November Volume I
In this new sequence of three graphic novellas by MATT FRACTION and ELSA CHARRETIER with colors by MATT HOLLINGSWORTH and exquisitely-crafted lettering by cartoonist KURT ANKENY, NOVEMBER follows the lives of three women intersecting in a dark criminal underground. As fire and violence tears through their city on a single day and night, they discover their lives are bound together by a mysterious man that seems to be the cause of it all.One night. One city. Three women. NOVEMBER.

November Volume I Details

TitleNovember Volume I
Author
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534313545
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Mystery, Crime, Fiction

November Volume I Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I was so disappointed in this. I typically love Fraction's writing but this was incomprehensible. Each issue switches to a different character that doesn't fit together until almost the end of the arc. The storytelling is disjointed and confusing. The cover blurb makes note of the groundbreaking lettering. I found this to be some of the worst lettering I've seen in a comic. Cursive in comics is always problematic and this was the case here. I couldn't read half of it. The art was very sketchy, I was so disappointed in this. I typically love Fraction's writing but this was incomprehensible. Each issue switches to a different character that doesn't fit together until almost the end of the arc. The storytelling is disjointed and confusing. The cover blurb makes note of the groundbreaking lettering. I found this to be some of the worst lettering I've seen in a comic. Cursive in comics is always problematic and this was the case here. I couldn't read half of it. The art was very sketchy, often with too many panels. They were too tiny to portray the story. Even the coloring by Matt Hollingsworth felt off, giving everyone blue skin tones. To say I was disappointed in this is an understatement.Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic, exquisitely crafted, expertly told story. Fraction channels his best David Lynch here, with a dash of noir storytelling style of Frank Miller and Ed Brubaker. Elsa Charretier's artwork is perfect, and Matt Hollingsworth's colouring is as much part of the story here as Fraction's script or Charretier's art. Same goes for Kurt Ankeny's brilliant hand-written lettering, which almost tells an entire story of its own. November is the kind of book where the more you pay attention to the Fantastic, exquisitely crafted, expertly told story. Fraction channels his best David Lynch here, with a dash of noir storytelling style of Frank Miller and Ed Brubaker. Elsa Charretier's artwork is perfect, and Matt Hollingsworth's colouring is as much part of the story here as Fraction's script or Charretier's art. Same goes for Kurt Ankeny's brilliant hand-written lettering, which almost tells an entire story of its own. November is the kind of book where the more you pay attention to the details, the more it rewards you. I'll definitely be re-reading the entire thing once volumes 2 and 3 are out. Boy, am I glad Fraction is writing comics again, proving that he's still one of the absolute best writers in the business. This was a masterpiece, and surely one of the best comics of the year.
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  • Frances
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully weird little slices of grim life coming together to build the first part of a story.
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not positive I know what the hell is going on, but I'm here for it. Volume 2, please!
  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    My normal problem with Matt Fraction books is that they can be so preoccupied with the smart pitch, the cool ideas and the nice moments that they don't quite work as stories. Whereas with this one, I don't remotely get yet where it's aimed or what it's trying to do, but I'm intrigued. Elsa Charretier draws, and though I know her stuff primarily from odd superhero issues, and Matt Hollingsworth's colours from Anglophone comics, there's something about the work they're doing here (and Kurt My normal problem with Matt Fraction books is that they can be so preoccupied with the smart pitch, the cool ideas and the nice moments that they don't quite work as stories. Whereas with this one, I don't remotely get yet where it's aimed or what it's trying to do, but I'm intrigued. Elsa Charretier draws, and though I know her stuff primarily from odd superhero issues, and Matt Hollingsworth's colours from Anglophone comics, there's something about the work they're doing here (and Kurt Ankeny's freestyle lettering, and the book's in-between length, closer to a BD album than either a US single or trade) that give the whole thing more of a European comics feel. And the story plays into that, following women in enigmatic predicaments not entirely explicable by what we see or what they say. There's a grubby, almost modern city, and sudden outbursts of criminality, and mysterious transmissions, and I'd definitely read a second volume just in the hope of some hint as to why, but also because they do seem so rounded and alive.And yes, being me I'm obviously miffed that the expiry dates on Edelweiss ARCs mean I needed to read November before the end of October.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    This was really good. It was the general weirdness I expect from a Fraction story and the art from Charretier and Hollingsworth was gorgeous. I'll be interested to see if they release all three volumes in one hardcover when it's all said and done.
  • Tom Mooney
    January 1, 1970
    Not sure I have any idea what the hell was going on here. But I liked it.
  • Casey
    January 1, 1970
    I'm generally a huge fan of Matt Fraction's writing, but the style of weaving the story between characters and timelines just makes this a confusing as hell, frustrating read. Maybe when all three volumes are published it will be a worthwhile read, but after finishing this, I don't feel any anticipation for what comes next.
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  • Hannah (Words of Hannah Kay)
    January 1, 1970
    I first saw this 0n Edelweiss+ and it was the beauty of the cover that urged me to request it. However, I was majorly let down. I was confused half of the time and didn't know what was happening nor did I care for the characters. As for the art, I wasn't really fan of the style BUT I did like a the colour scheme that it was done in.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I think this is a situation where I'll enjoy the work as a complete whole much more than I will enjoy the individual pieces. There were some interesting ideas here, but it would be just as easy for them to end up being poorly resolved as it would for them to be genius and, unfortunately, this volume doesn't really work as a complete story on its own, at least not for me. It's intriguing, though, and I'll be very interested in how it plays out over the next two volumes.
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  • Harry Jahnke
    January 1, 1970
    Ahhh, I loved this, I want to read the second part right now. I loved the handwritten quality to the type. Usually I can't ever read that stuff when its in comics but this did it just right. Also did a really good job balancing all of the different story arcs without losing the plot. Very, very well done.
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  • Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.As a fan of Matt Fraction's work with Sex Criminals I looked forward to this work, and first impressions, it is considerably darker and less humorous. November Vol. 1 The Girl On the Roof, the first of three novellas is centered around the lives of three women as they intersect over the course of one night as they are entangled in the criminal underground of an unnamed city. During the night the city also suffers a series of I received a free copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.As a fan of Matt Fraction's work with Sex Criminals I looked forward to this work, and first impressions, it is considerably darker and less humorous. November Vol. 1 The Girl On the Roof, the first of three novellas is centered around the lives of three women as they intersect over the course of one night as they are entangled in the criminal underground of an unnamed city. During the night the city also suffers a series of explosions. This first issue has sections devoted to each of the women, Dee (the girl on the rooftop) a second, unnamed woman, and Kowalski an emergency center phone operator. We also learn about Mister Mann who connects to two of the women (so far?). Overall the series shows promise, but in its first section it is rather murky and may take re-reading or close reading. One would hope that as more of the series is released and less world building is needed more time will be devoted to these characters and the mystery of their connections.As with other works Fraction has been involved with, taking the time to look at the backgrounds or note what is written down can be rewarding. However, as nice as hand lettering can be, there were many sections that took some time to decipher. Spoilers and summaries of the sections below: The book is largely center on Dee. She lives for the night and the crossword puzzle. At the beginning she meets Mister Mann who hires her to read out codes found in a newspaper from a radio station placed on her roof, next to her bird coop. She takes the job and we see her struggling with the new found wealth and her addictions. She knows she will have to run or flee, but not when or why. We're introduced to the second women as she anonymously travels to the city picking up groceries for a friend. Near that friends building she discovers a gun in a puddle and calls the police. When they arrive she is kidnapped.The third and final woman we meet in this book is Kowalski who has a very long five shift work day. Her story intersects with the unnamed women as the one who receives the call. She also has some tensions with the officer (12-6) who is dispatched to handle to the puddle pistol. The next section details Mister Mann. He is a police officer who in part handles materials in the police impound lot and does not feel the need for the evidence to stay in the police's custody making off with anything he finds of interest. He also feels like he and his partner can take the law into their own hands as needed.
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  • Pop Bop
    January 1, 1970
    Well, MaybeThis is Volume 1 of a planned three volume set. It comprises three vignettes featuring three different characters, with a promise that over the course of the series the plot and the characters' connections will become clear.Sometimes with projects like this the art or the writing or the overall vibe is so compelling that you're willing to read through the fog while waiting for the promised payoff. Based on this volume I'm not at all sure this is such a project.The line work is sketchy Well, MaybeThis is Volume 1 of a planned three volume set. It comprises three vignettes featuring three different characters, with a promise that over the course of the series the plot and the characters' connections will become clear.Sometimes with projects like this the art or the writing or the overall vibe is so compelling that you're willing to read through the fog while waiting for the promised payoff. Based on this volume I'm not at all sure this is such a project.The line work is sketchy and minimalist. Character expressions often don't match the dialogue and action. It's frequently hard to tell the characters apart, even from panel to panel. Many scenes are randomly abstract. The idea seems to be to have the storytelling be especially and intentionally abstruse. Since the scenes are dark and heavily inked, with dull and brownish washes, this sense of hidden, or missing, meaning becomes a bit claustrophobic.There are a few fun bits of dialogue here and there, but that's like saying that a few of the pieces in an overly complex jigsaw puzzle are sort of pretty. It doesn't help that the "exquisitely-crafted" lettering is often so overdone that it's indecipherable. It's a distraction and overly clever to no good end.But still, we have been promised a compelling mystery and a satisfying reveal. I hope we get it.(Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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  • Mark Schlatter
    January 1, 1970
    A very noirish turn from Matt Fraction (whom I usually associate with a more humorous bent). There are several overlapping stories, all of which center on criminals and police and most of which appear to center on strange goings-on involving a red light, a daily cryptic clue in the newspaper, and sudden shocking explosions.The art by Elsa Charretier is top notch with small (almost claustrophobic) panels and linework that reminds me of Darwyn Cooke and David Mazzucchelli. You add to that an A very noirish turn from Matt Fraction (whom I usually associate with a more humorous bent). There are several overlapping stories, all of which center on criminals and police and most of which appear to center on strange goings-on involving a red light, a daily cryptic clue in the newspaper, and sudden shocking explosions.The art by Elsa Charretier is top notch with small (almost claustrophobic) panels and linework that reminds me of Darwyn Cooke and David Mazzucchelli. You add to that an effectively limited color palette from Matt Hollingsworth, and the resulting pages scream noir and menace and tension.However, I found the storytelling a bit too opaque at times. Fraction's narrative jumps around in time quite a bit, and I wasn't always clued in when it did. I think the volume deserves close readings and rereads, but I was frustrated at times trying to decipher who was saying what, which character was which, and why a character was appearing twice (answer: time jump). I will definitely pick up the next volume, but I am hoping for much more clarity when I do.
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  • stine
    January 1, 1970
    “I realized last night I could walk all day long in any direction and I’d still be here. Somewhere. In this here; in this now. No matter what. And so then, I asked myself, well, if this is all there is… is this the best I could do?” I didn't know what to expect when I first started this but what I know for sure is that I left it feeling exactly the same way I went into it: clueless. That's not to say it wasn't good, because it definitely was, but this first volume sets out to achieve what I “I realized last night I could walk all day long in any direction and I’d still be here. Somewhere. In this here; in this now. No matter what. And so then, I asked myself, well, if this is all there is… is this the best I could do?” I didn't know what to expect when I first started this but what I know for sure is that I left it feeling exactly the same way I went into it: clueless. That's not to say it wasn't good, because it definitely was, but this first volume sets out to achieve what I presume it's supposed to - introduce the characters, lay down the groundwork, and reveal just enough to leave you wanting more. Matt Fraction's writing is a standout as usual, and the art is gorgeous - I wholly appreciate the three main characters having separate color palettes for distinction. The handwritten feel of the lettering was a nice touch but the cursive in Kowalki's parts come off as intelligible at times. Overall, it was very intriguing and I look forward to reading the second volume.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    A little too weird for its own good, this comic tries hard to be distinctive and mysterious, but just ends up too obtuse. Take a girl tasked with reporting from a roof-top pigeon shack the results of a puzzle printed daily in the paper – she's told it's some kind of entry code. Take a woman seemingly kidnapped by the police when she just finds a pistol on the pavement. Take the call handler that second woman was in contact with. And add in a bloke, and you get nowhere fast to working out what A little too weird for its own good, this comic tries hard to be distinctive and mysterious, but just ends up too obtuse. Take a girl tasked with reporting from a roof-top pigeon shack the results of a puzzle printed daily in the paper – she's told it's some kind of entry code. Take a woman seemingly kidnapped by the police when she just finds a pistol on the pavement. Take the call handler that second woman was in contact with. And add in a bloke, and you get nowhere fast to working out what the heck is going on. Bad marks off for the "exquisitely crafted lettering" that's actually quite unreadable at times, and I didn't begin to like all the cut-away, wordless panels that allegedly add things but really only layer on the obscurities. Allegedly the opening of a trilogy, this is not one I'll rush back to. One and a half stars.
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  • Rian *fire and books*
    January 1, 1970
    This is definitely one of those situations where you want the whole series, and not just the first book. To start, this isn’t my favorite art style and the lettering is in cursive at some points, but it works. The storytelling is done pretty well where it alternates text and photo panels. I found this story intriguing and have suspicions about how these 3 ladies and all the different men connect. Unfortunately, I wasn’t given more than a bare hint to really formulate some cohesive guesses. I’ll This is definitely one of those situations where you want the whole series, and not just the first book. To start, this isn’t my favorite art style and the lettering is in cursive at some points, but it works. The storytelling is done pretty well where it alternates text and photo panels. I found this story intriguing and have suspicions about how these 3 ladies and all the different men connect. Unfortunately, I wasn’t given more than a bare hint to really formulate some cohesive guesses. I’ll look forward to the second and third book but I’m worried people won’t buy the first since this is a story told in 3 parts? Like this is good, please read it. Just don’t be surprised when you’re left wondering what happened and when book 2 will be out.Volume 1: 11/6/2019Volume 2: 3/11/2020
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  • -RadioactiveBookworm-
    January 1, 1970
    With a very interesting looking cover, this book doesn't really give any insight to what might be waiting for you on the inside. Following a girl named Dee, she has a bad hip and walks with a cane. One day, she's sitting in a booth in a local diner, and a man approaches her with a strange request. He wants to pay her $500 a day to do some kind of mysterious work, neither she or the man will get in trouble from it, it's a win-win.Check out my full review here! With a very interesting looking cover, this book doesn't really give any insight to what might be waiting for you on the inside. Following a girl named Dee, she has a bad hip and walks with a cane. One day, she's sitting in a booth in a local diner, and a man approaches her with a strange request. He wants to pay her $500 a day to do some kind of mysterious work, neither she or the man will get in trouble from it, it's a win-win.Check out my full review here!https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr...
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  • Danny Zang
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to need to reread this several times to get a better handle on the various plot threads but from my first read through this is just a stunning book. Fraction delivers a tightly paced noir feel with the story, but it's Elsa Charretier's gorgeous artwork and Matt Hollingsworth evocative color palette that truly makes this book worth reading. Kurt Ankeny's lettering style was very visually appealing, though I'm generally not a fan of using cursive too much.
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    November is a complex graphic novel that feels like Tarantino crossed with a noir. Vol 1 contains four interwoven tales filled with mystery, tension and plenty of questions. I fell in love with Matt Fraction's take on Marvel's Hawkeye and couldn't wait to read November. Now I eagerly await more of this tale with Vol 2!
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  • Adam Bender
    January 1, 1970
    A weird graphic novel with classic Matt Fraction wordsmithing. The art reminded me a little of the band Gorillaz in its edgy cartoonishness. Like a good episode of Twin Peaks, what's happening is not always clear, but the mystery is compelling enough to want to continue the story in the upcoming second volume.
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  • Lukas Holmes
    January 1, 1970
    I have no idea what is happening and I could not be happier.
  • justine
    January 1, 1970
    matt fraction never fails
  • Annamae
    January 1, 1970
    Love the experience, raw, and interesting use of color.
  • Hannah Collins
    January 1, 1970
    Seems interesting but was kind of hard to follow along. Lettering was hard to read at some parts.
  • Jesse Richards
    January 1, 1970
    Incomprehensible and depressing.
  • t.i.m
    January 1, 1970
    The lettering made it really tough to read. The story was confusing. Art was okay.
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not entirely sure what's going on here, but I'm interested enough to keep reading
  • Jason Ragle
    January 1, 1970
    So frustrating only having one of three parts to a story.
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