Headliners (London Celebrities, #5)
Sparks fly when two feuding TV presenters are thrown together to host a live morning show in Lucy Parker’s latest enemies-to-lovers contemporary romance.He might be the sexiest man in London, according to his fan site (which he definitely writes himself), but he’s also the most arrogant man she’s ever met.She might have the longest legs he’s ever seen, but she also has the sharpest tongue.For years, rival TV presenters Sabrina Carlton and Nick Davenport have traded barbs on their respective shows. The public can’t get enough of their feud, but after Nick airs Sabrina’s family scandals to all of Britain, the gloves are off. They can barely be in the same room together—but these longtime enemies are about to become the unlikeliest of cohosts.With their reputations on the rocks, Sabrina and Nick have one last chance to save their careers. If they can resurrect a sinking morning show, they’ll still have a future in television. But with ratings at an all-time low and a Christmas Eve deadline to win back the nation’s favor, the clock is ticking—and someone on their staff doesn’t want them to succeed.Small mishaps on set start adding up, and Sabrina and Nick find themselves—quelle horreur—working together to hunt down the saboteur…and discovering they might have more in common than they thought. When a fiery encounter is caught on camera, the public is convinced that the reluctant cohosts are secretly lusting after one another.The public might not be wrong.Their chemistry has always been explosive, but with hate turning to love, the stakes are rising and everything is on the line. Neither is sure if they can trust these new feelings…or if they’ll still have a job in the New Year.

Headliners (London Celebrities, #5) Details

TitleHeadliners (London Celebrities, #5)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 20th, 2020
PublisherCarina Press
Rating
GenreRomance, Contemporary, Contemporary Romance

Headliners (London Celebrities, #5) Review

  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    This will likely come as no surprise to readers who have experienced, and loved, Parker's previous London Celebrities books but HEADLINERS just made me so happy. This book was like a warm, funny, sweet hug and it was everything I wanted it to be and everything I needed right now. Not only did this match-up work for me, but individually so did the characters. The cherry ontop of this sundae was also seeing almost all of the familiar faces from the previous books and, with this particular story This will likely come as no surprise to readers who have experienced, and loved, Parker's previous London Celebrities books but HEADLINERS just made me so happy. This book was like a warm, funny, sweet hug and it was everything I wanted it to be and everything I needed right now. Not only did this match-up work for me, but individually so did the characters. The cherry ontop of this sundae was also seeing almost all of the familiar faces from the previous books and, with this particular story set around the holidays, it really reinforced that feeling of warmth and loveliness that I almost always get from the author's writing.If you've loved prior books in this series, I have no doubt you'll love this one, too. 4.5 starsFuller review to come on release! ** I received an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **
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  • aarya
    January 1, 1970
    At several times during Headliners, our heroine Sabrina Carlton sarcastically wonders if her extremely bad luck is due to cosmic irony (aka the universe's method of laughing at her). Like Sabrina, I also attributed my present circumstances to the universe. Unlike Sabrina, it wasn't cosmic irony but rather cosmic fortune. This book is so freaking good that I paused every two chapters and profusely thanked the unknown entity upstairs for delivering this book to my tablet (all right, it isn't At several times during Headliners, our heroine Sabrina Carlton sarcastically wonders if her extremely bad luck is due to cosmic irony (aka the universe's method of laughing at her). Like Sabrina, I also attributed my present circumstances to the universe. Unlike Sabrina, it wasn't cosmic irony but rather cosmic fortune. This book is so freaking good that I paused every two chapters and profusely thanked the unknown entity upstairs for delivering this book to my tablet (all right, it isn't unknown. Thanks, awesome Carina Press publicist!). A few things right out the gate: 1) This will be spoiler-free flailing. But if you want to read without knowing anything, then stop right here. I loved it. The end. 2) Unlike the previous London Celebrities books, I don't think Headliners works as a standalone. A lot of the conflict stems from events that transpired in The Austen Playbook, and I highly recommend that you read that first. Will you be totally lost if you haven't read The Austen Playbook? Well, no, but I think you would lose nuance and fail to appreciate character/plot development. 3) Aside from the first and last chapters, Headliners is set in London during December. I said this on social media already, but I'll say it again. I was lucky enough to once visit London near Christmas, and it was the most magical December of my life. This book is the closest I’ve felt to recapturing that magic. However, it is NOT a Christmas romance. Since Sabrina and Nick are hosts of a morning show, they occasionally attend holiday-themed events (e.g., a Christmas whodunnit murder train). And they hunt down out-of-stock toys for the children in their lives. The festiveness is in the setting: snow, sparkly lights, yummy pastries, company holiday parties, a looming deadline that they need to get ratings up by Christmas Eve, charity events, and uncomfortable family relationships (hey, that last one is definitely a marker of the holiday season). But the actual holiday is not relevant. The book ends before Christmas! It's very much a story set in December but not focused on Christmas. Okay, now on to the squeeing. This will be short because I want to keep it spoiler-free. If I ramble on too long, I don't want to accidentally ruin the magic of discovering the best parts of the book when you read it. Here are some spoiler-free and vague things that I love. It's going to be numbers again because I like numerical order and if I hit ten, I'll know I've talked too much!1) Slytherin/Slytherin match-ups feed my soul. Ambitious career-oriented individuals who have really good reasons to dislike each other but begrudging have private respect? Perfection. Enemies-to-lovers is my favorite trope, and the level of humor and snark in every line kept it from veering into uncomfortable "oh, they really hate each other and not in a sexy way" levels. I mean, I want some hate, but I don't want loathing to the point of "oh no, nothing is going to solve this." I am not the biggest fan of hate-sex and that wasn't here. They only have sex once they have mutual admiration of each other and like each other! Yay, liking-each-other-sex! Though I will admit that everyone thinking that they were shagging (when they weren't) was hilarious. I'm down for imaginary hate-sex it seems!2) I loved that they both individually expressed desires to not have children and instead be adoring aunts/uncles. They never have a conversation of "Oh, I don't want children" together but they both think it so much that I'm confident that they're on the same page. I'm always on board for characters who love children but realize that it's not a responsibility they want. 3) Nick really f'ed up big time in the last book, and Sabrina has excellent reasons for loathing him beyond professional rivalries. Not going into much detail, but I really appreciated how his backstory explained some of his actions and his eventual sincere apology. And not just to Sabrina, but also to Griff (the hero of the last book and Nick's ex-friend). It didn't feel contrite or unearned. Nick isn't perfect, but he isn't some melodramatic villain either. Sabrina realizing that fact is one of my favorite parts of the book. 4) The shadows of parents, both dead and alive. Ooof. This was painful to read but so excellently drawn out. Nick and Sabrina have different but complicated relationships with their fathers (and mothers, too). They both suffer from gaping wounds of grief, regret, and bitterness. And things aren't 100% solved and tied up neatly into a bow, but I was really satisfied with how they confronted the past and came to Important Revelations. I realize this paragraph explains nothing but that's what trying to be spoiler-free is, unfortunately. Just know that I really appreciated the exploration of parental relationships. Not only for Nick and Sabrina, but for minor characters as well (I cried buckets during the scene when Sabrina is talking to REDACTED about her dead mother). F'ed up parental relationships and grief are on full display in Headliners. I'd go so far to say that it might be the main theme. 5) The morning show was brilliant. Utterly brilliant. I wasn't sure how I'd feel now that London Celebrities isn't focusing on theater anymore, but IT IS SO GOOD. Every day brought new hilarious segments and guests. I'm biting my tongue now because I really want to give examples, but I won't. Read it, y'all. You'll thank me between giggles. 6) Can I just say how much I endorse the London Celebrities Cinematic Universe? These books mostly work as standalones, but it is also SUCH a treat for readers who have read the entire series. From cameos of previous MCs to minor allusions, it's all there for eagle-eyed fans. At one point, I shrieked when there was a mention of a familiar opera singer (the mother of a previous MC). It's exciting to realize that even though we've left the theater, they all run around in similar circles. And it's not just old characters that I love. With every new introduction of an intriguing secondary character, I'm praying for a new book. Headliners introduced a few rugby players and the LCCU's equivalent of The Great British Bake-Off. Now I want those books, too (as though I'm not already crossing my fingers for a million other books. I want Charlie's story really bad!). Okay, I'm already at #6 and show no signs of wanting to stop. Which means I really should stop because my fingers will soon overrule any spoiler-free caution. I really freaking loved this book, which isn't surprising this series strokes my id perfectly. I hope you'll love it, too. Disclaimer: I received a free e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I have interacted with the author on social media, but these are my honest feelings about the book.
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  • Addie H
    January 1, 1970
    SPOILER FREE ARC - expected release 20th Jan 2020 (Tropes: Enemies to Lovers, Work Colleagues, Opposites Attract, Forced Proximity, Love Triangle)I adore Lucy Parker’s books. Several are among my favourite contemporary romance books of all time, and this was a strong delivery. Just imagine how I reacted when I got an email saying an ARC was waiting on me.This book is somewhat of a continuation of the previous in the series, The Austen Playbook, and it doesn’t work great as a stand-alone – but SPOILER FREE ARC - expected release 20th Jan 2020 (Tropes: Enemies to Lovers, Work Colleagues, Opposites Attract, Forced Proximity, Love Triangle)I adore Lucy Parker’s books. Several are among my favourite contemporary romance books of all time, and this was a strong delivery. Just imagine how I reacted when I got an email saying an ARC was waiting on me.This book is somewhat of a continuation of the previous in the series, The Austen Playbook, and it doesn’t work great as a stand-alone – but it works. The main lead, Nick Davenport did something pretty bad in the last book, but I knew LP would find a way to make me like him. I just wasn’t sure how. Although I do feel LP writes men the way she wants them to behave, rather than the reality, I don’t mind. I don’t read these books for that. Then again, she lifts conversation to a mature and adult level, which a lot of romance books fail to do. I loved the change in scenery (sort of) from theatre to television, and I loved that we got to briefly catch up with characters from book 1 and 4. Like most of her books (if not all so far), there are major parental issues for all the main characters that has left them all a bit wounded, battered and in need of some attention, love, tenderness and comfort. And Lucy Parker combines those ingredients SO well. The only negative is that I find there to be too many unnecessary characters and biplots, which at times can make me feel as exhausted as her characters often do. ***** Nick Davenport: as of today, her partner in crime. Her – as the security guard at the reception has put it with a twinkle in her eye – work hubby. *****- At their worst, the two of them could do a cracker impression of circling warplanes. She came in as the Spitfire, all weapons blazing; Nick was the Avro Lancaster, biding his time and then suddenly dropping the high-damage bombs. - Despite their history, she was still a stranger in a lot of ways. There were a million things he didn’t know about her, couldn’t answer about her. But he was also certain that if someone gave him a piece of paper and a pen, he’d be able to draw her profile accurately down to the last eyelash. - This was Nick Davenport. He was Nick. She kept silently repeating that as a sort of protective mantra. But it was starting to – It was starting to mean something different. And that, in turn, was the stirring of fear. - Very slowly, Sabrina lifted her hands, and without hesitation, he took them in his. He tugged, once, gently, and she stepped into the shelter of his chest so fluidly and naturally it was frightening. His back felt hard and muscular against her palms as she laid her cheek against him, and felt his arm wrap around her shoulders, his hand moving over her hair. - Their lips brushed and came apart. He dusted a soft kiss on her Cupid’s bow, then nuzzled his lips to her neck, her cheeks, the tip of her nose-teasing, making her smile despite the warmth pulsing through her. His smiling mouth returned to hers, and the kiss deepened naturally, his tongue pushing against hers, stroking, tingling. - She jumped a little when Nick’s weight and warmth moved close to her, and his lips touched her cheek. With the lightest of kisses there and on her ear, he said, his usually smooth voice still a throaty rumble, “I wasn’t expecting-“That’s they’d go up in flames?Likewise. - She was cautious. An inconvenient, mutual physical attraction was one thing. This was rapidly moving well beyond that, and he could see something in her eyes balk when the walls of her comfort zone rattled. Considering her past, and particularly considering their past, he got it. Fuck, he shared it. And, so far, she was wary – but she was still moving forward, towards him. With him. *****4 stars I cannot recommend this series enough.My other reviews in the series: Book One 5 stars Book Two 5 stars Book Three 3 stars Book Four 4 stars I received an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars rounded up for mature adults having actual conversations! And because it's Lucy Parker, after all. She's one of my go-to authors for sweet and hilarious contemporary romances that just leave you feeling giddy and warm. This was another excellent addition to the series, and I loved seeing all of the previous couples again. Ok, mostly just Richard and Lainie. They remain one of my favorite couples ever. But I digress… It's very rare I enjoy an "enemies" to lovers story, but in the 4.5 stars rounded up for mature adults having actual conversations! And because it's Lucy Parker, after all. She's one of my go-to authors for sweet and hilarious contemporary romances that just leave you feeling giddy and warm. This was another excellent addition to the series, and I loved seeing all of the previous couples again. Ok, mostly just Richard and Lainie. They remain one of my favorite couples ever. But I digress… It's very rare I enjoy an "enemies" to lovers story, but in the capable hands of Lucy Parker, this becomes a story about setting aside past hurts and moving past them, of letting go and forgiving, and I adored every second of it. It's so rare to find two characters I both love as individuals and as a couple, and Nick and Sabrina were both awesome people who I genuinely loved spending time with. I loved how openly they addressed their issues and gradually realized that they are kind of made for each other, always knowing instinctively when to challenge and tease, and when to just be there for each other. It was incredibly sweet to see them work things out, and my only slight criticism is that the sub-plot of someone trying to sabotage their show dragged on a tiny bit too long for me. But other than that, this book was just perfect for sitting all cuddled up on a couch, hot cocoa in hand, and just ignoring the world for a while. *I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars rounded up. (I think)Review to follow at AAR.
  • Dísir
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars...I'd round up. Nick Davenport and Sabrina Carlton are petty rivals on and off tv, but there’s good cause for it…up until the point where both their careers are suddenly in jeopardy. A twist of events forces them to co-host the dreaded early-morning show which no one bothers with, since it’s not quite the ‘serious’ stuff compared to what they used to do, and with the list of grievances sitting between them, neither’s looking good at all. This status quo doesn’t look like it’s about to 4.5 stars...I'd round up. Nick Davenport and Sabrina Carlton are petty rivals on and off tv, but there’s good cause for it…up until the point where both their careers are suddenly in jeopardy. A twist of events forces them to co-host the dreaded early-morning show which no one bothers with, since it’s not quite the ‘serious’ stuff compared to what they used to do, and with the list of grievances sitting between them, neither’s looking good at all. This status quo doesn’t look like it’s about to change, until mishap after mishap spring the comedy into the story and Nick/Sabrina find themselves in various compromising positions which make everyone else think that they are public enemies but secret shaggers. I’ve never felt so rewarded by a Lucy Parker book as I have with ‘Headliners’. (To be fair, I had a good feeling about it when I read the blurb and got started.) I can’t entirely remember what transpired at the end of the last book even, but as a standalone, ‘Headliners’ functions perfectly legitimately. Characters from Parker’s previous books who have already found their HEA do flit in and out however, and if you’ve not read the rest of the books, there’s a bit of an insider-wink-wink sort of joke that you could miss out on.Still, Parker crafts a holiday rom-com with so much panache and style and comedy—it’s hilarious to read how one thing after another befalls the ill-fated couple as they wear out the enemies-to-lovers trope to the fullest. In the previous books, I’d always found a particular sort of imbalance when it came to quirk, dialogue and characterisation, but ‘Headliners’ seemed to have perfected these somehow: not too many quirks, snappy and funny dialogue and spot-on ‘Love-Actually’ type characters. Might be a bit of a bias here, but I’m voting this as Parker’s crowning glory. *ARC by the publisher via Netgalley
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  • Saly
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely! I just wish Lucy wrote faster! Review soon...ARC provided by publisher through Netgalley.
  • nick
    January 1, 1970
    Is it any surprise I loved Headliners? It's Lucy Parker, after all! The chemistry between Nick and Sabrina just sizzles! And oof, all the soft moments between them? I SWOON! RTC
  • Blackjack
    January 1, 1970
    4.75The fifth book in Lucy Parker's London Celebrities series may not have displaced Pretty Face for my personal favorite, but I did have a big smile on my face the entire time I read this one. One of the recurring themes is that the main characters, celebrity journalists Sabrina Carleton and Nick Davenport, have magic when they are together, regardless of whether they are antagonists, co-workers, or lovers. I felt absolutely convinced of their chemistry, on and off screen, and that's despite 4.75The fifth book in Lucy Parker's London Celebrities series may not have displaced Pretty Face for my personal favorite, but I did have a big smile on my face the entire time I read this one. One of the recurring themes is that the main characters, celebrity journalists Sabrina Carleton and Nick Davenport, have magic when they are together, regardless of whether they are antagonists, co-workers, or lovers. I felt absolutely convinced of their chemistry, on and off screen, and that's despite everyone in their lives pointing it out to them at every opportunity. As astute TV personalities, they are frustratingly aware that chemistry is nothing to brush aside.At the start of the novel, Sabrina and Nick are respectively chastised in HR for bad professional behavior (some of this is spillover from the fourth book in the series) and subsequently demoted to morning rather than evening news. They are given the entire month of December to work together as a team and bring up the ratings on Wake Me Up London, a folksy, morning magazine type show filled with human-interest stories. Reluctantly agreeing, and being competitive pros, they are determined to succeed, and in the process, rescue their flailing careers. As far as forced proximity tropes, the set up here is one of the best I've read, and I loved the countdown to Christmas as the culture of a morning talk show slowly takes over their lives. The book has a number of laugh out loud moments with two serious journalists thrust into ridiculous scenarios involving baking on set, test driving some truly bizarre Christmas toys, interviewing London locals in silly settings like a row boat on the Thames, or cosplaying on the Murder Train. There are too many scenarios to name here, but all of them are highly entertaining on their own merits, and each successive one forces Sabrina and Nick to confront the feelings they have long had for each other. There is also a subplot involving a mysterious person trying to sabotage their collaboration, and it is fun to try along with the couple to determine who is out to get them.One of the few drawbacks (maybe?) to the enemies-to-lovers theme here though is that I did at times wish for a peek into some moments of antagonism prior to the start of the novel; we are told they are two big personalities with a great deal of friction between them. We don't really ever actually see them as enemies in this book though, and once Sabrina and Nick set off on their joint venture to save the morning show, they quickly come to an agreement to set aside past strife and work together as harmoniously as possible. I think a book like The Hating Game handled the co-worker’s enemies-to-lovers theme especially well because we get a bit of time with the couples' juvenile hostility before romance inevitably takes over, and I couldn't help but wonder if such a set up would have worked well here too. On the other hand, we instead get so many lovely scenes of the two characters sincerely trying to work together as adults, and it's clear pretty early that chemistry is a facade for deeper feelings. Also, Nick realizes he's in love early in the book and is honest with himself, and so this is a book that really stands out to me with respect to mature characters who work through their difficulties. Any time I felt anxious that misunderstandings or conflict would create obstacles, I was pleasantly surprised by Parker's insistence that respect and maturity are foundations for love.There is here a slightly underdeveloped examination of journalism that I found curious, though I'm not quite willing to call it a flaw in the book. Nick comes to the morning show with a strong background in hardcore journalism and a professional goal of making a name for himself in this field. The novel though is fairly apolitical and never ventures far into contentious issues, and there is not that much scrutiny of the ultimate decision Nick needs to make whether to stay in morning versus night time news. Along these lines, it's pretty much unexamined in this book that Nick is black and Sabrina is white. I don't know if that is a flaw in the book either, as interracial relationships have been a matter-of-fact focus of other Parker novels. Maybe interracial relationships should be unremarked upon, even in such racially charged times as we currently live. I’m genuinely divided on this topic. To complicate the racial dynamics, both main characters are celebrities, and so neither are simply ordinary people. Nick, in fact, is one of London's sexiest bachelors and even has a FB page devoted to “Nick's Chicks,” for which Sabrina relentlessly teases him. Does all of that negate the racial histories and identities of his character? Maybe it doesn’t matter because I fully bought into the romance between Sabrina and Nick, but in some ways the book feels like a fairy tale of a world where macro conflict, including racial unrest, does not exist.As with all of Parker's books, I simply adore the focus on the arts and the culture of city life. I think too that a shift from theater to television worked very well here as the London Celebrities series continues to broaden its scope. I think the hero of the next book is present and quite active in this story, and if it is who I think it is, I'm excited to read his book. I love Alan the Yorkshire terrier - how adorable is it that he is Nick's darling little baby. I loved the many secondary characters who populate this world, and I enjoyed reconnecting with past main characters from the previous books in this series. Parker never fails to entertain, and this fifth book is as romantic and charming as all of the books in this wonderful series. Highly recommend!
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  • Caro
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review. I am also friends with the author. However, all opinions stated here are my own.Whenever Lucy Parker releases a new book from the London Celebrities series, it feels like Christmas. A London Celebrities advance review copy set *during* Christmastime? Read while drinking Starbucks holiday beverages? That's heaven. Sabrina Carlton and Nick Davenport are rival TV presenters whose reputations have taken bad hits Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review. I am also friends with the author. However, all opinions stated here are my own.Whenever Lucy Parker releases a new book from the London Celebrities series, it feels like Christmas. A London Celebrities advance review copy set *during* Christmastime? Read while drinking Starbucks holiday beverages? That's heaven. Sabrina Carlton and Nick Davenport are rival TV presenters whose reputations have taken bad hits recently. Now, they have to decide: either work together or march up to the unemployment office. Although they have never been able to be in the same room without resorting to insults, they're forced to agree. But close proximity has a way of bringing long-denied feelings to the surface.Sabrina and Nick were amazing, fully fleshed-out characters, with a witty rapport that made me laugh out loud and "aweee" every other page. They didn't only feel real, they felt like people I would want to be friends with. The romantic relationship between them evolved at such a natural, charming pace that I never felt it was too rushed - and that had worried me going in. No, it was wonderful altogether.The Christmas setting, while not relevant to the plot, made the reading of this story even more magical. The descriptions were vivid enough to make me want to pull out my Christmas decorations a full month earlier than I usually do! I didn't, because my cat loves them a little too much, but I was tempted.This was a 5-star read for me, and I think it became my new favorite story in the series. While a standalone, there are mentions of previous protagonists and relationships, so if you hate spoilers of all kind, try starting on ACT LIKE IT, the first book in the saga.
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  • Adele Buck
    January 1, 1970
    I think most people who've read Lucy Parker will equate her with enemies-to-lovers. And this is yet another entry in that column. She does it so well, leavening the vitriol with wry observational humor. Sabrina and Nick are a different kind of couple for her, though. They're both tough and driven in very similar ways--no sunshine meets grumpus here. And for the first time, we get a hero who's unsure about his life and career path instead of a heroine. We also have the usual mouth-watering I think most people who've read Lucy Parker will equate her with enemies-to-lovers. And this is yet another entry in that column. She does it so well, leavening the vitriol with wry observational humor. Sabrina and Nick are a different kind of couple for her, though. They're both tough and driven in very similar ways--no sunshine meets grumpus here. And for the first time, we get a hero who's unsure about his life and career path instead of a heroine. We also have the usual mouth-watering descriptions of baked goods (and if someone can create a recipe off of the signature biscuit from Nick's mother's bake-factory, would they please forward it to me immediately? It sounds amazing). I don't really have a sweet tooth usually, but for Lucy's books I do.Basically, we have (yet again) another finish-and-turn-around-almost-immediately-to-re-read book.I was given an Advance Reader's Copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • c,
    January 1, 1970
    On my blog. Rep: Black mc and side characters, wlw side charactersGalley provided by publisherThere is something about Lucy Parker’s books that makes you want to just go and bingeread all the romance books you can find (and yes, I am currently trying to resist the urge to do just that). Headliners is obviously no different.In this installment of London Celebrities, we follow Sabrina and Nick, two rival TV presenters (and before you ask, no I couldn’t stop thinking Chilling Adventures of Sabrina On my blog. Rep: Black mc and side characters, wlw side charactersGalley provided by publisherThere is something about Lucy Parker’s books that makes you want to just go and bingeread all the romance books you can find (and yes, I am currently trying to resist the urge to do just that). Headliners is obviously no different.In this installment of London Celebrities, we follow Sabrina and Nick, two rival TV presenters (and before you ask, no I couldn’t stop thinking Chilling Adventures of Sabrina either. And I haven’t even watched it). Sabrina hates Nick because he exposed her family to scandal, while Nick hates Sabrina for… reasons which are not entirely clear. Anyway. They hate each other, but then, suddenly they’re forced to work together on a failing breakfast show, else they both lose their contracts.Obviously, my favourite aspect of the book was Nick and Sabrina’s relationship. I loved how it developed from hating each other to being reluctant partners and then like “oh shit we’ve been caught holding hands and everyone thinks we’re dating on the down low” and then to “oh shit now we’re really dating”. Honestly, just the way Lucy Parker develops her relationships feels so organic, like you could easily see it happening. And it makes you root for the characters because you can see how their viewpoints of one another are changing as the book goes on. It’s done so so well here.Also done well is the complete lack of any sort of miscommunication. Nick and Sabrina actually communicate like adults! Yeah, I know, it’s depressing how exciting that is… But they do actually talk to each other throughout the book, and the tension at the end doesn’t revolve around any miscommunication. So I really appreciated that.The one, less positive, thing I would say though is that there’s kind of a lack of tension from when they get together, around halfway through. I’m not sure what it was – possibly the fact that everyone knows about their relationship pretty early on so there’s nothing to hide – but I just felt like the tension wasn’t there. I mean, obviously, their dynamic was still great, but it was missing that little something.Though, of course, that won’t stop me rereading this book until the end of time.
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  • Renégade ♥
    January 1, 1970
    Brief excerpt from my feuding breakfast-TV co-hosts enemies-to-lovers book, the trope otherwise known as the journey from would-happily-push-off-a-bridge to God-help-whoever-tries-to-hurt-my-person. -- Lucy Parker on Twitter(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)]Excerpt:I just learned that the fifth book in the London Celebrities series up is for pre-order and will be out 01/20/20:https://www.amazon.com/Headliners-Luc... Brief excerpt from my feuding breakfast-TV co-hosts enemies-to-lovers book, the trope otherwise known as the journey from would-happily-push-off-a-bridge to God-help-whoever-tries-to-hurt-my-person. -- Lucy Parker on Twitter(view spoiler)[😜😁 (hide spoiler)]Excerpt:I just learned that the fifth book in the London Celebrities series up is for pre-order and will be out 01/20/20:https://www.amazon.com/Headliners-Luc...
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  • Lena
    January 1, 1970
    Wow... I really loved this book from beginning to end. I like the forced proximity scenario for Sabrina and Nick and that from day 1 they try to be as professional as possible. I also enjoyed that we get treated first hand on Nick's regret and the repercussions of his actions and choices. Lucy Parker is a *great* author and her books always pull me in to the point that I can't stop reading. I enjoyed the plot and how they move from animosity to partnership to attraction to love. It's a natural Wow... I really loved this book from beginning to end. I like the forced proximity scenario for Sabrina and Nick and that from day 1 they try to be as professional as possible. I also enjoyed that we get treated first hand on Nick's regret and the repercussions of his actions and choices. Lucy Parker is a *great* author and her books always pull me in to the point that I can't stop reading. I enjoyed the plot and how they move from animosity to partnership to attraction to love. It's a natural progression and it's incredibly well-handled in the book... it feels natural and organic and you can believe that these two are finally falling in love as they were meant to be.What I also love the most? The lack of unnecessary drama as a source of conflict in the romance. Once Nick and Sabrina are they... they are IN. They don't hesitate, they don't backtrack and they deal with things as adults. Even when they have moments of conflict, they communicate with one another in a mature way. It's such a great example of what a mature and healthy relationship is/should be that I cannot thank Lucy enough for continuing writing these examples in her books. I love the moment in which Sabrina hesitates for one second and then deciding that she trusts Nick and I love that she comes clean to him and acknowledges that. I love that he, in return, explains that it hurt him and frustrated him for about 10 minutes before he realized that it was natural and that he was happy that they are moving forward. It's not a "oh, everything is perfect from now on" but the little moments of conflict are dealt with communication and maturity. That is such a catnip for me!The only criticism I have for this book and the reason why it's not a 5 star for me is that I felt that the dual PoV was unbalanced. There's a very important part in the middle in which we only read from Sabrina's pov and is such an integral part of how their relationship is progressing that I felt I was being cheated out of following Nick's feelings as well. It hinder my experience a little as I prefer that when you do a dual pov it should not 50/50 but as balanced as possible that we get to be in the journey with both characters at the same time and not just one with the other as a supporting role. But a wonderul wonderful book and I loved that Griff made an appearance because he's my favorite.Is Charlie next?
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Four and a half stars.Professional rivals and personal enemies are forced to work together …Nick Davenport had a successful primetime TV show, until he was secretly videoed badmouthing the head of the network behind the scenes. Sabrina Colton also had a successful primetime TV show which rivalled Nick's until revelations about her grandmother's plagiarism and her very public fight with her ex-boyfriend turned her from media sweetheart to Cruella da Ville. Now they each have one last chance, work Four and a half stars.Professional rivals and personal enemies are forced to work together …Nick Davenport had a successful primetime TV show, until he was secretly videoed badmouthing the head of the network behind the scenes. Sabrina Colton also had a successful primetime TV show which rivalled Nick's until revelations about her grandmother's plagiarism and her very public fight with her ex-boyfriend turned her from media sweetheart to Cruella da Ville. Now they each have one last chance, work together on the dismal Wake Me Up London breakfast TV show.Sabrina hats Nick because he was the one who broke the news of her grandmother's plagiarism which tarred both her beloved sister Freddy's career and her burgeoning love life and her own career where Sabrina was accused of profiting from her family's lies.Both consummate professionals Nick and Sabrina do their best for WMUL but there are a series of stupid mistakes: wrong cue cards; using vinegar instead of water in a cake etc which make them look like amateurs - could someone be sabotaging their show?Lucy Parker at her best with two charming characters and oodles of laughs and fun. Chuck in a cute dog, lovable ex-wife, scarily clever kids and a countdown to Christmas and you have a sparkling romantic comedy. Loved it.I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Rec-It Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    not my fave (austen playbook takes the cake and its hard to top....pun not intended) but still lucy parker so still great
  • Jen Ryland
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't realize this was a (sort of) Christmas book. I was going to post a review in January, closer to release date, but I think I'm bumping it up in the queue!Want to read more romantic comedy reviews? Check out my Rom-Com-a-Thon feature here!Read more of my reviews on JenRyland.com! Check out my Bookstagram!
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  • Liv
    January 1, 1970
    LOOK AT THIS GORGEOUS COVER!!!!!!!!!
  • Bruna Oliveira
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks NetGalley for the digital copy in exchange for an honest review.Sabrina and Nick, TV hosts, never got along, which only got worse when he decided do expose a plagiarism case in her family. After both of them being in a difficult place professionally, their broadcaster force them to host the morning show together and to make matters worse, it has low ratings and they need to save the show and their careers - without killing each other in the process - until christmas.This is the fifth book Thanks NetGalley for the digital copy in exchange for an honest review.Sabrina and Nick, TV hosts, never got along, which only got worse when he decided do expose a plagiarism case in her family. After both of them being in a difficult place professionally, their broadcaster force them to host the morning show together and to make matters worse, it has low ratings and they need to save the show and their careers - without killing each other in the process - until christmas.This is the fifth book in the series London Celebrities, but each book has its own story and focuses on a different couple.The biggest difference between this book and the others is the setting, since the first three books focus on plays on the West End, the fourth one is about a kind of TV play and this one is about a TV program. So of course the dynamics is different here and the authors works with it very well. Just like in the other books, it is very easy to feel immersed in that reality, because of the level of the details Parker shows us.As expected, the romance is incredible. The author knows how to create very real and relatable characters and the dynamics between them is very natural and evolves in a instictive way. Their dialogs are hilarious - their british humor is on point - making me laugh a lot. Also, it's very, very cute to follow their relationship stages. Besides, it's always good to see a TRUE enemies to lovers, since they really have good reasons not to like each other.I ended up giving it 4 out 5, as I gave the others. I don't really have a reason for not giving it full rating, but as it happened to the other books, I felt the towards the ending, the books started to drag a little bit, but it could be just a personal impression.I highly recommend it to people who love the enemies to lovers trope, London setting (the author always makes me feel like I'm there) and the behind the scenes dynamics.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. Rival television presenters are forced to partner and host the morning show or get the boot entirely. Sparks have flown between them before, but not in a positive way. I really really really enjoyed this book. Enemies to lovers. A bit of forced proximity. Knitting. And a mystery to be solved. Lucy Parker is a treasure. I appreciated how the "enemies" part wasn't predicated only on a professional rivalry, but also on an act by one of them (that I believe was an important plot I loved this book. Rival television presenters are forced to partner and host the morning show or get the boot entirely. Sparks have flown between them before, but not in a positive way. I really really really enjoyed this book. Enemies to lovers. A bit of forced proximity. Knitting. And a mystery to be solved. Lucy Parker is a treasure. I appreciated how the "enemies" part wasn't predicated only on a professional rivalry, but also on an act by one of them (that I believe was an important plot point of Parker's previous book) that had profound personal impact on the other. But they manage to move past that act and its fallout in a realistic manner. Both MCs have support structures that realistically react to the news that they're now together.And of course you get the delicious "I can't possibly like this person but oooooh I really like this person."I received an ARC from the publisher via Netgalley for review.
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  • Susan in Perthshire
    January 1, 1970
    I really tried with this one. The author is not a bad writer, but somehow this just never took off for me. So many words, so much prose, so much dialogue getting nowhere and saying nothing meaningful. I think some judicious editing would have helped.. this was simply too long, too meandering, too involved, too many characters, too much of everything and yet nothing of importance. I just sadly got bored. I think there is the bones of a good story here but it isn’t there yet. The characters never I really tried with this one. The author is not a bad writer, but somehow this just never took off for me. So many words, so much prose, so much dialogue getting nowhere and saying nothing meaningful. I think some judicious editing would have helped.. this was simply too long, too meandering, too involved, too many characters, too much of everything and yet nothing of importance. I just sadly got bored. I think there is the bones of a good story here but it isn’t there yet. The characters never engaged me and the story was just blah! Overlong and self indulgent. Sorry., but I didn’t like it.
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  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    Mixed feelings about this one. On the one hand, the fallout from the end of the last book should be really interesting. On the other hand, I was kind of hoping we could skip over Sabrina and Nick as main characters. They're not the world's most sympathetic or likeable professional adult humans.
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  • Jessica (the naptime writer)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a complimentary ARC of this book from Netgalley but all opinions provided are my own. This is one of those books that I want all of my friends to read, because it’s so wonderful and I know you all will love it. (Please do what I ask; it’s for your own good.) Okay, now that that’s out of the way. I’ve loved Lucy Parker’s books since I first read the sensational opposites-attract romance Act Like It, and I think that Headliners is my favorite of a truly special series. Featuring I received a complimentary ARC of this book from Netgalley but all opinions provided are my own. This is one of those books that I want all of my friends to read, because it’s so wonderful and I know you all will love it. (Please do what I ask; it’s for your own good.) Okay, now that that’s out of the way. I’ve loved Lucy Parker’s books since I first read the sensational opposites-attract romance Act Like It, and I think that Headliners is my favorite of a truly special series. Featuring long-standing professional rivals whose relationship has recently turned even more nasty, Headliners sucked me in with its glares and insults and caustic chemistry and then it slowly turned as sweet (and necessary to my happiness) as sugar. For much of the book I was a pile of goo. In the previous book in the series, The Austen Playbook, journalist Nick Davenport reveals a huge scoop that just so happens to drag his reporter-nemesis Sabrina Carlton’s family through the mud and casts aspersions on her character. It’s the lowest moment for him personally, even if it does temporarily give him the career boost he wanted. Now, in Headliners, Nick’s career’s in trouble, and the only way he can save it is by teaming up with Sabrina, who, thanks to Nick’s earlier scoop, needs her own success story. The struggling morning show they’re tasked with running is the only thing keeping them both professionally afloat, which is really unfortunate since they can’t stand each other and there’s quite a lot of bad blood between them (and not in a cute Taylor Swift song kind of way). There’s so much about Parker’s writing, and Headliners in particular, that stands out to me—even in the sea of really well-written contemporaries I’ve read this year—but I think what it really comes down to is that Parker’s romances feel believable. The pacing is marvelously done: each moment of vulnerability feels like it’s leading convincingly to a future HEA, even if the protagonists started out as the most bitter of enemies at the beginning of the book. Even if one of them, *cough Nick cough* did something pretty bad that he’s now ashamed of. It feels like Parker's characters make genuine connections through touch, potentially awkward situations, and difficult conversations, and you can see them fall in love as it happens (even if the characters themselves are less than aware). There’s no moment of doubt for me—no wondering if the characters actually know each other even as they proclaim their love. Just the sense that two flawed and yet lovely people have found their person and they’re fantastically well-matched. I love Sabrina and Nick together--and also Freddy and Griff, the protagonists of The Austen Playbook who return in Headliners and are as cute as ever *bops them all on the nose*. Headliners is all so good: warm and witty and told in Parker’s distinctive fashion, and I loved every word of it. 5 ⭐️
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  • MMill
    January 1, 1970
    Nick Davenport's job prospects have taken a wrong turn since he was overheard badmouthing one of the higher-ups at his TV station. Sabrina Carlton's star has fallen since her family drama was splashed all over the tabloids thanks to none other than her arch-nemesis...Nick. Now their only hope at breathing new life into their careers as news presenters is to work together as co-hosts of a morning show. While it's basically their worst nightmare (they hate each other AND it's fluff pieces like Nick Davenport's job prospects have taken a wrong turn since he was overheard badmouthing one of the higher-ups at his TV station. Sabrina Carlton's star has fallen since her family drama was splashed all over the tabloids thanks to none other than her arch-nemesis...Nick. Now their only hope at breathing new life into their careers as news presenters is to work together as co-hosts of a morning show. While it's basically their worst nightmare (they hate each other AND it's fluff pieces like "Best Toys for Christmas" rather than real journalism), they both know they don't have much choice. They're dreading it but also hoping they can figure out a way to make it work so they don't have to find new jobs. But when someone appears to be sabotaging them by mis-cuing teleprompters and causing rogue set pieces to crash down on unsuspecting guests, Nick and Sabrina suddenly find themselves on the same side for once. And between working together to find out who's behind all the pranks and actually enjoying the whole morning show thing that they had both originally scoffed at, they discover they don't actually hate each other nearly as much as they thought. Can Sabrina forgive Nick for the terrible betrayal in the past and move on to something that looks an awful lot like love? And will Nick give up his dream of being a hard-hitting newsman to find real happiness that looks completely different from anything he'd ever expected?This is the fifth book in the London Celebrities series, and I'm not sure I could pick a favorite installment. So many romance series follow a certain formula and just rotate in new characters, but these books are all so different while maintaining the same charm and familiar faces. It's always fresh, and it's never boring. Some of the main characters have been actors, producers, directors, journalists...they all move in the same circles in London's West End, but the story is always unique and unpredictable in each installment. Kudos to Lucy Parker for coming up with ideas to keep this series going in new directions. (I'm really hopeful that Griff's brother, Charlie, will get his own book at some point...hint, hint!!)The writing is top-notch and clever, but it's also smooth and easy to read. There's witty banter, there are charming British-isms (which I always enjoy), and the characters are all likable but flawed in believable ways that make them more real and human. These are the perfect escapist romance novels, with some great London flavor to make them extra interesting. I really hope Parker keeps going with this series!**Thank you to NetGalley and HARLEQUIN - Carina Press for the fun ARC in exchange for my honest review!**
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  • Shana
    January 1, 1970
    This book was delightful. I was not a fan of Parker’s last few books but Headliners was solid with only a few issues. Nick and Sabrina are rival newscasters with faltering careers. Sabrina has particular reasons to dislike Nick, as he’s previously reported on her family in a hurtful manner. The books starts with them thrown together to head up a failing morning show, with their mutual antipathy turning out to be a thin veneer over attraction. With their viewers watching their every move and This book was delightful. I was not a fan of Parker’s last few books but Headliners was solid with only a few issues. Nick and Sabrina are rival newscasters with faltering careers. Sabrina has particular reasons to dislike Nick, as he’s previously reported on her family in a hurtful manner. The books starts with them thrown together to head up a failing morning show, with their mutual antipathy turning out to be a thin veneer over attraction. With their viewers watching their every move and waiting for them to kill one another—or kiss—the professional stakes are high. Headliners captures the heady feeling of falling in love perfectly, and Sabrina and Nick are adorable together. Parker’s books often play with power gaps, but these two are equally matched. I don’t usually enjoy enemies to lovers stories but this made me appreciate why this trope is so popular. The emotional tension between them was delicious. I think it helps that they are forced to cooperatively work towards the same goal and have a great deal of professional respect for one another. Nick clearly liked and was impressed with Sabrina from the very beginning of the book, so I didn’t have to deal with a moment of him being cruel or dismissive. Their period of direct competition is mostly in the past which allowed me to enjoy the lingering tension of years of them hating one another...without watching them metophorically trying to destroy one another and wondering which one of them will lose.I thought the representation of Nick was generally handled well. For example, I appreciated the lack of othering descriptions of his hair, skin and cultural background. However, I found it strange that he had no close relationships with people of color, other than his mother. All of his friends (and stepfamily) are white. When I read books with white/POC interracial relationships, they always feel much healthier when the person clearly has a strong network of friends and family that include people of color. Nick seems to be surrounded by whiteness, either as an oversight or for palatability to white readers. For a man who’d grown up in multicultural London, I found it off-putting that he lacked a Desi mate or black women friend.There’s also a minor mystery, but the perpetrator is obvious early in the book, although it takes our heroes ages to figure it out.Overall though, I found Headliners totally absorbing. And a primer on winning over a woman: from comforting touches, to excellent consent rep, to proactively picking up period supplies.I received an ARC from netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Carole V Bell
    January 1, 1970
    Having read the earlier books in the London Celebrities series, I was already convinced Lucy Parker was one of the best authors of contemporary romantic comedy writing today. Headliners more than affirms that. Take the opening paragraph:A dark day in October. There were scenes in life so gut-punchingly beautiful, they were impossible to do justice with words. Like the final rays of the falling sun, glittering across the Thames as the river turned dark and impenetrable, a silken blanket of Having read the earlier books in the London Celebrities series, I was already convinced Lucy Parker was one of the best authors of contemporary romantic comedy writing today. Headliners more than affirms that. Take the opening paragraph:A dark day in October. There were scenes in life so gut-punchingly beautiful, they were impossible to do justice with words. Like the final rays of the falling sun, glittering across the Thames as the river turned dark and impenetrable, a silken blanket of shadows. The infinite wonder of the night sky, a stretch of potentially endless stars, the scope beyond human comprehension. Or the video footage of the biggest wanker on British television single-handedly cannonballing his career in less than three minutes. Genius. This is classic Parker. She’s got the skills to both pull off and mock elegant, descriptive observation and an impeccable, irreverent sense of comic timing. In Headliners the story centers on Nick Davenport (the wanker in question) and Sabrina Carlton, longtime journalistic rivals, who are forced into sustained close proximity as cohosts on a morning chat show neither one of them really wants. Sabrina and Nick are popular news anchors who used to have their own shows on rival networks but have cocked up their careers a bit with scandal. Cohosting the morning show is the network’s way of combining penance and a second chance following a merger. Sabrina and Nick are adults, ambitious, driven and a little bit knocked around from past experience. Their primary obstacle is trust. Or distrust, rather. They have history. They’ve been professional competitors and Nick reported a story that did major damage to people Sabrina loves. There’s no big misunderstanding between them or major tricks and gimmicks. But there is a lot of banter, intelligent conversation and heat. While it isn't my favorite book in the series, Headliners is still a strong romantic comedy and better than the vast majority of its peers. The writing and character development are as sharp as they were in the previous three, and the relationship progresses at a believable pace. Parker is adept at balancing emotional depth and laughs, and I enjoy everything she writes, Headliners included.Tropes: Enemies to lovers (big time!); Forced proximity (in multiple ways).I received an advance review copy of this book courtesy of Carina Press via NetGalley. My opinions are candid and solely my own.
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  • Emmalita
    January 1, 1970
    Lucy Parker’s London Celebrity series has been one of my favorite romance series of the past few years. In general, they have been loosely connected, with characters from previous books showing up in later books. However, until Headliners, they have been stand alone books. In order to understand an important division between the MCs in Headliners you will need to have read The Austen Playbook. I will do my best to avoid spoilers, but you can assume that Freddy and Griff have ended up happily Lucy Parker’s London Celebrity series has been one of my favorite romance series of the past few years. In general, they have been loosely connected, with characters from previous books showing up in later books. However, until Headliners, they have been stand alone books. In order to understand an important division between the MCs in Headliners you will need to have read The Austen Playbook. I will do my best to avoid spoilers, but you can assume that Freddy and Griff have ended up happily together.Near the end of The Austen Playbook, a Carlson family secret came out and was scooped by Nick Davenport on his evening news program. The secret has left Sabrina with a tarnished public image just as Nick and Sabrina are competing for one slot as the evening news commentary show host. When Nick is recorded expressing his honest opinion about the head of the media company, he loses his advantage over Sabrina. In a last ditch effort to save their careers, they are jointly offered a failing morning program.Even before the events of The Austen Playbook, Sabrina and Nick had a contentious rivalry, occasionally taking potshots at each other, but since Nick chose to break the story, contentious has turned to hostile. As they are forced to work together, overcome a common foe, and save their careers, they become a team. Eventually they become lovers. I love that they handle their disagreements and misunderstandings like adults, I thought Nick could have grovelled more, but I understood the point that Parker was making about seeing the whole picture of people instead of reducing them to caricatures. The older I get the more I want to see lovers hashing it out instead of storming off dramatically. Lucy Parker delivered with a pair of romantics who balance their heads and their hearts, but with the wit she is known for.As I said, before you read Headliners, you should read The Austen Playbook (you should read it anyway). Parker is growing a lovely family of characters in her London Celebrities books. Family is important to her – both the harm family can do and the support family can give – blood, made, and found. This will be released January 2020 and will be a nice way to start your year.This was an arc from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jeeves Reads Romance
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books where I am so incredibly torn about my rating. It’s my first time reading a book by Lucy Parker, and initially I was loving it. Enemies to lovers is my favorite trope, so I loved the tension we feel between these two, and the potential in the writing itself was definitely there. But somewhere along the way, a combination of the involvement of characters from previous books in the series and the laidback, serious tone of the writing made my enjoyment of the story This is one of those books where I am so incredibly torn about my rating. It’s my first time reading a book by Lucy Parker, and initially I was loving it. Enemies to lovers is my favorite trope, so I loved the tension we feel between these two, and the potential in the writing itself was definitely there. But somewhere along the way, a combination of the involvement of characters from previous books in the series and the laidback, serious tone of the writing made my enjoyment of the story diminish significantly. That initial tension faded very quickly, leaving behind a subtler, more relaxed read that still has plenty of merit - it’s just not what I was looking for. The story follows Sabrina and Nick, two nighttime TV hosts whose images have both become tarnished recently. Their careers are in jeopardy, and things have deteriorated so much that they’re being given one last chance as morning show hosts during the month leading up to Christmas. Though these two have never gotten along, things took a turn for the terrible when Nick threw Sabrina’s whole family into the public eye, so working together comes with its own set of challenges. When things start falling apart with the show, they find themselves leaning on each other and digging beneath the surface to find the potential beneath all the regret.I will say that I really loved the intimacy that developed between these two. It’s one of the more realistic and adult relationships I’ve seen portrayed in books, with difficult conversations and a romance that develops along the way. The writing itself is so unique, and while I found it to be a little drawn out (and ultimately somewhat boring), I think there’s a whole lot of potential there. If you like a quieter, more serious romance then you’ll probably enjoy this more than I did - it just isn’t quite my style. I also think reading the books in order is somewhat important, because there were a lot of characters in play. So, while this didn’t work for me on all levels, I also think a lot of people will love it. I received an ARC via NetGalley and am voluntarily leaving a review.
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  • Catherine Heloise
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to get an ARC of this novel, which meant that I got to read it in the lead up to Christmas, which fits the structure of the book very well. Sabrina and Nick have both managed to disgrace themselves with their network - Sabrina largely through no fault of her own when her family scandal was revealed live on air by Nick; Nick in an act of foot-in-mouth live-mike stupidity. As their last chance to remain employed at the network, they are required to co-host the network's I was fortunate enough to get an ARC of this novel, which meant that I got to read it in the lead up to Christmas, which fits the structure of the book very well. Sabrina and Nick have both managed to disgrace themselves with their network - Sabrina largely through no fault of her own when her family scandal was revealed live on air by Nick; Nick in an act of foot-in-mouth live-mike stupidity. As their last chance to remain employed at the network, they are required to co-host the network's failing Breakfast show for the weeks leading up to Christmas. Since they loathed each other even before Nick's revelations about the Carlton family, the sparks that are expected to fly are not sparks of Christmas love, peace and joy. And yet...This novel was utterly delightful and laugh-out-loud funny. Parker writes snappy dialogue and physical comedy brilliantly well, but she also knows how to get to the heart of characters. I loved the many – oh, so very many – ways the lightweight content of the morning show could go wrong, and I especially loved the way every time anyone fell over or got locked in a wine cellar or whatever, somehow, Sabrina and Nick would wind up looking as though they were holding hands or snogging or were otherwise amorously inclined, and then someone would snap a photo and their 'secret relationship' would be all over the tabloids. I liked the way Nick's behaviour at the end of The Austen Playbook – which you should definitely read first if you care about spoilers – was addressed and given weight, without it being a source of angst that took over the entire story. I also enjoyed the Davenport and the Carlton families, and the resolution of a few storylines and issues from earlier books. And it was nice to see a story where quality of life was a factor in a career choice, not just the opportunity to be in the top of one's field. Just because one can do something, that doesn't mean it will be the thing that makes you happiest in life.Honestly, I just Headliners in every way. It's going to be on my annual December reading list every year for sure, and I expect it will go on my comfort read shelf for the months in between.
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  • shereadsromance
    January 1, 1970
    For years, rival TV presenters Sabrina Carlton and Nick Davenport have publicly snubbed one another. The public can’t get enough of their feud, but after Nick airs Sabrina’s family scandals to all of Britain, the gloves are off. They can barely be in the same room together—but these longtime enemies are about to become the unlikeliest of cohosts.With their reputations on the rocks, Sabrina and Nick have one last chance to save their careers. If they can resurrect a sinking morning show, they’ll For years, rival TV presenters Sabrina Carlton and Nick Davenport have publicly snubbed one another. The public can’t get enough of their feud, but after Nick airs Sabrina’s family scandals to all of Britain, the gloves are off. They can barely be in the same room together—but these longtime enemies are about to become the unlikeliest of cohosts.With their reputations on the rocks, Sabrina and Nick have one last chance to save their careers. If they can resurrect a sinking morning show, they’ll still have a future in television. But with ratings at an all-time low and a Christmas Eve deadline to win back the nation’s favour.5 STARS! Lucy Parker has been on such a roll for me since Pretty Face - every new book just ticks all of my boxes and she's fast become one of my favourite authors!The chemistry between Nick and Sabrina was so acute! I loved that they both recognised it existed but didn't just use it as an excuse to fall right into bed together before their relationship could develop - I find that this happens a lot in hate-to-love books and like my queens Mariana Zapata & Sally Thorne, Lucy is developing that chemistry and friendship first - it seriously makes ALL the difference.I wish this had come out a little earlier, because the timing of reading this book was perfect to me with Christmas right around the corner - I'm not sure if it is really intended to be a Christmas romance but that's certainly what it felt like to me - and I loved it!Nick & Sabrina both have very satisfying character development arcs throughout this book and I that is also one of my favourite things about Lucy Parker - all of her character pairings work because the characters become the best versions of themselves when they're together - and I think all great romances should be like this.Seriously so in love with this book - and cannot wait to have it physically in my hands when it is published!This review was based on an Advanced Reader Copy provided to me by Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.
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