Turtle under Ice
A teen navigates questions of grief, identity, and guilt in the wake of her sister’s mysterious disappearance in this breathtaking novel-in-verse from the author of 500 Words or Less—perfect for fans of Elizabeth Acevedo.Rowena feels like her family is a frayed string of lights that someone needs to fix with electrical tape. After her mother died a few years ago, she and her sister, Ariana, drifted into their own corners of the world, each figuring out in their own separate ways how to exist in a world in which their mother is no longer alive.But then Ariana disappears under the cover of night in the middle of a snowstorm, leaving no trace or tracks. When Row wakes up to a world of snow and her sister’s empty bedroom, she is left to piece together the mystery behind where Ariana went and why, realizing along the way that she might be part of the reason Ariana is gone.Haunting and evocative—and told in dual perspectives—Turtle Under Ice examines two sisters frozen by grief as they search for a way to unthaw.

Turtle under Ice Details

TitleTurtle under Ice
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 11th, 2020
PublisherSimon Pulse
ISBN-139781534442955
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Poetry, Realistic Fiction, Fiction

Turtle under Ice Review

  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 Stars "We have the capacity to be cruel, if we let the pain consume us." This book tackles themes such as grief, identity and also the overcoming of grief after a tragedy. It also talks about siblings relationships and how sometimes it's difficult to understand the people who are the closest to you. I quite enjoyed this read, but I think that there were some unresolved issues that I would have liked to see more of.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) I finished Turtle Under Ice in a few hours. I couldn't stop reading. Sure it's in verse which certainly makes it easy. However, Turtle Under Ice is lyrical, poignant, and moving. This dual POV verse novel is stunning. It's a lyrical portrayal of grief, sisterhood, and moving on. Turtle Under Ice is obviously lyrical, but it's also haunting. Like the chilling breeze in a winter forest (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) I finished Turtle Under Ice in a few hours. I couldn't stop reading. Sure it's in verse which certainly makes it easy. However, Turtle Under Ice is lyrical, poignant, and moving. This dual POV verse novel is stunning. It's a lyrical portrayal of grief, sisterhood, and moving on. Turtle Under Ice is obviously lyrical, but it's also haunting. Like the chilling breeze in a winter forest blanketed in snow. There's beauty to its words, surrounded by a setting that is both gorgeous with a hint of something deeper. A stillness of the forest. I adored 500 Words Or Less and del Rosario maintains that same commitment to characters in Turtle Under Ice.And Turtle Under Ice is moving. Telling us a story about grief, Rowena and Ariana demonstrate the ways grief can push us away, further from ourselves. It changes the molecules of our body. We each process the piercing cold differently. How can we still be the same sisters we were before when we don't even know who we are anymore? I could deeply empathize with the ways the sisters drift away from each other in Turtle Under the Ice. It isn't a conscious departure. It's that steady drifting away of ice pulled away by different currents.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Sacha
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC! I’ll post a review shortly in advance of publication!***Updated on 3/2/20 in accordance with publication...3.75 starsThis is a moving verse novel written from the perspectives of two sisters, both of whom are dealing with the aftermath of their mother's death, father's remarriage, and another source of more recent familial loss. I wish I had gotten to know the characters a bit better, but I did enjoy learning about their relationship, their Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC! I’ll post a review shortly in advance of publication!***Updated on 3/2/20 in accordance with publication...3.75 starsThis is a moving verse novel written from the perspectives of two sisters, both of whom are dealing with the aftermath of their mother's death, father's remarriage, and another source of more recent familial loss. I wish I had gotten to know the characters a bit better, but I did enjoy learning about their relationship, their independent processing of their mother's death, and their evolving sense that there could be some kind of healing on the horizon. The final scene did a lot for me in ramping up the overall quality of the work. I love the symbolism, find it totally appropriate for the audience, and think this is a great representation of how grief comes in many forms. Overall, this is a pain-filled but hopeful work -
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Ariana has disappeared. Her sister Row is first to discover this, but she can’t find any clues as to where she might be. Told in two voices in verse, this is a heart-felt story about grief and the ways it can manifest and emerge so differently for everyone.When Row and Ariana’s stepmother loses her 12-week pregnancy, Ariana spirals into grief as the wounds of losing her mother six years prior -- and being the person with her as she died. Row, too, finds sadness welling up inside her again, but Ariana has disappeared. Her sister Row is first to discover this, but she can’t find any clues as to where she might be. Told in two voices in verse, this is a heart-felt story about grief and the ways it can manifest and emerge so differently for everyone.When Row and Ariana’s stepmother loses her 12-week pregnancy, Ariana spirals into grief as the wounds of losing her mother six years prior -- and being the person with her as she died. Row, too, finds sadness welling up inside her again, but she takes it out by turning deep into her love of soccer. For her, whenever she’s on the field, her mother is right there with her. With the help of her friend Kennedy, Row begins to look for her sister, and it’s here we see the wells of her sadness emerge, particularly as Kennedy gets overbearing in relation to why it was she didn’t know Row’s stepmother had been pregnant. Ariana’s voice is present in this story, though it’s told primarily through flashbacks. She’s hopped on a bus, and we know there’s a piece of artwork in her lap. A few stops in, a former best friend gets on the bus, and she begins to share the story of the dissolution of their once-close connection. Ariana wanted to be so mired in her grief she couldn’t understand that other people, including this friend named Alex, deal with their personal losses in different means. Row finds Ariana, and the end of the book is a beautiful reflection of friendship, sisterhood, and the ways that loss and sadness can tie and unite people, as much as hurt and divide them. Rosario nails grief so perfectly, offering up the ways we can be cruel and isolating toward others, as much as the ways we can seek the comfort of a loved one through the things we cherish. For Ariana, it turns out, art is therapeutic in a way that she never anticipated until Row shares how much pouring herself into soccer has meant her mother is with her always. The verse is well written and the story is tightly told over a period of less than a single day. But within that day, we see a large expanse of life for both Row and Ariana. Both are girls of color who are part Filipino, and their ethnicity is something that furthers the power of exploring grief here -- it’s not something palatable, clean, easy, and consumable like the white media and “research” suggests it should be.This one hit me in some tender places, as I deal with a big loss in my own life. I felt both girls’ pains deeply and saw their methods of working through it as part of my own, too. This is a quick read, but it is in no way a slight one.
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  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight .I confess that every time I see this cover, I canonly see that this girl is stabbing herself in the eye with ice. And then my mind goes to her stabbing herself with a turtle, and honestly none of this tells you anything about the book whatsoever, but I needed to get this off my chest and/or find someone to commiserate. What I Liked: Obviously family is ahuge focus of this book.It You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight .I confess that every time I see this cover, I can only see that this girl is stabbing herself in the eye with ice. And then my mind goes to her stabbing herself with a turtle, and honestly none of this tells you anything about the book whatsoever, but I needed to get this off my chest and/or find someone to commiserate. What I Liked: Obviously family is a huge focus of this book. It isn't either of the girls' only focus, mind, which it shouldn't be. But I think that especially considering the past circumstances of both young women, it was clear that family was their central focus. And the family was just so authentic. They loved each other so fiercely, but were having difficulty coming to terms individually with all the really crappy stuff they'd been dealt. Which is really fair, how many other families find themselves in similar situations, you know? They're all just doing the best they can, and life is just hard. The writing was positively gorgeous. I could absolutely feel the pain radiating from the pages. The author did an amazing job setting the tone for the story, and it was sad but with specks of hope dotted, which is kind of perfect, considering the subject matter. Packs a big emotional punch in a very quick story. I'd be lying through my teeth if I said I didn't love reading a super quick book from time to time. I do, I love it. This one somehow makes the reader feel all the emotions during a fairly short time period, which is impressive. What I Didn't: This may be a "me" thing, but I have a ton of trouble connecting to characters in verse novels. Seriously, is this just me? Like I said, the writing was lovely and emotionally provocative without a doubt. I just wanted to feel a little more immersed in the characters themselves, but maybe I need to just let go of that expectation in verse books? Bottom Line: It's got beautiful writing, and a sister duo who have gone through more than they should have had to. But they go on, as we must, and this story illustrates it brilliantly.
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  • Monica (Tomes Project)
    January 1, 1970
    dnf @ p. 45Sadly, this one really didn't work for me. The premise is very appealing to me, which is why I requested a review copy, it's exploring grief and guilt and the disappearance of our main character's sister. But, it's written in dual perspective and both perspectives are written in verse, and for me that was kind of the breaking point of this story for me. The stylistic differences between the two sisters was not significant enough for me to easily grasp onto which sister was dnf @ p. 45Sadly, this one really didn't work for me. The premise is very appealing to me, which is why I requested a review copy, it's exploring grief and guilt and the disappearance of our main character's sister. But, it's written in dual perspective and both perspectives are written in verse, and for me that was kind of the breaking point of this story for me. The stylistic differences between the two sisters was not significant enough for me to easily grasp onto which sister was experiencing which emotions. I would have much rather one perspective (probably Row's) in verse while Ariana's could have been in traditional prose. I think that would have been a very quick way to distinguish between characters and have a firmer grasp on the actual story.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 3.5 ⭐️
  • Amy Layton
    January 1, 1970
    This was a beautiful novel in verse, perfect for fans ofTwo Girls Staring at the Ceiling. Told through both Row and Ariana's perspectives, we are allowed to see the different ways in which these girls still grieve for their mother six years after her death, and grieve for the little half-sister that they never had the chance to meet. Over the span of just two days, Row's life seems to explode: she can't find anyone to play soccer with her (her only coping mechanism), her sister has gone missing, This was a beautiful novel in verse, perfect for fans of Two Girls Staring at the Ceiling.  Told through both Row and Ariana's perspectives, we are allowed to see the different ways in which these girls still grieve for their mother six years after her death, and grieve for the little half-sister that they never had the chance to meet.  Over the span of just two days, Row's life seems to explode: she can't find anyone to play soccer with her (her only coping mechanism), her sister has gone missing, she's the only one able to recognize what needs to be done in the house, and her best friend is upset with her.  Ariana's life seems to explode, too: she's failing a course which means she might not graduate, she cannot stop grieving, and she left in the middle of the night to attend an extra credit event and meets her ex-best-friend on the way there.  Both girls' grief catches up to them, and they must make the mature decision to stop being defined by it.  It's perfect for grown-up fans of Frozen, and great for those who find sisterly bonds the most important bond of all.  I loved the ways in which their grief manifests, how their coping mechanisms (or lack thereof) seem to manipulate their actions and the ways in which they interact with their others, and their family.  What I find really interesting, though, something that I just now realized, is the fact that so much attention is placed on their late mother, yet there are no real-time conversations with their father or stepmother; an interesting choice that is both subtle and nuanced.  It truly goes to show how important mothers are in terms of navigating young adulthood, and how important sisters are in attempting to support each other.Turtle Under Ice certainly hits the mark for representing long-lasting grief, and succeeds in its efforts to allow the space and time the girls need in order to process their feelings.A fantastic book, and one that I can't wait for our library to purchase when released!
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  • Taylor (TaysInfiniteThougts)
    January 1, 1970
    Arianna is failing school, and may not graduate. She hasn’t told anyone and she has one last chance to get some extra credit so she can graduate. She’s doesn’t want anyone to know that she hasn’t done anything since her mother died.Row is an amazing soccer player. It’s her escape of sorts. When Row wakes to find Arianna missing, she feels abandoned. She and Arianna were supposed to be there for each other, always.Lyrically written, Turtle Under Ice a story about two sisters who are still Arianna is failing school, and may not graduate. She hasn’t told anyone and she has one last chance to get some extra credit so she can graduate. She’s doesn’t want anyone to know that she hasn’t done anything since her mother died.Row is an amazing soccer player. It’s her escape of sorts. When Row wakes to find Arianna missing, she feels abandoned. She and Arianna were supposed to be there for each other, always.Lyrically written, Turtle Under Ice a story about two sisters who are still grieving their mother’s death many years later. Because the story is told from both sister’s point of view, you feel all of the grief, loss, and heaviness of it all. It didn’t take me long to read this book, which makes me both happy and sad. It makes me sad because the book was written so wonderfully that I felt like I was forming some kind of bond with the sisters. I’m happy because both girls realize that they don’t have to have their grief define them. Arianna is failing school, and may not graduate. She hasn’t told anyone and she has one last chance to get some extra credit so she can graduate. She’s doesn’t want anyone to know that she hasn’t done anything since her mother died.Row is an amazing soccer player. It’s her escape of sorts. When Row wakes to find Arianna missing, she feels abandoned. She and Arianna were supposed to be there for each other, always. I have never read a book written in verse like this and I can honestly say I was a little concerned I was going to have trouble with it. This book turned out to be so beautiful and I’m so glad that I read it. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves a good book about sisterhood and grief. Thank you, NetGalley and Simon Pulse for this arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    3’5 “The thing about death is that you can never fight it.Be it bacterial or viral,addiction or cancer, natural causes or accidents,something is destined to kill us.Because in the natural order of things, dying happens.”“But without the lights turned on,does anyone even noticethat we are broken?”“I’m just here. The product of a failed backstory.In German there is a word for experience, Erlebnis,which comes from the verb erleben,and translates as living through something.In English, we have no 3’5 “The thing about death is that you can never fight it.Be it bacterial or viral,addiction or cancer, natural causes or accidents,something is destined to kill us.Because in the natural order of things, dying happens.”“But without the lights turned on,does anyone even noticethat we are broken?”“I’m just here. The product of a failed backstory.In German there is a word for experience, Erlebnis,which comes from the verb erleben,and translates as living through something.In English, we have no succinct wordfor living through something.”“I could learn from the internet the differencebetween menstrual cups, tampons, and pads.I could learn from a Google search home remedieson how to relieve cramps, and my questions about sex?There were plenty of sources for that.But what the internet lacked were any real lessonson how to navigate this world as a young womanwho felt solely defined by her grief.”“This young woman is productivelyapplying a coping strategy to manageher feelings of sadness.”“Maybe hope is like a turtle under icebreathing through its shell,through its biochemistry, still alive.Maybe hope waits for spring to come, for the ice to thawfor the weight of the pond that encapsulates usto melt into nothing.But maybe we are not meant to wait for springtime.Maybe, instead, we are meantto break the iceand be free.”
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    /5 for this novel in verse!...Rowena and Ariana are sisters of Filipino heritage who are both deeply affected by the loss of their mother years ago and their stepmother’s recent miscarriage. The sisters are very different; Row is a talented soccer player with tons of friends and Ariana is quiet to the point of nearly being invisible and without hobbies or interests. One snowy morning, Row wakes to find her sister gone. Ariana has left their town on a bus to the city with an unknown destination ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this novel in verse!...Rowena and Ariana are sisters of Filipino heritage who are both deeply affected by the loss of their mother years ago and their stepmother’s recent miscarriage. The sisters are very different; Row is a talented soccer player with tons of friends and Ariana is quiet to the point of nearly being invisible and without hobbies or interests. One snowy morning, Row wakes to find her sister gone. Ariana has left their town on a bus to the city with an unknown destination in mind. ...Told in first person alternating free verse from each sister, the entire book takes place in one day. The girls’ grief is front and center almost as if it were a character in the book itself. While somewhat slow moving, the book is introspective on the nature of grief. The girls both speak in plain language making this novel in verse accessible for all readers. Recommended for all middle school and high school collections. ...#middleschoollibrarian #middleschoollibrary #library #librarian #futurereadylibs #iteachlibrary #bookstagrammer #bookstagram #librariesofinstagram #librariansofinstagram #librariesfollowlibraries #librarylife #librarianlife #schoollibrarian #middlegrade #middlegradebooks #iteach #librarylove #booksbooksbooks #amreading #bibliophile #schoollibrariansrock #bookreview #bookrecommendation #igreads #malibrary #msla #mediaspecialist
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  • Meliss
    January 1, 1970
    This is an emotional punch to the throat and I enjoyed every second of it. I love a goo sibling story, and it's an incredible look at how two people who experience the same loss can grieve so differently. Stunning verse.
  • Levi van Zyl
    January 1, 1970
    Turtle Under Ice is a book about grief, sisters, and healing. Six years ago, Ariana and Rowena lost their mother, and both girls are still reeling from the loss. When Ariana wakes up to a snowstorm to find her sister is gone, she wonders if she's part of the cause, and starts to answer questions that have been left for six years.HOLY. CRAP. This book was beautiful and poignant and so goddamn good! I was initially interested because the cover is gorgeous, but it also sounded like a mystery. It's Turtle Under Ice is a book about grief, sisters, and healing. Six years ago, Ariana and Rowena lost their mother, and both girls are still reeling from the loss. When Ariana wakes up to a snowstorm to find her sister is gone, she wonders if she's part of the cause, and starts to answer questions that have been left for six years.HOLY. CRAP. This book was beautiful and poignant and so goddamn good! I was initially interested because the cover is gorgeous, but it also sounded like a mystery. It's very much not a mystery, but an intense contemporary told in verse, a format I am a downright sucker for.The POVs are between Row, the sister who has coped by throwing herself into soccer and trying to block out the pain of her mother dying, and Ariana, the sister who doesn't know how to handle the grief that still consumes her. I really like that this book takes place six years after their mother's death instead of right after, because it explores the ongoing trauma of losing a parent or family member.At the beginning of the book, the sisters have grown apart, even though sisterhood is something they both cherish. Ariana and Row have roughly the same age gap as my sister and I, and I think that's why it hit so close to home. I could see so much of our relationship here that it made it an intensely personal read. Ariana and Row have different enough voices that it didn't feel like the same person with the POV switches, and the discussion of grief and how to heal, how sometimes the grief will never stop, is one that is important to discuss even years following a death, especially one as impactful as a mother's death. I absolutely loved this exploration, and the ending had me shedding a few tears.The only thing I didn't like was some of the pacing. At some places I thought the verses were a little stilted and slow, but it wasn't anything that disrupted my love of the characters. Both Row and Ariana are somewhat unlikeable, and for this purpose, for the purpose of them healing, I liked that. They're both angry girls who are sad and feel like maybe they will never be the same sisters they were before.And the emphasis that's made here is because they won't. They won't be the same sisters they were before their mom died, and it's okay not to be. Change happens, and sometimes it hurts and is hard and sharp, but it doesn't mean life gets to stop. The conversation of change and healing hit me hard and took my breath away.From cover to cover this book is a gorgeous story of love, sisterhood, trauma, and healing, and the way change will change us. It's absolutely beautiful and just the right side of heartbreaking.
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  • Cindy Tran
    January 1, 1970
    Juleah del Rosario takes the reader through the different but similar ways two sisters deal with the passing of their mother. Ariana struggles with trying to let go of her grief, becoming the perfect role model for her younger sister, and finding her own place in a world so seemingly disconnected from personal emotion. Row struggles to piece together her broken family, and to prove to herself that she's more than just a soccer player. Things I loved: - Characterization: They way in which both Juleah del Rosario takes the reader through the different but similar ways two sisters deal with the passing of their mother. Ariana struggles with trying to let go of her grief, becoming the perfect role model for her younger sister, and finding her own place in a world so seemingly disconnected from personal emotion. Row struggles to piece together her broken family, and to prove to herself that she's more than just a soccer player. Things I loved: - Characterization: They way in which both characters deal with grief are different, but also very similar. Their sadness is impalpable, and it is truly mesmerizing to sit back and let del Rosario pull you gently through their stages of growth. - Angst: Me being me, I loved the angst aspect of the story. Row and Ariana's narrative isn't just about grief and family. It's also about friendship and kindness and finding your place in the world. As a teenager myself, I found myself really relating to the contemplation of their futures. They are faced with incredible emotional difficulties that add to the depth of the story, such as how to be a good friend, how to move on from a seemingly defining moment in your life, how to forgive and move on, and finally, how to feel okay again. - Writing: The writing is simply stunning. There are so many lines I would have posted here already if it was legal (arc rules, hehe), but I hope you trust me when I say that some of del Rosario's writing had my heart literally panging in my chest. Her writing is the kind of beautiful that sends you down a twisting tunnel of pain, but not in a terrible "Why would you do this to me?!" way, but more like a comforting, "I know the pain hurts, but it's important to understand" way. Would I recommend this book? YES. It's a wonderful story, and regardless of whether or not you have experienced grief, I think this book teaches a lesson about finding the balance between remembering and moving on that really is quite beautiful.
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  • Megan Schmelzer
    January 1, 1970
    We all deal with grief and loss in different ways.Some of us become paralyzed in our lives. We are frozen and stuck. Life seems to move around us, yet we are lost without the one that is gone forever. Others of us move on. We find happiness again with someone new. They don't replace the person that we have lost, but they do help us put our brokenness back together again. The brokenness then eventually allows happiness to enter our lives once again.Then, there are those of us that bury ourselves We all deal with grief and loss in different ways.Some of us become paralyzed in our lives. We are frozen and stuck. Life seems to move around us, yet we are lost without the one that is gone forever. Others of us move on. We find happiness again with someone new. They don't replace the person that we have lost, but they do help us put our brokenness back together again. The brokenness then eventually allows happiness to enter our lives once again.Then, there are those of us that bury ourselves in our work. We focus on everything that must be accomplished, and we do not stop until that task is complete. If we move forward, the grief has to ease... someday...eventually.Turtle Under Ice, is a powerful novel in verse about a family deep in their grief. Two sisters, Ariana and Rowena, have lost their mother, and they have to rely on each other to get through the pain that now surrounds their lives. Bonded by their loss and love for one another, the two sisters help each other as the days after their mom's death seem to come cascading by. As their dad remarries and the years continue to pass, the sisters find that their relationship and lives have gone in completely different directions. Now, their dad and stepmom are struggling with their sudden miscarriage, Rowena has disappeared, and Ariana is left alone in the house that seems to have seen more than its fair share of grief. Turtle Under Ice will break your heart as you read through the struggles of Juleah del Rosario's characters. Grief does unremarkable things to people, and you never know how you are supposed to move on. Through the mesmerizing lyrics of this story, you will follow along on the girls' separate, but intertwined, journey to find themselves again.
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  • Michelle Kidwell
    January 1, 1970
    Turtle under Iceby Juleah del RosarioSimon and Schuster Children's PublishingSimon PulseTeens & YAPub Date 11 Feb 2020I am reviewing a copy of Turtle Under Ice through Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing and Netgalley:In this book a teen navigates between grief, identity, and guilt in the wake of her sisters mysterious disappearance in this breathtaking novel told in verse.Rowena feels as if her family is a frayed string of lights that someone needs to fix with electrical tape. She and Turtle under Iceby Juleah del RosarioSimon and Schuster Children's PublishingSimon PulseTeens & YAPub Date 11 Feb 2020I am reviewing a copy of Turtle Under Ice through Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing and Netgalley:In this book a teen navigates between grief, identity, and guilt in the wake of her sisters mysterious disappearance in this breathtaking novel told in verse.Rowena feels as if her family is a frayed string of lights that someone needs to fix with electrical tape. She and her sister Arianna drifted into their own corners of the world, each figuring out in their own separate ways how to exist in a world in which their mother is no longer alive.Arianna disappears in the cover of the night, in the middle of a snowstorm leaving not a trace, or a track. Row wakes up the following morning to a world of snow and her Father’s empty bedroom and her sisters empty bedroom, she must piece together where Arianna went and why she left, while coming to realize that she may be part of the reason Arianna is gone.Turtle Under Ice is a powerful novel, dealing with loss, grief, discovering one’s self, and is powerfully told in dual perspectives.I give Turtle Under Ice five out of five stars!
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  • John Clark
    January 1, 1970
    Grief following the death of a loved one is perhaps the most unpredictable emotion we experience. No two deaths affect us the same way and no one death affects two people equally. That's what this story is about, the way sisters deal with the death of their mother six years before. Rowena has dealt with it by putting all her effort into becoming the best soccer player possible. Her older sister, Ariana has checked out of life for the most part, paralyzed by overwhelming sadness. This story, in Grief following the death of a loved one is perhaps the most unpredictable emotion we experience. No two deaths affect us the same way and no one death affects two people equally. That's what this story is about, the way sisters deal with the death of their mother six years before. Rowena has dealt with it by putting all her effort into becoming the best soccer player possible. Her older sister, Ariana has checked out of life for the most part, paralyzed by overwhelming sadness. This story, in verse form, is mostly a look at two days in their life when Rowena fears that her sister has chosen to vanish. That's not true, but what unfolds, with flashbacks for both sisters, fills in the full story, reveals an added loss that also affects them in different ways, but leaves the reader feeling more hopeful for a better future for each of them.
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  • Kendra
    January 1, 1970
    Two high-school/college-age sisters negotiate their grief for their mother and their stepmother's miscarriage, in free verse. I'm sure some readers will feel sympathy for the narrators, but they remained too generic for me to invest in them or their emotions very much, and the ending is horribly trite. I do think the verse form is aa good one for the story being told. The production values are low: the font for the narrators' names and page numbers is dated and unneeded, as are the faux-stains Two high-school/college-age sisters negotiate their grief for their mother and their stepmother's miscarriage, in free verse. I'm sure some readers will feel sympathy for the narrators, but they remained too generic for me to invest in them or their emotions very much, and the ending is horribly trite. I do think the verse form is aa good one for the story being told. The production values are low: the font for the narrators' names and page numbers is dated and unneeded, as are the faux-stains on the corners of the pages.
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  • Isha Narang
    January 1, 1970
    This book was written in verse. While the story only takes place over a day, most of it is told in the girls' memories. I wish less of it had been done like that. At times it annoyed me that the author couldn't just get on with the story. The ending of the book was fantastic if not a little cheesy. The story is told in alternating points of view, but both girls tell their stories the same way making it hard to differentiate them sometimes. Rowena wakes up to find Ariana gone. Ariana marches out This book was written in verse. While the story only takes place over a day, most of it is told in the girls' memories. I wish less of it had been done like that. At times it annoyed me that the author couldn't just get on with the story. The ending of the book was fantastic if not a little cheesy. The story is told in alternating points of view, but both girls tell their stories the same way making it hard to differentiate them sometimes. Rowena wakes up to find Ariana gone. Ariana marches out into the snowstorm to get on a bus. The girls spend the day thinking about how they define themselves, their grief and their relationship.
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  • Naika
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsThis was harrowing. “Turtle under Ice” was beautifully written, though the ending was not what I thought the novel was building up to. Granted, I may have also misunderstood or misread the blurb, so I went into it with a different premise in mind. I enjoyed this far more than the author’s debut novel, however something felt missing or underdeveloped, hence not quite 4 stars.
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  • Great Books
    January 1, 1970
    Ariana and Rowena are sisters whose mother died when they were young. Now in their teens both are struggling to move on with their lives. Ariana takes off in the early morning in the midst of a blizzard. Rowena is frantic and doesn't know where her sister could be. Will they be able to find each other and themselves before it's too late?Reviewer 19
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  • Tedi
    January 1, 1970
    This is the beautiful story of two sisters as a crossroads with grief, and how it doesn’t completely go away no matter how much time has passed. It is the story of how they both learn to move forward with their grief and find each other again on the other side. Heartfelt, and raw, and stunning.
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  • Sarah Sammis
    January 1, 1970
    CCCC66 sibling uhoria off-road
  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Unrealistic that both sisters would have a realization about their mother’s death at the same time, but I love the ending.
  • Dawn Ferencz
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the way grief was expressed through quiet moments.
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Rowena and Ariana are very close sisters, and for years afterwards, they each harbor grief from their mother's death in their own different ways. When their stepmother has a miscarriage, these emotions flare back to life. While Rowena contemplates at home, Ariana is doing the same while she makes her way through endless snow to hang up a precious painting at an exhibit. Turtle Under Ice is quiet yet expressive, accurately portraying that there is no one way to live through loss, and that it's Rowena and Ariana are very close sisters, and for years afterwards, they each harbor grief from their mother's death in their own different ways. When their stepmother has a miscarriage, these emotions flare back to life. While Rowena contemplates at home, Ariana is doing the same while she makes her way through endless snow to hang up a precious painting at an exhibit. Turtle Under Ice is quiet yet expressive, accurately portraying that there is no one way to live through loss, and that it's alright to feel everything.
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  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 StarsSad to say but this book is not going to be memorable for me. It wasn’t terrible but it was great either...
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Edelweiss+ provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.I liked 500 Words or Less, so when I saw del Rosario had another verse novel coming out, I knew I would need to get it for my school library. This one is full of emotion and the verse is beautifully written.Ariana and Row lost their mom when they were younger, and both of them are still trying to navigate their grief. When tragedy hits their family a second time, Ariana disappears and Row is left trying to figure out why. Edelweiss+ provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.I liked 500 Words or Less, so when I saw del Rosario had another verse novel coming out, I knew I would need to get it for my school library. This one is full of emotion and the verse is beautifully written.Ariana and Row lost their mom when they were younger, and both of them are still trying to navigate their grief. When tragedy hits their family a second time, Ariana disappears and Row is left trying to figure out why.Told by both sisters in alternating narratives, this story is an honest look at grief and all the ways it changes your life. Sometimes it's ugly. Sometimes it's sometimes it's absurd. Sometimes it turns you into a person that others don't particularly like. But there's always hope, if you know where--and at whom--to look.
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    “I am a human with grief. We and everyone around us will someday die, and grief is all that remains in the aftermath.” A novel in verse told in the voices of two sisters trying to come to terms with the death of their mom and a miscarriage of a sister. Sad, raw emotion, beautifully told as each sister learns to navigate a loss that there are no lessons on how to live with sadness. A YA worth owning and sharing.
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