A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs
Publisher's SummaryMost children go through a dinosaur phase. Learning all the tongue-twisting names, picking favourites based on ferocity, armour, or sheer size. For many kids this love of ‘terrible lizards’ fizzles out at some point between starting and leaving primary school. All those fancy names slowly forgotten, no longer any need for a favourite.For all those child dino fanatics who didn’t grow up to become paleontologists, dinosaurs seem like something out of mythology. They are dragons, pictures in books, abstract, other, extinct. They are at the same time familiar and mysterious. And yet we’re in an age of rapid discovery - new dinosaur species and genera are being discovered at an accelerating rate, we’re learning more about what they looked like, how they lived, how they evolved and where they all went. This series isn’t just a top trumps list of dino facts - we’re interested in the why and the how and like all areas of science there is plenty of controversy and debate.©2019 Audible, Ltd (P)2019 Audible, LtdLength: 2 hrs and 42 mins Original Recording Audiobook

A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs Details

TitleA Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 4th, 2019
PublisherAudible Original
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Audiobook, History

A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs Review

  • Montzalee Wittmann
    January 1, 1970
    A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs by Ben Garrod and narrated by author is a book that sparked the kid in me again! Who doesn't love dinosaurs? My youngest son answered the question of how old he was with, "I two year old dinosaur!" The next year he was a 3 year old dinosaur, by the next year he was, "I am four years old and I have a dinosaur. " He told everyone he was going to be a paleontologist. Most people just looked at me for help, they weren't getting any.This book brought back that fun! Going A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs by Ben Garrod and narrated by author is a book that sparked the kid in me again! Who doesn't love dinosaurs? My youngest son answered the question of how old he was with, "I two year old dinosaur!" The next year he was a 3 year old dinosaur, by the next year he was, "I am four years old and I have a dinosaur. " He told everyone he was going to be a paleontologist. Most people just looked at me for help, they weren't getting any.This book brought back that fun! Going to the museums, looking at the time of books, watching Jurassic Park and wearing out two tapes!It went into all the things kids want to know, how big do they get, do some really have feathers, how did some live after the big event that killed them, what did kill them, what's it like to dig for bones, how many mass extinctions have there been, and yes we are about to lose 1 million species now starting the sixth mass extinction! Can we stop it in time? Are we one of the ones to go? How many have to go extinct before we do something, and will it be to late by then?This was a book of good thought and thoughts that everybody needs to be thinking. Great book! Wish it had been longer
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    This was targeted at adults who outgrew their "dinosaur phase" but wanted to hear the latest research on dinos, so it was a fun listen for everyone who ever loved dinosaurs as a kid. The narrator interviews several paleontologists, asks everyone who their favorite dinosaur is (with some good-natured joking about the inevitable layman's answer, "T-Rex" or "Velociraptor") and talks a lot about the various geological epochs in which dinosaurs lived, and why pteranodons and icythosaurs aren't dinosa This was targeted at adults who outgrew their "dinosaur phase" but wanted to hear the latest research on dinos, so it was a fun listen for everyone who ever loved dinosaurs as a kid. The narrator interviews several paleontologists, asks everyone who their favorite dinosaur is (with some good-natured joking about the inevitable layman's answer, "T-Rex" or "Velociraptor") and talks a lot about the various geological epochs in which dinosaurs lived, and why pteranodons and icythosaurs aren't dinosaurs but chickens are.I enjoyed it, but it wasn't meant to be very deep and it isn't. Most of us already know that birds evolved from dinosaurs, that dinosaurs had feathers, and that some dinosaurs were probably warm-blooded. This has been pretty common knowledge since the 90s. They also go a bit into what Jurassic Park got wrong (it seems every paleontologist loves Jurassic Park while just wishing they could have been a bit more... scientific), and some early dinosaur enthusiasts who shaped the field today, as well as a dick-measuring contest still going on today over who's discovered the biggest dinosaur. Turns out figuring out how big any given beast actually was is not very straightforward when you're just working off of a couple of fossilized bones.
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  • C.L. Cannon
    January 1, 1970
    Who didn't want to be a paleontologist as a kid? Especially my generation who grew up on Jurassic Park! This was a wonderful refresher for grown-ups that was fun. It wasn't a boring list of dinos, but an exploration that makes you want to grab a brush and a pick and get digging!
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  • Lis Carey
    January 1, 1970
    As kids, most of us loved dinosaurs, and had a favorite dinosaur. As adults, other things, more urgent at least, if not necessarily more important, have displaced dinosaurs at the center of our lives. Not every dinosaur lover grows up to be a dinosaur scientist!But Ben Garrod agrees that that's a terrible shame, and presents a really engaging, informative, entertaining summary of the current state of our knowledge of dinosaurs.This includes the fact that dinosaurs, at least one branch of that la As kids, most of us loved dinosaurs, and had a favorite dinosaur. As adults, other things, more urgent at least, if not necessarily more important, have displaced dinosaurs at the center of our lives. Not every dinosaur lover grows up to be a dinosaur scientist!But Ben Garrod agrees that that's a terrible shame, and presents a really engaging, informative, entertaining summary of the current state of our knowledge of dinosaurs.This includes the fact that dinosaurs, at least one branch of that large family, are still with us, in the form of birds. Yes, really. Birds are dinosaurs.It's a lively, enjoyable, short summary of what we know about dinosaurs, and may have missed out on learning along the way, while we were busy being adults.Recommended.This was one of Audible's free offerings this month.
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  • Elijah Fry
    January 1, 1970
    Half the time it seems like they are trying to date and explain away a global catastrophic flood. Other stuff pretty interesting, though I was constantly wondering "do they actually know this fact with any certainty, or is it a wild guess?" I would love to see a statistical analysis applied to all of the facts presented here, and I would want to see the quantity of data that backs up everything. If an entire theory is based on one interpretation of one fossil, we make a ton of assumptions and th Half the time it seems like they are trying to date and explain away a global catastrophic flood. Other stuff pretty interesting, though I was constantly wondering "do they actually know this fact with any certainty, or is it a wild guess?" I would love to see a statistical analysis applied to all of the facts presented here, and I would want to see the quantity of data that backs up everything. If an entire theory is based on one interpretation of one fossil, we make a ton of assumptions and that should be noted where appropriate.
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  • Marre
    January 1, 1970
    Precisely what I look for in an audiobook. Very interesting and entertaining. Had me smiling through my commute.
  • Amanda Sola
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know why being an adult means I don’t want to learn about the rawrs but I wanted more dinosaurs and less chemistry of the asteroids.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A quick, informative look into the world of dinosaurs. The author approaches it from the angle that his audience has had almost no previous knowledge of dinosaurs, which was cool, but also meant that many people will already know quite a bit of the information he's providing.
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  • Patrick Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Dinosaurs are amazing. I loved being able to dive back into this fun subject. There are times that I don't believe they were real. Studying cosmology and the universe has made me think about life and this planet. Dinosaurs are the most successful living creature that we know of. They called earth home for almost 200 million years. Humans have called earth home for less than 2 million. What if aliens visited earth when their were dinosaurs? Science is fascinating and how we know things is almost Dinosaurs are amazing. I loved being able to dive back into this fun subject. There are times that I don't believe they were real. Studying cosmology and the universe has made me think about life and this planet. Dinosaurs are the most successful living creature that we know of. They called earth home for almost 200 million years. Humans have called earth home for less than 2 million. What if aliens visited earth when their were dinosaurs? Science is fascinating and how we know things is almost as amazing as what we know. This audio program was a brilliant mix of the two. It showed examples and explained how we know the things. Wild. The first mammals started around the same time as the dinosaurs, some how both survived. There are 10,000 species of dinosaurs left, they are mostly birds. The astroid that hit the earth and destroyed the dinosaurs was in the solar system for almost a billion years, what was it doing? What effect did it have on other objects? I want to know about the life of this astroid. There have been five mass extinctions, we are in the sixth. They all have climate change in common and climate change from the release of carbon dioxide.Fucking Dinosaurs man.
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    Tastes like Chicken!Review of the Audible Originals audiobook (2019)This audiobook is an extension of the So You Think You Know About... Dinosaurs? series by biologist Ben Garrod. That series is geared for 9-12 year olds but takes a scientific tone without dumbing down the subject matter.The Grown-Up Guide doesn't exclude younger readers/listeners except for the fact that there are no accompanying illustrations to adorn the audio text. Regardless of age, this will likely have most listeners goog Tastes like Chicken!Review of the Audible Originals audiobook (2019)This audiobook is an extension of the So You Think You Know About... Dinosaurs? series by biologist Ben Garrod. That series is geared for 9-12 year olds but takes a scientific tone without dumbing down the subject matter.The Grown-Up Guide doesn't exclude younger readers/listeners except for the fact that there are no accompanying illustrations to adorn the audio text. Regardless of age, this will likely have most listeners googling or searching on Wikipedia for related articles with visual images. This was still a very entertaining overview of the latest discoveries and speculations about dinosaurs, particularly about how they were the ancestors of birds and that many of them were actually feathered rather than scaly.A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs was one of the Audible Originals free audiobooks for members in July 2019.Trivia and LinksAuthor Ben Garrod provides a YouTube video introduction to the So You Think You Know About... Dinosaurs? series here.
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  • Marshall Wayne Lee
    January 1, 1970
    _Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs_ receives 4 stars from me. This is an audible original, and excellent for anyone who needs a refresher or forgot everything he or she might have known about Dinosaurs.Ben Garrod writes this work. He is a professor but he knows his audience. The language is easy for the lay person to understand, the explanations are clear. He also interviews other professors who all speak well of their topic in an understandable way. Ben Garrod also is the narrator. He has a beautiful _Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs_ receives 4 stars from me. This is an audible original, and excellent for anyone who needs a refresher or forgot everything he or she might have known about Dinosaurs.Ben Garrod writes this work. He is a professor but he knows his audience. The language is easy for the lay person to understand, the explanations are clear. He also interviews other professors who all speak well of their topic in an understandable way. Ben Garrod also is the narrator. He has a beautiful voice. I'll want to listen to him again. I think, however, he's very niche in his work. Recommended: yes! Absolutely
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  • Nate
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pleasure from beginning to end. Outstanding production that kept me engaged, which is not easy with me and nonfiction audio. The beginning was pretty basic (review for me since I have a 6 year old in a Dino phase), but quickly moved on to provide an in depth overview of Dinosaurs over their history. Provided me some excellent talking points to impress my kids and keep up on Dino facts.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    So, here I listened to the audio book. The narrator was ok and the Paleontologists were amazing. Neat people. They discussed what the Dinosaurs looked like, their diet, sexual activities, how they stayed alive and what certain appendages helped dinosaurs to do. There are no pics in an audio book. Not surprising, but..... Although the information and the Paleontologists' voices were neat, I would go with the book or a computer showing you what the dinosaurs looked like while they are talking. It So, here I listened to the audio book. The narrator was ok and the Paleontologists were amazing. Neat people. They discussed what the Dinosaurs looked like, their diet, sexual activities, how they stayed alive and what certain appendages helped dinosaurs to do. There are no pics in an audio book. Not surprising, but..... Although the information and the Paleontologists' voices were neat, I would go with the book or a computer showing you what the dinosaurs looked like while they are talking. It goes by quickly the dinosaurs got squished together in my head creating a big mess. Not pretty.
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  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars for pure enjoyment!! I love dinosaurs and I've always been so in love with science. I really enjoyed listening to this quick book on my drive to work and home. I actually learned quite a bit of information I never knew about dinosaurs! Definitely recommend!
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  • Kelsey Harrington
    January 1, 1970
    There is no universe where I would not love this book!!!! A great, conversational look at the history of dinosaurs. The author does a great job making it easy for everyone to understand, but still explain the science and theories so well that you do feel like you’re learning a lot.
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  • Tena Edlin
    January 1, 1970
    Did you know scientists can now actually find out the color of some dinosaurs? I learned this and more in this informative and entertaining piece.
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful listen!
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating!
  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    Refreshing, full of new discoveries; chickens are descendants of dinosaurs.
  • Mia Kleve
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this is being sold as a "book" you can clearly tell it's more of a compilation of podcasts or some other episodic series. However, this doesn't take away from the overall recording. If anything, it gives clear "chapter breaks" in the information.Definitely a great digest explanation of dinosaurs.
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  • Nicholas Driscoll
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed listening to this, as a big dinosaur fan from of old who recently wrote a ridiculous novel featuring dinosaurs. I guess I never completely outgrew my love of dinosaurs. Some things that stuck out to me:It was interesting to think that the duck-billed dinosaurs probably ate crustaceans when they were getting ready to brood, since they needed more protein to make their eggs.The stuff about the lungs of birds and how dinosaurs likely had similar respiratory systems (wherein the lungs don' I enjoyed listening to this, as a big dinosaur fan from of old who recently wrote a ridiculous novel featuring dinosaurs. I guess I never completely outgrew my love of dinosaurs. Some things that stuck out to me:It was interesting to think that the duck-billed dinosaurs probably ate crustaceans when they were getting ready to brood, since they needed more protein to make their eggs.The stuff about the lungs of birds and how dinosaurs likely had similar respiratory systems (wherein the lungs don't move in and out, and thus reduce wear on their lungs or something like that) was really interesting. I need to learn more about how avian lungs work!I was hoping that the book would cover the recent controversy about whether triceratops actually ate meat, but it didn't.The part about how dinosaur body size can be calculated based on femur thickness was interesting! I was confused, though, when they talked about an alternative computer model which generally requires a more complete skeleton, and then said they used the bone fragments of sauropods in that model. What gives? (I also realized that the paleontologists really don't know how big the dinos are.)It's been a while since I regularly read up on dinosaurs, so it was interesting to hear the new theories about the asteroid that apparently killed everything. The stuff about the pterosaurs and how their flight muscles made up 40-50% of their body weight was startling!I have to admit, though, that I still don't really get why birds are now considered to be dinosaurs, but pterosaurs and plesiosaurs are not. I mean, I can get why they would say that birds are descended from dinosaurs, but to say that they ARE dinosaurs seems strange to me. This is probably because I don't understand how scientists classify animals. This was not helped by the part of the book in which the question was asked, "When was the first bird?" And the discussion got to be about the first feathered dinosaur that flew. But why would the first dinosaur that flew be a bird? There are flightless birds today. Why wouldn't the flightless dinosaurs also be considered birds?The last part of the book discussed the changing climate and the sixth mass extinction being caused by human beings. And this IS something I worry about. I love animals, and even without climate change, human beings are killing off lots of them through pollution and destruction of forests and overfishing and so on. The book tries to paint things in a relatively positive light, that we know what to do, but the question is whether we have the will to do it.I wish I shared his optimism!
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  • JoLee
    January 1, 1970
    It seems that every ten years or so, my kids go through a dinosaur phase, and, inevitably, I succumb as well. The first one struck about 7 year ago when we watched a whole lot of the PBS Kids show Dinosaur Train (though really that might have mostly been about the train.) Props to Dinosaur Train for teaching me so many proper dinosaur vocabulary terms and introducing me to so many new dinosaurs, albeit in their cartoon form. I remember going down a deep Wikipedia hole during that phase because I It seems that every ten years or so, my kids go through a dinosaur phase, and, inevitably, I succumb as well. The first one struck about 7 year ago when we watched a whole lot of the PBS Kids show Dinosaur Train (though really that might have mostly been about the train.) Props to Dinosaur Train for teaching me so many proper dinosaur vocabulary terms and introducing me to so many new dinosaurs, albeit in their cartoon form. I remember going down a deep Wikipedia hole during that phase because I wanted to know more. Fast forward to today, and my kids are going through another dinosaur phase. We recently watched the original Jurassic Park. The youngest got a Jurassic Park LEGO set and now we have an imaginary velociraptor named Chomp who seems to go everywhere with us. After reading basically the entire DK Smithsonian: The Dinosaur Book, I decided I might as well be in a dinosaur phase too. So, when I saw that this book was one of the free Audible Original picks for July, it was an easy decision. A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs is a short, podcast-format audiobook. Dinosaur knowledge has come a long way since we were kids, and Ben Garrod basically gets us up to date. He interviews a bunch of experts in paleontology, geology, etc. They answer some of the questions you've probably had for a long time about dinosaurs, such as: "How did sauropods eat enough to maintain those huge bodies?" "Which dinosaurs were the biggest?" and "How are dinosaurs and birds related?" Kid's books just present all these answers as straight facts. This book explains the process behind figuring out which dinosaur was the biggest, the evidence behind the asteroid strike that ended the dinosaurs, how we can determine pigmentation from fossilized remains, and how much we still don't know. It was a quick and interesting read, and I would definitely recommend it, especially as it is free this month for Audible members. Although, I did like that I had the DK book on hand so that I could look at illustrations, as well.
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  • Catherine Puma
    January 1, 1970
    As advertised, this is a look at a couple different kinds of dinosaurs and events in their evolutionary history, put together for an intended adult audience. The assumption is that people tend to have favorite dinosaurs when they are younger but typically stop learning more about them as they get older, and this work professes that even adults should continue learning about dinosaurs because dinosaurs are awesome! I was sold on the premise, and this backs up its claim by describing many interest As advertised, this is a look at a couple different kinds of dinosaurs and events in their evolutionary history, put together for an intended adult audience. The assumption is that people tend to have favorite dinosaurs when they are younger but typically stop learning more about them as they get older, and this work professes that even adults should continue learning about dinosaurs because dinosaurs are awesome! I was sold on the premise, and this backs up its claim by describing many interesting new finds in the field of paleontology that have come to light in just the past few years. For a short audio production, this was packed full of information! Definitely a good use of my time. This is basically a long-form science journalism podcast, with Ben Garrod speaking to different paleontologists about their work. The sounds in the background were nice and cut together well with the rest of the piece, especially the part where Garrod is discussing birds as a branch of dinosaur and you can hear the fascinating calls of the Australian vultures behind him. The style of this really reminds me of the Nature podcast, which I also enjoy and highly recommend. I rate this piece only 4 out of 5 stars, however, because it could have been more diverse in the scientists that were represented. Though I appreciate the amount of women included, this is basically filled with all British or American accents. While a lot of great fossil specimens have been found in modern day North America and Western Europe/the UK, there have been fantastic contributions from China, Southern Africa, and South America as well. Because this is an audio production, I think I just noticed the lack of other accents all the more. Nevertheless, this is an excellent listen for ALL dinosaur fans, and I recommend everyone to listen to it. While this isn't only for adults, the discussion of recent discoveries can help remind adults why we loved these creatures so much all those years ago in our lives. I'll never look at a pigeon the same way again, that's for sure.
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  • Dave Shields
    January 1, 1970
    I snagged this as an Audible original and thought it was worth the read. As a kid, I was never a huge dinosaur fan other than the mild curiosity and nostalgic wonder. I thought Anklyosauras was awesome to fight on t-shirts, T-Rex was always the big baddy, etc. However, as an adult I do enjoy science in standard doses so I picked this one up.The story is more like a series of interviews (as I’ve found is pretty standard for most of these audible originals), wherein the author interviews various s I snagged this as an Audible original and thought it was worth the read. As a kid, I was never a huge dinosaur fan other than the mild curiosity and nostalgic wonder. I thought Anklyosauras was awesome to fight on t-shirts, T-Rex was always the big baddy, etc. However, as an adult I do enjoy science in standard doses so I picked this one up.The story is more like a series of interviews (as I’ve found is pretty standard for most of these audible originals), wherein the author interviews various scientists in the field of paleontology interspersed between a winding narrative about the different time periods of dinosaurs and what led to (and ended) those eras. The author asks pointed questions about the expert details of various types of dinosaurs and leads the interviewee into his narrative. This repeats across various eras and various professionals as the author shows how this information either supports or refutes the current opinions of dinosaurs in the current school of scientific thought. I did learn a number of interesting things about dinosaurs that I didn’t know such as the close relationship to modern birds. I also didn’t realize that the field of paleontology had changed so much between the 1980s and the present era. I learned about some newer dinosaurs that I was not aware of and got more insights into new research on some of the old dinosaurs. All of this was narrated by a British man and the interviews were largely with British people who had a notable accent. There were a few Americans in the mix and the accent difference was truly notable, as an American, I guess I didn’t think we sounded so different. In the end, this was a fun, if brief foray into the world of dinosaurs that was refreshing. I did find the frequent switches between the narrative and the professional interviews to be jarring and the “extreme” British focus to be a bit taxing but it makes sense in the context. You will learn a few things and travel to some interesting places.
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  • PJ Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I "read" the Audible version of this book. I listened to it in one sitting (just 2 hours & 42 minutes).It was interesting, up to a point.A lot of paths were discussed, including why dinosaurs got so big, their lungs (not like ours!!), how quickly they grew from an egg, etc. Even feathered dinosaurs are discussed. Chickens, and other birds, are living dinosaurs. I've heard that before and find it mildly interesting.Oh, and dinosaur poop, coprolite (yes, I looked that word up). It was all-in-a I "read" the Audible version of this book. I listened to it in one sitting (just 2 hours & 42 minutes).It was interesting, up to a point.A lot of paths were discussed, including why dinosaurs got so big, their lungs (not like ours!!), how quickly they grew from an egg, etc. Even feathered dinosaurs are discussed. Chickens, and other birds, are living dinosaurs. I've heard that before and find it mildly interesting.Oh, and dinosaur poop, coprolite (yes, I looked that word up). It was all-in-all an interesting book, but there was a major problem--it discussed different types of dinosaurs while, I think, assuming that most people would know what the fossils would look like. I'm afraid that unlike most kids, I had never cared about the subject of dinosaurs when I was a child. So, I found it somewhat hard to visualize. And I became totally lost in areas when the names of the dinosaurs were discussed. I only recognized a few names, T-Rex, for example.Yet, I think I still learned something. I really didn't know that poop was studied. LOL. It's hard for me to even imagine. One other thing in this book. At the very end, mass extinctions is discussed. And humans are blamed for one that is evidently happening now. Oh, and climate change. This made me roll my eyes. I, for one, am sick and tired, of humans being blamed for everything. To me, it's laughable that humans can be blamed for so-called climate change (aka global warming). If a man, woman or a child, has an interest in dinosaurs, I believe they'll enjoy this book--but beware of the political hits taken in the book.
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  • Richard Haas III
    January 1, 1970
    Recently I’ve been watching tons of documentaries, and a good portion has been on dinosaurs and pre-history. It’s a topic that has always fascinated me— back when I was a kid, I studied dinosaurs and ancient creatures like it was my job, like a paleontological Doogie Howser; one of the most special moments in my life was when I could finally pronounce Pachycsphelasaourus. That being said, I jumped at the opportunity to listen to this audio-only book about dinosaurs as one of Audible’s Original o Recently I’ve been watching tons of documentaries, and a good portion has been on dinosaurs and pre-history. It’s a topic that has always fascinated me— back when I was a kid, I studied dinosaurs and ancient creatures like it was my job, like a paleontological Doogie Howser; one of the most special moments in my life was when I could finally pronounce Pachycsphelasaourus. That being said, I jumped at the opportunity to listen to this audio-only book about dinosaurs as one of Audible’s Original offerings for the month.The prologue and I think the first chapter honestly didn’t hook me. Pretty much the first half hour is just a simplified rehashing of what anyone has ever said in a dinosaur documentary. That made me nervous. I mean the title is “A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs” and proclaimed as where you pick up your love of dinosaurs from when you were a kid. Here’s the problem: I never stopped loving dinosaurs and I never became a paleontologist or anthropologist. So does that mean this book isn’t for me? Or anyone else with a similar love for dinosaurs?The short answer? No... Just maybe fast forward through the opening half hour. Actually, for the most part, I believe that title is just a gimmick to get people to listen to the audiobook who normally would not, because the remaining hours are filed with fascinating topics on height calculation, eating habits and feces, their reptile reputation as well as their evolution into birds, and the great extinction, among other things. Aside from what the extinction level event was, these are topics that are often mentioned in passing or short segments, so to hear them expanded upon in detail was honestly refreshing. It was written in a way that both fans of the topic and those curiously interested can enjoy.All-in-all, this is a must listen. Maybe in the future this will be turned into a docuseries as it felt like many points and interviews would have benefited from having visuals paired with it. But while visuals would have enhanced it, the content was perfectly sound (no pun intended) without it.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Like many children, Ben Gerrod had a fascination with dinosaurs; but, unlike many children, he never grew out of that fascination. In A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs, Gerrod reintroduces us to the world of dinosaurs, dispels some of the myths, and tells us about some of today's amazing research and latest discoveries. He discusses how the Jurassic Park franchise brought the interest of paleontology to the mainstream world, and the history of Sir Richard Owen--one of the first paleontologists.In si Like many children, Ben Gerrod had a fascination with dinosaurs; but, unlike many children, he never grew out of that fascination. In A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs, Gerrod reintroduces us to the world of dinosaurs, dispels some of the myths, and tells us about some of today's amazing research and latest discoveries. He discusses how the Jurassic Park franchise brought the interest of paleontology to the mainstream world, and the history of Sir Richard Owen--one of the first paleontologists.In six chapters, Gerrod explains the key to dinosaurs surviving the third extinction (due largely to their size), explains how birds are actually dinosaurs (and how we are learning through discovery that feathers were more prevalent than previously thought), how trace fossils are used to better understand how dinosaurs lived and traveled, how they managed to take flight even though they were massive in size (a discovery originally made and reported on by a female paleontologist), and how an asteroid (now believed to be the cause of the Gulf of Mexico) is what eventually wiped them out.Incredibly interesting for anyone who ever had a childhood fascination with dinosaurs; or, even for those who are just gaining interest as adults (like myself). With flawless sound mixing, interviews and narration, Gerrod's A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs is for every child at heart.(I received this Audible Original for free as part of my monthly subscription.)
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  • Anniken Haga
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars ratingI never had a favorite dinosaur growing up. I never really had a relationship with dinosaurs at all until I was around 10, when I saw a documentary series one summer about the life a herbivor dinosaur and all the ways it might die. It was gruesome for a 10 year old to see, but also fascinating. It wasn't fascinating enough to get me any more interested, however. We jump 10 years forward, and my best friend is a geek that like dinosaurs, and we talk a little about them, but I'm 3.5/5 stars ratingI never had a favorite dinosaur growing up. I never really had a relationship with dinosaurs at all until I was around 10, when I saw a documentary series one summer about the life a herbivor dinosaur and all the ways it might die. It was gruesome for a 10 year old to see, but also fascinating. It wasn't fascinating enough to get me any more interested, however. We jump 10 years forward, and my best friend is a geek that like dinosaurs, and we talk a little about them, but I'm still not that interested in learning. On the other hand, when this month's Audible Original was a book about dinosaurs, it felt completly wrong not to pick it up. As someone who don't really know much about dinosaurs other than the general knowledge - birds are dinosaurs. Dinosaurs had feathers. They existed in all kinds of shapes and sizes. +++ - I found this book entertaining. It introduced me to some new facts I enjoyed, and the way it was made was compelling me to listening on. That is often a problem with books like this, they get dry, but this book did not. It held a spark going all the way through, and I'm honestly a little sad it's over. Oh well, time to call my friend and discuss dinos!
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Well produced and good quality. Also, some helpful information. My main gripe is largely with the accepted practice of swapping conjecture with fact. A nearly uncountable occurrences of bait-and-switch tricks takes place in virtually every conversation that ventures into the past, making it difficult for an audience to decipher what level of confidence to put behind each of the innumerable claims. “Such and such feature is found on this somewhat similar decedent so that’s why this dinosaur looke Well produced and good quality. Also, some helpful information. My main gripe is largely with the accepted practice of swapping conjecture with fact. A nearly uncountable occurrences of bait-and-switch tricks takes place in virtually every conversation that ventures into the past, making it difficult for an audience to decipher what level of confidence to put behind each of the innumerable claims. “Such and such feature is found on this somewhat similar decedent so that’s why this dinosaur looked like this”. Very rarely is the chain-of-custody on the logic shown and instead the audience is simply inundated with claim after claim after claim, all of which are treated as though they are 100% certain, rather than with the ambiguity and uncertainty that is necessary for things this old. If productions like this were simply straightforward with how certain or uncertain they are on things, they’d deserve more respect. Instead they are in the business of acquiring the respect by any means necessary.
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  • Zhelana
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fabulous romp through prehistoric earth. It gave details about dinosaurs both what makes them dinosaurs and what makes other animals from the same time not dinosaurs. Then it talked about dinosaur behavior which we can guess at from remains of poop, egg shells, nests, and footprints. It's short - only 2.5 hours - but it filled that time with commentary from many experts on dinosaurs, prehistoric marine and air life, birds, and even the kinds of mammals that lived with the dinosaurs. I This was a fabulous romp through prehistoric earth. It gave details about dinosaurs both what makes them dinosaurs and what makes other animals from the same time not dinosaurs. Then it talked about dinosaur behavior which we can guess at from remains of poop, egg shells, nests, and footprints. It's short - only 2.5 hours - but it filled that time with commentary from many experts on dinosaurs, prehistoric marine and air life, birds, and even the kinds of mammals that lived with the dinosaurs. I was particularly surprised to learn of a fox-sized mammal that was found with the remains of a baby dinosaur in its stomach. This has definitely moved a few full length science books on dinosaurs up on my to- buy pile. I was the little girl who loved dinosaurs before it was cool to love dinosaurs; and I remain the woman who loves dinosaurs.
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