The Highland Falcon Thief
In The Highland Falcon Thief: Adventures on Trains #1, a middle-grade series starter from MG Leonard and Sam Sedgman, a young boy is swept up in an investigation to uncover the perpetrator of a jewel theft.When eleven-year-old Harrison "Hal" Beck is forced to accompany his travel-writer uncle on the last journey of a royal train, he expects a boring trip spent away from video games and children his age.But then Hal spots a girl who should not be on board, and he quickly makes friends with the stowaway, Lenny. Things get even more interesting when the royal prince and princess board for the last leg of the journey--because the princess's diamond necklace is soon stolen and replaced with a fake! Suspicion falls on the one person who isn't supposed to be there: Lenny.It's up to Hal, his keen observation, and his skill as a budding sketch artist to uncover the real jewel thief, clear his friend's name, and return the diamond necklace before The Highland Falcon makes its last stop.

The Highland Falcon Thief Details

TitleThe Highland Falcon Thief
Author
ReleaseJul 28th, 2020
PublisherFeiwel & Friends
ISBN-139781250222893
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Mystery, Adventure, Crime

The Highland Falcon Thief Review

  • Gavin
    January 1, 1970
    I did not see that coming!The Highland Falcon Thief is the first book in a brand new series - Adventures on Trains. I do like trains, and I like mysteries, and I like mysteries set on trains, so already I knew I was going to have fun with this one. And reader, I had so much fun!We follow Hal who joins his uncle on the last journey the Highland Falcon is ever going to make. Not only that, but he is the only child allowed on board due to the journey also being part of the royal tour. Jewellery I did not see that coming!The Highland Falcon Thief is the first book in a brand new series - Adventures on Trains. I do like trains, and I like mysteries, and I like mysteries set on trains, so already I knew I was going to have fun with this one. And reader, I had so much fun!We follow Hal who joins his uncle on the last journey the Highland Falcon is ever going to make. Not only that, but he is the only child allowed on board due to the journey also being part of the royal tour. Jewellery begins to go missing and Hal is the prime suspect due to him being the only child on board - but Hal swears he has seen a young girl on the train! Thus begins an adventure and a rather exciting mystery.M. G. Leonard and Sam Sedgman wrote this novel together, and they write so seamlessly I can't tell who wrote what! They're literally writing partners (in crime) made for one another. I loved the way they wove the characters into the mystery. It's a tricky thing to surprise me when it comes to mysteries - but wow, this was such a clever mystery that I could not predict for one second. I had theories - but I'm so glad I was wrong by the end, and it all made sense! How could I not see it before? Gah, I'm kicking myself now. But it was actually well thought-out and unpredictable and it really did keep me on the edge of my (train) seat. Okay, I'll stop with the bracket puns.I'm looking forward to more books in the Adventures on Trains series and seeing what Leonard and Sedgman cook up next. I'm looking forward to seeing these characters again and if they can surprise me with the mystery the second time around. All in all, one of the best middle grade mysteries I have read yet!
    more
  • Schizanthus Nerd
    January 1, 1970
    All aboard! Uncle Nat is a travel writer who loves trains and is thrilled to be a passenger on the Highland Falcons final journey. Its the summer holiday and Hal is not looking forward to spending four whole days on board a train with his weird uncle. I dont like trains. Theyre boring. Hal isnt bored for long as it turns out theres a jewel thief on board and hes quickly caught up in the action. Often the best place to hide something is in full view. On board the Highland Falcon and All aboard! Uncle Nat is a travel writer who loves trains and is thrilled to be a passenger on the Highland Falcon’s final journey. It’s the summer holiday and Hal is not looking forward to spending four whole days on board a train with his weird uncle. ‘I don’t like trains. They’re boring.’ Hal isn’t bored for long as it turns out there’s a jewel thief on board and he’s quickly caught up in the action. ‘Often the best place to hide something is in full view.’ On board the Highland Falcon and potential suspects are:🚂 Harrison (Hal) Beck - 11, enjoys drawing🚂 Nathaniel (Nat) Bradshaw - Hal’s mother’s older brother, a travel writer🚂 Sierra Knight - a film star who is friends with the princess🚂 Lucy Meadows - Sierra’s personal assistant🚂 Countess of Arundel, Lady Elizabeth Lansbury - onboard with her dogs (Trafalgar, Viking, Shannon, Fitzroy and Bailey), her husband recently died🚂 Rowan Buck - the Countess’ gentleman-in-waiting/dog handler🚂 Ernest White - was the head steward on the royal train for 47 years, allergic to dogs🚂 Baron Wolfgang Essenbach - friend of the prince🚂 Milo Essenbach - the Baron’s youngest son 🚂 Steven Pickle - reality TV star, entrepreneur, runs a train company called Grailax🚂 Lydia Pickle - Steven’s wife🚂 Isaac Adebayo - the royal photographer🚂 The prince and princess🚂 Marlene (Lenny) Singh - 11, the train driver’s daughter🚂 Mohanjit Singh - train driver, Lenny’s father🚂 Gordon Goulde - head steward on the royal train🚂 Graham - train guard🚂 Amy - waitress🚂 Joel Bray - fireman🚂 Daniel and Kerry - the night shift. Lenny, with her enthusiasm and tool belt, was always going to be my favourite character, especially when she was described (with a smile) as “the most disobedient girl ever to be born”. The surprise stand out for me was Uncle Nat, who turned out to be a lot more fun than I expected him to be. From his six watches, because “It’s good to remember that there are other places on the planet, filled with wonderful people”, to his love for trains, Nat is the person I’m most looking forward to spending more time with as the series progresses. ‘This will be a journey you’ll remember for the rest of your life.’ With a mystery unfolding and a group of mostly rich people with various agendas on board, this was a fun adventure. Train enthusiasts will enjoy the information about how steam trains operate and detectives in training will have their work cut out for them separating the red herrings from the clues, which are found in the text and in Elisa Paganelli’s illustrations. The details in the illustrations matched the text most of the time.I was personally upset by how the (view spoiler)[dogs were treated at various times during the story, especially when a dog was kicked, but was relieved to know the dogs all went on to live happily ever after (hide spoiler)].I’ll definitely be on board for Hal and Uncle Nat’s next adventure.Thank you so much to NetGalley and Macmillan Children's Books, an imprint of Pan Macmillan UK, for the opportunity to read this book.
    more
  • L.H. Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a lot of fun. I went into The Highland Falcon Thief thinking well, I am ancient and absolutely have no interest whatsoever in trains, and I came out and realised that I loved it. There is a scene, for example, where they fill up the train with water (this is a thing!) and it is pretty much one of the best scenes I have read for a long while. It's breathless, visceral and genuinely good storytelling - and one that actually made me look up steam-trains on Youtube for the first time in This is such a lot of fun. I went into The Highland Falcon Thief thinking well, I am ancient and absolutely have no interest whatsoever in trains, and I came out and realised that I loved it. There is a scene, for example, where they fill up the train with water (this is a thing!) and it is pretty much one of the best scenes I have read for a long while. It's breathless, visceral and genuinely good storytelling - and one that actually made me look up steam-trains on Youtube for the first time in ever.Harrison Beck has been invited to join his Uncle Nat on the final journey of the royal steam-train: The Highland Falcon. Things go awry, as they do in all stories, and suddenly Harrison finds himself making friends and investigating the mystery of the Highland Falcon Thief. Told by MG Leonard and Sam Sedgman, this is such a vibrant and well-crafted story and one that gives you an incredibly rich mystery/adventure in the process. Mystventure? Forgive me, I am fond of tenuous portmanteaux.Evocative of Robin Stephens' delicious mysteries, with a side-order of Agatha Christie - and a little bit of Indiana Jones thrown in for good measure - the Highland Falcon Thief is the perfect title for confident, independent readers. If they're not, then it's perfect for a bedtime read as well but be warned - you'll have to deal with a fair few 'just one more chapter' requests. And, I suspect, not all of these requests will come from the child...Vibrant, fun and just really really good storytelling, this is one of the best books I've read for a while. I loved it.
    more
  • John Moore
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliant read from start to finish with fab illustrations!
  • Dreximgirl
    January 1, 1970
    This was so much fun! A book I did not know I needed but now I am craving more! I am so glad this is part one in a series because I have a feeling it might become a favourite. The writing flows perfectly, the characters are all intriguing and the illustrations compliment it all wonderfully. I didn't see all the twists coming and those I did just made me read on to see if I was right. Throughly enjoyable read which I highly recommend. Agatha Christie for kids! :)
    more
  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    This is our kids book of the month - a who dunnit set on board a steam locomotive called the Highland Falcon. Hal's mum is going to hospital to have a baby and finds himself on the locomotive with his journalist uncle, as it takes its final journey before retiring to the transport museum. Mid journey, some priceless jewels go missing, so Hal with the help of a stowaway called Lenny set out to solve the mystery before the end of the journey. A great read, I'm sure this will be a hit in our store.
    more
  • Kate Wyver
    January 1, 1970
    Steam trains are so cool!!!!
  • Angela Groves
    January 1, 1970
    Pure cosy crime joy for the middle graders. Full of mystery, drama, laughs and trains.
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    A super-fun middle-grade mystery with steam-trains and samoyeds. I loved it!
  • Pan Macmillan Australia
    January 1, 1970
    As a lifelong fan of red-herring Agatha Christieness (its a word!), I picked this up as an easy read about a young man with a talent for drawing and a taste for mystery all aboard a train (Orient Express anyone?). Its a fun, clever and well-illustrated junior crime book that travels at a fast pace and is sure to keep the reader interested.This is a great start for a young crime series that I found reminiscent of The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, with a young sleuth, a seemingly As a lifelong fan of red-herring Agatha Christieness (it’s a word!), I picked this up as an easy read about a young man with a talent for drawing and a taste for mystery all aboard a train (Orient Express anyone?). It’s a fun, clever and well-illustrated junior crime book that travels at a fast pace and is sure to keep the reader interested.This is a great start for a young crime series that I found reminiscent of ’The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie’, with a young sleuth, a seemingly straightforward plot that has a couple of deftly placed twists.- Mike
    more
  • Jonathan
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent crime caper set aboard the Highland Falcon, making its final journey around mainland Britain. After a spate of jewel thefts, 11 year old Hal is determined to uncover the thief. His plans do not go quite as he expected though. As an obvious homage to Agatha Christie's Murder On the Orient Express this aspect only adds an extra attraction for older readers to this middle-grade story, the first in a new series. Well written, plotted and illustrated it makes for an exciting and An excellent crime caper set aboard the Highland Falcon, making its final journey around mainland Britain. After a spate of jewel thefts, 11 year old Hal is determined to uncover the thief. His plans do not go quite as he expected though. As an obvious homage to Agatha Christie's Murder On the Orient Express this aspect only adds an extra attraction for older readers to this middle-grade story, the first in a new series. Well written, plotted and illustrated it makes for an exciting and involving read that also introduces the novice to many fascinating facts about steam train travel. The numerous suspects in the crime all contribute to the Christie-esque denouement. Great fun.
    more
  • MaryBrigid Turner
    January 1, 1970
    A most enjoyable whodunit set on a train. Like all good mysteries it was full of wonderful twists and turns and kept me guessing till the very end. I can't wait for the next Adventure on trains.
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    A super-fun middle-grade mystery with steam-trains and samoyeds. I loved it!
  • The Bookish Faerie
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to sit here and ponder over the cleverness of the power duo Harrison Beck and Marlene Singh, the Sherlock and Nancy Drews of their book. The Highland Falcon Thief is the first book in the series of stories that will take place on trains called "Adventures on Trains" by M.G Leonard and Sam Sedgman. The story takes place on the last journey of the Royal Highland Falcon locomotive train. Hal is sent away from home to his Uncle Nat for four days because his mother is giving birth to a baby I'm going to sit here and ponder over the cleverness of the power duo Harrison Beck and Marlene Singh, the Sherlock and Nancy Drews of their book. The Highland Falcon Thief is the first book in the series of stories that will take place on trains called "Adventures on Trains" by M.G Leonard and Sam Sedgman. The story takes place on the last journey of the Royal Highland Falcon locomotive train. Hal is sent away from home to his Uncle Nat for four days because his mother is giving birth to a baby sister. His Uncle Nat is a journalist and an author of famous books about trains and a devoted lover of locomotives. Because of that, they have the esteemed privilege of being guests on the Royal Train. However, on their route to Scotland, a jewel goes missing followed by several other cases of stolen jewels. Hal thought he was the only child on board the train until he meets sneaky Lenny hidden onboard, thinking that she may be a misguided child looking for mischieve, he seeks her out to convince her to return the stolen jewels. Upon confronting the little stowaway, he finds out that she is not the culprit. Together with Hal's artistic mind and observative eyes and Lenny's knowledge of the train inside and out, they put their brains to work to solve this horrendous crime before they reach the last station and everything blows up like steam from the train's funnel.This book is a middle-grade book that can be enjoyed by readers of all ages. I think children will particularly enjoy this mystery book when their parents read it with them as they can put their brains together to solve the crime like detectives. It is also a greatly informative book about trains so readers can learn about how this locomotive works. One of my favourite scenes is when Lenny brought Hal to meet her father, Mohanjit Singh, the engine driver of The Highland Falcon and Toey Bray, the fireman. The authors paint us a breathtaking picture of how a locomotive take on water to steam the vehicle. One thing that irks me is the character representation in the book. As a people of colour myself, I find it annoying that our diligent Lenny who is clearly an Indian based on the drawings in the book and her last name has zero ties to her heritage. It's like she's simply there to say "Hello! I'm a brown character in an English book!". It would have added to the excitement to know what it felt like to be an English-Indian living in the UK and many other English-Indian children would be able to relate. Thank you very much to @definitely.books for the ARC, I hope you will check it out when it hits bookshelves on 5th March 2020. #pansing
    more
  • Tracy Curran
    January 1, 1970
    http://www.thebreadcrumbforest.blogsp...All aboard! Jump on quickly if you fancy a ride (and a read) full of thrilling adventure and mystery.My love of children's literature means I am open to reading anything and everything. However, if you asked me what my preferred genre or ideal book is...this is it!A classic sleuth novel set in a timeless setting.My memories of watching Poirot with both sets of grandparents dates back to early childhood, when I was probably about six- curious but very http://www.thebreadcrumbforest.blogsp...All aboard! Jump on quickly if you fancy a ride (and a read) full of thrilling adventure and mystery.My love of children's literature means I am open to reading anything and everything. However, if you asked me what my preferred genre or ideal book is...this is it!A classic sleuth novel set in a timeless setting.My memories of watching Poirot with both sets of grandparents dates back to early childhood, when I was probably about six- curious but very easily scared! The tradition continued until I was well into my twenties and I still have a great love of detective mysteries today.So, throw in a child-friendly but very clever plot, a gaggle of quirky characters and a pair of easy to like protagonists and you have a winner!Harrison Beck is less than thrilled at the thought of taking a steam journey with his train fanatic uncle. But jumping aboard the Highland Falcon takes him on an adventure he never imagined. After meeting stowaway and steam train enthusiast, Lenny, he begins to see his surrounding with new eyes. And when they discover an infamous jewel thief is aboard, Harrison, Lenny and his beloved sketchbook have less than four days to solve the case!This novel combines a passion for two things; trains and mysteries. Although, I know nothing about trains, the authors draw you into the rich and detailed world of the railways through absorbing and irresistible descriptions. This provides the perfect setting for an all out chuffing adventure which instantly captures the imagination.The book contains much of the 'Poirot' charm. Elegant characters, an easy-going pace and friendly tone. I particularly liked the dynamics between Hal and his Uncle Nat. It was wonderfully refreshing to have an accompanying adult in the story who was encouraging, supportive and casual rather than oppressive. As a result Hal unfolded as an easy, likeable and sparky boy, who had worries without being too troubled. This light touch made the story trundle along happily - picking up pace towards the end and rattling towards a breath-taking, high-stake finish.I can see the 'Adventures on Trains' series quickly achieving the same success as M.G Leonard's 'Beetle Boy' trilogy- my best read of 2018. With a sneak preview of Book 2 in the Waterstones Exclusive Edition, I cannot wait for 'Kidnap of the California Comet.'(The Waterstones Exclusive Edition also includes extra sketches from the wonderful Elisa Paganelli and adds an extra dimension to what is already a fantastic read!)
    more
  • legenbooksdary
    January 1, 1970
    The Highland Falcon Thief is a fun mystery adventure of a story that will make readers wonder about the outcome. This middle grade book will also make readers hooked right from the very beginning and will make you follow along and piece together the odds regarding the investigations to find out who the thief turns out to be.This story is set on the Highland Falcon steam train which unfortunately is fiction but is definitely something that would be legendary if it were real. Just like Hal who The Highland Falcon Thief is a fun mystery adventure of a story that will make readers wonder about the outcome. This middle grade book will also make readers hooked right from the very beginning and will make you follow along and piece together the odds regarding the investigations to find out who the thief turns out to be.This story is set on the Highland Falcon steam train which unfortunately is fiction but is definitely something that would be legendary if it were real. Just like Hal who didn't want to be aboard in the first place, I too have fallen in love with the wonders of travelling on train. To be able to see the scenaries out the window, feeling absolutely posh, solving a mystery, feeling important is definitely an experience I would like to try if ever the opportunity arises which the odds are probably slim to none.This book is catered for middle graders so I feel like it is a great story for them to read. The mystery is easy to follow and pretty predictable though I had doubts but it was definitely forgotten as the hints that kept coming definitely lead to one suspect behind the thefts. The buildup from the missing jewels to finally uncovering the truth were pretty wholesome as they really went into detail that nothing was amiss. Justice will always prevail.This book is a fun and light read with a mystery that will keep you on edge and you'll have no choice but to continue reading until the end where the truth will finally be revealed. A good mystery book will have the element of suspense that wow the readers and I assure you this one has it.
    more
  • Sarah Corcoran
    January 1, 1970
    Book Review: Adventures on Trains: The Highland Falcon Thief by M.G. Leonard & Sam Sedgman. Illustrated by Elisa PaganelliThe Highland Falcon, Britain's famous steam train, is set to depart for one last journey around England and Scotland, calling at Balmoral to collect a Prince and Princess and returning to Paddington. Harrison Beck's Uncle Nat loves steam trains, writes books and articles about travel and trains and he has a ticket for this wonderful trip. Harrison's mum is expecting a Book Review: Adventures on Trains: The Highland Falcon Thief by M.G. Leonard & Sam Sedgman. Illustrated by Elisa PaganelliThe Highland Falcon, Britain's famous steam train, is set to depart for one last journey around England and Scotland, calling at Balmoral to collect a Prince and Princess and returning to Paddington. Harrison Beck's Uncle Nat loves steam trains, writes books and articles about travel and trains and he has a ticket for this wonderful trip. Harrison's mum is expecting a baby any minute now so she sends Harrison off on the train with his uncle. Four days on a train! thinks Harrison, there are no other children and it will be boring. So begins a fast speed journey, with a motley selection of guests on board. Bits of jewelry begin to go missing and Harrison, as the only child on board gets the blame. Determined to find out the truth, Harrison begins his own investigation, and gets help from an unexpected quarter.As a great fan of steam trains, I loved this book with just enough technical information about the train to complement the story. Harrison loves to draw and the illustrations by Elisa Paganelli are wonderful. It's all in the detail. Well done to M.G. Leonard and Sam Sedgman for a gripping read and I'm looking forward to the second one in the series "Kidnap on the California Comet"
    more
  • Sallie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss+ for an ARC of this book for an honest review.I started reading The Highland Falcon Thief with really no idea about what I was starting. I read the synopsis and thought it sounded like something my girls for Mother/Daughter book club. This story didn't disappoint. It starts with Harrison "Hal" Beck, having to go on a train ride with his journalist/book writer Uncle, while his mother is having his baby sister. It starts with Hal finding a stowaway in the form of, Lenny. Thank you to Edelweiss+ for an ARC of this book for an honest review.I started reading The Highland Falcon Thief with really no idea about what I was starting. I read the synopsis and thought it sounded like something my girls for Mother/Daughter book club. This story didn't disappoint. It starts with Harrison "Hal" Beck, having to go on a train ride with his journalist/book writer Uncle, while his mother is having his baby sister. It starts with Hal finding a stowaway in the form of, Lenny. The engineers daughter, who wanted to ride the Highland Falcon for its last ride. Liberties were definitely taken when it came to things that happen on the train (water troughs!), and there were some points where I thought it was very dry, but the detail that went into explaining the inner happenings of a steam engine were phenomenal. Hal and Lenny, soon discover that there was a jewel thief on the train and they decided that they were going to find out whodunit. With everyone a suspect (even Hal and Lenny), who stole the diamonds? I highly recommend this book, and I believe it's going to be a great read for my book club!
    more
  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this booking thinking "Hmm, trains, that's a novel concept, not sure I've ever thought much about trains before...", and I've come out of it immediately desperate to book a steam train adventure of my own.Combining all the best parts of an adventure-mystery, with all the gloriously fascinating details about trains your could possibly imagine, this 'debut' from the collaborative masterminds of M. G. Leonard and Sam Sedgeman is an absolute triumph.A rip-roaring (or, should I say, I went into this booking thinking "Hmm, trains, that's a novel concept, not sure I've ever thought much about trains before...", and I've come out of it immediately desperate to book a steam train adventure of my own.Combining all the best parts of an adventure-mystery, with all the gloriously fascinating details about trains your could possibly imagine, this 'debut' from the collaborative masterminds of M. G. Leonard and Sam Sedgeman is an absolute triumph.A rip-roaring (or, should I say, tooting!) tale, as fast-paced as the Highland Falcon herself, with two ingenious detectives and a very daring jewel thief.You like trains? You like adventure stories? You like detectives and mysteries? You simply like excellently written adventures and grand tours across Scotland? This book is for you!The Highland Falcon Thief has instantly shot into my list of middle-grade favourites - I can't wait for it to land in yours!
    more
  • janetandjohn
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this children's mystery about robbery on the Royal Train!! I often read children's books or YA reads, mainly because I like to keep up with everything in the book world, the styles are very different and the books are very easy to read. This means that I can do one in in 24 hours, which I did with this one.Lovely illustrations in this first of a series (Adventures on Trains), which are the drawings Hal, our hero and detective, makes to clear his mind and put down on paper what he saw Loved this children's mystery about robbery on the Royal Train!! I often read children's books or YA reads, mainly because I like to keep up with everything in the book world, the styles are very different and the books are very easy to read. This means that I can do one in in 24 hours, which I did with this one.Lovely illustrations in this first of a series (Adventures on Trains), which are the drawings Hal, our hero and detective, makes to clear his mind and put down on paper what he saw before he forgets. I guessed that something odd was going on but not the who until about half way through, and the how was inspired, and something that will definitely appeal to younger readers!! Great story (and the next one already written), clever illustrations, and all in all a book that takes the reader on a wild adventure. Great for reading out loud too, as there are some great characters within.
    more
  • Laura Noakes
    January 1, 1970
    As a devoted fan of Maya's BEETLE BOY series, I knew I had to read her latest offering as soon as possible. I adore mysteries, and this one had everything I needed: it was tightly plotted, well researched and TOOK PLACE ON A TRAIN!! The research and innate train knowledge that had gone into the writing of this book was clear to see--and from reading the acknowledgments I am confident in attributing a lot of this knowledge to Sam Sedgman, Maya's talented co-writer and a really exciting talent in As a devoted fan of Maya's BEETLE BOY series, I knew I had to read her latest offering as soon as possible. I adore mysteries, and this one had everything I needed: it was tightly plotted, well researched and TOOK PLACE ON A TRAIN!! The research and innate train knowledge that had gone into the writing of this book was clear to see--and from reading the acknowledgments I am confident in attributing a lot of this knowledge to Sam Sedgman, Maya's talented co-writer and a really exciting talent in KidLit. Despite this, the train facts didn't dominate the narrative, but were woven in in a really subtle way. I also really enjoyed the illustrations, and the fact that Hal, our protagonist, was also an artist--a skill that comes into use in his subsequent mystery solving. This was a fabulous mystery middle grade, and I am really excited to read the sequel when it's released!
    more
  • Stephen Connor
    January 1, 1970
    A high-speed romp on the Highland Falcon, a one-of-a-kind steam train that is on its final journey. On board are a range of high society figures, royalty, influencers and journalists. And, amongst one of them, a thief. Jewellery starts to go missing as the train lurches from station to station, and fingers are pointed at Hal Beck, a young boy who is only on the train at the behest of his soon-to-give-birth mum. He has his own suspicions though - he has seen an unfamiliar face lurking in the A high-speed romp on the Highland Falcon, a one-of-a-kind steam train that is on its final journey. On board are a range of high society figures, royalty, influencers and journalists. And, amongst one of them, a thief. Jewellery starts to go missing as the train lurches from station to station, and fingers are pointed at Hal Beck, a young boy who is only on the train at the behest of his soon-to-give-birth mum. He has his own suspicions though - he has seen an unfamiliar face lurking in the shadows. A stowaway!Deliciously detailed and a proper whodunnit, with chapters short and pacy, this is one for train enthusiasts, mystery solvers and artists alike.
    more
  • Teri B
    January 1, 1970
    I was excited to discover a new series when I got the audiobook from the local library.I felt intrigued by the characters that started to show up on the pages. They are mostly very well known public characters here in the UK. Then, for a moment it felt like a boy's introduction into the upper classes, with all the posh and glamour that goes with it.And then I started to feel getting really annoyed when I looked at how much specially and mostly exclusively the female characters are being I was excited to discover a new series when I got the audiobook from the local library.I felt intrigued by the characters that started to show up on the pages. They are mostly very well known public characters here in the UK. Then, for a moment it felt like a boy's introduction into the upper classes, with all the posh and glamour that goes with it.And then I started to feel getting really annoyed when I looked at how much specially and mostly exclusively the female characters are being ridiculed in a way that just maintains male superiority and the current status quo of class and gender.Therefore, this book is no longer on my reading list.
    more
  • Stella
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This book was awesome. That's all. Pick it up. Read it to your kids. Read it to yourself!Ok so... I loved this book. Holy dang it was awesome. I know its middle grade but that's what makes it so great. I can't wait for my kids to read this book I love it so much I grabbed the Waterstones Exclusive edition (I have no idea what makes it exclusive until I see the Australian version but anyway).Harrison Beck has joined his Uncle on board the final journey of the Highland Falcon. He's the only Wow. This book was awesome. That's all. Pick it up. Read it to your kids. Read it to yourself!Ok so... I loved this book. Holy dang it was awesome. I know its middle grade but that's what makes it so great. I can't wait for my kids to read this book I love it so much I grabbed the Waterstones Exclusive edition (I have no idea what makes it exclusive until I see the Australian version but anyway).Harrison Beck has joined his Uncle on board the final journey of the Highland Falcon. He's the only kid on board, or so he's told. He finds a stowaway on b0ard and together they begin the search for the thief on board the train.With some well-placed train facts, some daring train antics and some humour, they piece together the clues and outsmart the police to catch the thief and make a few friends along the way.The writing, the imagery, the feels, the everything - I just loved it.*** Thanks to Netgalley and Pan McMillan for giving me the honour of reading this book in return for my honest review.***
    more
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this mystery adventure set on a steam trains last voyage.With a fantastic cast of characters. 5 samoyeds & some questionable guardian skills of an uncle. I thought Hal and Lenny were a great team of detectives trying to work out who was stealing jewellery off the gentry.A special hilla to the Lady Lansbury who is based on Angela Lansbury, you can see the character as if from a TV screen. Fun and full of adventure I can't wait for more in this series.
    more
  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished reading The Highland Falcon Thief and desperately want to read more . This book was an engaging, fun mystery and perfect for both boys and girls. The illustrations were excellent and characters were fantastically full of personality. I know this is a middle grade book but even as an adult reader I loved it. I love a good mystery and this was very much reminded me of Death in Paradise or Agatha Christie but for kids.
    more
  • John Feetenby
    January 1, 1970
    An admirable stab at a golden age style mystery in which two young investigators try to identify a jewel thief at work on a round Britain steam train journey. It rattles along pleasantly enough, but I thought there were disconnects between the narrative and the train buff info-dumps. Also I didnt feel that the grown-up characters adult motivations blended well with the childrens mystery perspective, but Im not the target audience here. What do I know? An admirable stab at a golden age style mystery in which two young investigators try to identify a jewel thief at work on a round Britain steam train journey. It rattles along pleasantly enough, but I thought there were disconnects between the narrative and the train buff info-dumps. Also I didn’t feel that the grown-up characters’ adult motivations blended well with the children’s mystery perspective, but I’m not the target audience here. What do I know?
    more
  • Book-Social
    January 1, 1970
    The Highland Falcon is a very different idea for a childrens mystery, harking back to a certain journey Mr Poirot took on the Orient Express. Harrisons mum is about to have a baby so Harrison goes to spend the weekend with his Uncle who just happens to be writing a travel article about the last journey of the royal steam train The Highland Falcon. I can imagine children would find it fascinating to read about a royal train, it has a greenhouse, and a library??? Even I (ambivalent about trains) The Highland Falcon is a very different idea for a children’s mystery, harking back to a certain journey Mr Poirot took on the Orient Express. Harrison’s mum is about to have a baby so Harrison goes to spend the weekend with his Uncle who just happens to be writing a travel article about the last journey of the royal steam train ‘The Highland Falcon’. I can imagine children would find it fascinating to read about a royal train, it has a greenhouse, and a library??? Even I (ambivalent about trains) found it interesting to read about the workings of the engine and the quenching of the water tank. It’s also a good one to get the map out to follow the train’s journey. I confess I wasn’t too sure where they were at one or two of the places on route.It is a royal train we are reading about and they do visit Balmoral, a royal residence, yet it isn’t the actual real royal family we meet. The recently married Prince and Princess allude to Harry and Megan but no names are ever mentioned and just enough is given to make it believable, yet a work of fiction.When a priceless jewel is taken Harrison gets to work and writers Leonard and Sedgman do a good job of placing clues and red herrings. I find the stumbling block when it comes to mysteries for children is the cast list, often rather large and confusing. Again Leonard and Sedgman do a good job of bringing the characters to life, recapping and zoning in on the most important ones. The cast is varied from a film star to a stowaway and it was lovely to see a bit of girl power being added to the mix in the form of Lenny who I think is my first children’s character from an Asian background.The book is enjoyable but one that’s more for children than for ‘children and adults’. Before you complain, this isn’t a criticism as after all children were who the book was written for. It’s a brilliant mystery for children and you don’t need to be train spotter to enjoy it. The book keeps it open for another one and it is of course an ‘Adventures on Trains’ series so keep your eyes peeled. With Uncle Nat being a travel writer the possibilities are endless for train journeys so who knows what’s next in store for Harrison. A wild west train ride? His very own Orient Express trip?
    more
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this book. Lots of twists and turns I hadnt worked out it all but being a major crime book reader I did work it out halfway through . Read it to see if the younger members of family would like it and I believe they will. This will be bought for birthday and Easter gifts. Cant wait for the next one Really enjoyed this book. Lots of twists and turns I hadn’t worked out it all but being a major crime book reader I did work it out halfway through . Read it to see if the younger members of family would like it and I believe they will. This will be bought for birthday and Easter gifts. Can’t wait for the next one
    more
  • Sally Boocock
    January 1, 1970
    A thoroughly well deserved 5 stars for The Highland Falcon Thief. A bit like a children's Agatha Christie without the murders. I was entranced and had to find out who the thief was . Combining present and past it worked so well. I loved all the information about towns and trains. Will look forward to the next one.
    more
Write a review