Good Boys
In an era of rising nationalism and geopolitical instability, Megan Fernandes’s Good Boys offers a complex portrait of messy feminist rage, negotiations with race and travel, and existential dread in the Anthropocene. The collection follows a restless, nervy, cosmically abandoned speaker failing at the aspirational markers of adulthood as she flips from city to city, from enchantment to disgust, always reemerging—just barely—on the trains and bridges and bar stools of New York City. A child of the Indian ocean diaspora, Fernandes enacts the humor and devastation of what it means to exist as a body of contradictions. Her interpretations are muddied. Her feminism is accusatory, messy. Her homelands are theoretical and rootless. The poet converses with goats and throws a fit at a tarot reading; she loves the intimacy of strangers during turbulent plane rides and has dark fantasies about the “hydrogen fruit” of nuclear fallout. Ultimately, these poems possess an affection for the doomed: false beloveds, the hounded earth, civilizations intent on their own ruin. Fernandes skillfully interrogates where to put our fury and, more importantly, where to direct our mercy.

Good Boys Details

TitleGood Boys
Author
ReleaseFeb 18th, 2020
PublisherTin House Books
ISBN-139781947793408
Rating
GenrePoetry

Good Boys Review

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    In these poems, Megan Fernandes confronts the inconsistencies and mixed messages of living both inside and outside of your given identity (female, Indian diaspora, poet) - sometimes with sarcasm, irony, and humor. My favorite is probably "In California, Everything Already Looks Like the Afterlife." Out from Tin House on February 18th, I had an early copy from the publisher through Edelweiss.
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  • Ari
    January 1, 1970
    [A copy of this book was provided by the publisher or author in exchange for my honest review]This was a slow burn of falling in love with the mastery with which these poems are looped together. The content spanned a wild range, dipping into and across personal identities and society's reactions to them. What really gripped me was the effortless way in which the words navigated around these subjects, dancing over heavy content in a way that felt weightless but left me breathless.
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  • Jessicarr
    January 1, 1970
    Nukemap.com remains my favorite of her poems, but every PoemPageLineWordBreak hits me in my guts. Read this book, and give it to everyone you know whether they’re a white person who wants to tell everyone they grew up poor or if you’ve had to hear that too many times to count
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  • Malik
    January 1, 1970
    Superbly unique, honest & most importantly precise.
  • Mo
    January 1, 1970
    ARC given by NetGalley for Honest Review"Good Boys" by Megan Fernandes is an incredibly well written collection of poems and prose about life as a person of color, someone who is mentally ill, and someone just trying to navigate the trials of living. I was impressed by the richness and fullness of each poem, each one colorful and successful in painting a picture for the reader. This is the kind of poetry I personally aspire to write and also enjoy reading. I have already put in an order for my ARC given by NetGalley for Honest Review"Good Boys" by Megan Fernandes is an incredibly well written collection of poems and prose about life as a person of color, someone who is mentally ill, and someone just trying to navigate the trials of living. I was impressed by the richness and fullness of each poem, each one colorful and successful in painting a picture for the reader. This is the kind of poetry I personally aspire to write and also enjoy reading. I have already put in an order for my library!"Regret Is Blue Dive" is my favorite poem from the collection. The quote that stood out to me: "Depression is and endless Quebec snowfield, it is the Pacific oceans in January, whaleless and deep in soft, cold current."
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