A Warning
An unprecedented behind-the-scenes portrait of the Trump presidency from the anonymous senior official whose first words of warning about the president rocked the nation's capital.

A Warning Details

TitleA Warning
Author
ReleaseNov 19th, 2019
PublisherTwelve
Rating
GenrePolitics, Nonfiction, History, Autobiography, Memoir, North American Hi..., American History, Audiobook, Historical, Literature, American, Political Science

A Warning Review

  • Maru Kun
    January 1, 1970
    Looking forward to seeing how many "1 star" ratings this gets before it's even published from new Goodreads members who have never read any other books.
  • Ben Haskett
    January 1, 1970
    I am pleased to report that this book is NOT a simple chronological blow-by-blow of Trump's campaign, inauguration, and presidency. Honestly, it's bad enough to live through it in real time. It was painful to read through it in Michael Wolff's Fire & Fury , and it was something close to torture to read it again in Bob Woodward's Fear . Instead, A Warning uses Cicero's criteria for leadership to run through various events in Trump's presidency like a time traveler. One minute, staff members I am pleased to report that this book is NOT a simple chronological blow-by-blow of Trump's campaign, inauguration, and presidency. Honestly, it's bad enough to live through it in real time. It was painful to read through it in Michael Wolff's Fire & Fury , and it was something close to torture to read it again in Bob Woodward's Fear . Instead, A Warning uses Cicero's criteria for leadership to run through various events in Trump's presidency like a time traveler. One minute, staff members are pacing a room thinking how they're going to defend Trump clearly defacing a weather map; the next, Trump is insisting that there are very fine people on both sides of the Charlottesville incident. The benefit of this approach is that the author is able to lump similar events together to show a clear pattern in Trump's behavior and decision-making process. The book is intelligently communicated and is far less salacious than other Trump books I've read, but nevertheless paints a clear picture of a man who doesn’t really have any interest in government, no knowledge of how government works, and even less interest in learning how government works. He’s an old man who’s spent his entire life with subservient staff who jump at the chance to do whatever he wants. As a result, he doesn’t know or care what anyone’s role is – they’re all just there to do what he demands, even if it means asking the press secretary to wash his socks. A Warning, which seems to have been written specifically for republicans, comes off less like the warning it says it is (until the very end) and more like a sincere plea. The plea is a simple one: being a good president is more than simply appointing conservative judges willy-nilly, and Trump has none of those good qualities, so please, pleeease, pleeeeeeeease do not vote for him in 2020. The most surprising thing about this book is how little of it wasn’t already in the public domain. I’m pleased with that – while the book does sometimes give us a look into the foul life of our president, the book doesn’t rely on things we can’t prove. Instead, it groups similar patterns and events together so that we can clearly see Trump’s cruelty, ineptitude, and incuriousness at every level. Most of the private interactions between the author and the president simply involve a bit more swearing than what we see in public. He hates/mistrusts notetakers, often stopping halfway through a meeting when he finally notices someone taking minutes and shouts something to the effect of “WHAT THE F*CK ARE YOU DOING?!” All of the nicknames/terms of endearment he has for women are plastered across one awful, cringeworthy page. All in all, this was a great, quick read. It’s damning, but with a somber tone and an underlying plea that we decide we deserve better than him. While I don’t think it will change the mind of even a single Trump supporter, I do think it’s the closest thing out there to accomplishing that.
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  • Adam Shinners
    January 1, 1970
    I challenge all Senate Republicans to read this book. Preferably before the next round of hearings.
  • Bettie
    January 1, 1970
    - Tit-Bits (1886)7th November: Maddow has an ARC and she read out excerpts on her show. Maybe she should read the audiobook like she narrates as Vesper Fairchild in Batwoman!Book: Trump recklessness sparked W.H. 'five-alarm fire drills': Rachel Maddow shares some of the first excerpts from the forthcoming book "A Warning" by an anonymous author described as “a senior official in the Trump administration,” describing the challenge of briefing Donald Trump in pictures and sound bites, and the - Tit-Bits (1886)7th November: Maddow has an ARC and she read out excerpts on her show. Maybe she should read the audiobook like she narrates as Vesper Fairchild in Batwoman!Book: Trump recklessness sparked W.H. 'five-alarm fire drills': Rachel Maddow shares some of the first excerpts from the forthcoming book "A Warning" by an anonymous author described as “a senior official in the Trump administration,” describing the challenge of briefing Donald Trump in pictures and sound bites, and the staff panic of trying to prevent damage from Trump's ill-considered decisions.
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  • Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a 15-hour blaze and...30-minutes wait to call the firemen...and
    January 1, 1970
    https://amp.theguardian.com/us-news/2...Same people as the New York Times op-ed some time ago? Maybe.https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/05/op...
  • Jill Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    The identity of the "Anonymous" who wrote "A Warning", will probably be identified before too long. Certainly, the person who wrote this book, an expose of his time in the Trump White House, is giving away the secrets Trump and his associates would like to keep hidden. Much of what he exposes is scary - Trump's finger is where it definitely shouldn't be.If you don't like Donald Trump - or are terribly scared of him - you'll like this book. If you like Trump, nothing here will change your vote in The identity of the "Anonymous" who wrote "A Warning", will probably be identified before too long. Certainly, the person who wrote this book, an expose of his time in the Trump White House, is giving away the secrets Trump and his associates would like to keep hidden. Much of what he exposes is scary - Trump's finger is where it definitely shouldn't be.If you don't like Donald Trump - or are terribly scared of him - you'll like this book. If you like Trump, nothing here will change your vote in November. The book is well-written, but if it wasn't written by "anonymous", it would probably be out there with the Trump-exposure books.
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  • Brad Galloway
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could put a copy of this in the hand of every American. It is a rather bleak and sobering look at the presidency of Donald J. Trump, and more than anything makes me pray that he is ousted from the office in 2020. The author points out all the reasons we need a new president, whether it's another Republican or Democrat, we really can't afford another 4 years of this man in the office.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    "A Warning" is a strange mix of common sense, confirmation, and partisan propaganda that, oddly, feels like an expanded op-ed piece written by an outsider. I'm not saying the author isn't a "high ranking White House official," only that his or her fear of being outed means that there is virtually no insider information to be found within these pages which, let's face it, is the main reason why most of us are reading it in the first place.To get this out of the way: The author claims the reason "A Warning" is a strange mix of common sense, confirmation, and partisan propaganda that, oddly, feels like an expanded op-ed piece written by an outsider. I'm not saying the author isn't a "high ranking White House official," only that his or her fear of being outed means that there is virtually no insider information to be found within these pages which, let's face it, is the main reason why most of us are reading it in the first place.To get this out of the way: The author claims the reason for his or her anonymity is to avoid the message being overshadowed by the messenger, but I believe this logic is faulty. The author's anonymity actually undermines the message. After detailing signs of Trump's systemic racism, for example, the author states "I still don't think he's a hardline racist, but draw your own conclusions." Not knowing who the author is makes it difficult to care what he or she thinks; it might as well be the guy on the bar stool next to me. And consider this, from page 185: "It's important that advisers speak truth to power. Presidents have enough flatterers in their midst. What they need more than anything are people willing to present unvarnished facts and to challenge bad decisions." Ideological statements like this, while lofty, carry no weight because without knowing who the author is we cannot know if they are actually voicing truth to the commander in chief.From a literary standpoint the writing is good, but the author engages in one of my pet peeves: telling readers what they will find in the book if they keep reading as opposed to just getting on with it. Sentences such as "as we will discuss later" pepper the first third of the book. I'm already reading the thing; I don't need a "coming up after the break!" to keep going; just tell me already.The few pieces of previously unpublished information we do get are only half-anecdotes (to avoid spilling protected state secrets) or frustrating teases that divulge too little. Here's an example of the latter, from page 178: "People around Trump are also blameworthy. Some among us have too readily accepted the president's offers to start Twitter wars to denigrate critics opposed to the administration's policies, while others actively seek him out and ask Trump to send raw voltage into the news feeds of his followers in order to light up a new cause." There are a dozen questions to be asked about this fascinating passage, but you won't find any of them answered here and, of course, we don't know who to direct them to. Aside from those three or four sparse paragraphs spread throughout the book, we get a dull recounting of the past three years of journalists' hard work (although there are no citations, which should have been a common sense inclusion). Anonymous tells us that Trump is "misogynistic", a "pathological liar," uses "weaponized language" at his rallies, and "exploits the mob mentality" of social media by "inflaming public debates and dispatching supporters to attack politicians who've criticized him." When even his supporters don't deny any of those things, it all just feels like filler. Here's another scoop: Apparently, the president uses his Twitter account a lot, and it makes life difficult for his administration. And --get this-- Trump once told a reporter he could "grab [women] by the [genitalia]!" You don't say? Tell us more, anonymous insider! The book is chock full of things like this that only waste your precious reading time.More than any of Trump's personality traits / faults, Anonymous (who claims the Republican party as his or her own) despises the president's well-documented capacity for lying, and makes the convincing argument that Trump's near-constant distortion of the truth is the major reason for the ineffectiveness of his administration and the damage it has arguably caused to international relationships. For someone who relies so heavily on the truth however, there is a fair bit of spin here. According to the author, democrats refuse to work with anyone about anything (despite the hundreds of bills the House has passed that can't make it past the Senate majority leader's desk). Members of congress reportedly can't get anything done because they are constantly "shying away from cooperation and adopting the tone of those who pressure them" on social media. And here, I thought it was the corporate pac money they were taking, but nope - according to Anonymous, it's all Twitter's fault."A Warning" is not entirely a waste of time; the best moments of the book come when the author holds up an historical mirror to our current sociopolitical climate (particularly effective is the analogy of Trump to Cleon, an ancient, prominent Athenian). These moments are insightful and thoughtfully presented, and the author draws a clear parallel between the two men. This type of analysis could have given the book merit, but these moments are too few and fleeting.The last third of the book speaks directly to readers who still support the president. Given its thesis (President Trump is a danger to our democracy and must be replaced), it's difficult to imagine any of them will read that far. Yet, those readers who have decided this administration is not doing the job they want it to are likely familiar with the already well-worn arguments the book presents. Who, then, is it for? I have a thought: Hundreds of years from now, as long as all newspaper, internet, and media archives have been destroyed, "A Warning" will stand as a correlational report of what happened during the reign of this administration. Until and unless that happens, it's a pointless read.
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  • Dan Graser
    January 1, 1970
    And here it is, the big "scandal" book of year, and for the most part, it lives up to the hype in terms of the depth of examination it brings to the current administration while also at times falling short. It is certainly true that there isn't much genuinely "new" in this book, beyond what all sensible people of every political persuasion understand about the preposterous little man-child we currently have as president and his administration: it's in shambles and that long-dead fish rots from And here it is, the big "scandal" book of year, and for the most part, it lives up to the hype in terms of the depth of examination it brings to the current administration while also at times falling short. It is certainly true that there isn't much genuinely "new" in this book, beyond what all sensible people of every political persuasion understand about the preposterous little man-child we currently have as president and his administration: it's in shambles and that long-dead fish rots from the head. The author is very aware of the waves of extreme talk on our constitutionally-anointed king joffrey and how it has become quite easy to accept that this is just how politics is currently run and that the constant alarmism of some generates a pervasive apathy among otherwise upstanding citizens:"The criticism of the Trump administration is so frenzied that ordinary Americans are struggling to discern truth from fiction. There is only so much the public can absorb. When everything is a crisis and a scandal, the end result is that nothing is. Americans are fed up with the cacophony, becoming numb to it."While many in right wing news media will already be calling this author a traitor, or treasonous, or a member of the deep state, or any other bits of social-media age vocab they learned from our pusillanimous prelate, this author makes it very clear that:"To be clear, there is no seditious plot inside the administration to undercut the president."Adding later, contradicting the tone of the previous op-ed from this author last year:"I was wrong about the quiet resistance inside the Trump administration. Unelected bureaucrats and cabinet appointees were never going to steer Donald Trump the right direction in the long run, or refine his malignant management style. He is who he is. Americans should not take comfort in knowing whether there are so-called adults in the room. We are not bulwarks against the president and shouldn't be counted upon to keep him in check. That is not our job. That is the job of the voters and their elected representatives."Though that may ring hollow for some or as a disappointment for others, there it is. What this book forms is an insider's argument for the firing of their boss, not as some missive from the resistance. This person then proceeds to evaluate our commander in chief by the standards of the Greek cardinal virtues (wisdom, temperance, courage, and justice) as reformulated by Roman philosopher and orator Cicero a couple hundred years later:1) Understanding and acknowledging truth.2) Maintaining good fellowship with men, giving to every one his due, and keeping faith in contracts and promises.3) Greatness and strength of a lofty and unconquered mind.4) The order and measure that constitute moderation and temperance. I know, you likely didn't get past the first one before you either chuckled or raised an eyebrow at the idea of the donald measuring up to any of that (nor would even he think that he is trying to), that is the author's conclusion as well reinforcing the idea of, this is were we are with our democracy, but is this truly what we wish to be?There are some behind the scenes revelations that have already been discussed among the news networks that received advanced copies so you can peruse those as you like. Having purchased this I cannot imagine that you don't already have some sort of critical view of the president, this book will confirm your worst intuitions and then some. The author is at their most poignant and perspicacious in the epilogue:"We are getting the presidency and the Congress we deserve. It is not obvious that elected leaders are mimicking our behavior. Their snarky attacks and Twitter jabs sound a lot like the text messages we send, the comments we make below news articles, and the condescending memes we post to Facebook because it's easier to fire rounds from behind a digital wall than has out problems face-to-face. It's no wonder people think Washington is broken. We are broken."And throughout this review I have hardly kept my opinions on the president a mystery and have engaged in talk that perhaps the author would find counterproductive, perhaps, but then again you work for him, I do not. And you think something can be done about him, I do not.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    The author, a senior administration official, paints an alarming picture of the 45th President of the United States as an erratic and unqualified leader.Through a toxic combination of amorality and indifference, the president has failed to rise to the occasion in fulfilling his dutiesChapter 1: Collapse of the Steady State. Those officials that may have kept Trump from his worst impulses at the beginning of the term are leaving and The White House is broken. The remaining individuals are ... The author, a senior administration official, paints an alarming picture of the 45th President of the United States as an erratic and unqualified leader.Through a toxic combination of amorality and indifference, the president has failed to rise to the occasion in fulfilling his dutiesChapter 1: Collapse of the Steady State. Those officials that may have kept Trump from his worst impulses at the beginning of the term are leaving and The White House is broken. The remaining individuals are ... like bank-robbery hostages lying on the floor at gunpoint, unable to sound the alarm, but aware that everyone else was stricken with the same fear of the unknown.Chapter 2: The Character of a Man. "Intellectual laziness", "irregular mental state", "idiot", and "moron" are some of the observations by the author and others who have worked closely with Trump. He routinely exhibits traits of a bad character or no character at all. Many of us who've joined his administration recognize he is a vindictive and self-promoting person, one who spends inordinate time attacking others to advance his interests. Those qualities translate into governing. As a result, we have all learned the hard way that the president's modus operandi emphasizes combat over peacemaking, bullying over negotiating, malice over clemency, and recognition over true generosity. In sum, he is the portrait of an unjust man.His behavior is quintessentially unseemly, from crude rhetoric and vulgar jokes to immodest public reactions.Chapter 3: Fake Views. Trump changes his mind and is on every side of every issue, not seeming to hold a single firm principle or position. The successes are mostly the result of the Republicans in Congress or senior WH aides. He promised to reduce the federal debt but the deficit has increased every year that he's been in office.He has fooled them into thinking he is a conservative, when he is not. They expect he will be unfailingly loyal to their causes, when he will not.The patriots who are still in uniform will not come out and say it because they don't want to openly disagree with their commander in chief but many are appalled by Trump's lack of decorum and his imprudent leadership of the armed forces.Chapter 4: Assault on Democracy. Trump is abusing his power and seeks to undermine the checks and balances from the other branches of government, a cornerstone of our democracy. He also regularly assails and denigrates the public servants who work for the federal government. He is seriously ignorant of national security challenges.The president's claim of a Deep State sounds preposterous because it is. The person intent on destroying democratic foundations is Donald Trump, not the honorable public servants who go to work every day to make sure our government runs ... to uphold our Constitution.The unavoidable conclusion is that the president sees himself as above the law, which is a scary point of view for a person who swears before God and the nation to "faithfully execute" it.Chapter 5: A Weakness for Strongmen. Trump has demeaned and insulted America's historical allies in the G7 and elsewhere, while ... he has seemingly abandoned a century-long consensus about America's role as leader of the free world. Even those in his own administration don't understand why Trump has met alone with Putin, without any advisors present. Why doesn't he want anyone to know about his discussions with Russia? Why is he appeasing America's enemies. Those privy to the content of the president's phone calls with foreign leaders were red-faced with embarrassment. To us, he came off like a complete amateur, using important calls to brag about himself and make awkward comments.Willful ignorance is the fairest way to describe the president's attitude towards our enemies.Our enemies and adversaries recognize the president as a simplistic pushover.Chapter 6: The New Mason-Dixon Line. Trump's words have three serious consequences: coarse vulgar rhetoric, undermining the truth, and fostering a mob mentality, all historical destroyers of democracy.It's not just that [Trump's] style of communicating is rambling or contentious. It's that he's laid waste to public decencyThe president has been called a pathological liar. I used to cringe when I heard people say it just to score political points, and I thought it was unfair. Now I know it's true.Chapter 7: Apologists. The environment inside the White House is getting uglier. There are too many people who are "obsequious pleasers" that won't stand up to Trump, a trend that accelerated about two years into his presidency. The new White House cohort is increasingly filled by those with questionable morals, the undereducated, persons with weak principles, and united by negative altitudes, most often hatred. These new Trump disciples are motivated by power, tribal allegiance, and fear. Capitol Hill also has its share of Republican sycophants and servile attitudes.Chapter 8: We the Electorate. The author, who wrote an op-ed in The New York Times, now confesses that s/he was wrong about the administration advisors being able to fix the situation. They can't do it. And the author opposes non-electoral means — impeachment, instigating a crisis, or the 25th Amendment. S/he supports an electoral decision that removes Trump decisively. However Plato wrote that the government represents the citizens that comprise the nation and the views and morality of the people are reflected in the leaders they elect. The Trump administration is an unmitigated catastrophe, and the responsibility rests entirely at his feet, the predictable outcome of assigning organizational leadership to a man of weak morals.An excellent book and hopefully Americans will heed the "Warning".
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  • Cindy Woods
    January 1, 1970
    Sobering expose!I had a difficult time deciding on a title for my review after finishing the book. Much of what I have read here is not a surprise. The character of President Trump and his ability to cause such division in not only the government entities in Washington DC but in the people of the United States is serious and striking especially in a nuclear warfare age. Our enemies are without and within while we bicker and our leader fans the flames of discord. We do not have our eye on the Sobering expose!I had a difficult time deciding on a title for my review after finishing the book. Much of what I have read here is not a surprise. The character of President Trump and his ability to cause such division in not only the government entities in Washington DC but in the people of the United States is serious and striking especially in a nuclear warfare age. Our enemies are without and within while we bicker and our leader fans the flames of discord. We do not have our eye on the ball! And we have already suffered the effects of our failure as a nation when 9/11 became a national wake-up call! I have always believed this president was not suited, immoral and ill-equipped to be our president and the leader of the whole world. His words of hate, his lies and basic stupidity are astounding and his refusal to listen to his advisors, professionals in their fields of expertise, is the sign of an extremely weak leader making us a divided and weakened nation. I hadn't been much for social media until recently and was struck by the same immature hate-speak and absolute misinformation Trump spews coming from people daily as they post gifs, meme's and political cartoons. The name calling is prolific and attacks on one another is like a game of one upmanship. Here, I agree with the author wholeheartedly. The president sets the tone, and this one is dangerous.I do have a disagreement with the author as to whether this president is a racist. Of course he is. Anyone who defines a person specifically, negatively and wholly by his race is a racist. And we will never become comfortable with our melting pot of a nation until this is no longer an issue. I have said from the night of the last election results swept my TV screen.....we are in trouble! I just didn't know how quickly and how bad! What I thought was simple ineptness and naivety on Trump's part with regard to his understanding how our government works and what his limitations were has turned into a rock solid division in Congress and the nation as a whole. And we are at risk! Great risk as the author articulates! The epilogue is an analogy that everyone should read and think about very carefully and deeply! The first part of it made me cry. Lest we forget!I have mixed feelings with regard to the author his/herself as "anonymous." Especially given the courage of the witnesses giving testimony during this impeachment investigation and hearings presently ongoing and the " whistleblower. " They risk careers, their very lives and their families as one by one they give testimony under oath. They didn't choose to see and/or hear what they did, but they are patriotically doing their citizen 's duty while their characters are put under a microscope, intimidated by their president and must deal with the continuing threats of extremist viewers and synchophants. The author, a senior Whitehouse official, has stated others know what he relates and are as concerned for the country as he/she. I would tell the author that more than half the country are and were aware, at various levels of awareness, of the danger Trump presents on a daily basis since taking office. Many of us were hopeful, in the beginning, that his cabinet and advisors would temper and guide him through the term. More fools us! He is one man, not God, yet he has wounded our nation and we are wide open for enemy interference and attack! Nixon had the Saturday night massacre, " and thank God for it! Need I say more?I will close by saying I'm not shocked by the contents of the descriptions of day to day life as a senior official in Trump's Administration so much as I am shocked by the silence of all those who serve it have served in the same capacities. A unified front makes an enormous statement. I do come away with a deeper anxiety and concern for the welfare of our nation as a whole. An inciteful and serious read that I recommend highly to every American citizen. Sobering and chilling. Much to consider.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the most frightening books that I have read in a long time. Stephen Kings has got nothing on “Anonymous”. At least King writes fiction. The author doesn’t reveal anything that we don’t already know about Donald Trump; he just puts it all in context, especially in terms of his being POTUS. His impulsivity, his lack of knowledge about how governments run; his sense of entitlement, his vulgarity, his lack of a moral center, his refusal to have intelligence briefings, his making This is one of the most frightening books that I have read in a long time. Stephen Kings has got nothing on “Anonymous”. At least King writes fiction. The author doesn’t reveal anything that we don’t already know about Donald Trump; he just puts it all in context, especially in terms of his being POTUS. His impulsivity, his lack of knowledge about how governments run; his sense of entitlement, his vulgarity, his lack of a moral center, his refusal to have intelligence briefings, his making decisions based on his instincts instead of information, his alienation of our allies and courting of despots. These are just a few of the traits he describes from an inside’s vantage point. At one point he writes:“We learned that, given enough time and space, Donald J. Trump will seek to abuse any power he is given.”After citing chapter and verse about the dysfunction of this administration, he then goes into what kind of people support or enable him in the administration. A kind of psychological evaluation of them. He also explores what it will take to remove him from power, which he contends is the only way to restore America’s own moral compass. “If we look within ourselves and undertake the arduous task of moral repair, America can restore the soul of its political system. We can once again illuminate a pathway for others onto the vaunted plazas of open society. If, however, we shrink from the task, our names will be recorded by history as those who didn’t pass the torch but let its light expire. That is my warning. Every American generation before us faced and passed this test. Our charge is to do the same, proving that the United States can do what other civilizations could not - survive the ages - and bend the arc of the moral universe toward the value that is the real sinew of civic life: freedom.”I realize that I refer to the author as “he”, but realistically, DJT does not surround himself with strong women, so I assume that the author is a man. The book is surprisingly well written, much better than Michael Wolff’s book or Bob Woodward’s book were. The author is clear eyed as to what the problems are, how they came about and what can realistically be done to end this nightmare of an administration. He understands his own complicity in remaining in the White House, but feels this may be the only way he can try to prevent more disasters. I honestly don’t care who the author is, and he makes a good case for maintaining his anonymity, at least for now. “I have decided to publish this anonymously because this debate is not about me. It is about us. It is about how we want the presidency to reflect our country, and that is where the discussion should center. Some will call this “cowardice.” My feelings are not hurt by this accusation. Nor am I unprepared to attach my name to criticism of President Trump. I may do so, in due course. But when the sitting president prefers to focus on distractions, we need to focus on his character and his record. Removing my identity from the equation deprived him of an opportunity to create a distraction. What will he do when there is no person to attack, only an idea?”This is an important, yet frightening book to read, but a “must read” as we approach the coming election. We need to weigh what we know about the current president against those who will campaign to replace him, and make an informed, moral decision about who and what we want our country to be. History has its eyes on us.
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  • Kurt Pankau
    January 1, 1970
    This book is fascinating. Allegedly written by a senior member of the Trump administration, it’s a book that has surprisingly few surprises. The author addresses their own anonymity right off the bat, insisting that the most pressing concern is that the message not be conflated with the messenger. As such, there’s not a ton of palace intrigue in here. I’m not going to speculate about who the author might be (we’ll all find out in a few years, I’m sure), but we can glean a few things. They’re This book is fascinating. Allegedly written by a senior member of the Trump administration, it’s a book that has surprisingly few surprises. The author addresses their own anonymity right off the bat, insisting that the most pressing concern is that the message not be conflated with the messenger. As such, there’s not a ton of palace intrigue in here. I’m not going to speculate about who the author might be (we’ll all find out in a few years, I’m sure), but we can glean a few things. They’re intellectually conservative—they have good things to say about Reagan, Thatcher, and Bush 43. They have some training (formal or otherwise) in Hayakian economics. They make frequent direct references not just to the Constitution, but also to the Federalist Papers and Cicero. They didn’t like Obama’s politics, but don’t have any animosity towards the man—so, not a reactionary hard-liner. They have very little good to say about Fox News, but advocates for small government and Republican principles.As I said, very little is genuinely surprising. Most of the criticisms of Trump are driven off of things that Trump said in public. The author will add in a few missing details, noting that aides are normally blind-sided by Trump’s behavior and that they all talk about how much of a moron he is behind his back. They comment on the way that good people get coopted into the Trump disinformation machine and become corrupted. I would say that the main thesis of the book is really a message to Republicans that a) yes, he really is as dumb as he acts, b) he’s doing far more damage than you realize, and c) it’s okay if you were optimistic and liked a few of his accomplishment—we were all doe-eyed hopefuls at one point but it’s time to face facts. Some of the “behind the scenes” conversations related play out exactly the way you think they would. After the Comey firing, some officials discussed the possibility of invoking the 25th Amendment—not as a serious consideration, but to reason out how it would work if it actually happened because Trump was seeming especially unhinged at that time. They ultimately decided that this would add more instability, especially if Trump were unwilling to leave, which is what you would expect from a rational adult in that situation.The real dynamite is in the conclusions. They advocate for voting against Trump, no matter the cost, but voting Republican down-ballot. They urge the Democrats to field a centrist on the ticket rather than a socialist—they don’t explicitly mention Sanders or Warren, but they definitely are talking about Sanders and Warren. They then end with a reimagining of the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks but swap out George W Bush’s inspirational rhetoric for some of the things Trump said about Russia and Charlottesville. They imagine Trump talking about “fine people on both sides” of that attack and that he talked to bin-Laden and he seems like a good guy. It’s kind of jaw-dropping.It’s a very of-the-moment book that’s less sensational than it’s been marketed. It’s extremely well-written, and it does not pull punches. Whoever wrote it hates not just Trump but the state of American politics that he was able to leverage to get into office. It is fundamentally what it says right there on the label: a warning.
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  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    I received A Warning in the mail this afternoon and devoured it within a few hours. The book is written by a senior official in the White House, we don't know who. It's written well--very matter of fact but also engaging. Honestly, I thought it was going to be a book directed more toward liberals, but I was surprised to find that it's much more a book written for Republicans by a Republican--kind of a plea to rethink what the party stands for.The book is divided into eight chapters:Chapter 1 I received A Warning in the mail this afternoon and devoured it within a few hours. The book is written by a senior official in the White House, we don't know who. It's written well--very matter of fact but also engaging. Honestly, I thought it was going to be a book directed more toward liberals, but I was surprised to find that it's much more a book written for Republicans by a Republican--kind of a plea to rethink what the party stands for.The book is divided into eight chapters:Chapter 1 talks about a group within the White House called the "Steady State." The author describes this group as people behind the scenes who "keep the wheels from coming off the White House wagon" by guiding Trump toward better, less crazy decisions. But the author says this group is all but gone now, since most people have quit or been fired by volatile Trump. So the author is writing this book because the people need to know who Trump is.Chapter 2 is about character, what makes a good leader, and how Trump basically doesn't possess any of the necessary qualities (like courage, bravery, level-headedness, mental stability, loyalty, fairness, etc.) to be considered one.Chapter 3 is how Trump isn't even an actual Republican. What was especially interesting to me is how much Trump has expanded the government and driven up the deficit. Did you know that he took our deficit from $587 billion (from when Obama left office) to over $1 trillion currently? And he is on track to add another $2 trillion in debt over the next decade.Chapter 4 gives Trump's record on undercutting democracy, either through revealing government secrets and putting soldiers at risk or wanting to prosecute and persecute anyone who challenges him or undercutting his own intelligence community.Chapter 5 talks about how badly Trump has damaged our international reputation and put us all in danger by alienating our allies while cozying up to dictators who don't even support us.Chapter 6 is about how Trump talks like he's, well, straight out the trailer even when he's standing in front of the White House--how he uses his words to lie, insult and divide people, and encourage mob rule. Chapter 7 is about the newest wave of staffers in Trump's White House. The author describes them as confrontational, critical, catty, vicious, incompetent, insecure, and easily manipulated. S/he also describes the environment as completely leaderless.Chapter 8 argues how important it is to get Trump out of the White House using proper channels--no impeachment or takeover by the Vice President. The author believes the best way to get a new president is to elect one on Voting Day. What an intriguing read! I was already familiar with a lot of the highlights of Trump's presidency, but the book still gave me some insights into both Trump and the Republican party. And the Democratic party, too, actually. I'm going to be thinking about this book for a while.
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  • Wendelle So
    January 1, 1970
    There's a bit of prevailing hypocritical inconsistency to the motivations of this book. The author claims his/her main reason for penning this book is to 'warn' voters of the 2020 cycle about the real character and temperament of Donald Trump. The author then insists that the voters have to take the initiative and control in the choice and the evaluation of the next President, and that they cannot rely on unelected government officials and bureaucrats to be the 'bulwark' cordoning the There's a bit of prevailing hypocritical inconsistency to the motivations of this book. The author claims his/her main reason for penning this book is to 'warn' voters of the 2020 cycle about the real character and temperament of Donald Trump. The author then insists that the voters have to take the initiative and control in the choice and the evaluation of the next President, and that they cannot rely on unelected government officials and bureaucrats to be the 'bulwark' cordoning the President's actions. Yet with the same breath the rather self-righteous, austere author claims that the reason he/she and the rest of the appointees did not hand in their resignation letters during the most serious moral crisis in Trump's presidency-- the Charlottesville white supremacist rally-- is that they have to protect the country from Trump's worst mistakes. Dear author, you cannot have it both ways. You cannot pass the buck to the ordinary voters, then justify staying on and aiding and abetting his government by claiming you can help control his worst impulses and decisions. Which is it- can you actively change things from within or can you not?Otherwise the content and overall of this book doesn't really deviate from the curation of news insights we already absorb from the available media, if one is an astute news consumer. The only new things from this book (aside from astounding bits here and there like Trump's desire to send non-legal immigrants to Guantanamo Bay) is that it is an internal documentation of the mess and amorality of the Trump government, published before the next election cycle with the hope of changing same-side Trumpers' minds. But let's be honest, the chances this will convince a significant portion of Trump loyalists is measly. And the novelty of it being an internal document, a primary document, from an insider working in Trump's government in real time, loses some of its merit from the choice of anonymity. To be fair, the author explains his choice as an effort to keep from distraction from the message of the book. But the flip side of this choice is that it loses the 'weight' of a book with a real author behind it, who will stand behind his message even if it costs him his position with the Republicans. That move of unmasking and sacrifice would give the words of this book the merit of a second glance from Republicans, that there may be really something 'going on' behind the charade. As it stands, this anonymous book will only reach Democrats, and salve the author's limited conscience that 'he/she did his part' at very limited cost and suitable book profit to himself, and can now pass the buck on to the voters. The author used Cicero's framework of 'wisdom, courage, temperance and justice' to prospect Trump's moral character, but will he turn the microscope on his own decisions as an anonymous author and Trump government collaborator?
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  • Maris
    January 1, 1970
    Well, that was a sobering read. On the one hand, it’s difficult to read this and not be frustrated that this anonymous senior official in the Trump administration, who is incredibly intelligent and articulate, did not see the writing on the wall prior to Inauguration Day. On the other hand, it is precisely this point that makes their words carry so much weight. To their credit, they take responsibility for being a Trump Apologist who waited too long to speak out. And there are plenty of Well, that was a sobering read. On the one hand, it’s difficult to read this and not be frustrated that this anonymous senior official in the Trump administration, who is incredibly intelligent and articulate, did not see the writing on the wall prior to Inauguration Day. On the other hand, it is precisely this point that makes their words carry so much weight. To their credit, they take responsibility for being a Trump Apologist who waited too long to speak out. And there are plenty of reminders throughout the book that this is a very politically conservative Republican author and not just a disgruntled former employee.There is little to nothing revealed here that anyone paying attention to the news for the last three to four years hasn’t already heard - but there are many stories from 2017-2018 that many may have forgotten about since. As the author states, “when everything is a crisis or a scandal, the end result is that nothing is.” It is indeed hard to keep track of everything from birtherism to paying hush money to porn stars to using a sharpie to extend a hurricane path to Alabama to the refusal to condemn election interference or white nationalism post-Charlottesville or the murder of a journalist at the hands of Saudi Arabia to...the list goes on. I presume there are so few insider anecdotes here for the purpose of protecting both the author’s identity and our national security. And of course there’s no shortage of public material to work with. That said, the book provides a profound analysis of the man and the culture that has developed inside the White House, and it is nothing short of riveting. At what point will we reclaim our national identity and put country before party, as this author has done? They argue that the time is now and warn that the consequences of a re-election would be detrimental. This book is an important read for anyone who will be of age to vote in November 2020. What’s concerning is that those who need to read it most are the least likely to, and that is unfortunate. In sum: “I cannot overstate the consequences of reelecting Donald Trump. I’ve seen the impact of his leadership on our government and country, up close and all too personal. The Trump administration is an unmitigated catastrophe, and the responsibility rests entirely at his feet, the predictable outcome of assigning organizational leadership to a man of weak morals. What is more regrettable is that his faults are amplifying our own. I believe firmly that whatever benefits we may have gained from individual Trump policies are vastly outweighed by the incalculable damage he has done to the fabric of our republic. I cannot yet say who will turn the ship, but four more years of Trump could very well sink it.”
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    “The survival of our democracy is not inevitable.”For those who have been following the news, “A Warning” by Anonymous, contains few startling revelations about the Trump presidency. Instead, the book builds upon the author’s eyewitness insights as a self-described “senior official in the Trump administration” into the chaos and instability of the administration, and how people within the administration are working to keep the president’s worst impulses in check. Be assured, the author is a “The survival of our democracy is not inevitable.”For those who have been following the news, “A Warning” by Anonymous, contains few startling revelations about the Trump presidency. Instead, the book builds upon the author’s eyewitness insights as a self-described “senior official in the Trump administration” into the chaos and instability of the administration, and how people within the administration are working to keep the president’s worst impulses in check. Be assured, the author is a conservative Republican, and has nothing good to say about Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama. Nor does he even suggest that Trump has been deteriorating mentally since being elected. But he describes Trump as “unfit for the job.” He believes that future historians will write “He couldn’t focus on governing, and he was prone to abuses of power, from ill-conceived schemes to punish his political rivals to a propensity for undermining vital American institutions.”Early on, members of the administration were told to condense briefings to three main points – preferably in PowerPoint – because the president would not read memos. Soon afterwards, they were told to come up with just one main point, repeated over and over, because the president couldn’t focus his attention on more than one idea at a meeting. “As a result, complex proposals were reduced to a single page (or ideally a paragraph) and translated into Trump’s ‘winners and losers’ tone.” Moreover, Trump’s impulsive nature has led him to make major decisions with little forethought or discussion even with his own advisors. As a result, “mini crises became the norm,” Anonymous says. “Some aides grew so worn down by the roller coaster of presidential whims that they started encouraging him to hold campaign rallies, putting aside the fact that it wasn’t campaign season. The events had the dual benefit of giving Trump something ‘fun’ to do and also getting him out of town, where he would hypothetically do less damage.”Many more examples of Trump’s irrational and damaging behavior are given throughout the book, most of them familiar.The author ends with his opinion that impeachment or a forced resignation of finding the president unfit to govern would be the worst ways to remove Trump from office. He believes that only way to resolve the issue is to vote Trump out of office in the 2020 election. On a somber note, he writes, “We are getting the presidency and the Congress we deserve… elected leaders are mimicking our behavior. Their snarky attacks and Twitter jabs sound a lot like the text messages we send, the comments we make below news articles, and the condescending memes we post to Facebook.” Vote.
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    In “A Warning” the famously anonymous author describes a president that is lazy, uninformed and an individual with the worst possible tendencies for the leader of the free world. Anonymous says that the President is misogynistic, a bully and is nearly illiterate with regards to reading books. The author is clearly a conservative Republican who desperately wants to convey how the President is not fit for office and that the voters need to know how bad things are in the White House. The author In “A Warning” the famously anonymous author describes a president that is lazy, uninformed and an individual with the worst possible tendencies for the leader of the free world. Anonymous says that the President is misogynistic, a bully and is nearly illiterate with regards to reading books. The author is clearly a conservative Republican who desperately wants to convey how the President is not fit for office and that the voters need to know how bad things are in the White House. The author provides almost no clear inside information about the administration that could not be speculated on by an outsider listening to the media. In fact, I finished this book wondering if the author was actually part of the administration at all, or at least whether anonymous had more than a minor position in the West Wing. Certainly, the author’s interest in maintaining the anonymous status would preclude including direct dialog with other staffers who might remember the conversation. However, the author never provided evidence of actual participation in an event, action or group conversation, not widely known, that could be validated by others involved. There are dozens of references to historical figures, such as Cicero, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, George Washington, and Abraham Lincoln. These references are typically used to highlight the contrast between the President and the philosophy or ethics of these great men. The author is clearly a history buff.Towards the end of the book, the author discusses the possible paths for removing the President from office, including the 25th amendment, impeachment and at the ballot box. The specter of riots in the streets and a president that refuses to leave is suggested as the outcome of the Presidents removal by the enacting the 25th. Impeachment is discussed as a possibility, but with a detrimental polarization of the electorate. The authors expressed goal in writing this book is to encourage voters to use the ballot box to remove Trump from office in 2020.
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  • Joanne Clarke Gunter
    January 1, 1970
    Against my better judgment, I read this book. A more appropriate and descriptive title for it could be "Profiles in Thinking About Courage". The author claims to be a senior White House official and he/she certainly knows a lot about government and the protocol and procedures of a normal government and is fond of quoting Greek, Roman, and American history. But this is no normal government and Donald Trump is no normal president. The entire book discusses the author's first-hand witnessing of the Against my better judgment, I read this book. A more appropriate and descriptive title for it could be "Profiles in Thinking About Courage". The author claims to be a senior White House official and he/she certainly knows a lot about government and the protocol and procedures of a normal government and is fond of quoting Greek, Roman, and American history. But this is no normal government and Donald Trump is no normal president. The entire book discusses the author's first-hand witnessing of the unparalleled ignorance, impulsiveness, recklessness, dishonesty, and general meanness of Donald J. Trump. Trump has little knowledge or curiosity about anything world or government related and often has the attention span and demeanor of a spoiled toddler. But we knew that. Many examples are given, most of which we who follow the news and politics already knew about before this book. The author over and over again discusses the many times that what he calls the people in the "Steady State" have had to cajole, withhold information, and do all that they can to prevent Trump from doing yet another stupid and impulsive thing, sometimes succeeding, sometimes not. Throughout this book I kept getting angrier and angrier because the author and the other dwindling members of the so-called "Steady State" continue to work for and prop up a clearly unfit and unqualified president knowing that they really have little power to stop his impetuousness. And so it is our country that suffers while they remain silent and anonymous. They are cowards who congratulate themselves for attempting to rein in this president all the while knowing that any day can bring some potential disaster where they cannot. I can count on one hand the times I have given a 1-star review, but this book deserves it and I am sorry to even have read such a cowardly screed as this book is.
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  • Zulfiya
    January 1, 1970
    Unputdownable but riddled with partisan logic. There was revelation upon revelation, and at the same time, there was nothing new. We all knew/suspected that Trump can not do the job the way it should be done. We all suspect that his mental architecture is not adequate to handle the requirements of this job, and we all suspected that he is spoiled rotten, emotionally abusive, petty, revengeful, and pathologically narcissistic. Now it was confirmed. This is not the revelation. The revelation is Unputdownable but riddled with partisan logic. There was revelation upon revelation, and at the same time, there was nothing new. We all knew/suspected that Trump can not do the job the way it should be done. We all suspect that his mental architecture is not adequate to handle the requirements of this job, and we all suspected that he is spoiled rotten, emotionally abusive, petty, revengeful, and pathologically narcissistic. Now it was confirmed. This is not the revelation. The revelation is that a huge number of conservatives know all that and still publicly defend him or serve him or comply with his style. One has to be really gutless, hypocritical,scared witless or self-profiteering. I know that the author tries to justify his choice or the choice of others by the noble imperative to curb his evil ambitions or veer off from the impending catastrophe, but I find it equally hypocritical and dubious. Of course, the author does justify his or her choice and uses solid arguments, but they are not for me. Plus, he/he is very much a Republican/Conservative who is somewhat dubious in his/her standing about the Supreme Court situation as he/she applauds conservative judges but later in the book he/she insists that we should not have either liberal judges nor conservative judges. The thing that made me roll my eyes. Another one is the jingoistic white man's burden about American being most free, most democratic, most everything ... The she dude/he dude is either delusional ( I would not be surprised) or just is catering to the needs of his/her electorate. Really? Really? But, hey, I am Russian, so who am I to lecture the author about the delusions of grandeur of this country ... .... .... I hope you can read sarcasm in this last sentence.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I debated as to whether or not I should read this book, then decided, "Yes. If it's awful I can donate it to the local library." It is not being donated, and will be finding a home on the bookshelf.Whether you are a Democrat, Republican, Independent or any other political party out there, I recommend you read this book. Written by a senior official in the Trump administration, the author relates first-hand accounts of the inner actions of the current presidency, and does it in a reasonable and I debated as to whether or not I should read this book, then decided, "Yes. If it's awful I can donate it to the local library." It is not being donated, and will be finding a home on the bookshelf.Whether you are a Democrat, Republican, Independent or any other political party out there, I recommend you read this book. Written by a senior official in the Trump administration, the author relates first-hand accounts of the inner actions of the current presidency, and does it in a reasonable and well-written voice. Be advised that he or she doesn't sugar coat it and doesn't pull any punches either.Yes, yes... I can hear many responding that this is a "one-sided account," or that the author is "biased and has their own agenda." I had the same thoughts myself when contemplating whether or not to read it. Past experience with similar books has made me skeptical too.I found it to be a compelling account (read: eye-opening, jaw-dropping) told by a Republican serving in the country's highest government. Knowledgeable in US history, they provide parallels of times in the past, and how a similar result (good or bad) could play out today.I came away thinking, "even if HALF of what the author says is true, we are way off the course the founding fathers set up." While I may not have liked reading about how The White House is being run (or not run), reading how officials that previously lambasted Trump are now sucking up to him and promoting his behavior, how policy and tone have deteriorated, I am ultimately glad to have read the book, even if it left me feeling disturbed at the same time.
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  • Bruin Mccon
    January 1, 1970
    It’s hard to give accolades to anonymous for this book. Not because we don’t actually know who he is, but rather because he really only gives one of two shitty choices: a sycophant or a silent abettor. For a while I thought it might be Vice President Mike Pence, but I highly doubt Pence would author a book that drops several F-bombs. It is a rather intellectual book that examines the meaning of character and quotes ancient philosophers. This would also rule out Pence as the author. I do think It’s hard to give accolades to anonymous for this book. Not because we don’t actually know who he is, but rather because he really only gives one of two shitty choices: a sycophant or a silent abettor. For a while I thought it might be Vice President Mike Pence, but I highly doubt Pence would author a book that drops several F-bombs. It is a rather intellectual book that examines the meaning of character and quotes ancient philosophers. This would also rule out Pence as the author. I do think anonymous is a senior aide in national security given many of the stories related in the book. I can’t rule out it being a female author. In fact, without looking at a list of West Wing staffers, I would almost guess this book was written by someone outside of the WW: Nikki Haley. We’ve all heard the rumors she may be Trump’s second term VP pick so it is someone vice presidential. But she was more than a “senior aide”.In any event, this book is truly frightening. I can’t conceive of a modern day Democratic Admin senior aide writing a book like this during any recent Dem President’s time in office. The author believes Trump is getting rolled repeatedly by foreign leaders, is personally enriching himself through sketchy deals with Russia and Saudi Arabia, and is a complete imbecile. This is not remotely an exaggeration. I read this book the day it came out; it’s like rubbernecking a car wreck. While most of the book’s information is somewhat known, it is simply shocking that this person remains employed by the WH, if that’s not a cover. Get your hands on this book only if you have a strong stomach.
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  • Budd Margolis
    January 1, 1970
    If the American democratic political system, the Republican party and our shared sense of the common good is to survive the divisive state of our political warfare then this book exposes the corrosion and shines a light on the solution. There is hope but we all must swallow some pride and compromise for the sake of our survival and the 2020 election is that moment.Few books express what it is like to work with Trump or what this means to America's safety, security and future economy. A Warning If the American democratic political system, the Republican party and our shared sense of the common good is to survive the divisive state of our political warfare then this book exposes the corrosion and shines a light on the solution. There is hope but we all must swallow some pride and compromise for the sake of our survival and the 2020 election is that moment.Few books express what it is like to work with Trump or what this means to America's safety, security and future economy. A Warning explains how we are lucky not to be in a serious crisis with this man in charge. But everything else, from the betrayal of the Kurds to the infantile handling of our foreign diplomacy with Iran, North Korea is beyond sane. And the Impeachment and pro-Putin stance of this President is a danger to our national security and in fact, is treason.I do not agree that the tax cut benefitted Americans as the author Annonymous states. I do not accept that "socialism" is evil and that if we returned to the times of Eisenhower we would be far better off but the far right would claim it was communism.But many of the ideas expressed are solid such as the need to educate Americans about how our system works and what we stand for as expressed in our Constitution.The 2020 election is perhaps the most important vote in American history for it is at this point that the country lurches into the deep and spiteful world of the far hard right or we return and restore civility and American values.Everyone, Americans and global citizens, the right and left, the wealthy and poor, privileged or minorities, everyone would be better off for reading this book with an open mind and warm heart.
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  • Eileen Godbout
    January 1, 1970
    Initially I found it disturbing and rather cowardly, that the author of this book would remain “Anonymous” but having just finished the read and allowing myself to think about it, I applaud the author for making that decision. I now believe that not knowing the identity of the author makes this a more pristine read.A very intelligent read. The author weaves Greek philosophy and rich American history into the storyline. He/she uses “The Road to Serfdom” by Austrian thinker Frederick Hayes to Initially I found it disturbing and rather cowardly, that the author of this book would remain “Anonymous” but having just finished the read and allowing myself to think about it, I applaud the author for making that decision. I now believe that not knowing the identity of the author makes this a more pristine read.A very intelligent read. The author weaves Greek philosophy and rich American history into the storyline. He/she uses “The Road to Serfdom” by Austrian thinker Frederick Hayes to explain the phenomenon of Trump’s ascent to Presidency. It is a cautionary tale with a good dose of hope. The author however puts the responsibility for the future of America back on the individual voting citizens of the USA calling for a need for “Civic Resistance.”At the end of the read, the author showcases the courage of Todd Beamer who was a passenger on flight 93 on September 11, 2001. The book ends with the last known words of Todd Beamer, “Let’s Roll”. Very powerful.Finally, I found it very refreshing that the author did not publish this book for self enrichment. He/she refused the potential 7 figure advance from the publisher and promises to earmark a significant portion of royalties for US and International organizations devoted to holding powerful government officials accountable.
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  • Brad Kent
    January 1, 1970
    I’ll be interested in some commentary on this book because I don’t know that I can catch everything that’s really new, but on first reading I didn’t see much. Mostly this is a restatement of what we already know about Trump: he’s vulgar, incurious, self-involved and at least authoritarian-curious. He shouldn’t be president. Exactly how much credit should we give the author (or group of authors!) for binding these things together in yet another book without attaching their name(s) to it? The I’ll be interested in some commentary on this book because I don’t know that I can catch everything that’s really new, but on first reading I didn’t see much. Mostly this is a restatement of what we already know about Trump: he’s vulgar, incurious, self-involved and at least authoritarian-curious. He shouldn’t be president. Exactly how much credit should we give the author (or group of authors!) for binding these things together in yet another book without attaching their name(s) to it? The latter seems potentially much more influential.The conclusions are even more frustrating. The last third of the book amounts to so much concern-trolling Ford-era pablum; Democrats should nominate someone who will bring the country together, it would be a mistake to remove the president from office, we should speak decisively through the ballot box, blah, blah, blah. More than anything I think whoever wrote this definitely studied political science, but only got so far - they note a lack of civic engagement and political knowledge, but ignore some of the really important institutional hurdles (the Senate, the Electoral College, redistricting) set up between Americans and effective representation. This is a 1990s-era undergraduate treatise on How to Fix America, by Someone Abetting its Destruction. Fantastic. Thanks for... the very least you could do.
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  • Kelley Gaske
    January 1, 1970
    Now that the impeachment hearings are over, I finally had a chance to finish reading this book. For detractors who said it was ridiculous to rely on an anonymous accounting of what's going on inside the White House by a "Never-Trumper", I can only say that these people haven't read a page of this book. It was written by a die-hard Republican patriot who loves their country more than most of the general American population even considers on a daily basis. The author isn't "dishing the dirt" on Now that the impeachment hearings are over, I finally had a chance to finish reading this book. For detractors who said it was ridiculous to rely on an anonymous accounting of what's going on inside the White House by a "Never-Trumper", I can only say that these people haven't read a page of this book. It was written by a die-hard Republican patriot who loves their country more than most of the general American population even considers on a daily basis. The author isn't "dishing the dirt" on Donald Trump, rather he's giving an accounting of the generalities of a chaotic White House that is spinning out of control and is held in place only by the guardrails of aides and personnel (guardrails that Trump often kicks down on purpose or accidentally trips over while shouting out Tweets). I am proud that a Republican took the time to pen such a thoughtful, philosophical tome that attempts to relay objective accountings from the inner workings of this administration. For those who call the author a coward for remaining anonymous, I can only say that Donald Trump has shown (and, in fact, said out loud) that his best defense is a solid offense - and I wouldn't want the leader of the free world, someone we consider to hold the most powerful office in the world, to use the power of his office to disparage myself or my reputation as well as that of my entire extended family.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Grabbed off a to-shelve rack at the library--and once you start reading, it's hard to stop.The anonymity of the author isn't really a problem--other than the unremitting nature and level of the chaos and destruction happening daily in the Oval Office, nobody's spilling state secrets in this book. Which boils down to: Donald Trump cannot be contained. 'We' thought we might restrain him, but clearly he's too nuts. He can't be re-elected. It's too dangerous. So do something, America.The political Grabbed off a to-shelve rack at the library--and once you start reading, it's hard to stop.The anonymity of the author isn't really a problem--other than the unremitting nature and level of the chaos and destruction happening daily in the Oval Office, nobody's spilling state secrets in this book. Which boils down to: Donald Trump cannot be contained. 'We' thought we might restrain him, but clearly he's too nuts. He can't be re-elected. It's too dangerous. So do something, America.The political assessment of the unknown author clearly labels him (and it has to be a him) a rock-ribbed Republican mourning the devastating loss of political capital and party identity, and feeling more than a little guilt at having once thought a Trump presidency might be managed. He makes some important observations about the nation being at a tipping point.I've read a half-dozen books on our current president/politcal landscape. This is one of the better ones, even though the author strikes me as old and deeply embedded in party politics and conservatism. I can't say I learned any new facts (unlike the Impeachment hearings, currently playing in the background) about this POTUS or his behavior. But Anonymous made me think more about how precarious democracy is, at this moment.
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    While providing some specifics of the continuing chaos of the Dumbtruck Whitehouse, the cowardly author adds little new to our understanding. The most amazing part of the book comes at the end, where he suggests that voters should vote for third party candidates rather than either the Democratic or Republican candidates, whoever they should be. Eh? The author does not explain how that might be effective, given the ten or eleven choices typically listed. While claiming to be an internal force to While providing some specifics of the continuing chaos of the Dumbtruck Whitehouse, the cowardly author adds little new to our understanding. The most amazing part of the book comes at the end, where he suggests that voters should vote for third party candidates rather than either the Democratic or Republican candidates, whoever they should be. Eh? The author does not explain how that might be effective, given the ten or eleven choices typically listed. While claiming to be an internal force to attempt to control the President, this writer continues to support him. Yes, it's a bad idea to let Dumbtruck further damage the nation, which the author claims would happen if he left his position in the Whitehouse. He also, however, points out how lucky we have been that there has not yet been a serious attack on the US, either physical or electronic. He misses the point that that is exactly why we need to remove the idiot immediately and not wait for his opportunity to drop the US into complete chaos. Few people doubt that the president is an idiot. Is it worth continuing to accept this brink of disaster situation as we gamble on a few Whitehouse staffers being able to control the rabid dog?
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  • Milton P.
    January 1, 1970
    Reads like the Screenplay to the 2020 movie "The Trump Presidency- the Destruction of the American Democracy"While I was aware of most of the immoral, amoral, narcissistic examples attributed to Trump, the book provided a fairly strong outline of Trump's incredibly evil persona. I found the author's solution or way forward for America after Trump to be naive. After several chapters, I tried to identify the author.The author was too soft on the lawless Attorney General Barr; too uninterested in Reads like the Screenplay to the 2020 movie "The Trump Presidency- the Destruction of the American Democracy"While I was aware of most of the immoral, amoral, narcissistic examples attributed to Trump, the book provided a fairly strong outline of Trump's incredibly evil persona. I found the author's solution or way forward for America after Trump to be naive. After several chapters, I tried to identify the author.The author was too soft on the lawless Attorney General Barr; too uninterested in VP Pence; lacking in exposing the ambitious, snarky Pompeo. None of the three are honest or patriotic to expose Trump.I'm not sure the author was truly on the inside of the administration. That leaves a presidential historian or established "true" conservative. The lack of dictionary prose eliminates George Will. Krautenhamer is dead. The presidential historians are too classy to publish anonymously. Must be Washington Post or NY Times writer.Early in the Trump Presidency-, a professor friend of mine pronounced "Men with evil in their heart eventually destroy themselves".That is our best hope- and is why the House Impeachment must proceed. Trump is going to implode by Christmas.
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  • Robert Kingett
    January 1, 1970
    DNF. I couldn’t finish it, but not for the reasons you may think. There’s absolutely nothing new, shocking, unusual, strange, jaw-dropping, or, well, shocking, about the events outlined in this book. Nothing, at all. If you read mainstream media then you will know everything in this book. The only thing that made this somewhat a valuable read was the direct historical comparisons. The author compares a lot of historical figures and events to our current time period, clearly demonstrating how DNF. I couldn’t finish it, but not for the reasons you may think. There’s absolutely nothing new, shocking, unusual, strange, jaw-dropping, or, well, shocking, about the events outlined in this book. Nothing, at all. If you read mainstream media then you will know everything in this book. The only thing that made this somewhat a valuable read was the direct historical comparisons. The author compares a lot of historical figures and events to our current time period, clearly demonstrating how history repeated itself, again. That’s the only thing worth reading and examining in this book. But, unless you’re a snobby prude who boycots the mainstream media, everything about this administration, outlined in these pages, has been said before. Over, and over, again, with better context and, in some cases, better writing in mainstream media. DT said you can grab a woman by the pussy? Really, anonomous? I had no idea he said that. It was one of the largest media items, after all. Thank you for telling me. I don’t think a warning works if thousands of others have said the same warning. Over, and over again. I hate Donald Trump as much as the next evil liberal but I fail to see why so many should pay to read a warning that the mainstream media has been saying since 2015.
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