The Fall of Richard Nixon
The last year of the Nixon presidency was filled with power politics, legal jiu-jitsu and high-stakes showdowns, with head-shaking surprises every day. Tom Brokaw, the NBC News White House correspondent during the final year of Watergate, gives us a close-up, personal account of the players, the strategies, and the highs and lows of the scandal that brought down a president. Brokaw writes, “Even now, almost half a century later, I am astonished by what the country went through, and I wanted to share press stories from the inside looking out—what it was like to be on call 24/7, the twists and turns, the laughs and tensions during this historic time.”

The Fall of Richard Nixon Details

TitleThe Fall of Richard Nixon
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139781400069705
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Politics, Mystery, Crime, Presidents, Writing, Journalism

The Fall of Richard Nixon Review

  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    I don't read much about American politics in general, but I saw this pop up in my library app and gave it a shot. It didn't really give me any information that I didn't already know about. It just recounted Nixon's presidency. Pretty forgettable.
  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    "HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF!"As I sit here watching and listening to the Impeachment Hearings on Donald Trump I digress to this book I read last night.The similarities are striking. The media being the enemy. The cover ups. The lack of transparency. The lack of remorse for wrongdoings but rather being caught. The immediate campaign trail agenda with non stop political events while the televised live impeachment hearings are on going to appear busy and disinterested.Look- I married and happily "HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF!"As I sit here watching and listening to the Impeachment Hearings on Donald Trump I digress to this book I read last night.The similarities are striking. The media being the enemy. The cover ups. The lack of transparency. The lack of remorse for wrongdoings but rather being caught. The immediate campaign trail agenda with non stop political events while the televised live impeachment hearings are on going to appear busy and disinterested.Look- I married and happily divorced a malignant narcissist. I can tell you the enablers, the followers, the loyal harem, the flying monkeys, the loyalty dreamers are enough to make one go nuts.Why would anyone not wish to have the truth exposed?Why wouldn't Americans want to know the reality behind the blackmails, the threats, the intimidation, the corruption, the empty promises and broken dreams?Nobody is above the law!Not Nixon, Not Trump, Not Clinton!NOBODY!I highly recommend reading this as I for one couldn't wait to get cracking on it. Especially from a 'well respected' and knowledgeable reporter and journalist with years of professional knowledge and expertise.I have like many Americans watched the reports, read the reviews, checked the online stats of those opposed to DT and have found it all striking and disturbing.Whether you agree or disagree our democracy is in danger...Was there a quid pro quo?If you're wondering why all this is important you need not ask...Our country is under attack from those within it's own walls.How many more need to be indicted and charged criminally before the public gets it right? Are all these people wrong or is their one common denominator to address?Can this many be corrupt yet our own not be knowledgeable or a part of such actions?It'll be interesting in the coming months but this book was an eye opener in many ways not only with Nixon but the aftermath with Ford giving Nixon a Presidential Pardon.A must read!Providing excuses for such alleged illegal behaviors then and now is wrong and must end!For more information:http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-sh...
    more
  • Jill Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    Tom Brokaw’s new book, “The Fall of Richard Nixon”, is not a straight history of Nixon’s impeachment, but rather it’s collection of short chapters about Richard Nixon and the story around the Watergate scandal and Nixon’s subsequent resignation. Brokaw begins his book with a question posted at the Nixon Presidential Library, “Who was Richard Nixon?”. He attempts to answer that question, but fails in the end, because I doubt if anyone, even Nixon himself, could have answered correctly.Tom Brokaw’ Tom Brokaw’s new book, “The Fall of Richard Nixon”, is not a straight history of Nixon’s impeachment, but rather it’s collection of short chapters about Richard Nixon and the story around the Watergate scandal and Nixon’s subsequent resignation. Brokaw begins his book with a question posted at the Nixon Presidential Library, “Who was Richard Nixon?”. He attempts to answer that question, but fails in the end, because I doubt if anyone, even Nixon himself, could have answered correctly.Tom Brokaw’s broadcasting career began in the late 1960’s. TV and newspapers were the main way we got our news in those days before the internet. Brokaw fit in to the NBC news organization. He was a go-getter and became friends with many politicians in Washington DC when he was there to cover; I was left wondering about the cozy dinner parties he and his wife went to and if they interfered with how he reported the news. He knew most of the politicians and news makers who were involved in first the probe of the crime at the Watergate and then the attempt at impeachment of Richard Nixon.Most of those readers of Brokaw’s book lived through the Nixon presidency and the Watergate era. We remember the old and now dead figures so important 45 years ago. Some - a few - are still around and they pop up on the cable shows to talk about what they remember from their Watergate days and how it relates to the current administration and their problems. Don’t Jill Wine Banks and Liz Holtzman look good for their ages? And hasn’t John Dean aged divinely? (I wonder what happened to Mo Dean and if she’s still wearing her pearl ear studs).Tom Brokaw combines yesterday and today in his book. And somehow, the Watergate scandal was evocative of a more innocent time than we’re going through now. Brokaw’s writing has always had a tinge of looking backward to see more honest and simple times; to use as a guide for dealing with today’s society. That was clearly apparent to me when I read this book.
    more
  • Christopher Saunders
    January 1, 1970
    Quick and bland memoir of Brokaw's time covering the Nixon White House (very briefly - August 1973 through Nixon's resignation). There are some interesting anecdotes - Brokaw's revelation that Nixon asked him to serve as Press Secretary, a few playful sketches of other reporters and White House insiders - but it's mostly perfunctory and not particularly revealing. Mostly because Brokaw's role in the White House Press Corps was minor and he had only peripheral access to key events. Like a lot of Quick and bland memoir of Brokaw's time covering the Nixon White House (very briefly - August 1973 through Nixon's resignation). There are some interesting anecdotes - Brokaw's revelation that Nixon asked him to serve as Press Secretary, a few playful sketches of other reporters and White House insiders - but it's mostly perfunctory and not particularly revealing. Mostly because Brokaw's role in the White House Press Corps was minor and he had only peripheral access to key events. Like a lot of recent Watergate ephemera, it stresses the parallels with 2019's ongoing scandals which honestly seems to be the book's reason for existing. That, or Brokaw needed a quick buck.
    more
  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    Loved itTom Brokaw is a great storyteller. The Watergate story is one that has been told many times, but Tom’s easy style and view from inside the White House press corps is a refreshingly new take on it.
  • Jeff Swystun
    January 1, 1970
    Given current events, the publisher sped Brokaw's book to market. The result is a short work that fails to add anything substantively new beyond a first-hand account. The author was the White House correspondent for NBC News. At time of Watergate, he was in his early 30's.There are some interesting bits, “We did not feel forced … to react to every ‘omigod’ from the vast universe of social media — factual, mythical, malicious or fanciful. In contrast to President Trump, President Nixon was seldom Given current events, the publisher sped Brokaw's book to market. The result is a short work that fails to add anything substantively new beyond a first-hand account. The author was the White House correspondent for NBC News. At time of Watergate, he was in his early 30's.There are some interesting bits, “We did not feel forced … to react to every ‘omigod’ from the vast universe of social media — factual, mythical, malicious or fanciful. In contrast to President Trump, President Nixon was seldom seen and rarely heard,” he writes. That would have kept things infinitely clearer than the current president's pummelling and distorted broadcast mentality.Brokaw paints a very clubby and chummy Washington, official dinners and many dinner parties where folks of all different political stripes mixed and mingled. There is much less of that now, he contends, which promotes division. When the media heat turned up on Nixon, he lashed back, “I have never heard or seen such outrageous, vicious, distorted reporting in 27 years of public life,” Brokaw quotes the president and adds, “(Sound familiar?)”.One fact I did not know until reading this was that H.R. Haldeman once ran the L.A. office of the J. Walter Thompson, the ad agency. I worked on Madison Avenue and that seems surreal but no more surreal than today's events (just yesterday President Trumped tweeted a picture of his head on Sly Stallone's body). I can't imagine the sheer number of books that will come out following the Trump presidency. There are plenty of books on Watergate, I recommend reading a few before this one, as it does not provided the required tapestry.
    more
  • Joseph J.
    January 1, 1970
    This small but info-packed history/memoir really brought back my youth! I also learned some new tidbits-how Tom Brokaw may have missed a stay in jail as happened to so many at that time! This is also a flashback to a time when-despite Nixon' s supreme contempt of the press-journalists and politicians met for interviews and mingled socially, and when Dems and Republicans could come together, and politicians placed the Constitution and mere right and wrong above one political leader. There are This small but info-packed history/memoir really brought back my youth! I also learned some new tidbits-how Tom Brokaw may have missed a stay in jail as happened to so many at that time! This is also a flashback to a time when-despite Nixon' s supreme contempt of the press-journalists and politicians met for interviews and mingled socially, and when Dems and Republicans could come together, and politicians placed the Constitution and mere right and wrong above one political leader. There are lessons for and reflections upon the times today: Page 21 Brokaw writes of a White House (when it was) the day of the "deadly amateur" with "too much responsibility (given) to too many people with no experience." Small mindedness and a lack of respect for and knowledge of this country's history and the office of the Presidency. Reading this book and remembering Nixon and Haldeman and Agnew and Zeigler, war in the mid-east and long gas lines and worry that an un-hinged President under pressure might press the button, I never thought it could happen again-only much worse. In the closing pages, Brokaw shows Nixon's warm and human side. (A side note from one who holds the Random House umbrella as the gold standard: Tricia Nixon's husband is at once referred to as Eddy and pages later as Edward. Some editing consistency please!)
    more
  • Helga Cohen
    January 1, 1970
    The Fall of Richard Nixon by Tom Brokaw was not a straightforward history of Nixon’s impeachment but short chapters about Nixon and the Watergate scandal and his resignation. It was an overview on his remembrance as a young reporter in his early career.Some people who have reviewed it negatively should not look to this book for the history of Richard Nixon and a history during that time. There are many books written by historians who have written definitively about Nixon and Watergate and this The Fall of Richard Nixon by Tom Brokaw was not a straightforward history of Nixon’s impeachment but short chapters about Nixon and the Watergate scandal and his resignation. It was an overview on his remembrance as a young reporter in his early career.Some people who have reviewed it negatively should not look to this book for the history of Richard Nixon and a history during that time. There are many books written by historians who have written definitively about Nixon and Watergate and this whole time period. I found it a refreshing summary where Brokaw combines yesterday and today in a memoir. It is a guide to dealing with today’s society. In this book, he shows parallels of the despicable deeds that we see in our current president that is happening right now and what happened with Nixon.Brokaw stated in his acknowledgment that he was reluctant to write this book but was approached by his editor and Jon Meacham to revisit the final year of President Nixon through his experience as a White House correspondent. They persuaded him that the current political climate is a reminder that history provides context for large and small issues. I think he accomplished this with this book. I liked that it was in memoir form and a quick absorbing read.
    more
  • Meghan Lyons
    January 1, 1970
    Wanted to read this for a couple reasons: 1) in light of what’s going on at the Capitol currently 2) always wondered why Watergate happened since it was likely to be a landslide victory, anyway 3) grandma and aunt worked on the McGovern campaign, so personal interest with this particular presidential eraThe book started out slow with lots of repetition and foreshadowing, but built as the chapters went on. For someone who didn’t have much (if any) familiarity with the folks in the White House at Wanted to read this for a couple reasons: 1) in light of what’s going on at the Capitol currently 2) always wondered why Watergate happened since it was likely to be a landslide victory, anyway 3) grandma and aunt worked on the McGovern campaign, so personal interest with this particular presidential eraThe book started out slow with lots of repetition and foreshadowing, but built as the chapters went on. For someone who didn’t have much (if any) familiarity with the folks in the White House at the time, I got an decent education of the cast of characters, and I also learned about the additional critical activities involved, outside the raiding if the Democratic Party headquarters. Brokaw’s account of the period made the history more personal with all his stories and anecdotes. All in all, a quick read (one day) that fulfilled my objectives for reading this book.
    more
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this book an extra star because, as a former journalist myself, it was mildly interesting to read about the experiences of someone who was covering Watergate at the time it was actually unfolding.However, Brokaw doesn’t give any insights into Watergate or President Nixon that haven’t already been made many times before. He also doesn’t draw any direct parallels between Nixon and the current impeachment controversy that’s going on in the present administration, even though I’m assuming I gave this book an extra star because, as a former journalist myself, it was mildly interesting to read about the experiences of someone who was covering Watergate at the time it was actually unfolding.However, Brokaw doesn’t give any insights into Watergate or President Nixon that haven’t already been made many times before. He also doesn’t draw any direct parallels between Nixon and the current impeachment controversy that’s going on in the present administration, even though I’m assuming that’s what prompted him to write this book in the first place.In fact, this book reads more like a memoir of Brokaw himself, with a lot of reminiscing about what he was doing at the time and a lot of name-dropping of all of the famous people he knows.A quick but forgettable read.
    more
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    A very thin book in both content and length. For substance, you'd be better off reading Woodward and Bernstein's "The Final Days" and/or Jonathan Aitken's "Nixon: A Life", both of which are referenced and quoted often in this book. From a historical perspective, there's not much here that hasn't been told often or better before. However, if you're interested in what it would be like to have cocktails with Tom Brokaw, pour your self a few fingers and read this book. The anecdotes about Washington A very thin book in both content and length. For substance, you'd be better off reading Woodward and Bernstein's "The Final Days" and/or Jonathan Aitken's "Nixon: A Life", both of which are referenced and quoted often in this book. From a historical perspective, there's not much here that hasn't been told often or better before. However, if you're interested in what it would be like to have cocktails with Tom Brokaw, pour your self a few fingers and read this book. The anecdotes about Washington and California are worth the price of admission.
    more
  • Howard Christie
    January 1, 1970
    While this does review the years around Richard Nixon, it feels like any of us could have written it with a quick Google search. Not much in depth here. No particular insights from 40+ years away. It feels like a quick money grab to capitalize on today’s events. Brokaw also frequently adds little bits about people he knew or lived near or had dinner with, but none of these add weight or substance to the story. If you want to quickly review the end of Nixon this is a reasonable primer but that’s While this does review the years around Richard Nixon, it feels like any of us could have written it with a quick Google search. Not much in depth here. No particular insights from 40+ years away. It feels like a quick money grab to capitalize on today’s events. Brokaw also frequently adds little bits about people he knew or lived near or had dinner with, but none of these add weight or substance to the story. If you want to quickly review the end of Nixon this is a reasonable primer but that’s it.
    more
  • Roger Smitter
    January 1, 1970
    Tom Brokow still has the skill of any successful TV journalist. In just a few pages, he tells how Presdient Richard Nixon became the first American president to leave the White House. There';s not much depth. Why would we expect that from TV news. But, those of us who remember that time, the book brings back lots of memories. The book is not about politics. It is about how the powerful can be taken down. Some readers will say the book has little depth. But maybe it's useful to provide a story Tom Brokow still has the skill of any successful TV journalist. In just a few pages, he tells how Presdient Richard Nixon became the first American president to leave the White House. There';s not much depth. Why would we expect that from TV news. But, those of us who remember that time, the book brings back lots of memories. The book is not about politics. It is about how the powerful can be taken down. Some readers will say the book has little depth. But maybe it's useful to provide a story line that demonstrated the power not of people but of the laws.
    more
  • John Deardurff
    January 1, 1970
    Only about 25% of this book deals with the Impeachment of Richard Nixon. It is really anecdotal reflections of when Tom Brokaw was a White House correspondent (1973-1976) that coincided with the Watergate years. I did enjoy the book as a light airport read but took a star away for the click-bait title. Mr. Brokaw also does a fair amount of name dropping and humble-bragging which also takes away from the historical perspective of the times.
    more
  • Phil
    January 1, 1970
    I would describe this as 'Watergate Lite'. A cursory overview of the Watergate affair. There are many other and better detailed works. My personal favorite retrospective is Bob Woodward's 'Last Of The President's Men' (2016).But to Brokaw's credit he lays out enough to draw parallels to the times we are now witnessing: the attacks on the press, the 'partial' transcript release that Nixon thought would suffice, the stages of defense, to the final days.
    more
  • Andrew &
    January 1, 1970
    A newsman recalls a helluva storyNostalgic for a bad age of leadership and a great age of journalism? Tom Brokaw's account takes you right back there. Very readable prose - I read it in one sitting. The young NBC correspondent was more observer than a news breaker but in this perspective he evokes the sophisticated fever of DC and the weirdness of Nixon very well. There is plenty of plus ca change in the book too.
    more
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    This is a view of Watergate from the press corps. It is not a deep look at the investigation and how Nixon dealt with it rather what Tom Brokaw saw. But I guess that is what he intended since he is a reporter. Four stars because I truly love Tom Brokaw and remember him fondly from the NBC news desk.
    more
  • William
    January 1, 1970
    I think it's worth a look if you were are interested in what was happening to reporters as they were covering Watergate. There are obviously more thorough records of the scandal, and it's clear Brokaw thought this book would be timely because of the Trump impeachment. I would have liked a larger picture of Washington at that time, but that's just me.
    more
  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    To be fair, Brokaw doesn't suggest he is offering any great insights to the Fall of Richard Nixon and is more about his time as a White House correspondent during the dying days of the administration. 'The Final Days' by Woodward and Bernstein - often referenced in Brokaw's book - is a much better record of the period, but for a Nixon junkie, it's still an enjoyable read.
    more
  • Emily Fritz
    January 1, 1970
    A nicely written concise account of Nixon’s downfall. My one criticism is the mentions of Trump in a few places. I’m not a fan either, but we are all aware of his shortcomings. I wanted to read a book on Nixon, not a book on Nixon with a side of criticizing Trump. Still, it was an interesting read by an insider.
    more
  • Jeff J.
    January 1, 1970
    Not much new here. The book does serve as a reminder that Watergate wasn’t the first time that Democrats weaponized impeachment in an effort to overturn an election, nor would it be the last time, and in each case their coup attempts backfired on them. It was interesting to relive a time when television cameras weren’t allowed in White House press briefings.
    more
  • Csparrenberger
    January 1, 1970
    I was in college when the Watergate break-in occurred. I followed it with interest then and over the years I have read many books about it. This book includes nothing new except for the relationship of the press corps and the camaraderie of the press corps which I found interesting. Therefore, a lukewarm recommendation.
    more
  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    Good review of our past. Definite parallels to the present day political environment.Enjoyed Mr. Brokaw's insights. The anecdotes and personal experiences provided much to a subject that I personally followed as a young student.
  • Joann Amidon
    January 1, 1970
    This was a perfect opportunity for Brokaw, with all his experience and knowledge, to offer encouragement for current times. Instead, he chose to write an autobiography.
  • Murray Heltzer
    January 1, 1970
    Quick read. Easy refresher of history that I am old enough to remember
  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Nice easy read hitting the highlights of Watergate and the tension of the country.
  • Yosef Shapiro
    January 1, 1970
    Tom Brokaw reflects on his early days as a reporter during Watergate. Many of the things that happened then are being repeated now wit the current impeachment inquiry.
  • Michelle Miller
    January 1, 1970
    A fascinating history and a look at the present.Written by a great reporter who was in the action in real time. His comparison with Mr. Trump is astonishing. A great read!
  • Gary Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Timely.
  • Sandi
    January 1, 1970
    This was a story of the country fall from grace of Richard Nixon it was a quite memory of tom Brokaw
Write a review