Hella
A master of science fiction introduces a world where everything is large and the problems of survival even larger in this exciting new novel.Hella is a planet where everything is oversized—especially the ambitions of the colonists.The trees are mile-high, the dinosaur herds are huge, and the weather is extreme—so extreme, the colonists have to migrate twice a year to escape the blistering heat of summer and the atmosphere-freezing cold of winter.Kyle is a neuro-atypical young man, emotionally challenged, but with an implant that gives him real-time access to the colony’s computer network, making him a very misunderstood savant. When an overburdened starship arrives, he becomes the link between the established colonists and the refugees from a ravaged Earth.The Hella colony is barely self-sufficient. Can it stand the strain of a thousand new arrivals, bringing with them the same kinds of problems they thought they were fleeing?Despite the dangers to himself and his family, Kyle is in the middle of everything—in possession of the most dangerous secret of all. Will he be caught in a growing political conspiracy? Will his reawakened emotions overwhelm his rationality? Or will he be able to use his unique ability to prevent disaster?

Hella Details

TitleHella
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 16th, 2020
PublisherDAW
ISBN-139780756416577
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction

Hella Review

  • Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    There's a Hella Planet?That's hella... dope.
  • Starshadow
    January 1, 1970
    Got this as advance copy. I plunged into the story headlong, barely coming up for air. Written from first-person narrative (hard to maintain for most authors) , the protagonist is a teenager with unique problems- and skills. He was born on Hella, yet Earth is in his very genes. Hella has its own ecology, not just hostile to human life, but also different to human life and to Earth evolved organisms. If the colonists want to avoid the problems that made Earth untenable, they need to respect Hella Got this as advance copy. I plunged into the story headlong, barely coming up for air. Written from first-person narrative (hard to maintain for most authors) , the protagonist is a teenager with unique problems- and skills. He was born on Hella, yet Earth is in his very genes. Hella has its own ecology, not just hostile to human life, but also different to human life and to Earth evolved organisms. If the colonists want to avoid the problems that made Earth untenable, they need to respect Hella and its lifeforms. They had come to Hella prepared for the work that none of them would see finished. But there were factions which wanted to take an easy path, to gain riches and power, without regard for the future. And they were prepared to destroy anything-or anyone-who would stand in their way. Would they suceed in making Hella their own private kingdom, or would they avoid the mistakes which evidently destroyed Earth? And how would the arrival of the last colonists from Earth disrupt their plans?And how would Kyle keep them from destroying all he held dear? It's a gripping tale, which manages to ask hard questions about what it means to build an ethical human society when so many of us lack ethics, without being preachy or lectures. The best stories tell the adventure while leaving things to chew on. This is one of those.
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  • Sydney Smith
    January 1, 1970
    “These are the people who screwed up Earth and then ran away. They’ll do the same here.” 4.5 stars. A lot of interesting ideas and a very unique narrative perspective. It’s pretty hard sci-fi, which is usually hit or miss for holding my attention. Fortunately, I really connected with the characters and the story, and especially the world, which was so bizarre that it kept me enthralled throughout, even during the super detailed world building parts that probably could be viewed by some as info “These are the people who screwed up Earth and then ran away. They’ll do the same here.” 4.5 stars. A lot of interesting ideas and a very unique narrative perspective. It’s pretty hard sci-fi, which is usually hit or miss for holding my attention. Fortunately, I really connected with the characters and the story, and especially the world, which was so bizarre that it kept me enthralled throughout, even during the super detailed world building parts that probably could be viewed by some as info dumps. I think the success has a lot to do with our narrator, Kyle, a boy who is “emotionally challenged” in a way similar to autism. “That’s one of the things about my syndrome. I don’t think about other people enough.” Gerrold does such a good job with this narrator’s unique voice. I love Kyle! Really, I love most of the characters. Jamie and the Captain and Dora and Jubilee, they’re all great. This is a very smart, well thought out story, world, and character development. Gerrold thought of everything. Hella is a fully developed and wildly complex world and I was fascinated from the start (although it did take me about 30 pages to be at the “can’t put the book down” stage). There are some pretty controversial ideas that are dealt with very thoughtfully. For example, the politics can be intense. There’s a proposal for a Genetic Protection Resolution that would basically cull anyone without perfect genes (which means anyone born like our narrator would be aborted, although it probably would never get to that point because DNA would be very carefully selected to weed out certain undesirable traits). Welfare type issues, capitalism, environmental conservation, and classism are also brought up. It was all so well done and handled in a way that parallels our modern struggles and failures in a very accurate and ugly reflection. “The most important question to ask before you introduce any new law is this: What problem will this law solve? Who does it make life better for? If it doesn’t help everyone, it’s a bad law.” Hella has a very strong LGBT presence. Switching genders is normal for people and you can go back and forth presumably as many times as you want. Our main character was born female and switched when he was about 7 Earth years old (almost 3 Hella years old, and don’t worry, there’s a time conversion chart in the back of the book). His mom was born male and switched to female so she could have children (although most babies aren’t born naturally anymore, she just wanted to experience it). There are poly couples too. It was all so organically written and Gerrold did a great job with this. The representation is awesome, especially how well he did writing from the perspective of an emotionally challenged boy. “Normal is a delusion. There’s no such thing as normal, there’s only ordinary. And I’m not ordinary either. I am what I am and it’s fine with me, so why can’t it be fine with everyone else?” I read an uncorrected version, so I’m not sure if this is something that might change, but in my copy, there aren’t any chapter breaks. The entire book is like one very long chapter. I thought I would hate it but it didn’t end up bothering me because I got sucked into the story so thoroughly, and it all just flowed together so smoothly. The narrative voice worked well with this kind of format and writing style. The dialogue was one of my favorite things about this book because Kyle is such a unique character. He’s funny without trying to be, serious 100% of the time, and has a very special understanding (or lack of understanding) of humans. Well, of everything, really. Kyle is fascinating, and the way David Gerrold plugged into his characters’ mindsets is even more fascinating. About halfway into Hella, everything changes. Like the whole tone changes, but also the pace, which speeds up big time. There’s a lot less of the super-detail-info type paragraphs and a lot more action and dialogue. After an AI character is introduced, the plot kind of changes too (or maybe it just becomes fully fleshed out). So yeah, once you get to the point I’m talking about, you’ll know. This story will take you for a ride. Prepare your emotions. My only complaints are kind of snobby ridiculous ones, so they won’t affect my rating. Firstly, I really don’t like the cover of this book. There are so many cool creatures on Hella and yet the one on the cover is just a giant version of a crocodile. I wish they’d put a leviathan (similar to a brachiosaurus) or carnosaur on the cover. Or a humungosaur! I really want to see what an artist rendering of these creatures would look like. Secondly, it would’ve been nice to have some sort of map for Hella, but I always say that about any book that doesn’t have a map, and maybe there will be one in the finished book. And lastly, there’s a slightly frustrating name similarity of two characters (Jamie and J’mee) and I basically had to change J’mee in my head to A’mee whenever I read it just to differentiate the two. Maybe it’s pronounced some crazy way that doesn’t sound like Jamie, but I don’t see how else it could sound and why the author would make two main characters have such similar sounding names. So, in conclusion, I loved this book. So much more than I thought I was going to. I really took my time with it, savoring the character development, the world, the plot, everything. I filled up so many notecards with things I wanted to remember and make note of. One whole notecard is just page numbers for quotes I wanted to keep and look back on. Very thankful I won this book. I read an uncorrected manuscript. All quotes are subject to change with the final published book. Thank you to DAW Books for this ARC! TW: Bullying. Also… there’s a semi confusing relationship that appears to be with a 14ish year old and a 25ish year old. I feel like I must be misunderstanding the age difference though, because it really doesn’t make sense. I know that the way people look and mature is definitely different in this distant future though. Still, the time difference of Earth and Hella is clearly explained. And the relationship itself didn’t make me uncomfortable unless I let myself consider the ages in present day. I wanted to mention it in case anyone is upset by the thought of that even in a different evolutionary spectrum. The relationship doesn’t seem to bother anyone in the story, the parent or friends or anyone. The age thing isn’t even mentioned. Again, I could be completely misunderstanding it anyway.
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  • Octavia
    January 1, 1970
    Great subject but hard to get into.I Love Sci-fi, so reading this book was a no brainer. As a member of Goodreads I was gifted the book and really want to like it. However, it was extremely hard for me to get into. Kyle narrates the story for us and at times it was painful. I felt like I was listening to a monotone lecturer trying my best to stay awake. Once I got in about a hundred pages I realized that Kyle was Autistic. So, the story was written from his perspective and his voice. I figured o Great subject but hard to get into.I Love Sci-fi, so reading this book was a no brainer. As a member of Goodreads I was gifted the book and really want to like it. However, it was extremely hard for me to get into. Kyle narrates the story for us and at times it was painful. I felt like I was listening to a monotone lecturer trying my best to stay awake. Once I got in about a hundred pages I realized that Kyle was Autistic. So, the story was written from his perspective and his voice. I figured out the plot twist early on but I wanted to see how the writer would handle it. I enjoyed the characters in the story and loved the world that is Hella. This is a good book, but it isn't a great book. I'm torn because it was the narration that killed the read for me. This may not bother you. I understand why it was done, but it just didn't work for me.
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  • Brandy {The Review Booth}
    January 1, 1970
    The unique combination of a lighter gravity and increased oxygen density has allowed everything on Hella to grow into supersized proportions. The dinosaurs and their herds achieve monstrous sizes while the flora can reach over a mile high. The weather is even more harsh and unpredictable than Earth's which is why the colonists are forced to retreat twice a year. Once to Summerland to avoid the heat so intense it can cause raging wildfires, then to Winterland to avoid brutal winter storms with wi The unique combination of a lighter gravity and increased oxygen density has allowed everything on Hella to grow into supersized proportions. The dinosaurs and their herds achieve monstrous sizes while the flora can reach over a mile high. The weather is even more harsh and unpredictable than Earth's which is why the colonists are forced to retreat twice a year. Once to Summerland to avoid the heat so intense it can cause raging wildfires, then to Winterland to avoid brutal winter storms with winds that can be 300+ mph and snows that refuse to melt for months.Kyle Martin is a very unique young man who just happens to be neuro-atypical, struggles with emotion and has brain implant that allows him instant access to the network that runs the colonies. The star-ship Cascade arrives ahead of schedule and the occupants are forced to stay aboard the ship, Kyle is tasked with bridging the gap between the colonists and those seeking the refuge of Hella. The colony on Hella is still in its fledgling stages and barely able to perform at optimum. Will the addition of over a thousand new people break the tenuous balance the colony has been able to build?Kyle finds himself unwittingly in the center of the storm and in possession of a perilous secret. A political conspiracy threatens to entangle him and his once subdued emotions might win over his logical nature but he is hoping that he can utilize the uniqueness the colony tormented him over to prevent their own downfall.The author and family of Kyle do not actually specify Kyle's condition but from the descriptions it sounds very similar to at least some aspects of Autism. Some people may have a hard time with Kyle as the narrator of the story because he doesn't "get" people and therefore doesn't connect with them very well. What he does connect with is nearly everything else - and I found myself enjoying Kyle's narration even if he does get bogged down with over information. Like many kids who are different than "ordinary", Kyle suffers from the comments and behaviors of others. Below are three quotes that really hit me regarding Kyle, one from his mother and two from his own thoughts. Marley is one of the people in the colony that is constantly harassing Kyle and his brother.Kyle's character is very unique and interesting - the way he thinks and what he thinks about and the book's characters also see this (at least some of them). Hella is littered with puns, jokes and nuances that Kyle doesn't understand but the other characters and the reader most likely would. I feel a very close connection to the truth of Kyle's "conversation" - the truth in himself that HARLIE and his friends help him discover. I too wish that I could live in a world that doesn't pillage the planet for everything valuable and is at peace with becoming a part of the symphony of life that exists upon it's surface. Hella is haunting and sad in the sense that the issues the colonists face in the book are the beginnings of what destroyed the Earth. We are seeing portions of this now - and I can only imagine all of the things that we've missed out on because of human nature. What I wouldn't give to be able to see the Earth as it once was and wonder what it could've been had we not taken the courses of action that we did. It always seems that the people like Layton and those that agree with his ideology vastly outnumber those that think like Kyle, his family and friends.I've never had to resist the urge to not highlight and share swaths of text before and I have so, so many quotes that mean quite a lot to me that I would love to share with you. Hella covers a vast variety of societal, moral and political issues (and many more) that will be very similar to our own daily lives. Kyle really got me with the politics and people quote below, it's how I feel most of the time. Actually all three of the political quotes that I picked really highlight how I feel most of the time and my thoughts being so similar to Kyle's really helped cement how I felt about his character and this book.The world building is top notch - I can imagine what the environment and beasties could look like. The description of Hella's flora and fauna remind me of some of the card artwork that I've seen for Magic the Gathering. I highly suggest looking at these if you don't know what I'm referencing, quite a large portion of the artwork seen on the cards is nothing short of stunning and if I were to pick a group of artists to draw what was described in Hella, it would be them.The portion near the end of the book at the trial really really got me - that's all I can say without a spoiler but... damn. Going into this book I was not expecting to love it this much - even though it would be fraught with danger and exceedingly hard I kinda wish I could join Kyle and the others on Hella. Even just the trip through words is worth it - I am very glad that I requested this book to read through this quarantine. A Hella-sized thank you to David Gerrold for writing this book, DAW Books and NetGalley for the opportunity to read a digital ARC of Hella.
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  • deep
    January 1, 1970
    PW Starred: "Hugo and Nebula Award–winner Gerrold (The Martian Child) showcases his powerful storytelling skills with this outstanding tale of interstellar intrigue. Hella is a planet of extremes, so named because its oxygen-rich atmosphere causes everything from the trees to the leviathans that inhabit it to grow “hella big.” The barely self-sufficient human colonists who call Hella home flee its blistering summers and harsh arctic winters in a biannual migration. Among these colonists is Kyle, PW Starred: "Hugo and Nebula Award–winner Gerrold (The Martian Child) showcases his powerful storytelling skills with this outstanding tale of interstellar intrigue. Hella is a planet of extremes, so named because its oxygen-rich atmosphere causes everything from the trees to the leviathans that inhabit it to grow “hella big.” The barely self-sufficient human colonists who call Hella home flee its blistering summers and harsh arctic winters in a biannual migration. Among these colonists is Kyle, a neuroatypical 13-year-old with a chip implant meant to regulate his emotions. This brain chip, which he calls “the noise,” allows him direct access to the colony’s vast computer database of information. As the colony prepares for a new crop of colonists to arrive from the ravaged remnants of Earth, Kyle’s outsider status and special access to the database lands him in the middle of a political conflict that threatens the future of the struggling colony. The worldbuilding is masterful, with hard scientific explanations for Hella’s many abnormalities and rich descriptions sure to keep the attention of even the most casual reader. The effortlessly diverse cast, complex political machinations, and heartfelt coming-of-age themes combine to create a fleshed-out vision of the future that is intense, emotional, and immersive while still maintaining a sense of rollicking fun. Sci-fi readers should snap this up. (June) "
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  • Fredrick Danysh
    January 1, 1970
    The colonist on Hella have to deal where everything is oversized except for its gravity. Humans cane change sex at will. Kyle is considered a freak because he can interface with the computer network. As he reaches adulthood a new group of colonists and all of the problems of Earth start to rear their heads.This science fiction/fantasy book was a free advance read through Goodreads.com.
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    **I received an advance copy of this book from a Goodreads Giveaway! These are my honest opinions**I truly enjoyed Hella by David Gerrold. Hella is the story of colonists on a new planet, affectionately called Hella, home to lighter gravity and huge ... well, everything! The dinos are bigger, the flowers are bigger, and the days and years are longer! (Be prepared to do some Hella math throughout--otherwise your brain will skitter every time this teen calls himself four years old.) The story unfo **I received an advance copy of this book from a Goodreads Giveaway! These are my honest opinions**I truly enjoyed Hella by David Gerrold. Hella is the story of colonists on a new planet, affectionately called Hella, home to lighter gravity and huge ... well, everything! The dinos are bigger, the flowers are bigger, and the days and years are longer! (Be prepared to do some Hella math throughout--otherwise your brain will skitter every time this teen calls himself four years old.) The story unfolds through the eyes of Kyle Martin, a neurodivergent young man who has a bionic implant that allows him access to the colony's wealth of information via computer networks. The Hellan colonists are preparing for a new arrival of colonists from Earth, and Kyle is tasked with creating videos describing the beauties and terrors of life on Hella. This conceit functions extremely well in driving the story forward: we readers learn about Hella as the newcomers do, through Kyle's stream-of-consciousness narration and no-detail-too-small explication. With the impending crop of newcomers, however, comes political intrigue and machinations that Kyle cannot understand: he often cites his inability to understand nuance as the reason for his strangeness, but the people in his life constantly assure him that it is his unique outlook that makes him just the right person for this job. As the seasonal migration brings more than the standard challenges, Kyle has to learn to use and understand his special skills to help save his community and the people he loves. A note about the narration style: as mentioned, Kyle's first-person narration takes on a stream-of-consciousness feel, and therefore the book is not broken up into chapters. At first, I was offput by this, as I couldn't figure out when to stop myself reading, but as the pages turned, I realized I didn't want to stop reading at all, thus solving my dilemma!
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    ARC review for Netgalley. So this book has me all over the place. It is lost world meets coming of age kid with robot side kick. It is nothing like what I was expecting. The cover art is pretty misleading. I know I shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but I was expecting a more tongue-in-cheek snarky humor piece. What I got instead was too many things to ponder.What I liked- World building...wowza. Nailed it. Everything is hella big—the people, the plants, the dinosaurs! Whaaat?There was no issu ARC review for Netgalley. So this book has me all over the place. It is lost world meets coming of age kid with robot side kick. It is nothing like what I was expecting. The cover art is pretty misleading. I know I shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but I was expecting a more tongue-in-cheek snarky humor piece. What I got instead was too many things to ponder.What I liked- World building...wowza. Nailed it. Everything is hella big—the people, the plants, the dinosaurs! Whaaat?There was no issue with imagining Hella. Everything is described to minutiae. This is largely an intentional affect of Kyle’s syndrome and while the worldly details are mostly interesting, it made reading a bit tedious and boring. Luckily, the second half is a decent page turner and more typical SCI-fi. The Characterization is...eh, ok. I found Kyle to be very wooden, as he is supposed to be. But I didn’t find the other characters to be developed. He was unable to relate to them, neither was I. Actually that was the overarching theme. Kyle’s inability to connect with others, his desire for that connection and how connections makes us human. ‘“Now ask me how I feel. Ask me what I think.’ He said I should learn to do that, because that would help me learn about other people.” There is a lot of Exploring the connections between individuals, genders and relationships (LGBTQ).So as if human relationships aren’t enough, societal issues heavily feature in the book too. There are many good criticisms to ponder. One quote that sticks out as imminently relevant,“Government is the tool that people create to provide the necessary services of society. It is an instrument of service. It is the apparatus by which we manage our resources for the common good.”This was my first David Gerrod book so maybe all his books are like this. I just don’t really like to think when reading fantasy/SCI-fi.
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  • John Clark
    January 1, 1970
    A slow reading delight for science fiction fans liking a new world story. Hella's bigger than Earth in almost every way, planet size, creatures, seasons, weather, trees (a km. tall) and days. The colony there has been on planet for 40 Hella years and is about to receive 1200 new residents in from what might be the final voyage from a planet that has, or is about to experience complete ecological collapse. Kyle is almost 5 in Hella years, close to 13 in Earth ones. He has a unique condition that' A slow reading delight for science fiction fans liking a new world story. Hella's bigger than Earth in almost every way, planet size, creatures, seasons, weather, trees (a km. tall) and days. The colony there has been on planet for 40 Hella years and is about to receive 1200 new residents in from what might be the final voyage from a planet that has, or is about to experience complete ecological collapse. Kyle is almost 5 in Hella years, close to 13 in Earth ones. He has a unique condition that's never clearly spelled out and has a neural implant that helps him by leveling him as well as giving him access to all data in the colony at lightning speed. There's dissension among those in leadership roles and that is at the core of this story, but is by no means all of it. The way colonists can change gender, more than once id they so choose, the description of the flora and fauna, as well as why and how the colonists must migrate from a summer encampment to a winter one, complete with a great description of one such journey, provide readers with more than enough to satisfy their reading interest. A bang-up book!
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  • Heather Brock
    January 1, 1970
    Hella is decent piece of sci-fi with some interesting ideas. The world-building is solid and fun. Everything is oversized-plants, animals, etc. It's an interesting mechanism to humble humans with since we tend to think we're at the apex of everything. Humans have had to adapt to Hella and learn to respect it. It's interesting to consider, since we as the human race can't even be stewards of our own planet. Would we be willing and able to respect the natural resources and organisms of another pla Hella is decent piece of sci-fi with some interesting ideas. The world-building is solid and fun. Everything is oversized-plants, animals, etc. It's an interesting mechanism to humble humans with since we tend to think we're at the apex of everything. Humans have had to adapt to Hella and learn to respect it. It's interesting to consider, since we as the human race can't even be stewards of our own planet. Would we be willing and able to respect the natural resources and organisms of another planet? I had a bit of difficulty with the narration. Using a neuro-atypical character to narrate is an important choice. I think the reader potentially having difficulty reading Kyle's POV possibly mirrors the difficulty neurodivergent individuals might feel with neurotypical folks at times. I applaud that, intentional or otherwise. I appreciated that this book caused me to consider and ruminate on so many different issues and aspects of life: Ethics and morality, environmental issues, politics, gender-fluidity, relationships of all kinds. Hella has a lot to say, but executes it in a fun way that doesn't feel oppressive. Thank you to DAW for providing a copy of this book for review.
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  • Larry Tressler
    January 1, 1970
    It's a story about people from Earth who have to start a new life on a new planet. The first half of the book was narrated by who we would call a "special needs" young man. In detail, he tells us of all the things about the planet. What to eat, what not to eat. How they built facilities on the planet. And pretty much the daily lives of he and his family. While interesting, I kept thinking, "Is this ever going to get a plot?" Then all of a sudden, it traps you with family tragedy, assassinations, It's a story about people from Earth who have to start a new life on a new planet. The first half of the book was narrated by who we would call a "special needs" young man. In detail, he tells us of all the things about the planet. What to eat, what not to eat. How they built facilities on the planet. And pretty much the daily lives of he and his family. While interesting, I kept thinking, "Is this ever going to get a plot?" Then all of a sudden, it traps you with family tragedy, assassinations, political unrest, and overthrows. It all surrounds our young narrator, or does it really? I had by doubts about this book, but I found it hard to put it down until I finished it 1.5 days later.
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  • Galen Strickland
    January 1, 1970
    It has been several years since I read an unfinished draft of this novel, which I got directly from the author. The finished product comes out next month, and I have an ARC from Net Galley. I will re-read the draft first, just to see what changes and/or improvements David has made.EDIT: While there are a few things I could nitpick, they're minor, and I have no qualms about giving this 5 stars. It may take me a while to write a full review, cause there's a lot to unpack. Ostensibly a YA title, it It has been several years since I read an unfinished draft of this novel, which I got directly from the author. The finished product comes out next month, and I have an ARC from Net Galley. I will re-read the draft first, just to see what changes and/or improvements David has made.EDIT: While there are a few things I could nitpick, they're minor, and I have no qualms about giving this 5 stars. It may take me a while to write a full review, cause there's a lot to unpack. Ostensibly a YA title, it tackles some heady themes, and proves that good SF has as much to do with what's going on in the world today as it does a future the author is either looking forward to, or maybe trying to warn against.I'm likely to add to this review later, or maybe confine extra comments to my facebook page, but for now a streamlined review of Hella - http://templetongate.net/hella.htm
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    The author wrote Hella as if he's lived there. The story is like walking into a huge mansion and into a room and into another room and so on. Parts seemed repetitive and the book a little long. It would be nice to have included a map and sketches.
  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    Why would anyone give David Gerrold any time or money when he doesn't care about either of yours. Still waiting for 25 years for him to finish the Chtorr books.
  • Sarai Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic ride through space. I loved this book. It's been a while since I've read a scifi that kept my attention from cover to cover. I think what really made this story was the main characters undefined autism traits. He was different, but familiar. I think we all struggle to fit in, and this story really brought out how society struggles to be perfect, but what we really need is to embrace difference. The thrilling mystery of the unknown and the who done it, was intriguing. I also enjoyed t A fantastic ride through space. I loved this book. It's been a while since I've read a scifi that kept my attention from cover to cover. I think what really made this story was the main characters undefined autism traits. He was different, but familiar. I think we all struggle to fit in, and this story really brought out how society struggles to be perfect, but what we really need is to embrace difference. The thrilling mystery of the unknown and the who done it, was intriguing. I also enjoyed the world building. A good scifi relies on the world around it since the familiar is somewhat unknown. This world was new and exciting, a wonderful but scary place that sucked me in and spit me back out.I can't say enough about how much I loved this story.Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.Sara | Book Confessions of an ExBallerina
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