Parachutes
Speak enters the world of Gossip Girl in this modern immigrant story from New York Times bestselling author Kelly Yang about two girls navigating wealth, power, friendship, and trauma.They’re called parachutes: teenagers dropped off to live in private homes and study in the US while their wealthy parents remain in Asia. Claire Wang never thought she’d be one of them, until her parents pluck her from her privileged life in Shanghai and enroll her at a high school in California. Suddenly she finds herself living in a stranger’s house, with no one to tell her what to do for the first time in her life. She soon embraces her newfound freedom, especially when the hottest and most eligible parachute, Jay, asks her out.Dani De La Cruz, Claire’s new host sister, couldn’t be less thrilled that her mom rented out a room to Claire. An academic and debate-team star, Dani is determined to earn her way into Yale, even if it means competing with privileged kids who are buying their way to the top. When her debate coach starts working with her privately, Dani’s game plan veers unexpectedly off course.Desperately trying to avoid each other under the same roof, Dani and Claire find themselves on a collision course, intertwining in deeper and more complicated ways, as they grapple with life-altering experiences. Award-winning author Kelly Yang weaves together an unforgettable modern immigrant story about love, trauma, family, corruption, and the power of speaking out.

Parachutes Details

TitleParachutes
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2020
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062941138
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction, Realistic Fiction, Young Adult Contemporary

Parachutes Review

  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I wondered how the pitch "Speak meets Gossip Girl" would work but indeed, that's a great meets pitch. Dani is a poor girl, living with her mom in East Covina, California, where she works as a cleaner for a company that contracts with many of her wealthy classmates' families. Her school is known for hosting "parachutes," or Chinese students sent by their wealthy families to America to get an edge in their education. There's money to be had in hosting these students, so Dani's mother decides to ho I wondered how the pitch "Speak meets Gossip Girl" would work but indeed, that's a great meets pitch. Dani is a poor girl, living with her mom in East Covina, California, where she works as a cleaner for a company that contracts with many of her wealthy classmates' families. Her school is known for hosting "parachutes," or Chinese students sent by their wealthy families to America to get an edge in their education. There's money to be had in hosting these students, so Dani's mother decides to host one in their home. Enter Claire, who comes from extreme wealth and privilege in Shanghai. She's not interested in going to school in America, but her parents give her no choice. When she arrives, she's quickly taken in by other Chinese students in the same position as her. She also finds herself falling for a boy named Jay, who is said to be tough to get with and who, she later discovers, has connections to the entire foreign exchange program. Their relationship is not good, nor is the fact Claire is beginning to fall for another boy named Zach...who happens to be Dani's crush, making what was a budding friendship between the two housemates more complicated.Dani is killer at speech and debate, but with so much going on in her life, it's getting a little harder to invest fully, despite her passion and the knowledge that it's her ticket to Yale. So when her coach offers private lessons, she's game. That is, until he begins making passes at her and ignores all of her pleas for him to stop.This is a book about how young women navigate the #metoo era, living with experiences that fill them with tremendous terror about speaking up and out. But what makes this book especially sing is the fact both characters are girls of color and come from very different social classes. Claire is Chinese, while Dani is Filipina. Claire has access to wealth and privilege. Dani has to keep secret that she has a job cleaning houses. These intersections matter, and yet, both girls experience sexual harassment and assault in very similar -- and different -- ways, which puts them in a place where they are no longer what their backgrounds are. They're victims. Smart, well-developed, and an essential book for YA readers.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/ 5 starsParachutes is a Young Adult book that I would describe as YA contemporary realistic fiction.The book follows two teenage girls. Claire is 17 and from Shanghai, China. She is rich and comes from a very privileged family. The second girl is Dani (17). She lives in East Covina, California with a single mom. She is on the debate team, she is a scholarship student, and after school she works as a maid. Both are 1st person POVs.These start out as two distinct stories. But then they overlap 4.5/ 5 starsParachutes is a Young Adult book that I would describe as YA contemporary realistic fiction.The book follows two teenage girls. Claire is 17 and from Shanghai, China. She is rich and comes from a very privileged family. The second girl is Dani (17). She lives in East Covina, California with a single mom. She is on the debate team, she is a scholarship student, and after school she works as a maid. Both are 1st person POVs.These start out as two distinct stories. But then they overlap a bit. I found this book to be very interesting. To be honest I didn't even know that parachuting was a thing. It involves privileged families from another country (in this case China) sending their kids to the US (alone) to study.This was a really powerful and important YA story. The book focuses on many issues that are relevant to high school and college-aged students today. There are warnings at the beginning of the book because two of the topics are sexual harassment and sexual assault. I maybe wouldn't recommend this book for a young teen. But this book is not graphic. And I think that this book tells two important stories.There is some romance in this book. But it is woven in between the more important issues that the author focuses on.I was invested in both girls' stories. I was fascinated by Dani and her debating team. And I was really interested in Claire and the fact that she was sent to the US alone to study.Also, it was very interesting to read the author's note and see how her own experiences mirrored some of what was in the story. This was such a moving and emotional story. I really enjoyed it.I really loved this book. My only issue was that the ending was too abrupt. I would have liked another chapter, some resolution or an epilogue. The story just needed more. I needed more.Thanks to edelweiss and Katherine Tegen Books for allowing me to read this book.
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  • ikram
    January 1, 1970
    full review can be found on my blog!Claire and Dani came from different backgrounds which caused them to become each other’s polar opposite. Since the very beginning, I just know Kelly Yang wouldn’t pull the queen bee & sidekick trope—and I’m grateful for it! Often, the queen bee & sidekick trope erases one character and makes them less meaningful. This is not the case of Claire and Dani, because they have their own story to tell and they’re equally important.Dani De La Cruz is a scholarship stu full review can be found on my blog!Claire and Dani came from different backgrounds which caused them to become each other’s polar opposite. Since the very beginning, I just know Kelly Yang wouldn’t pull the queen bee & sidekick trope—and I’m grateful for it! Often, the queen bee & sidekick trope erases one character and makes them less meaningful. This is not the case of Claire and Dani, because they have their own story to tell and they’re equally important.Dani De La Cruz is a scholarship student living with her mother in East Covina, California, where she is a part of her school’s debate team and has a big dream to be the first woman in her family to attend university. After school, she works as a maid for her wealthy classmates’ families. Dani is really impressive with her speech and debate, often getting praise from her coach. I adore Dani’s principle and ambition to get into Yale; to always try upholding justice.Claire Wang comes from a wealthy and privileged family in Shanghai, China. When she arrives as a new parachute in her school, Claire is instantly drawn into a “Crazy Rich Asians” crowd. Here, we get to explore Claire’s personality and character more. Despite the stereotype of rich people often buying their success rather than achieving it, Claire is working very hard to get a good grade. She is against cheating and corruption—even when her parents encourage her to do so.With the amount of issues Kelly Yang brought to her book, she’s done a great job for not making her readers feel like she shove everything down our throats. Let me tell you something; there are a lot of issues going on in Parachutes that I know high school and college aged readers can relate to. These issues, however, are often overlooked by adults because they normalize them and expect us to do the same—and they will be explored more below. But, before I start, I’m going to list the trigger warnings for Parachutes: rape, sexual harassment, pedophilia, racism and discrimination.17 May 2020: Kelly Yang, being amazing & brave author, singlehandedly raise awareness about issues adults in every country often ignore. It is hard to read this book, not gonna lie, but I want to personally thank Kelly Yang for using her voice to write this story. RTC!
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  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Raathi ChotaKelly Yang has taken a shot at a young adult novel and brought readers to tears in this gripping story involving wealth, immigrant, relationships, and trauma.Parachutes is a lengthy novel but it deals with many important topics faced in our society today, so it’s a breeze to read. For Yang’s first YA novel, it’s beautifully written. Readers are so invested in the story, we don’t realise until later that there’s only been one non-Asia Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Raathi ChotaKelly Yang has taken a shot at a young adult novel and brought readers to tears in this gripping story involving wealth, immigrant, relationships, and trauma.Parachutes is a lengthy novel but it deals with many important topics faced in our society today, so it’s a breeze to read. For Yang’s first YA novel, it’s beautifully written. Readers are so invested in the story, we don’t realise until later that there’s only been one non-Asian (major) character. That’s how Yang crafted the story so well. We’re driven by their experiences more than their appearances.The story begins with Claire’s luxurious life in Shanghai, China. Everything might seem perfect for the wealthy girl, but up close there’s pressure. It’s all about status and reputation teenagers are put on for the family. Claire understands this well, but still wants to speak her mind. She wants to be different! She wants to break the system of pleasing adults and going with what her gut is feeling. It’s not possible in China. Too much at risk. It’s admirable to read the pros and cons to being wealthy. Thinking it’s all good but people on the outside don’t realise how pressurising and fake it can all be.The only way Claire can have a normal life is moving to America. Still, there’s pressure since stereotypes of America are brought in and who Claire might become. That’s where we’re brought into Dani’s life. The total opposite from Claire. They’re both smart but have totally different personalities and way of living.Dani has dreams and aspirations. She wants to get into Yale with her top grades and credit of being on the debate team. She also works hard outside of school. She’s a maid along with her mother and best friend, Ming. She lives in a small villa with her mother, with no complaints until Claire arrives and Dani’s mother hosts her.Two girls under the same roof are bound to stir up trouble. Claire finds her parachutes of popular girls while Dani keeps her distance. Everything Claire does, Dani finds fault with it. It’s understandable when someone invades your home and has high expectations. It doesn’t help that Dani’s mother treats Claire like royalty.Yet Dani has bigger things at hand. Her debate teacher favourites her with a nickname and soon offers her private coaching. All seems well in Dani’s eyes until he gets too friendly. Shocked by someone she thought she could trust, Dani doesn’t know what to do. It affects her more than she realises. When she calls him out on it through email, things only get worse since he plays the victim. Torn between whether to speak up with her debate senses kicking in or brush it off, Dani doesn’t know who to turn to for guidance.Claire’s life begins to crumble when she learns the difficulties of her parents relationship. It doesn’t help when her father blinds her with money. She doesn’t take anymore of it and finds solitude with Jay. Another wealthy kid who seems too perfect. When Claire and Jay date, things are okay at the start but Jay becomes suspicious throughout the story.What once were Dani’s and Claire’s perfect lives, begins to crumble around them—they only have the voice of themselves to make things right. What made this book more realistic to today’s society was that when they did speak up about harassment, no one listened or believed them. I don’t want to give too much away since I highly recommend this book! At times Dani and Claire did or reacted to things in the way that wasn’t favourable, but them coming together in the end and finally finding something they share—that they can both fight for, is empowering.The ending to Parachutes doesn’t give much closure but that’s what makes it even more realistic! So many cases of sexual harassment and assault today are still left unanswered, opened while the victims are left to fend for themselves. At least they have people around them supporting them. In other sub-plots, Claire’s parents are more understanding to what she wants and who she is. Dani finally finds her debating voice to speak on a matter that she can relate to the most. Her speech wasn’t based off facts, rather experience. That’s what made it so moving. It’s that moment in the book readers waited for. It’s that moment where Claire begins to realise she isn’t alone and that she isn’t as different to Dani at all. They didn’t bond well throughout the book but in the end, when they came together and spoke up, that was enough closure for readers.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    the Kelly Yang train is pulling into YA station next year and we are NOT READY
  • Sana
    January 1, 1970
    Oooh, this is gonna involve #MeToo so I'm definitely here for it Oooh, this is gonna involve #MeToo so I'm definitely here for it
  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    Kelly Yang is a masterful storyteller. I already knew that from reading "Front Desk," but this time the content is most definitely PG-13. Despite covering some very weighty issues including racism, sexual assault, harassment, and class discrimination; there is an underlying "Crazy Rich Asians" vibe that adds to the readability. Told from the perspective of a "parachute" named Claire and Dani, daughter of a Filipino immigrant; the narrative takes some unexpected twists and turns to uncover hypocr Kelly Yang is a masterful storyteller. I already knew that from reading "Front Desk," but this time the content is most definitely PG-13. Despite covering some very weighty issues including racism, sexual assault, harassment, and class discrimination; there is an underlying "Crazy Rich Asians" vibe that adds to the readability. Told from the perspective of a "parachute" named Claire and Dani, daughter of a Filipino immigrant; the narrative takes some unexpected twists and turns to uncover hypocrisy and the roots of systemic injustice. I was disappointed at the lack of redeemable male characters, but decided that might add a "White Knight" trope that would detract from Yang's vision. I predict this will be an award winner for Yang just as "Front Desk" has been. She writes stories that contain her own struggles in a way that draws us into her world and gives us new understanding.Thank you to Katherine Tegen Books and Edelweiss for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • faith ✨
    January 1, 1970
    this book walked so anna k could run this book walked so anna k could run
  • Isabelle | Nine Tale Vixen
    January 1, 1970
    >> Buddy read with Soph! >> Buddy read with Soph!
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: Sexual harassent, rape, racismParachutes is a book about opposite worlds. Two girls who are so alike, but couldn't have grown up more different, struggling with trying to figure out who they are, their family situation, and love. They are asked how much they are willing to pay for freedom. For the life that they want. It's a book that tackles issues of racism, sexual assault, spe (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: Sexual harassent, rape, racismParachutes is a book about opposite worlds. Two girls who are so alike, but couldn't have grown up more different, struggling with trying to figure out who they are, their family situation, and love. They are asked how much they are willing to pay for freedom. For the life that they want. It's a book that tackles issues of racism, sexual assault, speaking up, and a culture that tries to silence girls. All while being inextricably linked with privilege, money, and corruption.Yang allows both Claire, a rich parachute from Shanghai, and Dani, a poor Fillipino girl struggling with her future, to be complex, flawed, and human. While Parachutes has plenty of action, it is propelled by its characters. Whether that be Claire's struggle with her family pressure, Dani's confrontation with corruption, or even Ming, a lesbian scholarship student from China. Parachutes is complex, tackling issues of racism and the dangers that these girls face on all avenues. While I am not an ownvoices reader for these identities, I could deeply identify with Dani's principles when confronted with corruption, as well as the challenges Claire faces from both her fellow Asians in the US and the non-POC characters - not being accepted by either.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Tilly
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsTW: Rape, sexual assault, bad parenting, drugs and alcohol abuse, bullying and racism.I started reading Parachutes with no expectations and found I could not put it down. I read it in a day and that shows how important this book is.I firstly want to say well done to the fact that even in my ARC copy, before I got to the first page there was a very clear page for trigger warnings. More writers and publishers need to do this.This story is of 2 asian girls that live vastly different lives 4.5 starsTW: Rape, sexual assault, bad parenting, drugs and alcohol abuse, bullying and racism.I started reading Parachutes with no expectations and found I could not put it down. I read it in a day and that shows how important this book is.I firstly want to say well done to the fact that even in my ARC copy, before I got to the first page there was a very clear page for trigger warnings. More writers and publishers need to do this.This story is of 2 asian girls that live vastly different lives but find themselves in the same house and school. Claire, a rich and priviledged Chinese "parachute" has been sent to a school in the US and stays with her host family that is Dani and her mum who need the money to pay their bills.The storyline follows both points of view as Dani and Claire live their own lives in and out of school. It shows the huge differences in how they see the world and live due to their differing social and economic status. Despite this they unknowingly find themselves in similar situations. I won't say any more as do not want to spoil the plot. What I will say is that it is an incredibly emotional, inspiring and important storyline, it is very well written and a definite must read. To Kelly Yang. I read your author's note and I cried. Please know that you now have many more people that know your story, believe you and stand beside you. Thank you for this book.Please note that I was gifted this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • sophie b
    January 1, 1970
    i just read kelly yang’s story on twitter and wow...i cannot wait to read this.
  • tappkalina
    January 1, 1970
    interview with the authorSounds really promising! interview with the authorSounds really promising!
  • Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    This sounds like a YA version of Crazy Rich Asians and I'm here for it.
  • Ameema Saeed
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Heartfelt, strong, raw, and powerful, this book absolutely blew me away. A smart, thoughtfully written story about immigration, circumstance, power, privilege, friendship, and isolation, Parachutes took my breath away. Yang is an incredible writer, and she painted a painful, and all too real picture of sexual assault, and the ways power, privilege, & structural opposition play their roles in silencing & dismissing survivors, and brushing incidents under the rug.I admired the complexity of D Wow. Heartfelt, strong, raw, and powerful, this book absolutely blew me away. A smart, thoughtfully written story about immigration, circumstance, power, privilege, friendship, and isolation, Parachutes took my breath away. Yang is an incredible writer, and she painted a painful, and all too real picture of sexual assault, and the ways power, privilege, & structural opposition play their roles in silencing & dismissing survivors, and brushing incidents under the rug.I admired the complexity of Dani, Claire, and all of Yang’s nuance in writing smart, believable, and unforgettable characters. Dani and Claire were strong and bold in different ways - and both were remarkable women, and memorable characters.This book was a hard read because of its content - I cried, I raged, and I sympathized. I also accidentally read my ebook until my phone died! This is the kind of book that once you finish it - you just want to find every other person who has read it, and talk to them about what they thought about the book!Smart, vulnerable, and unfortunately all too relevant in the #MeToo era - this book shined a light on sexual assault (especially in schools) in a really thoughtful way - with all of the sharp edges, dark corners, and harsh realitiesTo have read this book during Sexual Assault Awareness Month felt right. I can only imagine that this will be a book that will continue to drive conversation, learning, & hopefully change, as more and more people continue to read it.I received a digital advanced reading copy from the publisher, in exchange for my honest feedback.
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  • Janice
    January 1, 1970
    This is not written by the same kind of Kelly Yang who wrote Front Desk. Wow! Raw and edgy are words that I'd use to describe this book.Two perspectives, the haves and the have nots, are told in the alternating voices of Claire (a parachute from China) and Dani (Claire's host in America). A good friend of mine commented that THUG tried to tackle all kinds of issues important to Black Americans, and I feel like this book does the same thing for Asian Americans and teenage girls, really: we have t This is not written by the same kind of Kelly Yang who wrote Front Desk. Wow! Raw and edgy are words that I'd use to describe this book.Two perspectives, the haves and the have nots, are told in the alternating voices of Claire (a parachute from China) and Dani (Claire's host in America). A good friend of mine commented that THUG tried to tackle all kinds of issues important to Black Americans, and I feel like this book does the same thing for Asian Americans and teenage girls, really: we have teacher-to-student sexual harassment, host-dad-to-teenage-girl creepiness, prejudice against Asian Americans, teenage-boyfriend-against girlfriend-violence-and-rape, closeted-lesbians-with-disapproving-parents, Chinese teenagers driving Lamborghinis and living completely on their own in the US... I could keep going! What we didn't have in this story were any parental figures with integrity (except maybe the substitute English teacher). Even Dani's mom was too busy working and trying to make ends meet to even notice that her exchange student wasn't actually sleeping under her roof for weeks at a time. This book was just too all over the place to really sink into and enjoy.
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  • Krisha||Bookathon
    January 1, 1970
    This book was complex and so important. It talks about sexism, speaking up and sexual assault while also tackling the subjects of money and the privilege and corruption which comes with it. It was a painful book to read at times but also a hopeful one. Living the story through Dani and Claire who are so different and yet so alike, it’s also focuses on female friendship and family. I will put up a full review soon. TW: sexual assault, on page rape, racism, trauma
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Just came across this twitter thread and immediately added this book to my tbr. Just came across this twitter thread and immediately added this book to my tbr.
  • Sasha Zatz
    January 1, 1970
    woww i have no words, for now i just need to say you NEED this book, it is so important, powerful and raw
  • Tatiana
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting subject matter. Wish the author wasn't so compelled to fall for all the tired YA tropes and too-on-the-nose writing style.
  • Meg GlitteryOtters
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars
  • Fanna
    January 1, 1970
    May 1, 2020: Featured in Fanticipating Reads of May 2020!✔ young Asians as immigrant students✔ focuses on female friendships✔ themes of trauma & finding your voice during an immigrant experience✔ treating sexual harassment and assault with empathy✔ glitz and greed of economic wealth May 1, 2020: Featured in Fanticipating Reads of May 2020!✔ young Asians as immigrant students✔ focuses on female friendships✔ themes of trauma & finding your voice during an immigrant experience✔ treating sexual harassment and assault with empathy✔ glitz and greed of economic wealth
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  • Candace
    January 1, 1970
    There are some books that just hit you in a spot you can't stop talking about them and telling people that they really MUST give them a chance. In Parachutes we meet two characters who we come to root for, knowing their stories and their struggles. We see as the system begins to fail them and as they feel as if they aren't heard. It's up to them to decide to stand up for what is right. A strong voice for the #MeToo movement and the need for girls and women to know that their voice matters and as There are some books that just hit you in a spot you can't stop talking about them and telling people that they really MUST give them a chance. In Parachutes we meet two characters who we come to root for, knowing their stories and their struggles. We see as the system begins to fail them and as they feel as if they aren't heard. It's up to them to decide to stand up for what is right. A strong voice for the #MeToo movement and the need for girls and women to know that their voice matters and as we rise, our voices come together, demanding to be heard. We are in a time of change and these stories are important. In this book we get to see how both characters move through this incredibly difficult thing. This story brings a different perspective and we see how easily these things happen and how often it's easier to just brush it under the rug rather than cause a 'scene' or 'sully' your reputation. But is it 'right'?This is a much needed story and I have so much respect for Yang and her ability to create a story that feels authentic and is definitely needed. I feel honored to have had an opportunity to read an early copy of this book (as a bookseller). Be sure to preorder yours so you can read it ASAP.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    This was phenomenal and unexpected and unlike anything I have ever read before. While I very much appreciated the trigger warning at the start (sexual harassment, rape), it also left this foreboding feeling that almost made me not want to read it. I'm thankful I did and those scenes were handled as well as can be expected. The stories of Claire and Dani set out to be completely opposite, but somehow wove together to be more alike than different. It was powerful and a much needed exploration into This was phenomenal and unexpected and unlike anything I have ever read before. While I very much appreciated the trigger warning at the start (sexual harassment, rape), it also left this foreboding feeling that almost made me not want to read it. I'm thankful I did and those scenes were handled as well as can be expected. The stories of Claire and Dani set out to be completely opposite, but somehow wove together to be more alike than different. It was powerful and a much needed exploration into rape culture, particularly within the school setting and with international students, and how deep-seeded racism feeds into it all. The author drew from an incredibly personal experience and did much heavy research that was cited at the end. This book should be studied and picked apart and examined at schools across the world. It was moving and eye-opening and full of light all at once and that is a rare talent.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Parachutes 🪂 by had a #bookbirthday yesterday and I gobbled this story up immediately. Fans of Anderson’s novel Speak & Gossip Girl will enjoy this #YA tale about Dani and Claire. *Note possible triggers for abuse.Dani comes from Shanghai to be Claire’s host sister. However the two do not bond in the beginning. Desperately trying to avoid each other under the same roof, Dani and Claire find themselves on a collision course, intertwining in deeper and more complicated ways, as they grapple with l Parachutes 🪂 by had a #bookbirthday yesterday and I gobbled this story up immediately. Fans of Anderson’s novel Speak & Gossip Girl will enjoy this #YA tale about Dani and Claire. *Note possible triggers for abuse.Dani comes from Shanghai to be Claire’s host sister. However the two do not bond in the beginning. Desperately trying to avoid each other under the same roof, Dani and Claire find themselves on a collision course, intertwining in deeper and more complicated ways, as they grapple with life-altering experiences. This was an unforgettable modern immigrant story about love, trauma, family, corruption, and the power of speaking out and speaking up for yourself. Congrats Kelly on an amazing YA debut! You have found your calling in writing. Thank you for giving a voice to an issue that rarely has one. Thank you Edelweiss for providing an ARC. All opinions are my own.
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    “Your voice is your armor.” Kelly Yang addresses so many issues in this YA novel from the lives of a parachutes: teenagers dropped off to live in private homes in the US while their wealthy parents remain in Asia, to life-altering experiences. It is a modern immigrant story of love, trauma, friendship, corruption, and the power of speaking out. “Being strong doesn’t mean never hurting.” This is possibly one of the best books I have read in 2019. I cannot wait to buy several copies to share. Than “Your voice is your armor.” Kelly Yang addresses so many issues in this YA novel from the lives of a parachutes: teenagers dropped off to live in private homes in the US while their wealthy parents remain in Asia, to life-altering experiences. It is a modern immigrant story of love, trauma, friendship, corruption, and the power of speaking out. “Being strong doesn’t mean never hurting.” This is possibly one of the best books I have read in 2019. I cannot wait to buy several copies to share. Thank you Edelweiss Plus for sharing an ARC with me.
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  • Ms. McKinney
    January 1, 1970
    This is an amazing YA read that touches on so many pertinent issues such as rape, toxic masculinity, and class. I would give this book a million stars if I could; a must read for teenagers from all walks of life. I really hope this book gets a deal Netflix, Paramount, Fox, Hulu or something. It is that good!
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusYang, already a master of middle grade (as evidenced by Front Desk), nails the introspective, character driven genre of YA fiction as well. I won't buy it for middle school because of content, but it was still a great read.
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  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 4.5The #MeToo book we’ve been waiting for.
  • Chadreadsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars
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