No More Naps!
The #1 New York Times bestselling middle grade powerhouse of Lemoncello fame brings his wit and humor to a pint-sized audience in his picture book debut that turs the universal dilemna of getting kids to sleep on its head.It’s time for a nap but, just like stubborn toddlers everywhere, Annalise Devin McFleece won’t have anything to do with bedtime. Dad tries to encourage sleepiness by pushing her around the park in her stroller. Along the way, they pass a man sitting on a bench, dog walkers walking dogs, a boy on a skateboard, kids playing ball, a girl practicing her juggling, and others. Each of them thinks that taking a nap is a great idea and if Annalise Devin McFleece doesn’t want hers, they’ll happy take it. And one by one, everyone falls asleep…except Annalise Devin McFleece. But when she’s finally ready for her nap, all the naps are taken! Is there anyone who has an extra nap to spare?With every turn of the page, the busy city scene becomes more and more quiet…except for Annalise Devin McFleece.Will she ever take a nap?

No More Naps! Details

TitleNo More Naps!
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139781524771287
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Humor, Psychology, Emotion, Storytime, Animals

No More Naps! Review

  • Bea
    January 1, 1970
    Is that cover not perfect? Completely irresistible. Illustrator Espinosa perfectly captures a pissed off toddler. Just look at that expressive face, the eyes, the rigid body. Yeah, Espinosa has spent time around a toddler, lol. That same care is seen inside the book. With a few lines and color, Espinosa captures a toddlers emotional highs and lows as well as the poor folks having to deal with a tired, uncooperative toddler.Annalise Devin McFleece does NOT want to nap. Her parents are tired, the Is that cover not perfect? Completely irresistible. Illustrator Espinosa perfectly captures a pissed off toddler. Just look at that expressive face, the eyes, the rigid body. Yeah, Espinosa has spent time around a toddler, lol. That same care is seen inside the book. With a few lines and color, Espinosa captures a toddlers emotional highs and lows as well as the poor folks having to deal with a tired, uncooperative toddler.Annalise Devin McFleece does NOT want to nap. Her parents are tired, the neighbors are tired, the construction workers in the street are tired. Annalise is wearing everyone out. Dad comes up with a plan, one that has worked for many parents. But not for him. Annalise Devin McFleece does NOT want to nap. As dad and Annalise stroll through the city, people and animals all around them begin to fall asleep. They are happy and willing to take naps even if Annalise Devin McFleece does NOT want to nap. The practical side of me kept worrying about potential accidents as all the adults kept falling asleep, even the garbage man. It was sheer luck no one got hurt! Anyway, as everyone falls alseep, Annalise becomes bored. There is no one to scream at, fuss at, or shriek at. It was Boring, capital B boring. Being a toddler, and contrary as all get out, soon Annalise Devin McFleece WANTS to nap. She wants to NAP, damn it! Don't tell her no. LOL Toddler and contrary are synonyms, dontcha know. :D"No More Naps!" is humorous, and oh so relatable. Despite the delightful artwork, it's a little hard for toddlers to sit through, though my 2.5 year olds mostly manage it. The one year olds start to lose interest. The text is too long for the younger ones. It's really geared more for preschoolers and kindergarteners. While a little wordy, it's a fun, humorous story and worth a read, even if just for the artwork.
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  • Lindsi (Do You Dog-ear?)
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product.I've lost count of how many times I've read this book! I read it to the girls when it arrived (I like to get their reactions to books meant for them), and they've asked me to read it over and over again. I think it's because they can relate to the main character, since they never want to take naps I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product.I've lost count of how many times I've read this book! I read it to the girls when it arrived (I like to get their reactions to books meant for them), and they've asked me to read it over and over again. I think it's because they can relate to the main character, since they never want to take naps themselves. They're clearly exhausted, but will fight me tooth and nail to stay awake. I rarely cave to their demands (although it does happen occasionally), since they're little terrors by 5 PM when they haven't had one.No More Naps! shows two parents that are totally and understandably exhausted. When a baby doesn't sleep, no one can rest (try this with twins, I dare you). It's a miserable existence for everyone involved. I really loved that the author chose to tell this story from the child's perspective (or at least shows her point of view), and explained how she was feeling through sounds and actions instead of verbal communication. Annalise only knows one word -- no -- and it's one she uses often and without reservation. My girls could relate to her emotional state, and even tried to explain to me how she was feeling and why. It was a great conversation starter (for three-year-olds anyways). I also really liked that it wasn't just two parents trying to find ways to get their child to take a nap. It showed a community and how they were affected by a child's unwillingness to sleep. Her cries could be heard for miles (crazy, right?), and the people in her vicinity were tired of her hollering and frequent fussing. In a way, the author used reverse psychology to make Annalise want to take a nap. She was uninterested in even trying to sleep until she no longer thought she could. When the world was asleep, there was nothing interesting to see, so she wanted to do what everyone else was doing. Brilliant! Although, now it will be harder to trick my girls into taking their naps. ;)The little twist at the end was cute and really rounded out the story. I think the author creatively captured the essence of a small child, and demonstrated how their emotions could rule their actions. Annalise was tired but didn't want to sleep. She didn't want to miss anything, but in the end still felt like she was being left out. It was a lovely story that I've enjoyed reading on repeat the last week or so. The girls actually sleep with the book in their beds (they take turns with it), and I have to remember to put it away before I go to bed. I'm not going to fault my kids for wanting to read (even when it's late at night), but I will move the books so no one is uncomfortable while they sleep, and to make sure no one damages the pages as they roll around during the night (books are our friends, so we treat them with care). I'm starting to ramble... Basically, if you have small children, even those that are slightly older than the main character, I would highly recommend this book. It puts a fun spin on naps, and lets children know that they're not the only ones out there trying to avoid sleeping for a few hours during the day (it's a universal theme amongst youngsters, this aversion to sleeping during the day). I think knowing that other kids struggle with naps, helped mine to understand that it's a necessary evil right now. We'll see how long that lasts! The illustrations are phenomenal and really did this story justice. It was a simple concept that ended up being really effective. It vaguely reminded me of Madeline, and how that television show was drawn (showing my age, right?). It felt familiar and comfortable, but was totally unique to this book. I have no complaints about this one! No More Naps! was incredible.Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Bloglovin' | Amazon
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    My daughter and I both yawned about twenty times while reading. It would be cute for storytime.
  • Sara Grochowski
    January 1, 1970
    My 3-year old nephew found this story hilarious! He's a bit too antsy for the full length text, but we read bits - especially the loooong, drawn out cries from the nap-resisting Annalise - and named and counted different animals, identifed who was sleeping and who was awake in each scene, and practiced predicting what might happen next. The illustrations are wonderfully expressive and perfect for mimicking and identifying!
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  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Napping is not something anyone has to encourage me to do.
  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Age: Toddler-PreschoolAnnalise Devin McFleece is a stubborn little nap-avoider. Her dad desperately takes her for a calming stroll in the park where they see every other sentient being fall asleep before she does. Not being one to back down, she becomes enraged that all the naps have already been taken until a kind cat offers her one of his. Silly, undeniably relatable, and soothing for the nap-averse. Perfect to the T.
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  • Katie Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fun take on the toddler who refuses to nap. My current toddler actually doesn't resist naps that much, but she does grumble and fuss like the girl in the book about other things, and I think my bigger kids will find that amusing. For a story time, it would be really fun to pair this with a book like Silly Sally for a different spin on the sleepy theme. I'm going to hang onto my copy until we resume story time this summer to see if I can make that work!
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  • Dierric Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    This book left me sleepy but in a good way. Annalise Devin McFleece refuses to take a nap, much to her parents dismay. Her father decides to take her one a stroll to the park to tire her out. Along the way passersby decide to take the nap that Annalise refuses to take. What happens when everyone but Annalise sleeps? You have to read the book to find out.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrations capture this toddler's expressions so clearly. Parents everywhere will identify with this struggle. She's determined to stay awake and defies all persuasions until the whole world is sleeping. Then she wants to do it too. Humor comes through clearly.A terrific read aloud for families.
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  • Ruby
    January 1, 1970
    Funny and cute to read aloud, we liked going over all the people and animals sleeping.
  • Randi
    January 1, 1970
    Cute twist on this. What happens if all of the naps are taken when you finally decide you need one?
  • Austin Gullett
    January 1, 1970
    This book is essentially one giant play on words, but it really works. So, at first it's just about a toddler who won't take a nap. Been there, heard that story. But, there's a bit of a twist in that she can't "take a nap" because after a certain point all of the naps have been "taken." It's really very cute.
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  • Rich Farrell
    January 1, 1970
    This book is adorable, with great facial expressions on little Annalise Devin McFleece and a story that is both silly and sensical.
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    This is the most adorable book! I wish my kids were still little. They would have loved this!
  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a brand new picture book. The kids enjoyed it at Story Time.
  • Awjtf
    January 1, 1970
    Love it!
  • Joanne
    January 1, 1970
    LOVE THIS AUTHOR! For those us who wish we could take the nap our little one does not want.
  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    Liked it
  • Rebecca Ann
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great choice for parents of children who have just learned the word No. The story helps children understand their feelings, the consequences of their actions, and how to manage it all.
  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    So cute!
  • Nik
    January 1, 1970
    I'm NOT sleepy!
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes it take a village to get a kid to nap... or in this case, a whole city.
  • Kari (momfluester) Instagram
    January 1, 1970
    An adorable book with great illustrations that makes children laugh and is an enjoyable family read.
  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fabulous read-aloud where sleepy people volunteer to take a nap for energetic Annalise; and when she is finally ready for some rest, all the naps are already taken!
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This toddler has a very strong opinion about nap time. She does NOT approve. Her patient but seriously sleepy daddy takes her for a walk in the park as a last resort. Everyone there is ready for a nice rejuvenating rest. As her dad pushes her stroller, seemingly asleep on his feet, our girl is finally drowsy, but will she sleep? She does, and gets some much needed sleep.A darling and determined little girl is a humorous heroine in this picture book about a negative napper. The illustrations This toddler has a very strong opinion about nap time. She does NOT approve. Her patient but seriously sleepy daddy takes her for a walk in the park as a last resort. Everyone there is ready for a nice rejuvenating rest. As her dad pushes her stroller, seemingly asleep on his feet, our girl is finally drowsy, but will she sleep? She does, and gets some much needed sleep.A darling and determined little girl is a humorous heroine in this picture book about a negative napper. The illustrations emphasize her stubborn resistance to relaxation perfectly with her scowling face and folded arms. Everyone who has ever tried to put a toddler down for a nap will relate to this stand-off, it's always the baby who doesn't want to rest. The relief of her final somnolent state is a wonderful release. Great little story with a silly little non-sleeper.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    There's no denying that chapter book author Chris Grabenstein is funny and imaginative. In this picture book--his first--he describes a situation with which many new parents may be familiar but takes it in a surprisingly different direction. Annalise Devin McFleece simply won't go to sleep no matter what her parents try. In a desperate attempt to lull her to sleep, her father heads outdoors and strolls her around the park, thinking the motion will have the right effect on her. But Annalise stays There's no denying that chapter book author Chris Grabenstein is funny and imaginative. In this picture book--his first--he describes a situation with which many new parents may be familiar but takes it in a surprisingly different direction. Annalise Devin McFleece simply won't go to sleep no matter what her parents try. In a desperate attempt to lull her to sleep, her father heads outdoors and strolls her around the park, thinking the motion will have the right effect on her. But Annalise stays just as wide awake as she was before. Instead, as they pass by other visitors to the park, they decide to "take" her nap since she doesn't want it. Before you know it, everyone's snoozing except for Annalise and a friendly gray cat. He offers one of his naps, and she finally drifts off. The use of direct address at times as well as repetitive language adds to this story's appeal, and the illustrations, filled with sounds of crying and large images, fit the story well. My particular favorite is a double-page spread that shows Annalise up close as her eyes are beginning to droop, and she seems ready to drop by into slumber. Readers won't want to miss the "Shhhh" entreaty on the last set of end papers. After all, no one wants to wake that sleeping baby and start all this over again.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely adorable relateable story with adorable illustrations!!
  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pretty fun storytime read for my preschool crowd. I edited some of the words and pages to make it shorter, but the concept was hilarious, and we really had a great time with the built-in question lines and tantrum noises. To older kids, a story of a younger kid refusing to take a nap is always going to be funny.Wishing this book was shorter, or didn't have talking animals in what didn't seem a logically consistent flow, or had more diverse representation in the illustrations of the This was a pretty fun storytime read for my preschool crowd. I edited some of the words and pages to make it shorter, but the concept was hilarious, and we really had a great time with the built-in question lines and tantrum noises. To older kids, a story of a younger kid refusing to take a nap is always going to be funny.Wishing this book was shorter, or didn't have talking animals in what didn't seem a logically consistent flow, or had more diverse representation in the illustrations of the people. Oh well.
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  • Rachael Bookfairs
    January 1, 1970
    Too young for fairs
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Cute, but I just wanted this kid to take a nap.
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