Catch and Kill
In a dramatic account of violence and espionage, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Ronan Farrow exposes serial abusers and a cabal of powerful interests hellbent on covering up the truth, at any cost.In 2017, a routine network television investigation led Ronan Farrow to a story only whispered about: one of Hollywood's most powerful producers was a predator, protected by fear, wealth, and a conspiracy of silence. As Farrow drew closer to the truth, shadowy operatives, from high-priced lawyers to elite war-hardened spies, mounted a secret campaign of intimidation, threatening his career, following his every move, and weaponizing an account of abuse in his own family. All the while, Farrow and his producer faced a degree of resistance that could not be explained--until now. And a trail of clues revealed corruption and cover-ups from Hollywood, to Washington, and beyond. This is the untold story of the exotic tactics of surveillance and intimidation deployed by wealthy and connected men to threaten journalists, evade accountability, and silence victims of abuse--and it's the story of the women who risked everything to expose the truth and spark a global movement.Both a spy thriller and a meticulous work of investigative journalism, Catch and Kill breaks devastating new stories about the rampant abuse of power--and sheds far-reaching light on investigations that shook the culture.

Catch and Kill Details

TitleCatch and Kill
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 15th, 2019
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316486637
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Crime, True Crime, Politics, Feminism, Audiobook

Catch and Kill Review

  • Cas
    January 1, 1970
    do i spend $30 to preorder this vote now
  • Rebecca Crunden
    January 1, 1970
    Ronan Farrow has a new book, you say? Excuse me while I search under the sofa for spare change because I must have it.
  • Lea
    January 1, 1970
    You think you already know this story, but you don’t. This is essential reading.
  • Neville Longbottom
    January 1, 1970
    It’s probably cliché to describe this book as seeming like a real life spy thriller… but it truly does read at times like a real life spy thriller. Catch and Kill extensively covers the behind the scenes of Ronan Farrow’s reporting on Harvey Weinstein, how he was trailed by intelligence agencies, and the tactics that were used to try and stop him from getting the story published. Reading this book really gives the big picture about how Harvey was able to prey on women for such a long period of time. It’s probably cliché to describe this book as seeming like a real life spy thriller… but it truly does read at times like a real life spy thriller. Catch and Kill extensively covers the behind the scenes of Ronan Farrow’s reporting on Harvey Weinstein, how he was trailed by intelligence agencies, and the tactics that were used to try and stop him from getting the story published. Reading this book really gives the big picture about how Harvey was able to prey on women for such a long period of time. His tactics for shutting down journalists over the years are spelled out, and we see first hand through Ronan’s eyes how Harvey was able to get NBC to kill the story. In interviews after Ronan’s initial stories broke he was always guarded about why NBC wouldn’t air the story and why he no longer worked for the company. He would always say things like, “I don’t want to be the story, the women and sources should be the focus of the story.” And while the women being the center is important, Ronan’s story as a journalist is also imperative because it shows how an investigation with credible information was being shut down and keeping Harvey’s abuse in the dark. If you’re thinking, “oh I’ve read The New Yorker articles, there won’t be too much new information in this book” … think again. It’s extremely illuminating to see the process of trying to report the story at NBC and being shut down at every turn compared with the experience Ronan had being completely supported by The New Yorker. Ronan is also more forthcoming about his personal relationships in this book. Detailing how in the past he wasn’t always supportive of his sister Dylan being public with her abuse allegations. Then showing how he came around to supporting her and asking her for insight on how to interview survivors. Some of the more funny or sweet moments in the book come through commentary from Ronan’s partner Jon Lovett (or as Ronan calls him, Jonathan). And there’s a very nice culmination to their romantic arc at the end of the book. While a lot of this book can be heavy to read, sexual assault, powerful men abusing their power, companies covering for abusers instead of protecting people, and so on, there is also a sense of hope. It shows a changing of the times, how these stories can be taken more seriously now than compared with the past. It shines a light on all the brave survivors and sources who risked their careers and their safety to come forward to help others. I think this is a triumph of non-fiction writing. It’s fast-paced, compelling from start to finish, exhaustively fact checked, serious when it needs to be, but also has amusing and hopeful moments sprinkled throughout. Definitely check this one out.
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  • julia ☆ [owls reads]
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so sad and so proud and so angry.If you’re at all interested in the culture of abuse in Hollywood, especially the Weinstein rape and sexual assault cases, and how the media often helps protect abusers and cover up the crimes, please read this.
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  • Moira
    January 1, 1970
    Holy shit. Ronan Farrow, Ultimate Friend of the Pod, knocked this one out of the ballpark. You think you know this story, but there’s so much I learned. This reads like the ultimate spy thriller, but is in fact reality. Not only did Ronan did an outstanding job sharing the stories of all these women, what he went through personally will blow your mind.q I honestly couldn’t put this book down and cannot wait for pictures of the Lovett/Farrow wedding.
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  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    About as compulsive as book-form investigative journalism gets. Farrow's biggest service with this fascinating and harrowing account is to unpeel in systematic detail the multi-levels of a carefully-rigged system of attrition and protection put in place by the monster-emperors presiding over it. Control everybody with inducements and the threat of swift and irrevocable ruination and behave however you want to. Enormous bravery shown by those pushing back, all of whom, had they failed, faced life About as compulsive as book-form investigative journalism gets. Farrow's biggest service with this fascinating and harrowing account is to unpeel in systematic detail the multi-levels of a carefully-rigged system of attrition and protection put in place by the monster-emperors presiding over it. Control everybody with inducements and the threat of swift and irrevocable ruination and behave however you want to. Enormous bravery shown by those pushing back, all of whom, had they failed, faced lifelong career purgatory.'In December 2014, when she was twenty-five, Nestor had worked as a temporary front desk assistant at the Weinstein Company in Los Angeles. She was overqualified, but took the job on a lark to get a firsthand view of the entertainment industry. On her first day, Nestor said, two employees told her that she was Weinstein’s “type” physically. When Weinstein arrived at the office, he made comments about her appearance, referring to her as “the pretty girl.” He asked how old she was, and then sent his assistants out of the room and made her write down her telephone number. Weinstein told her to meet him for drinks that night. Nestor invented an excuse. When he insisted, she suggested an early-morning coffee the next day, assuming that he wouldn’t accept. He told her to meet him at the Peninsula hotel, one of his favorite haunts. Friends in the entertainment industry and employees in the company had by then warned her about Weinstein’s reputation. “I dressed very frumpy,” she recalled. At the meeting, Weinstein offered her career help, then began to boast about his sexual liaisons with other women, including famous actresses. “He said, ‘You know, we could have a lot of fun,’” Nestor recalled. “‘I could put you in my London office, and you could work there and you could be my girlfriend.’” She declined. He asked to hold her hand; she said no. She recalled Weinstein remarking, “Oh, the girls always say no. You know, ‘No, no.’ And then they have a beer or two and then they’re throwing themselves at me.” In a tone that Nestor described as “very weirdly proud,” Weinstein added “that he’d never had to do anything like Bill Cosby.” She assumed that he meant he’d never drugged a woman. “Textbook sexual harassment” was how Nestor described Weinstein’s behavior. She recalled refusing his advances at least a dozen times. “‘No’ did not mean ‘no’ to him,” she said. Throughout the meeting, Weinstein interrupted their conversation to yell into his cell phone, screaming at, of all people, Today show management, enraged that they’d canceled a segment with Amy Adams, a star in the Weinstein movie Big Eyes, when she refused to answer questions about a recent hack targeting Sony executives. Afterward, Weinstein told Nestor to keep an eye on the news cycle, which he promised would be spun in his favor and against NBC. Later in the day, items critical of NBC’s role in the spat surfaced as promised. Weinstein stopped by Nestor’s desk to make sure that she’d seen them. Nestor found the ferocity with which Weinstein moved to intimidate a news organization unsettling. By that point, she recalled, “I was very afraid of him. And I knew how well-connected he was. And how if I pissed him off then I could never have a career in that industry.” Still, she told a friend about the incident, and he alerted the company’s office of human resources. Nestor had a conversation with company officials about the matter but didn’t pursue it further after they told her that Weinstein would be informed of anything she told them. Later, employee after employee would tell me the human resources office at the company was a sham, a place where complaints went to die.' ---------------'It was 1998 when Perkins got the green light to hire an assistant of her own, something she hoped would put some distance between her and Weinstein. She warned candidates for the job that Weinstein would make sexual advances. She even rejected “very overtly attractive” applicants, “because I knew he’d never leave them alone. It would never stop.” In the end, she chose Chiu, a “prodigiously bright” Oxford graduate, who would overcome paralyzing fears of retaliation and make her name public only years later. At the Hotel Excelsior during the Venice Film Festival in September 1998, Chiu emerged from a meeting with Weinstein in his hotel room, shaking and crying, saying he had pushed her against a bed and attempted to assault her. Perkins confronted Weinstein, interrupting a lunch meeting with a prominent director on the hotel terrace. “He stood there and he lied and lied and lied,” Perkins recalled. “I said, ‘Harvey, you are lying,’ and he said, ‘I’m not lying; I swear on the lives of my children.’” Chiu was, Perkins said, “shocked and in a traumatized state,” and too frightened to go to the police. The difficulty of reporting the allegation was deepened by their location at the time, Venice’s Lido island. “I didn’t know who I would go to,” Perkins recalled. “The security guard in the hotel?” Perkins did what she could to ensure that Chiu was kept away from Weinstein for the remainder of the trip. After returning to England, Perkins notified Gigliotti, who gave her a referral to an employment attorney. Eventually, Perkins and Chiu sent notice that they were resigning from Miramax and pursuing legal action. Their departure from the company set in motion the frenetic meetings at Miramax that Wolfe had described to me. Weinstein and other executives called Perkins and Chiu again and again. The night she resigned, Perkins received seventeen calls of “increasing desperation” from them. In the messages, Weinstein veered between pleading and menacing. “Please, please, please, please, please, please call me. I’m begging you,” he said in one message. Perkins and Chiu hired lawyers from the London-based firm Simons Muirhead & Burton. Perkins initially pushed back on accepting what she called “blood money” and inquired about going to the police, or to Disney, Miramax’s parent company. But the attorneys seemed intent on foreclosing any outcome except a settlement and a nondisclosure agreement. In the end, she and Chiu accepted a settlement of two hundred fifty thousand pounds, to be evenly split between them. Weinstein’s brother, Bob, cut the check to the women’s law firm, obscuring the transaction from Disney and distancing it from Harvey.' -------------------------'Masters was invariably described as a veteran media journalist, which she joked was a euphemistic way to call her old. She’d worked as a staff writer for the Washington Post and a contributor for Vanity Fair, Time, and Esquire. She told me she’d heard the rumors about Weinstein “forever.” Once, years earlier, she’d even confronted him about them. “Why are you writing this shit about me?” he’d roared at her at a lunch at the Peninsula in Beverly Hills. “Why do you say that I’m a bully?” “Well, Harvey,” Masters recalled telling him. “I hear you rape women.” “Sometimes you have sex with a woman who’s not your wife, and there’s a disagreement about what’s happened, and you just have to write a check to make it go away,” Weinstein replied calmly. Hiltzik, the public relations operative, was also there that day. Masters recalled him looking shocked. He’d later deny that he heard her mention rape.' -------------------------------'The first year they’d worked together, Canosa had tried repeatedly to brush off Weinstein’s advances. During one meeting about the Cassidy film, he casually told her he needed to go up to his hotel room to get something. “It was like midafternoon or something. So, I just didn’t think,” she said. When they got there, he told her he was going to take a shower. “Would you get in the shower with me?” he asked. “No,” Canosa told him. “Just get in the shower with me. I don’t even need to—I don’t want to have sex with you. I just want you to be in the shower with me.” “No,” she said again, and went into the living room. Weinstein announced, from the bathroom, that he was going to masturbate anyway, and started doing so through the open door as she averted her gaze. She left Weinstein’s hotel room, upset. Another time, Weinstein left a jacket behind at one of their meetings and asked her to hold onto it. In its pockets, she found a pack of syringes that googling revealed were a treatment for erectile dysfunction. She reeled at the implications of him arming himself for sex ahead of their meetings. By then she was working on the film for Weinstein; her professional life had come to revolve around him. And they had developed a friendship that was real, if twisted by imbalances of power and by Weinstein’s overtures. At one work dinner with a number of colleagues that summer, he wept over news that Disney would be selling Miramax. He asked her, yet again, to come to his hotel room. When she refused, he roared at her, “Don’t fucking refuse me when I’m crying.” She relented, and nothing happened. He just sobbed. “I’ve never been happy,” she remembered him saying. “You’re one of my best friends. You’re so loyal.” She hoped the declarations of friendship meant he understood her boundaries. She was wrong. “What came next,” she said, beginning to cry, “was he raped me.” The first time had been after another meeting in a hotel. As they discussed the Cassidy project, he said a scene in the script reminded him of a classic film, and asked her to come up to his room to watch a clip. Weinstein had by then apologized for his advances profusely and he was, after all, her boss. “I was like, I can handle myself,” she said. The only television in Weinstein’s hotel room was in the bedroom. She sat on the bed and watched the clip, feeling uncomfortable. “He made a move, and I told him, ‘No.’ And he made another move, and I told him, ‘No,’” she recalled. Weinstein got angry, aggressive. “Don’t be a fucking idiot,” she remembered him saying. He departed for the restroom and returned a few minutes later wearing only a robe. Then he pushed her onto the bed. “I said no more than once, and he forced himself on me,” she said. “It wasn’t like I was screaming. But I was definitely like, ‘I don’t want to do this.’ And his full body weight was on top of me.”Weinstein’s misconduct continued. Once, he ordered her to accompany him to an appointment with an osteopath and to remain in the room as he stripped naked and received treatment for a worsening case of sciatica. Another time, during an attack of the same condition, he demanded that she massage his thighs. She remembered him screaming at her when she refused. “What the fuck? Why aren’t you gonna? Why?” “Because I don’t feel comfortable,” she told him. “I’m your employee.” “For fuck’s sake, Ally!” he shouted. “For fuck’s sake, you can massage my thighs!” “I’m just not going to.” “Then fucking get out of here! Fuck you! Fuck! Fuck! Fuck!”'
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  • Sonja
    January 1, 1970
    I'd give this more than 5 stars if I could. What a masterpiece.This is so well-researched, well-sourced, everything I've come to know as the standard of Ronan Farrow's reporting. But beyond that, it's such a powerful account of corporate silence and failure, complicity, of brave sources coming forward, a frankly wild look into the world of international espionage, and so much more. It is also harrowing and incredible to read what Ronan personally went through to get these stories out I'd give this more than 5 stars if I could. What a masterpiece.This is so well-researched, well-sourced, everything I've come to know as the standard of Ronan Farrow's reporting. But beyond that, it's such a powerful account of corporate silence and failure, complicity, of brave sources coming forward, a frankly wild look into the world of international espionage, and so much more. It is also harrowing and incredible to read what Ronan personally went through to get these stories out. Part II of the book was especially shocking and hard to read; a lot of this is incredibly hard to read (the content warning for detailed descriptions of sexual assault should probably go without saying re: this book), but it's so wildly important that this story is out there, and that Ronan used his relative privilege in the world to tell it. When I say I couldn't put this book down, I mean it. I read it while walking around New York City, like a jerk. I stayed up way past my bedtime multiple nights. I read through lunch breaks and on the subway and while waiting on line for Ronan's book event at the Cooper Union. So truly, it was impossible to put down. But also? For such a difficult and horrific topic, the book is surprisingly funny. Ronan has an incredible sense of sometimes wry humor that weaves its way through the book, especially when things are at their most ridiculous, and there are a number of fantastic and hilarious asides, like for example: "Pentagon officials had announced she [Rose McGowan] was visiting and asked if I'd join them for lunch, like they were looking for a language specialist and figured I spoke fluent actress," or "I looked drawn and pale and thinner than I had at the beginning of the summer, like a consumptive child in an ad for some Victorian-era tonic," and lines such as, "Nothing is certain, it turns out, except death and taxes and investigation by the Southern District of New York," a line that made me laugh so hard I nearly cried. And then, beyond all of that: It's not a secret how much I love one Jon Lovett, who happens to be Ronan's partner. I was honestly surprised at just how prominently Lovett featured in this, and his cameos and quotes in the book are impossibly delightful. (view spoiler)[His indignation and offense at how NBC is acting comes across so well throughout the book. Ronan doesn't shy away from writing about the fights they had during the reporting and how they were going through a rough time as a result of it, but it's always clear how Lovett is not only supportive, he's instrumental in this story getting published at all. His suggestion of taping the Weinstein recording from a speaker, and that suggestion being how Ronan ended up with the recording, was incredible. Lovett continued to offer his house for Ronan to film interviews with sources, and their dog Pundit (THAT MIA FARROW GAVE TO LOVETT) as an emotional support dog to said sources. And his commentary throughout the book is just PHENOMENAL. "I'm interesting! I went to an escape room!" "Don't worry, baby, I'll take care of you. I'll keep you in finery and smoothies." "It means I love you?" "You're not a morning person anyway." ALL SO VERY GOOD. His voice comes across so well in every single quote, it was so easy to hear the exact cadence of it. AND THEN RONAN PROPOSED TO LOVETT IN A BOOK DRAFT, AND I HAD MANY A FEELING ABOUT IT. I love these two people I don't actually know personally a lot, and I hope they have a very happy life together. (hide spoiler)] This book is an incredible piece of reporting and it'll make you feel both wildly unsafe to live in this world, but also (I hope) hopeful because of so many brave people coming forward and speaking up, leaking documents, and so much more. I can't recommend this book highly enough.
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  • Chris Burd
    January 1, 1970
    What makes this book so compelling is the combination of meticulous detail and genuinely captivating storytelling. There's also a very specific zeitgeist that this book captures that, I think, will make it compelling in different ways over the course of time. The feeling of this moment is that this book - and the reporting that the book itself is about - have helped to create change in the way the world operates, even as it reports on those very things. By being so fearless and persistent about What makes this book so compelling is the combination of meticulous detail and genuinely captivating storytelling. There's also a very specific zeitgeist that this book captures that, I think, will make it compelling in different ways over the course of time. The feeling of this moment is that this book - and the reporting that the book itself is about - have helped to create change in the way the world operates, even as it reports on those very things. By being so fearless and persistent about telling the stories of victims and survivors of sexual harassment and assault, the world is a safer place for future victims of sexual harassment and assault. I hadn't been quite so excited for a book launch...ever. Farrow did an impressive job of using his social media and media appearances to maximum advantage to instill a sense of anticipation. That could have backfired if the book hadn't been so damn good. I admit - I bought this book in Hardcover, Kindle and Audible versions, because I had a busy day on Tuesday and I knew I needed to be able to access it in all forms. And I utilized all of them. I genuinely loved this book, but I hope that the trigger warnings for readers are rather obvious given its subject matter. There are really difficult depictions of rape and assault in the book, and readers who may find that traumatic should be aware.
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    Truly truly exceptional. I listened to the audio version of this book and listening felt like a clean slice through the heart: devastating, unflinching, lethal. As a woman, I'd always been aware of the structural power imbalances that I and others had to work against, but Farrow lays bare the layers upon layers that society creates to insulate and protect powerful male predators and makes it clear that in ways both subtle and menacing, the rules are stacked against us. There are some really diff Truly truly exceptional. I listened to the audio version of this book and listening felt like a clean slice through the heart: devastating, unflinching, lethal. As a woman, I'd always been aware of the structural power imbalances that I and others had to work against, but Farrow lays bare the layers upon layers that society creates to insulate and protect powerful male predators and makes it clear that in ways both subtle and menacing, the rules are stacked against us. There are some really difficult things to read - some are about the corruption from those at the top, some are physical descriptions of rape, and by the end, I was moved to tears. Ronan Farrow deserves huge accolades for writing this book despite being threatened, coerced, stifled and followed. If he endured that, you can imagine what the women he wrote about endured.Catch and Kill should be required reading for everyone. Period.
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  • Michael Perkins
    January 1, 1970
    Trump no better than Weinstein....https://www.democracynow.org/2018/9/2...
  • Cori
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book I've read (She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement) in the last 30 days about serial sexual assault/abuse and sexual criminal behavior in Hollywood and Washington, and I think if you are going to read This is the second book I've read (She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement) in the last 30 days about serial sexual assault/abuse and sexual criminal behavior in Hollywood and Washington, and I think if you are going to read one book, you need to read them both. While She Said concentrates on the victim's stories, Catch and Kill takes it a step further and delves into the lies, intimidation and cover-up by the people, including NBC, that protect predators like Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer, etc. I think these two quotes sum up the book perfectly: "...people contorting their bodies into the shapes of gears for Harvey Weinstein's machine.""In the end, the courage of women can't be stamped out. And stories--the big ones, the true ones--can be caught but never killed."Excellent writing by Ronan Farrow. As I said in my review for She Said, the same goes for Catch and Kill: This is an important book for our times and I highly recommend it.
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  • Cara
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in 36 hours...I couldn’t put it down and I have so many thoughts coming out of it. Here’s what I will say—the subject matter is brutal but Farrow’s approach is very journalistic so material is presented very straightforward. Farrow put a trigger warning on the first page but how we are each triggered is going to be shaped our experiences. I found the Matt Lauer account brutal. I would say if you are a Jon Lovett/Crooked Media fan then his cameos and being able to understand the I read this book in 36 hours...I couldn’t put it down and I have so many thoughts coming out of it. Here’s what I will say—the subject matter is brutal but Farrow’s approach is very journalistic so material is presented very straightforward. Farrow put a trigger warning on the first page but how we are each triggered is going to be shaped our experiences. I found the Matt Lauer account brutal. I would say if you are a Jon Lovett/Crooked Media fan then his cameos and being able to understand the tone of the interaction between he and Farrow adds some levity. And while Farrow is straight forward in his reporting, he has a dry sense of humor and an ability to deliver a one liner that was both humorous and could cut through the bullshit. Given how many fact checkers and lawyers reviewed the material this book is air tight. Farrows case for how nefarious and despicable HW and NBC were to preserve power and manipulate public narrative is captivating and terrifying. This book is why good journalism is needed for democracy.
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  • Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely devoured this. The world can be horrible - power structures can run so deep - conspiracies can be true - but it is so inspiring how many people chose to stand up and do the right thing when the wrong thing is so much easier. Obviously all of the sources who were brave enough to go on the record with their stories, but also everyone who broke NDAs to verify their claims, the private investigator who came clean after months of working for the bad guys, the double agent who leaked Black Absolutely devoured this. The world can be horrible - power structures can run so deep - conspiracies can be true - but it is so inspiring how many people chose to stand up and do the right thing when the wrong thing is so much easier. Obviously all of the sources who were brave enough to go on the record with their stories, but also everyone who broke NDAs to verify their claims, the private investigator who came clean after months of working for the bad guys, the double agent who leaked Black Cube documents under a code name. And the people who remained strong in their moral convictions that this story was worth it even though the opposition was so vast and powerful and terrifying- Ronan himself, his partner Jon Lovett, his sister on the other end of a phone call, producer Rich McHugh, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey. So much evil in these pages but also so much bravery and humanity and tenacity and love.
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  • jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 100th book I've read this year, and it leaves me with the realization that we're going to have to - quoting the Housemartins here - "batter all the sinners to the ground". Bad to their bones people have a lot of control over what is news, whose experiences matter, and who gets to tell their stories. And whether the tellers survive the experience.I'm afraid they'll all have to go. There are way too many older white men in positions of power whose interests are vested in th This is the 100th book I've read this year, and it leaves me with the realization that we're going to have to - quoting the Housemartins here - "batter all the sinners to the ground". Bad to their bones people have a lot of control over what is news, whose experiences matter, and who gets to tell their stories. And whether the tellers survive the experience.I'm afraid they'll all have to go. There are way too many older white men in positions of power whose interests are vested in themselves. They aren't going to change and they aren't going away on their own.A good housecleaning at NBC: Griffith, Lack, Oppenheimer: they need to be out. Lauer and the rest should understand they're lucky to keep their freedom and riches and stop attempting to intrude on our notice.Our news will be better for younger journalists, more BIPOC, and more women who aren't going to carry water for their abusive male peers (NBC Legal, looking at you!)
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Having just read Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey's She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement about their investigation into Harvey Weinstein and the widespread sexual harassment and abuse in Hollywood, I was bound to follow it up with this book in short order. Where She Said focussed most heavily on the victims, Catch and Kill looks more deeply at the people and power structures conspiring to cover it all up for so long, by means of lies, intimidation, pay-offs and harassment of Having just read Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey's She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement about their investigation into Harvey Weinstein and the widespread sexual harassment and abuse in Hollywood, I was bound to follow it up with this book in short order. Where She Said focussed most heavily on the victims, Catch and Kill looks more deeply at the people and power structures conspiring to cover it all up for so long, by means of lies, intimidation, pay-offs and harassment of a different kind. A harrowing account that reads like a thriller.
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  • Sharon Hackl
    January 1, 1970
    Riveting and, hopefully, game-changing bookHonest, factual account of not just Harvey Weinstein’s predation and abuse of power, but of the systemic abuse and self-interest that pervades institutions great and small allowing predators to thrive. I have profound respect and gratitude for the women who were victimized and terrorized but still bravely came forward in hopes of helping others. I applaud Ronan Farrow and like-minded journalists who fight for the unbiased, unvarnished truth despite Riveting and, hopefully, game-changing bookHonest, factual account of not just Harvey Weinstein’s predation and abuse of power, but of the systemic abuse and self-interest that pervades institutions great and small allowing predators to thrive. I have profound respect and gratitude for the women who were victimized and terrorized but still bravely came forward in hopes of helping others. I applaud Ronan Farrow and like-minded journalists who fight for the unbiased, unvarnished truth despite what it could cost them. I hope this will continue to shift the culture and not get lost in the next news cycle.
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  • Lauraadriana
    January 1, 1970
    This book was...A JOURNEY. And cemented what I went in already knowing...Unbridled and unchecked power can become a monstrous thing. Ronan Farrow could possibly be the one person in the world who could've broken the Weinstein story. Privilege, brilliant, integrity and a serious drive to bring out the truth about predators and how our culture doesn't believe survivors...and yet he almost couldn't do it. This books is as enraging as it is enthralling. I could not stop reading...I wonder if he re-r This book was...A JOURNEY. And cemented what I went in already knowing...Unbridled and unchecked power can become a monstrous thing. Ronan Farrow could possibly be the one person in the world who could've broken the Weinstein story. Privilege, brilliant, integrity and a serious drive to bring out the truth about predators and how our culture doesn't believe survivors...and yet he almost couldn't do it. This books is as enraging as it is enthralling. I could not stop reading...I wonder if he re-read all of Raymond Chandler's body of work preparing to write this, because it has a very hard boiled feel to it.
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  • Anamarija Jagusch
    January 1, 1970
    You might think you know all there's to know about the sexual crimes of powerful men, but you don't. Farrow goes into details of the conspiracy to cover-up the crimes, silence the victims or anyone trying to uncover the facts. The book reads like a spy thriller; I often would forget I'm reading a non-fiction book. Farrow's story will leave you shocked, disgusted, and outraged.Besides giving the victims a fair coverage, he brings his personal life into the story. He's writing about th You might think you know all there's to know about the sexual crimes of powerful men, but you don't. Farrow goes into details of the conspiracy to cover-up the crimes, silence the victims or anyone trying to uncover the facts. The book reads like a spy thriller; I often would forget I'm reading a non-fiction book. Farrow's story will leave you shocked, disgusted, and outraged.Besides giving the victims a fair coverage, he brings his personal life into the story. He's writing about the effort to keep him silent during the process of investigating and writing this book, his family scandals, as well as his relationship with Jon Lovett, the Crooked Media co-founder. It's been a long time since I finished a book within 24 hours, but I couldn't leave Catch and Kill alone until I was done. It's not a surprise that Farrow is an outstanding investigative journalist and writer, but Catch and Kill is his best work yet.
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  • Jasmina
    January 1, 1970
    not to sound too psycho, but I LOVE RONAN FARROW. and everything be writes. what a smart articulate and brave man. the book feel like a very good detective novel but is both more interesting - and chilling - for not being fiction. certain passages depicting the ways different women were abused and violated are awfully hard to read, so headsup, but Ronan never goes into more detail than is necessary or is vulgar. bonus pts for pundit cameo and for lovett!!! just!!! ah. tl;dr READ THIS BOOK IT IS not to sound too psycho, but I LOVE RONAN FARROW. and everything be writes. what a smart articulate and brave man. the book feel like a very good detective novel but is both more interesting - and chilling - for not being fiction. certain passages depicting the ways different women were abused and violated are awfully hard to read, so headsup, but Ronan never goes into more detail than is necessary or is vulgar. bonus pts for pundit cameo and for lovett!!! just!!! ah. tl;dr READ THIS BOOK IT IS GREAT AND IMPORTANT.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must read book. This is a non fiction account of Ronan Farrow’s reporting on his Pulitzer Prize winning Harvey Weinstein story. But this book reads more like a fiction book. It’s full of spies, document destroying, being followed, and really, really bad people. It’s about people who bow to pressure from more powerful people and forget their ethical duty. It’s about how difficult it can be to report on a story this explosive. And it’s about telling the stories of women who had horrific This is a must read book. This is a non fiction account of Ronan Farrow’s reporting on his Pulitzer Prize winning Harvey Weinstein story. But this book reads more like a fiction book. It’s full of spies, document destroying, being followed, and really, really bad people. It’s about people who bow to pressure from more powerful people and forget their ethical duty. It’s about how difficult it can be to report on a story this explosive. And it’s about telling the stories of women who had horrific things done to them. It’s also a story of a reporter whose work makes him look at events in his own life that maybe he didn’t handle as well as he should have. And it’s a love story about a couple that goes through the terrible stress of this reporting effort and comes out in the end stronger than ever. This is my #1 read of 2019. I highly recommend the audiobook.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    A good compilation of Ronan Farrow's incredible reporting job for the last several years. Most of it was reported at the time, though, or at least discussed extensively in the media tour for this book. That doesn't make the book bad, or not worth reading, but I almost felt like I'd already read it. I'm happy to support his work by buying the book, but...I preferred the interviews.On a minor note, he reads his own book on audio and the voice he does for women drove me insane. I felt d A good compilation of Ronan Farrow's incredible reporting job for the last several years. Most of it was reported at the time, though, or at least discussed extensively in the media tour for this book. That doesn't make the book bad, or not worth reading, but I almost felt like I'd already read it. I'm happy to support his work by buying the book, but...I preferred the interviews.On a minor note, he reads his own book on audio and the voice he does for women drove me insane. I felt demeaned by it, honestly, in a book that's supposed to be championing women.
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely stunning. Required reading. Still trying to catch my breath. My heart breaks for all the victims given voice in this book. It breaks twice as hard for all those whose voices have been silenced, and those who are still trying to find theirs. Evil exists in this world. Boy does it. It’s our duty to not be blind to it when it appears. And not to ignore it when it very clearly announces itself. Thank you, Ronan. And thank you to everyone risking their lives (figuratively and literally) to Absolutely stunning. Required reading. Still trying to catch my breath. My heart breaks for all the victims given voice in this book. It breaks twice as hard for all those whose voices have been silenced, and those who are still trying to find theirs. Evil exists in this world. Boy does it. It’s our duty to not be blind to it when it appears. And not to ignore it when it very clearly announces itself. Thank you, Ronan. And thank you to everyone risking their lives (figuratively and literally) to make this world a better place for my daughter and for all of us.
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  • Katie Burke
    January 1, 1970
    This is absolutely about sexual harrassment, #MeToo, and power and the workplace, but it's also about the crazy role that media coverups have played in silencing these investigations for years. Frankly, NBC comes across as the biggest villain in the entire story, but the stories of lawyers behaving badly, covert ops following around journalists, and overall bad behavior is stunning and worth the read.
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  • Sarah/DragonflyReads
    January 1, 1970
    "In the end, the courage of women can't be stamped out. And the stories, the big ones, the true ones, can be caught, but never killed.: Catch and Kill is riveting and captivating and so disheartening.
  • Jordana Horn Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    Can this be a movie please????
  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    Just read it
  • Jai
    January 1, 1970
    harrowing & compellingly told. (content warning for sexual assault & stalking) negative audiobook points for Farrow trying to do accents - his own narration style is personable, and the attempt to do the voices cheapens the telling.
  • Amanda Blocker
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh this was such a devastating read, yet so well done. The layers of corruption are appalling, but there are glimpses of hope.
  • Peg Harrington
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Just. Wow.
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