Cry of the Heart
She gave away her child to save his life. Another woman took him in, at risk to herself. Viviane Renaud is a young mother living on the French Riviera in the Second World War. Times are hard but she is not the sort to be dismayed by circumstances. One day her life changes forever. A young Jewish woman, fleeing from the authorities, begs her to take care of her four year old boy, David. Almost without thinking, Viviane agrees. Viviane’s life is never the same again. She fabricates a story to explain how David came to be with her and must tip-toe around the suspicions of her neighbours, her friends and most of all her mother and sister. She and her husband, Alain, find allies in unlikely places, particularly an American woman, Dorothy Pine. But then, the world crashes around them. Threatened by Allied military success, Hitler sends the German army to occupy the south of France. With them come the SS and the Gestapo. The peril for Jews and for those, like Viviane, who hide them, appears overwhelming. The challenge for them now is to survive.

Cry of the Heart Details

TitleCry of the Heart
Author
ReleaseAug 18th, 2019
Rating
GenreWar, Historical, Historical Fiction

Cry of the Heart Review

  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    Cry of the Heart is by Martin Lake. This WWII novel is based on a true story where a Jewish Mother was forced to give her tiny child to a stranger to keep her child alive while she was taken to the death camps. Luckily, she survived to return for her child. When Martin Lake heard the story and decided to write a book concerning this incident, he began to wonder what would the stranger who took in the child think when asked and what would make her take the child when it could easily mean her own Cry of the Heart is by Martin Lake. This WWII novel is based on a true story where a Jewish Mother was forced to give her tiny child to a stranger to keep her child alive while she was taken to the death camps. Luckily, she survived to return for her child. When Martin Lake heard the story and decided to write a book concerning this incident, he began to wonder what would the stranger who took in the child think when asked and what would make her take the child when it could easily mean her own death. Also, he wondered what was going through the Mother’s mind as she came to this hard decision. He also wondered what went trough their minds when the Mother returned to get her child. It was from this incident that he created this wonderful story. The story tears at your heart at the beginning when Vivienne was approached by a stranger and asked to take in her child, David. Vivienne knew that the boy was Jewish and knew that it would be difficult to hide him from everyone. If he lived as her child, she had to quickly come up with a plausible story as to why the boy was with her. She also knew that she would immediately be putting her own child, Celeste in danger simply by having the boy. Yet, how could she refuse. Once she had taken David in, she would be forced to face her Mother and Sister who were always against her as well as Alain, her partner who was part Gypsy. Her Mother and sister were against her in part because she was not married to Alain; but it is obvious that there are other reasons. Her Father was the only reason she even tried to get along with them. He could control her Mother; but her sister was married and was a different story. However, she stuck to the story that David was the son of a friend she had near Paris who had been killed in the recent bombings and who had sent David to her as there was no one else to take him. As the war continues and changes, their lives become even more complicated when the Nazis include Gypsies to be on the same level as Jews and must be rounded up and gotten rid of. Now, Alain, who she had married on the advice of her brother-in-law who was in charge of the police in town. Now, Vivienne has to worry more about Alain as well as her children. What will happen next? I know that this scenario played out all over Europe during this time period. How each person decided to give up their children to strangers to care for is beyond my imagination. The decision of the stranger to take care of a child you know is in danger all the time at the risk of your own family is something to be admired. I would hope I would be able to do this; but never having been placed in that situation, I have no idea how I would react. It makes you think.
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  • Kathryn Spurgeon
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this bookThe characters drew me into the story. I had not read a WW2 book from this point of view and I’ve read a lot. The child was probably the most compelling because all the way through the book I wondered what would become of him, especially knowing the tragedies of the war as we do.
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  • Cyndi Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Poorly written While the story was interesting, it was really unbelievable. There was not enough description of people or surrounding areas. The thought process of each character was lacking. One question that I kept asking is why did Odette hate her sister so much? Why was there strive with the mother? The other problems with the story was that it was just not in enough detail to be believable
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  • Mary Sue Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Great Historical FictionThis novel was difficult to put down. It is well written with interesting characters. It deals with the realities of war and the effects of those who experience it.
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    This was good but the ending left me wanting more!
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