The Hope of Glory
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham explores the seven last sayings of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels, combining rich historical and theological insights to reflect on the true heart of the Christian story.For Jon Meacham, as for believers worldwide, the events of Good Friday and Easter reveal essential truths about Christianity. A former vestryman of Trinity Church Wall Street and St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, Meacham delves into that intersection of faith and history in this meditation on the seven phrases Jesus spoke from the cross.Beginning with "Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they do" and ending with "Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit," Meacham captures for the reader how these words epitomize Jesus's message of love, not hate; grace, not rage; and, rather than vengeance, extraordinary mercy. For each saying, Meacham composes an essay on the origins of Christianity and how Jesus's final words created a foundation for oral and written traditions that upended the very order of the world.Writing in a tone more intimate than any of his previous works, Jon Meacham returns us to the moment that transformed Jesus from a historical figure into the proclaimed Son of God, worshiped by billions.

The Hope of Glory Details

TitleThe Hope of Glory
Author
ReleaseFeb 18th, 2020
PublisherConvergent Books
ISBN-139780593236666
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Religion, Christian, Christianity, Theology

The Hope of Glory Review

  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    The hope of glory by Jon Meacham is a very deep book that looks at the seven last sayings of Jesus. I found the book to be very solid. It has helped me to grow in my faith and understanding as I study the person and work of Jesus. The books description says:For Jon Meacham, as for believers worldwide, the events of Good Friday and Easter reveal essential truths about Christianity. A former vestryman of Trinity Church Wall Street and St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, Meacham delves into that The hope of glory by Jon Meacham is a very deep book that looks at the seven last sayings of Jesus. I found the book to be very solid. It has helped me to grow in my faith and understanding as I study the person and work of Jesus. The books description says:For Jon Meacham, as for believers worldwide, the events of Good Friday and Easter reveal essential truths about Christianity. A former vestryman of Trinity Church Wall Street and St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, Meacham delves into that intersection of faith and history in this meditation on the seven phrases Jesus spoke from the cross.Beginning with "Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they do" and ending with "Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit," Meacham captures for the reader how these words epitomize Jesus's message of love, not hate; grace, not rage; and, rather than vengeance, extraordinary mercy. For each saying, Meacham composes an essay on the origins of Christianity and how Jesus's final words created a foundation for oral and written traditions that upended the very order of the world.Writing in a tone more intimate than any of his previous works, Jon Meacham returns us to the moment that transformed Jesus from a historical figure into the proclaimed Son of God, worshiped by billions.I highly recommend this book. Anyone who wants to study Jesus and the cross more deeply will find this book to be a very helpful tool.
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  • Darlene
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley for review and all thoughts and opinions are my own.Unfortunately, I can not recommend this book to Christian believers. In the prologue, the author declares his statement of faith. He does not hold to the principle tenet of Christian belief in the infallibility of the Word of God. He states very clearly that there are many ways to salvation and Bible clearly states " there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by I received this book from Netgalley for review and all thoughts and opinions are my own.Unfortunately, I can not recommend this book to Christian believers. In the prologue, the author declares his statement of faith. He does not hold to the principle tenet of Christian belief in the infallibility of the Word of God. He states very clearly that there are many ways to salvation and Bible clearly states " there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved. " (Acts 4:12) His focus is illumination, creating truth from what we see; which is problematic for conservative believers. He also writes that the final words of Jesus may not actually be spoken by Jesus. I asked then, why write the book? I won't be recommending this book.
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  • Kevin Loveland
    January 1, 1970
    I have a great respect for anyone willing to put themselves out on a ledge and be vulnerable by sharing the nuances of their beliefs that open themselves to criticism the way this book does. It will be polarizing for many. Evangelical Christians might take issue with, what they might see as his lukewarm defense of the divine nature of scripture among other issues.Non believers (of which I am one) might take issue with his acknowledgment of the many issues they have with religion and God but I have a great respect for anyone willing to put themselves out on a ledge and be vulnerable by sharing the nuances of their beliefs that open themselves to criticism the way this book does. It will be polarizing for many. Evangelical Christians might take issue with, what they might see as his lukewarm defense of the divine nature of scripture among other issues.Non believers (of which I am one) might take issue with his acknowledgment of the many issues they have with religion and God but failure to actually address them outside of the “Pascal’s wager” defense.However he is very upfront about the purpose of this book in the prologue. It is not to convince those needing convincing. It is to inspire those looking to be inspired. I enjoyed the detail and energy throughout. I listened to this on audible and was delighted to see he read it himself. You get a better sense of his passion and even his struggles when you hear it in his own voice.If you choose to read this, and I think you should. I suggest tempering your expectations. Take this book as an opportunity to get into the mind of someone who thinks differently about God, religion and scriptures than you do. Instead of looking for areas you disagree, I suggest you enjoy the experience of seeing a man and his beliefs put out into the world in all its nuance and vulnerability.
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  • Pearl
    January 1, 1970
    Jon Meacham, a Pulitzer Prize winning author, writes biographies, histories, magazine articles and is a frequent television commentator called upon for his opinion on some aspect of American political, social, or cultural life. I have not read all of his books, but I think this is the fourth one I have read. I became a fan when I read his "Franklin and Winston: An Intimate Portrait of an Epic Friendship." It is a wonderful book.This one not so much. Its not a bad book; just kind of a middling Jon Meacham, a Pulitzer Prize winning author, writes biographies, histories, magazine articles and is a frequent television commentator called upon for his opinion on some aspect of American political, social, or cultural life. I have not read all of his books, but I think this is the fourth one I have read. I became a fan when I read his "Franklin and Winston: An Intimate Portrait of an Epic Friendship." It is a wonderful book.This one – not so much. It’s not a bad book; just kind of a middling one, unusual for him. It’s also a departure from the kind of books he usually writes. As the title tells us, the book contains his personal reflections on the seven sayings from the cross. Reflections, meditations, some historical context, not much theology and what theology there is, is decidedly in the liberal direction. But, in a central way, orthodox as well. And, as in all of his books, his erudition is on display. I don’t mean that he’s showing off. Just that references and allusions and quotes from a wide variety of sources flow copiously and easily.He has a short chapter on each of the seven sayings, beginning with “Father, forgive them: for they know not what they do.” And ending with “Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit.” He discusses each of the seven sayings, not as something Jesus may actually have said and literally meant, but as sayings epitomizing the essential message of Jesus: forgiveness, grace, love, mercy, responsibility for others, doubt and assurance, trust. Within the spiritual and historical context of his reflections, you may find familiar territory and you may find some new nuggets to like. His Prologue is as important as his individual chapters, if not more so, as is his shorter Epilogue. Maybe what I like most about Meacham’s reflections is his acknowledgement that “now we see through as glass darkly;” the story of Christianity begins “with confusion, not with clarity; with mystery, not with certainty.” He’s referencing here the puzzlement of Mary Magdalene and the two women with her who saw the empty tomb and then the incredulity of the disciples when they related what they had found. Meacham advocates being content in mystery yet affirming hope.
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  • Margy Eastmond
    January 1, 1970
    the best synopsis of Christianity ever written
  • John Katsanakis
    January 1, 1970
    Jon Meacham approaches Scripture from such an interesting place he begins by placing it in a historical context: who wrote it, when, and why? The most interesting use of this is Meachams approach to the Gospel of Luke. Then he starts dissecting it from a literary perspective: what language was it originally written in, and how have translations altered it? What was the original intended meaning? How does the earliest Greek translation of a verse ascribe new meaning to the text?Finally, Meacham Jon Meacham approaches Scripture from such an interesting place — he begins by placing it in a historical context: who wrote it, when, and why? The most interesting use of this is Meacham’s approach to the Gospel of Luke. Then he starts dissecting it from a literary perspective: what language was it originally written in, and how have translations altered it? What was the original intended meaning? How does the earliest Greek translation of a verse ascribe new meaning to the text?Finally, Meacham then runs it through a theological lens: how does this influence our faith? What does this say about God? About Christianity? The most worthwhile sermons come from Meacham’s discussion of the sixth word: “It is finished.”I found this book to be well worth the price of admission, even with such a small page count. While it can be read in a single setting or two (as I read it this first time), I believe I’ll switch to reading one sermon a night the next several times I engage with it, so that I might better contemplate each individual Word from Christ more fully before moving on. I think the book can be enjoyed even if you’re not a Christian for its analytical value alone, but this was certainly written for the faithful. Though Meacham does offer a critical eye to Scripture, he’s not doing so to renounce his faith but to reaffirm it. My pastor from my youth always said “challenged faith is strengthened faith” and this book is a wonderful example of that — indeed, I walked away from this reading with a stronger connection to my faith than I’ve had in quite some time.
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  • Dennis Hogan
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished The Hope of Glory: Reflections on the Last Words of Jesus from the Cross by Jon Meachem, the noted Historian and Presidential Biographer. This is a short audiobook packed with religious insights. Its a timely work with the approach of Lent and Easter. A powerful work by a masterful writer. Just finished The Hope of Glory: Reflections on the Last Words of Jesus from the Cross by Jon Meachem, the noted Historian and Presidential Biographer. This is a short audiobook packed with religious insights. It’s a timely work with the approach of Lent and Easter. A powerful work by a masterful writer.
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  • Richard de Villiers
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a Jon Meacham fan so seeing him stretch out of his comfort zone intrigued me, I was not disappointed. It should be noted that I am Catholic and while Meacham is Episcopalian, we speak the same language so to speak. That is to say that this book really only works for you if you are a person of faith but even then you have to have a certain perspective. Fundamentalists and Evangelicals will have their qualms with Meacham. He readily admits that there are inconsistencies in the Bible and notes I'm a Jon Meacham fan so seeing him stretch out of his comfort zone intrigued me, I was not disappointed. It should be noted that I am Catholic and while Meacham is Episcopalian, we speak the same language so to speak. That is to say that this book really only works for you if you are a person of faith but even then you have to have a certain perspective. Fundamentalists and Evangelicals will have their qualms with Meacham. He readily admits that there are inconsistencies in the Bible and notes that Matthew, Mark, Luke and John tailored their messages to reach certain audiences. If you are a person of faith and you approach this book with an open mind you will be rewarded. Meacham is not trying to break new ground, but his reflections and observations are well tailored for the Lenten Season. This book can easily be read in one sitting but it doesn't hurt to pace yourself and reflect on what Meacham has to say.
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  • Chris Brune
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I didnt actually read the book..I listened to it as an audio book.Its a short book, and Meacham is biographer / historian, not a theologian. So while noting that the Crucifixion was an event that forever transformed the world, the book weighs heavier on its historical impact than on its theological significance. It did force me to consider the differences of how the people who witnessed that Good Friday first-hand were affected, versus how the early Christians who heard the Gospel a First off, I didn’t actually read the book…..I listened to it as an audio book.It’s a short book, and Meacham is biographer / historian, not a theologian. So while noting that the Crucifixion was an event that forever transformed the world, the book weighs heavier on its historical impact than on its theological significance. It did force me to consider the differences of how the people who witnessed that Good Friday first-hand were affected, versus how the early Christians who heard the Gospel a few decades later were affected, versus how Christians reading their Bibles in 2020 are affected.Lastly, Meacham doesn’t hold that the Bible is the authoritative, divine Word of God, which is disappointing to me. But he does encourage judiciously reading it, in depth, and within context…..I agree with his sentiments here.
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  • MGMaudlin
    January 1, 1970
    Jon Meacham has carved out an interesting niche as one of our leading public intellectuals. His combination of journalist and historian along with his deep study of the American character and his religious fluency has made him one of the people I look to for measured, deep, and wise counsel during many of our moments of cultural crisis. This book, however, is not such an instance. These meditations on the last seven sayings of Jesus from the cross are solid examples of mainline Protestant Jon Meacham has carved out an interesting niche as one of our leading public intellectuals. His combination of journalist and historian along with his deep study of the American character and his religious fluency has made him one of the people I look to for measured, deep, and wise counsel during many of our moments of cultural crisis. This book, however, is not such an instance. These meditations on the last seven sayings of Jesus from the cross are solid examples of mainline Protestant thought and piety. If this is a new topic for you, you might find them enlightening and inspiring. If you have gone to such churches for many years, you might wonder why someone thought they should be made into a book.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    To quote the author - it (the book) is about illumination not conversion. It started as a series of sermons in an Episcopal church so it is directed at an audience who is familiar with the broad concepts of Christianity and values the traditional liturgies and the sacraments.It is different than Meachams previous books - much shorter and more personal but as erudite and eloquent as ever.As an Episcopalian who regularly finds herself in the pews was found much of the book resonated with me and To quote the author - “it (the book) is about illumination not conversion”. It started as a series of sermons in an Episcopal church so it is directed at an audience who is familiar with the broad concepts of Christianity and values the traditional liturgies and the sacraments.It is different than Meacham’s previous books - much shorter and more personal but as erudite and eloquent as ever.As an Episcopalian who regularly finds herself in the pews was found much of the book resonated with me and offered new insights, explanations and affirmations of what summers belies the surface of my faith.
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  • Murray
    January 1, 1970
    Mr. Meacham a historian by trade reflects on the last 7 phrases uttered by Jesus Christ on Good Friday and how as modern day Christians should digest them. He makes no apologies by stating that the Bible should not be taken literally and needs to studied, discussed and meditated on and too under stand the historical context in which the Gospel writers wanted the early Christians to understand Jesus. Ultimately his take home message is that Christ death and resurrection gives hope to those who Mr. Meacham a historian by trade reflects on the last 7 phrases uttered by Jesus Christ on Good Friday and how as modern day Christians should digest them. He makes no apologies by stating that the Bible should not be taken literally and needs to studied, discussed and meditated on and too under stand the historical context in which the Gospel writers wanted the early Christians to understand Jesus. Ultimately his take home message is that Christ death and resurrection gives hope to those who are faithful that they will be one with God's kingdom. This book would not be everyone's cup of tea and more appropriate for Christians with a questioning and open mind.
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  • Laina Johnston
    January 1, 1970
    From the prologue:This book began as a series of sermons (religious discourses) but is a book of illumination, not conversion. These meditations are shared in the hope that a sense of history and appreciation of theology might help readers make more sense of the cross in a world too much given to the competing forces of hostile skepticism, blind acceptance, or remote indifference. Short and very well written and conveyed. People complaining about this authors personal beliefs does a disservice From the prologue:This book began as a series of sermons (religious discourses) but is a book of illumination, not conversion. These meditations are shared in the hope that a sense of history and appreciation of theology might help readers make more sense of the cross in a world too much given to the competing forces of hostile skepticism, blind acceptance, or remote indifference. Short and very well written and conveyed. People complaining about this author’s personal beliefs does a disservice to his meditations about what Jesus’ seven sayings mean deeply to him.
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  • Cheryl Ballard
    January 1, 1970
    This was an excellent book written by the Pulitzer Prize winning author, Jon Meacham. Known for his books on history and politics he has written this book based on the last words of Jesus from the Cross. It is not preachy, but well researched and informative. I think the timing was perfect by having his book available shortly before Easter.
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  • Dorothy Fischer
    January 1, 1970
    Thought and faith provoking. Amazing read, at a time I needed it the most. I remember why I have faith. I remember why I need to have faith! I will, more than likely, read again and again! Read this little book.
  • George Briggs
    January 1, 1970
    Darkness Unto ClarityHistorian Jon Meacham reflects on the inspirational,but often contradictory, message of the Good Friday crucifixion of Jesus. The book traces the soul searching which Christians have to deal with as they journey on their faith quest.
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    No doubt most readers will be bringing their already-entrenched beliefs to their reading of this well-crafted book. Meacham accomplishes his goal and this is a welcome addition to the shelf of Lenten readings.
  • Ed Miner
    January 1, 1970
    Ive read a few Meacham books. His writing is precise and his insights are pointed. Im especially impressed by the introduction to this short book which is roughly half the entire text; an insightful dissertation on his views of God and religion. I’ve read a few Meacham books. His writing is precise and his insights are pointed. I’m especially impressed by the introduction to this short book which is roughly half the entire text; an insightful dissertation on his views of God and religion.
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  • Pam Bales
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting read. I saw an interview with Mr. Meacham on the Today show last week and decided to purchase the book. I enjoyed it and have shared with several of my Bible study compatriots. Studying the Bible and sharing God's word is good for everyone.
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  • Linda Bumba
    January 1, 1970
    The Hope Of Glory is well written and well thought out, addressing and explaining the seven last words of Christ on the cross.
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    No offense to this award-winning writer, but he doesn't exude any authority on the subject matter here.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect book for Lenten reflection. I may return to add another star after reflecting on the text.
  • Ginny
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend in this Easter season.
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written
  • Sherrie Kolb
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic, understated and powerful, just as Meacham's books always are. A thought-provoking and humble work from the mind of a genius.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I did enjoy this book. Meacham uses Jesus' last words to take a look at the origins of faith entwined with history. His faith shone through!
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Though provoking book on the last words of Jesus from the Cross. A quick read but good theological insights by the author on the meaning of the words. Recommend.
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