to a pharmacist as an infringement of his human rights. Now, with Theo standing in front of me, fake-beaming, I realised that with his thin face and shifty eyes, he looked exactly like a weasel.I had a bath and did all the woman -going-on-a-date things I hadn’t done for years… and had a little trim of the old lady-garden, not that I was planning to sleep with him, obviously not, he was clearly a café-lothario, but just in case… In case what? I heard Rose say. In case there was a freak accident that involved your pants coming off in public?My Review:This was my introduction to the stellar stylings of Beth Miller and I was an instant fan. Forgive my exuberance and probable abuse of exclamation marks but I reveled in this book! The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright was thoughtfully written and gently chronicled and may be best suited for those of us more mature beauties on the other side of fifty, but being on that side of the age stick I found it flawless. The writing was as profoundly insightful and perceptive as it was cleverly entertaining. I was fully engaged from page one and adored Beth Miller’s witty prose, seamless writing style, enticing and quirky characters, and ample servings of clever levity that were skillfully woven in all the way through. The storylines and writing were easy to follow and continually poked and prickled my curiosity. I was enjoying the tale so much I would have gleefully continued on for several hundred more pages. Beth Miller has a new fangirl and I have a new favorite author at the top of my list.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    Fifty one year old Kay Bright who has spent the last twenty nine years married to her husband Richard, raising their two children and working in his stationery store, wakes up one morning and decides she has had enough of living with a man who never wants to do anything interesting. She decides to leave Richard and do some of the things she has always wanted to do, such as visiting her dear friend Bear in Australia. Since Bear's family emigrated to Australia when she and Kay were teenagers, they Fifty one year old Kay Bright who has spent the last twenty nine years married to her husband Richard, raising their two children and working in his stationery store, wakes up one morning and decides she has had enough of living with a man who never wants to do anything interesting. She decides to leave Richard and do some of the things she has always wanted to do, such as visiting her dear friend Bear in Australia. Since Bear's family emigrated to Australia when she and Kay were teenagers, they have exchanged letters regularly so Kay is concerned that Bear hasn't answered her letters for the last six months.This is a lovely, beautifully written book about women's friendships, mother-daughter relationships and finding yourself, no matter how late in life. Sad in places, it was also heart warming and a reminder that it's never too late for a new beginning.With thanks to Netgalley and Bookouture for a digital copy to read
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  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    Kay has been writing to her friend Bear is Australia for more than thirty years. When the letters from Bear stop she decides to go there to find out why. She also decides that now the children have grown up its time to leave her husband and start out on her own.A story of family, friendship and new beginnings.This is the first book by this author that I have read and I will be looking out for more of her work.Thank you to NetGalley and Bookouture for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Kay Bright is married with two grown up children. She has worked in her husbands chain of stationary shops, paid her bills on time and writes to her best friend in Australia. She leads a quiet life. But then she shocks her husband when she tells him she's leafing him. The letters from her best friend have stopped so she decides Australia is where she will visit first.Kay has been married for twenty nine years and shes fed up with the same mundane routine day in, day out. The story is full of Kay Bright is married with two grown up children. She has worked in her husbands chain of stationary shops, paid her bills on time and writes to her best friend in Australia. She leads a quiet life. But then she shocks her husband when she tells him she's leafing him. The letters from her best friend have stopped so she decides Australia is where she will visit first.Kay has been married for twenty nine years and shes fed up with the same mundane routine day in, day out. The story is full of humor and love but it's also tinged with a little sadness. There are some great characters. The letters give us snippets of what Kay's life was like since she became a mother, giving us an insight leading up to her departure. I throughly enjoyed this moving but entertaining story.I would like to thank NetGalley, Bookouture and the author Beth Miller for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • DeAnn
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 friendship stars, rounded up to 4What happens when your childhood friend (who moved to Australia) stops writing monthly letters to you? Kay and Bear have been friends for ages, but now Bear isn’t writing back. What I didn’t expect is that Kay would walk out on her 29-year marriage, her job, and head to Australia at long last.There’s quite a bit of drama around how Kay could just leave her marriage, all those around her expect the usual suspects – infidelity or escaping a violent situation. 3.75 friendship stars, rounded up to 4What happens when your childhood friend (who moved to Australia) stops writing monthly letters to you? Kay and Bear have been friends for ages, but now Bear isn’t writing back. What I didn’t expect is that Kay would walk out on her 29-year marriage, her job, and head to Australia at long last.There’s quite a bit of drama around how Kay could just leave her marriage, all those around her expect the usual suspects – infidelity or escaping a violent situation. I think Kay finds herself just wondering about everything in her life and decides she doesn’t want to be married.This book has a great pattern of mother-daughter alternating narration. I enjoyed both Kay’s part and her daughter Stella’s part. They both are trying to figure out what life has in store for them. I definitely rooted for them both to find happiness in their love lives and careers. There are some fun adventures in Venice and I’m dying to eat at the Gritti Palace now. Stella was a fun character and I wanted to remind her to stay strong!I did enjoy this one, but I was not completely drawn into in emotionally. It has been compared to “Eleanor Oliphant” and “A Man Called Ove” – I agree that if you like those, you would enjoy this one, it just didn’t pack the emotional punch of those in my opinion. It’s definitely filled with friendship, secrets and drama, and even a few moments when I laughed out loud (especially with Kay’s mother-in-law and Stella’s friend Piet).This one made for another fun buddy read with Jayme. Thank you to NetGalley, Beth Miller, and Bookoutre for an early copy of this one to read and review. Watch for this one on January 9, 2020.
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  • Renita D'Silva
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely beautiful! A wonderful, heartwarming, life affirming tale from this fantastic author. This story was not only entertaining and addictive but it also made me think, to realise that life doesn't stop for you. It served as reminder to live life to the fullest. Every one should be reading this book and this author. Outstanding. Five stars do not do this book justice. Read this beautiful book and get 2020 off to a brilliant start! Thank you Beth Miller for this exquisite treasure of a Absolutely beautiful! A wonderful, heartwarming, life affirming tale from this fantastic author. This story was not only entertaining and addictive but it also made me think, to realise that life doesn't stop for you. It served as reminder to live life to the fullest. Every one should be reading this book and this author. Outstanding. Five stars do not do this book justice. Read this beautiful book and get 2020 off to a brilliant start! Thank you Beth Miller for this exquisite treasure of a book!
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  • Adrian Dooley
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, well that was a hugely enjoyable read. A bit off piste for me. Having spent the last three years or so reading almost exclusively thrillers and horror stories, this was a real departure and, as a middle aged man a bit of risk as it’s described as “women’s fiction”. Kay has been married for 29 years. In her early 50s with two grown up children she has been unhappy for a long time. When her best friend Bear moved to Australia 30 years ago they wrote to each other religiously. One month Bear Wow, well that was a hugely enjoyable read. A bit off piste for me. Having spent the last three years or so reading almost exclusively thrillers and horror stories, this was a real departure and, as a middle aged man a bit of risk as it’s described as “women’s fiction”. Kay has been married for 29 years. In her early 50s with two grown up children she has been unhappy for a long time. When her best friend Bear moved to Australia 30 years ago they wrote to each other religiously. One month Bear to Kay, the next Kay to Bear. When Kay doesn’t hear from Bear for three months in a row she becomes concerned and it makes her make a life changing decision. Not only is she going to travel to Australia to see what is up with Bear, she decides to leave her husband for good. This is just an incredibly readable book. A beautifully told story of life, love, regret, secrets, friendship, self discovery. I could go on. The story is told from two view points, Our main protagonist Kay and her daughter Stella. Both worlds are equally as intriguing and entertaining as each other and the changing between the two throughout is beautifully judged. I laughed out loud, I cried, I stayed up well into the night reading just a little bit more. I just loved this book so much. I’m marking this 4.5 stars. I was so close to marking this 5 stars but there was one thing that happened in one of the characters lives about half way through the book that just didn’t sit right with me and felt a bit clumsy, a device to move the story along. It seemed quite out of place. I won’t say what it was of course as it would be a spoiler. Despite that I really really loved this book. Maybe it was the change from my usual genre that made it stand out or maybe “women’s fiction” is a genre that was made for me! Either way, the book in itself was an absolute joy to read. So many of the characters are so vividly sitting in my mind a day after finishing it. Highly highly recommended. Thanks to Netgalley, Bookouture and Beth Miller for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Charlotte Burt
    January 1, 1970
    This has been my first five star read for about six months. I loved this dual pov story about a woman in her 50's making a break for freedom and the effect this has on her family. Empowering and she knows how to evoke emotions like a master. I had tears in my eyes for the last 10%.
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  • Sherri Thacker
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher for an early release of this book for my honest review. I really enjoyed this book and loved the friendships in it. My first book by this author and looking forward to many more.
  • Yvonne (It's All About Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Finished reading: December 4th 2019 "I wanted to try whatever life I had left without that net. Close my eyes and take a leap of faith." *** A copy of this book was kindly provided to me by Netgalley and Bookouture in exchange for an honest review. Thank you! *** (view spoiler)[I know I don't read contemporary romance all that often, but I like mixing up my genres every once in a while and there was just something aboutThe Missing Letters Of Mrs. Brightthat made me want to read it Finished reading: December 4th 2019 "I wanted to try whatever life I had left without that net. Close my eyes and take a leap of faith." *** A copy of this book was kindly provided to me by Netgalley and Bookouture in exchange for an honest review. Thank you! *** (view spoiler)[I know I don't read contemporary romance all that often, but I like mixing up my genres every once in a while and there was just something about The Missing Letters Of Mrs. Bright that made me want to read it instantly. I think it was a combination of the blurb itself and the comparison to Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine and A Man Called Ove; two of my favorite books with characters I absolutely adored. And the blurb definitely sounded like main character Kay was going to have the same vibe, so I was superexcited to finally meet her. I might have set my expectations a tad too high, because somehow I didn't end up enjoying this story as much as I thought I would... I'll try to explain why.First of all I have to stress that The Missing Letters Of Mrs. Bright is by no means a bad read, and the rating reflects my personal reaction to this story and its characters rather than the quality of the story. There is a lot to love in The Missing Letters Of Mrs. Bright, and depending on how you react to the main characters your reading experience might just be completely different from my own... First of all, we have the bookish elements. Not only does main character Kay's husband own multiple bookshops, but we see other references as well throughout the story. I always love those little references in my books, and I'm sure I'm not the only one. Another element I loved was travel related; not only that Kay wants to spread her wings and start seeing the world, but also those descriptions and chapters set in Australia and especially those in Venice. This Italian city really came alive for me in the descriptions and was one of the highlights of this book for me.I also loved the idea behind the letters, and some actually being incorporated into the plot between chapters. This most definitely added an original touch! The plot itself is intriguing enough and uses multipe POVs to help us understand how different people react to Kay's decision to leave her husband of twentynine years and start doing things she has always wanted to but never has. There is the underlying worry and mystery around Bear of course as well, and it was interesting to see things develop and secrets slowly coming to light. The writing was easy on the eye and superfast to read, and in many ways this is the perfect contemporary romance read.What went wrong for me then? I still can't put my finger exactly on the why, but part of the reason is pretty clear: the main characters. Sadly, I wasn't able to connect to the characters as I thought I would. I had issues with various decisions and personality traits of more than one character, and this really put a damper on things... I won't go too much into details to avoid spoilers, but I wasn't a fan of Kay and her selfishness after her decision. I fully get she has the right to a life of her own, but she truly only thinks of herself and doesn't seem to care too much of what her children and friends are going through... And that was not the only thing that annoyed me about her. I wasn't able to warm up to Stella,Edward or Richard either, although I did like Newland, Rose and even Piet. What I absolutely detested was the whole cheating angle, but that is just a personal reaction as I never respond well to this element in a story...I did love the food element in The Missing Letters Of Mrs. Bright though. The descriptions of the food really made me crave those dishes and I actually prepared my curry recipe as a result afterwards. There were a lot of other things I enjoyed as well, like mentioned above, but as a whole something just didn't click for me and I ended up having mixed thoughts about this story. Fans of the contemporary romance genre might just have a fantastic time with The Missing Letters Of Mrs. Bright though! Definitely give this story a chance if you think it might be your cup of tea, because it seems like I'm in the minority with this one. (hide spoiler)] P.S. Find more of my reviews here.
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  • Bridget
    January 1, 1970
    If your favoured reading material is a compelling tale with a good sprinkling of relationships, imperfection, hope, secrets and friendships then The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright by Beth Miller is a must-read for you! This book is substantially about family, love, mother-daughter relationships, women's friendships and starting-over, and the synopsis also implies a soupçon of mystery, which was exactly the reading experience I had.Beth Miller has an admirable writing style: it is seamless, flows If your favoured reading material is a compelling tale with a good sprinkling of relationships, imperfection, hope, secrets and friendships then The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright by Beth Miller is a must-read for you! This book is substantially about family, love, mother-daughter relationships, women's friendships and starting-over, and the synopsis also implies a soupçon of mystery, which was exactly the reading experience I had.Beth Miller has an admirable writing style: it is seamless, flows well, and is wonderfully expressive. The characterisation is impressive with an unforgettable cast of people that are complex and determined, though difficult and flawed to somewhat varying degrees. The character-driven plot uses a perfect blend of narrative, letters, and multiple points of view to help the reader understand the different reactions to Kay's decision to leave her husband after twenty-nine years of marriage. This was an exceptionally compulsive story and the ending was bittersweet. I really hoped that things worked out well for all of the characters, having lived in their pockets throughout their respective journeys. Very highly recommended.I received a complimentary copy of this novel, at my request, from Bookouture via NetGalley and this review is my own unbiased opinion.
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  • Shalini
    January 1, 1970
    Ah, this book was a journey. It told me the story of Mrs Bright and daughter Stella along with the letters to and from her best friend Ursula (Bear), who had migrated to Australia. One day, after 29 years of marriage when letters from Bear stopped coming since the past 6 months, Kay decided to walk out of her marriage. She went to Sydney to meet Bear, then to Venice then came back home with new realizations. My first book by author Beth Miller, the story told me their lives in the present and Ah, this book was a journey. It told me the story of Mrs Bright and daughter Stella along with the letters to and from her best friend Ursula (Bear), who had migrated to Australia. One day, after 29 years of marriage when letters from Bear stopped coming since the past 6 months, Kay decided to walk out of her marriage. She went to Sydney to meet Bear, then to Venice then came back home with new realizations. My first book by author Beth Miller, the story told me their lives in the present and past. Both Kay and Ursula were adorable, but I liked Stella once she decided to stand up for herself. Strength personified these women and I lived how the bold strikes of the author made them real. The depth of emotions were missing, I couldn't cry at any of the scene. That was a good thing for me as I didn't want an overly emotional book. The story had humor interspersed with truths and facts of life. Friendship between the best friends made me smile. They sure went through the rigmaroles of life. Overall, a sweet read filled with strength and bittersweet moments of friendship and family.
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  • Robin Loves Reading
    January 1, 1970
    The letters from her best friend Ursula arrived like clockwork. Actually, Kay Bright's life was the same - day in, day out. All of a sudden, the letters have stopped. This is exactly the catalyst Kay needed to take a hold of her life. She informs her husband Richard that she is leaving, and she does just that. Her husband is shocked and panics. Simply put, Kay does not care. Her husband stopped paying attention and she has stopped caring. She takes a very long flight and is now in Australia, The letters from her best friend Ursula arrived like clockwork. Actually, Kay Bright's life was the same - day in, day out. All of a sudden, the letters have stopped. This is exactly the catalyst Kay needed to take a hold of her life. She informs her husband Richard that she is leaving, and she does just that. Her husband is shocked and panics. Simply put, Kay does not care. Her husband stopped paying attention and she has stopped caring. She takes a very long flight and is now in Australia, having traveled for hours and hours - plenty of time for her to feel confident in her decision. Richard and their daughter Stella are both shocked with Kay's decision. This is especially so because it becomes clear that Kay's concern over the missing letters is only part of why she left.Not only is Kay's relationship with Ursula examined, but that of Kay and Stella as well. I was rooting for Kay all the while I patiently waited for a reason as to why Ursula stopped writing.This warm story by Beth Miller is touching and often heartbreaking. However, it is also one borne of lifelong friendship and that of a woman taking hold of her own life. This takes what could be a tragic novel into one of hope and starting over. Many thanks to Bookouture and to NetGalley for this ARC for review. This is my honest opinion.
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  • Jodi
    January 1, 1970
    The phrase that keeps coming into my mind about The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is "a charming little book". That's exactly what it is. Things come together, families experience joys and dramas, secrets are revealed. It deals with some weighty personal issues, but is overall a light novel. Sometimes light is good.The novel starts as Kay Bright, a British woman in her early fifties, suddenly packs up a backpack, puts her wedding ring on the table, and tells her husband she's leaving for good as The phrase that keeps coming into my mind about The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is "a charming little book". That's exactly what it is. Things come together, families experience joys and dramas, secrets are revealed. It deals with some weighty personal issues, but is overall a light novel. Sometimes light is good.The novel starts as Kay Bright, a British woman in her early fifties, suddenly packs up a backpack, puts her wedding ring on the table, and tells her husband she's leaving for good as if it's the same as going to the supermarket. This comes entirely out of the blue to her husband of 29 years. Nobody is having an affair, being abusive or abused, or battling an addiction. Kay is simply sick of her life. The title comes from her regular correspondence with an old friend in Australia. Kay wonders why her friend has suddenly stopped sending letters. Almost the first thing she does after she leaves is go to Australia to find out. Of course, there are repercussions. Everyone around Kay is as bewildered and upset as her husband, including her young adult daughter Stella. Stella gets several chapters devoted to her as she attempts to process what her mother has done. She, too, is at a turning point in her life.The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is about the heavy weight of secrets, the finite nature of time, and the ways time should be spent. Some readers may find it maddening, but others will find it relatable, even inspiring. It is a perfect novel for any woman who has considered running away from home as an adult.Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review..
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  • Lee Husemann
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a slow starter for me but then all of a sudden it was really good and I enjoyed it. Kay decides to leave her husband, Richard, after almost 30 years of marriage and two grown children. Kay has a good friend, Bear (Ursula) who she has exchanged letters with for years up until about six months ago. The story is told from different POVs to go along with the different story lines within this book. This is a very poignant story of love, loss and hope. Thank you NetGally and Bookouture This book was a slow starter for me but then all of a sudden it was really good and I enjoyed it. Kay decides to leave her husband, Richard, after almost 30 years of marriage and two grown children. Kay has a good friend, Bear (Ursula) who she has exchanged letters with for years up until about six months ago. The story is told from different POVs to go along with the different story lines within this book. This is a very poignant story of love, loss and hope. Thank you NetGally and Bookouture for the ARC of this very touching book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    When fifty-something Kay Bright announces she won't be celebrating her thirtieth wedding anniversary, it's not only husband Richard left reeling. The repercussions of her decision reverberate through her family, leading to shocking revelations and life-changing events. Oh, what an absolute gem of a book. Right from the start, I was rooting for Kay, yet found much sympathy for her struggling daughter, Stella, difficult mother-in-law, Alice (OK, I secretly adored her) and even the rather dull but When fifty-something Kay Bright announces she won't be celebrating her thirtieth wedding anniversary, it's not only husband Richard left reeling. The repercussions of her decision reverberate through her family, leading to shocking revelations and life-changing events. Oh, what an absolute gem of a book. Right from the start, I was rooting for Kay, yet found much sympathy for her struggling daughter, Stella, difficult mother-in-law, Alice (OK, I secretly adored her) and even the rather dull but essentially kind Richard. As for the three-way relationship between Kay and school friends Rose and Bear, well … for me that was the beating heart of the story. The letters from Kay to Bear (Ursula), were a skilful blend of humour and sadness and carried the plot along effortlessly. So many lines stood out for me. Too many to mention, but here are a couple of examples –'You don't need a husband at all,' Rose said. 'You can cook and fix things. You are basically a hermaphrodite.''And there, wearing the sort of anthropologically intrepid expression patented by the Queen during 1960s' tours of exotic countries, was Alice Bright.'At several points I definitely had something in my eye, and towards the end, well … All I can say is that it takes a lot for a book to simultaneously make me laugh and need to clear a lump in my throat. This one did it in spades. Highly recommended. My thanks to Netgalley and Bookouture for an advance copy.
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  • Sheri
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautifully told story. I have to admit that there were many parts while I was reading that I was teary-eyed. At times it was funny, unforgettable, lifted you up and so warm. A book to truly fall in love with! I couldn't seem to read this book fast enough. I stayed up way, way too late to finish it. There were parts that actually had me laughing out loud. I haven't read such a warm your heart type of book in a very very long time. I totally recommend it. I would like to thank the What a beautifully told story. I have to admit that there were many parts while I was reading that I was teary-eyed. At times it was funny, unforgettable, lifted you up and so warm. A book to truly fall in love with! I couldn't seem to read this book fast enough. I stayed up way, way too late to finish it. There were parts that actually had me laughing out loud. I haven't read such a warm your heart type of book in a very very long time. I totally recommend it. I would like to thank the Author/Publisher/Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Diane Merritt
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a touching heartfelt book, tears a few times. Couldn't put this one down finished it in one day. First for me from this author. Great great book!Thanks to the publisher and net galley for an early release of this book.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    When I picked up this book, I thought I was getting something light and fast. It was definitely a fast read -- I got sucked in and finished it in a day -- but it was not light. Have tissues at the ready, especially in the middle of the book. But it was a really good, unexpected read.Kay Bright's mother passed away recently, and while cleaning out her old childhood bedroom, she finds a list of what she wanted to accomplish before she turned 30. Kay is now in her early fifties and realizes that When I picked up this book, I thought I was getting something light and fast. It was definitely a fast read -- I got sucked in and finished it in a day -- but it was not light. Have tissues at the ready, especially in the middle of the book. But it was a really good, unexpected read.Kay Bright's mother passed away recently, and while cleaning out her old childhood bedroom, she finds a list of what she wanted to accomplish before she turned 30. Kay is now in her early fifties and realizes that the only thing she has accomplished from the whole list is having children, and she got that done much earlier than she planned, having dropped out of college to have her son. The book opens with her packing a bag and leaving her husband. Her husband, while reliable, is obsessed with building and running his businesses and treats her more like an employee than a spouse. Kay decides to go to Australia -- which her husband would never do or allow her to do without making her feel guilty -- because she hasn't received a letter from her best friend in six months. There's also a subplot/alternating chapter style with Kay's adult daughter Stella, who is trying to figure out her own complicated love and professional life while struggling to leave the nest.Really, though, this is a book about living your best life, giving yourself the opportunity to be the person you want to be, and to avoid getting trapped by everyone else's expectations for your life, an amazing message that so many of us need to hear (says the stay-at-home mother of two young children.)Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with the ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. It has not influenced my opinion.
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  • Silke
    January 1, 1970
    I must admit that it was the blurb that drew me in. Perfect for fans of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry. That book is one of my all-time favourites! And I do understand why The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is compared to it, but I don’t think that the comparison does these two books any justice.Don’t get me wrong The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is a beautiful book, that I enjoyed immensely. But it lacks the emotional punch and the integrity of Harold Fry. I won’t be talking about this I must admit that it was the blurb that drew me in. Perfect for fans of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry. That book is one of my all-time favourites! And I do understand why The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is compared to it, but I don’t think that the comparison does these two books any justice.Don’t get me wrong The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright is a beautiful book, that I enjoyed immensely. But it lacks the emotional punch and the integrity of Harold Fry. I won’t be talking about this book in years to come. Even now, only 3 days after finishing this story I already lost connection with it. It is quite frankly a book that will speak mainly to woman who enjoy feel good stories. And there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. But don’t blurb it for something that it isn’t.Don’t get me wrong, it is really quite an enjoyable story. Told from a dual perspective we follow two female characters. Kay, who closes the door on her 29 year old marriage and her daughter Stella, who is trying to find her own way in life.Two very different perspectives. Kay has been a caring mother and faithful wife for years, but now she has been unhappy for the longest time. For more than 30 years she has been corresponding with her best friend Bear in Australian. But when Bear doesn’t respond to her letters anymore, Kay gets worried. So worries that she decides to break free from her own unhappy life and explore what else the world has to offer. Starting in Australia to see why her friend hasn’t responded to any of her letters.Stella on the other hand has finally left her childhood home to start a food truck. But she soon learns that adult life isn’t all it is cracked up to be. And it gets even more rough when her mother drops a bomb and leaves her after. The missing Letters of Mrs Bright is a story that covers a lot of ground. Of course there are the obvious topics such as family, friendship, relationships… But the story goes deeper than that. It deals with pregnancy, sickness, marriage,… It is a very emotional story with an important message. Life is short, live it to its fullest! I think the dual storytelling really added something extra to the story. Older and younger readers will find a connection with the characters. All the characters in the story are well written and have the needed amount of depth to them. I truly enjoyed the story and would recommend it to all readers who enjoy female fiction and feel good stories.
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  • Caroline Kerdouci
    January 1, 1970
    The missing letters of Mrs Bright is a charming, uplifting read that will resonate with many, particularly women of a certain age. Who hasn’t ever thought of escaping a humdrum existence where work and children are all consuming and before a blink of an eye your life has seemingly passed you by??That’s the case for Kay Bright, married for twenty nine years with two grown up children and a life spent in stationery! We meet her at the beginning of her epiphany when she decides to abandon her home The missing letters of Mrs Bright is a charming, uplifting read that will resonate with many, particularly women of a certain age. Who hasn’t ever thought of escaping a humdrum existence where work and children are all consuming and before a blink of an eye your life has seemingly passed you by??That’s the case for Kay Bright, married for twenty nine years with two grown up children and a life spent in stationery! We meet her at the beginning of her epiphany when she decides to abandon her home and her husband in search of adventure and self discovery. She’s realised she’s unhappy, having set aside her own dreams and goals to be a mother and dutiful wife but now it’s her time to shine before her time on this planet runs out.Full of warmth, love and humour, plus a little bit of sadness, this novel has some great characters, not just the plucky Kay who is determined to venture out of her comfort zone but her daughter Stella, best friend Rose, a difficult mother in law and last but not least her friend Bear.The novel is interspersed with letters written between Bear and Kay over many years, revealing snippets of the Kay’s life since motherhood swallowed her up, giving the reader an insight to events leading up to her dramatic decision. Having not heard from Bear in a while, Kay’s first stop is Australia where Bear has lived since a teenager. So begins a journey of self discovery, much soul searching and a chance to make memories with a friend she holds so dear.This is not just Kay and Bear’s story but Stella’s too, as she finds her place in the world but not without a few hilarious escapades along the way.With characters that are believable and easy to like, this is a novel that will bring a smile to your face, maybe a few tears too and is a comforting, enjoyable read. It’s about friendship and happiness and following your heart. Perhaps slightly over sentimental in a few places for my liking but a read that will make you question your own place in this world and a gentle reminder that it’s never too late to realise your dreams.Definitely recommend as a feel good read. My thanks as always to the author and publisher and Netgalley for allowing me to read in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ixxati
    January 1, 1970
    I quite enjoyed this book but not too much. This story are told based on Kay and Stella (Kay's daughter) point of view. Instead of liking Kay I like Stella more. I can't connect to Kay duh I don't understand her Kay freaking selfish and I hate her lol When I found out bout David I feel mad at Kay!! Like omg you left your husband who accepted you when you got pregnant even after what you did to him. I want to have a friendship like Kay, Rose and Bear. But I don't like when Kay kept a secret I quite enjoyed this book but not too much. This story are told based on Kay and Stella (Kay's daughter) point of view. Instead of liking Kay I like Stella more. I can't connect to Kay duh I don't understand her 😂 Kay freaking selfish and I hate her lol When I found out bout David I feel mad at Kay!! Like omg you left your husband who accepted you when you got pregnant even after what you did to him. I want to have a friendship like Kay, Rose and Bear. But I don't like when Kay kept a secret from Rose. I hope me and my friends stay close to each other till death do us apart awwwww 💜Thank you Netgalley and Beth!🌟🌟🌟.5
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  • Miki Mackennedy
    January 1, 1970
    Mrs. Bright is your average middle-aged woman, married for more than half of her life, mother to 2 grown children, keeping up with friends and obligations. Until one day, when she wakes up and decides that she has had enough and walks away from her marriage.Kay finds herself at the point in her life where she wonders at the road not taken and looks back too fondly at what could have been, seeing the past through a distorted lens of wistful thinking.After her friend’s bi-monthly letters suddenly Mrs. Bright is your average middle-aged woman, married for more than half of her life, mother to 2 grown children, keeping up with friends and obligations. Until one day, when she wakes up and decides that she has had enough and walks away from her marriage.Kay finds herself at the point in her life where she wonders at the road not taken and looks back too fondly at what could have been, seeing the past through a distorted lens of wistful thinking.After her friend’s bi-monthly letters suddenly stop with no notice, Kay decides that while she is spreading her wings and finding her own identity post marriage, she will check in on her friend in Australia. What she learns on her travels, about her friends, herself and her marriage helps her to put feelings in perspective and find a new way forward while maintaining her relationships with her husband, children and friends. This is a novel about midlife, looking back, family and friendship. It is a nice light read, the troubles and turmoils are put to bed a little too neatly for my taste, making it a little hard to believe at times, but overall a good book.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the e-ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Sania Jain
    January 1, 1970
    "𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐧𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐥 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐎𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐢𝐭?"I received this beautiful ARC of 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐋𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐫𝐬 𝐁𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 by Beth Miller from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. The journey of Kathlene Bright from being in a dull and monotonous marriage of 29 years to being an independent divorced woman who wants to fulfill all her dreams on her own, gripped me to the book till the end. Often in long marriages people tend to "𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐧𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐥 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐎𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐢𝐭?"⁣⁣I received this beautiful ARC of 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐋𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐫𝐬 𝐁𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 by Beth Miller from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. The journey of Kathlene Bright from being in a dull and monotonous marriage of 29 years to being an independent divorced woman who wants to fulfill all her dreams on her own, gripped me to the book till the end. Often in long marriages people tend to forget their individual dreams. What once was a top priority in your to-do list, now moves out of the list altogether. But it takes courage to recognize that and make a move. Life is too short to lock your dreams in some dark corner. ⁣If you already don't know it, this book will make you realize that. The story is told from Kathlene Bright’s perspective as well as from her daughter Stella’s point of view. Will Kathlene get a divorce from her nearly dead marriage after 29 years? Will she set out to follow her dreams? What havoc this uncertainty of divorce will bring in the children’s lives? Will she have enough time? Grab a copy of this marvellous story which is getting released on Jan 9, 2020 to find out. Its never too late to look for happiness.⁣The writing style is simple and easily read. I loved the slight punches author throws in after every few lines. A beautiful story of freedom, dreams, friendship and loss. I would definitely recommend this book to all my reader friends. ⁣The best thing that i like about the story is that it tells me how easy it is to find your way through complicated situations in life. 𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐧𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐈𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐧𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠.⁣⁣
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  • Laura Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    This book was wonderful from start to finish! The writing was well done and the story was very enjoyable. I liked how the book followed both Kay and her daughter Stella, while each of them were going through an important part of their lives. The relationships in this book felt real and relatable. The book started with Mrs. Bright (Kay) making the decision to leave her husband, the rest of the book is what follows. It had heart wrenching moments as well as times that made me so happy for the This book was wonderful from start to finish! The writing was well done and the story was very enjoyable. I liked how the book followed both Kay and her daughter Stella, while each of them were going through an important part of their lives. The relationships in this book felt real and relatable. The book started with Mrs. Bright (Kay) making the decision to leave her husband, the rest of the book is what follows. It had heart wrenching moments as well as times that made me so happy for the growth of the characters.I will be recommending this book to others! Thank you @netgalley and @Bookouture for the change to read this ARC.
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  • Misfits farm
    January 1, 1970
    There are some books that you want to gallop through as you “have” to know what happens. Others like a good wine or chocolate you want to savour- let them linger awhile and mature whilst your brain relaxes and takes in the thought processes. This is one of those savouring reads that I really didn’t want to end. Kay has left her husband. She has packed a rucksack with a few bits, told him that she is going travelling and walked out of the door. He didn’t realise to start with that she meant There are some books that you want to gallop through as you “have” to know what happens. Others like a good wine or chocolate you want to savour- let them linger awhile and mature whilst your brain relaxes and takes in the thought processes. This is one of those savouring reads that I really didn’t want to end. Kay has left her husband. She has packed a rucksack with a few bits, told him that she is going travelling and walked out of the door. He didn’t realise to start with that she meant leaving him as in “this marriage is over”. She takes herself to a friend’s cottage in Wales and so starts the rest of her life. Every month she and her friend Bear exchange letters. Bear has known Kay for more years than she cares to remember and knows things that no-one else does about her.When Bear misses writing, Kay begins to think something must be wrong but what? They have always been so very honest with each other. Oh I loved this beyond words. I believe that there are parts of this that most women will relate to. For me it was something along the lines of “ I am now free of the shackles that I have worn forever” which took my breath away. A poignant read and an emotional one. Beautiful doesn’t do it justice. If you read just one book about life make it this one. 10* if I could.For more reviews please see my blog http://nickibookblog.blogspot.co.uk/or follow me on [email protected]
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  • Olivia L
    January 1, 1970
    'The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright' is both irrepressibly brave and bold. With one fateful decision, one woman takes a momentous leap of faith. The result is an epic second chance at life. This story, that beautifully told of life's gains and love's losses, is all at once warm and witty, spicy yet sweet. There were many moments when I found myself laughing through tears. No one could butcher English slang like Piet. No one could so eloquently knock someone's knees out with one little quip like 'The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright' is both irrepressibly brave and bold. With one fateful decision, one woman takes a momentous leap of faith. The result is an epic second chance at life. This story, that beautifully told of life's gains and love's losses, is all at once warm and witty, spicy yet sweet. There were many moments when I found myself laughing through tears. No one could butcher English slang like Piet. No one could so eloquently knock someone's knees out with one little quip like Alice. Gah! Dare not cross her before she had her brandy aperitif on a bad coiffure day!This story hit the sweet spot: poignant and uplifting. A treasure that must be read, savored, and shared. 5+ stars.Thank you to NetGalley, Bookouture, and Beth Miller for an ARC of 'The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright' in exchange for an honest and voluntary review.
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