You Don't Live Here
Robyn Schneider, author of The Beginning of Everything, delivers a witty and heartbreaking tale of first love, second beginnings, and last chances in this timely and authentic bisexual coming-of-age story, perfect for fans of Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera.In Southern California, no one lives more than thirty miles from the nearest fault line. Sasha Bloom is standing right on top of one when her world literally crumbles around her. With her mother now dead and father out of the picture, Sasha moves in with her estranged grandparents.Living in her mom’s old bedroom, Sasha has no idea who she is anymore. Luckily, her grandparents are certain they know who she should be: A lawyer in the making. Ten pounds skinnier. In a socially advantageous relationship with a boy from a good family—a boy like Cole Edwards.And Cole has ideas for who Sasha should be, too. His plus one at lunch. His girlfriend. His.Sasha tries to make everything work, but that means folding away her love of photography, her grief for her mother, and he growing interest in the magnificently clever Lily Chen. Sasha wants to follow Lily off the beaten path, to discover hidden beaches, secret menus, and the truth about dinosaur pee.But being friends with Lily might lead somewhere new. Is Sasha willing to stop being the girl everyone expects and let the girl beneath the surface breath through?

You Don't Live Here Details

TitleYou Don't Live Here
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 2nd, 2020
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062568144
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, LGBT, Romance

You Don't Live Here Review

  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Think "Lorelai Gilmore died in an Earthquake, leaving Rory to move in with Richard and Emily" if they all lived in California, Rory was bi and more into photography than literature, and Jess was a girl. There are some really lovely coming-of-age moments here and especially in a queer context, where Sasha gives a lot of thought to what she wants, what's right for her, what makes a good friend, and how you discern attraction from really wanting to be with someone, and Sasha and Lily are really cut Think "Lorelai Gilmore died in an Earthquake, leaving Rory to move in with Richard and Emily" if they all lived in California, Rory was bi and more into photography than literature, and Jess was a girl. There are some really lovely coming-of-age moments here and especially in a queer context, where Sasha gives a lot of thought to what she wants, what's right for her, what makes a good friend, and how you discern attraction from really wanting to be with someone, and Sasha and Lily are really cute together. A sweet and affirming read.
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  • Juliana
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars.I'm kind of conflicted with this book. The premise sounded interesting and I was into it in the beginning. A big earthquake hits SoCal and in an area I know! Nitpicky thing but I've never heard anybody refer to San Bernardino county as San Bernardino Valley before so that was kind of weird. I feel like the author just googled the area. ANYWAY, big earthquake hits and the MC's mother dies in the quake. She moves in with her grandparents and her life is turned upside down.Some of the cha 2.5 stars.I'm kind of conflicted with this book. The premise sounded interesting and I was into it in the beginning. A big earthquake hits SoCal and in an area I know! Nitpicky thing but I've never heard anybody refer to San Bernardino county as San Bernardino Valley before so that was kind of weird. I feel like the author just googled the area. ANYWAY, big earthquake hits and the MC's mother dies in the quake. She moves in with her grandparents and her life is turned upside down.Some of the characters were really cliche and one dimensional and others actually had some depth. I was NOT a fan of Cole, especially after what he did to Sasha. It took until (view spoiler)[his brother was deep in a sexual harassment problem for him to realize what he did was wrong? That's like men not understanding how to treat women until they have a daughter. It left a bad taste in my mouth (hide spoiler)]. I did love Lily for the most part but when Sasha was figuring out her sexuality, she said to take her time at one point and then got frustrated she was taking too long at another? There was also the cliche trope I hate where they don't communicate and don't let them EXPLAIN so they suffer for a while. I do like the positive bisexual representation because that isn't in books as often. I loved reading about Sasha figuring out her feelings and the way it was all developed.Otherwise, it was simplistic writing. There was a lot of 'he said' and 'she said' and it was glaringly apparent when it's being read out loud. Give your characters more emotion in the way they say things. This was not my favorite YA book I've read in a while.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 2.5 starsWhen it comes to You Don’t Live Here, I have mixed feelings. I didn’t love the book, but I didn’t hate it. I really wanted to love this book, and in the beginning I did; it started out so strong. But by the end of the book, I found that while I liked the story, but I was also bored with it—not enough to hate it or even fully dislike it, but enough to feel dissatisfied with my reading experience. It’s not that I need a story to be 100 percent fresh and new and exciting, bu Actual rating: 2.5 starsWhen it comes to You Don’t Live Here, I have mixed feelings. I didn’t love the book, but I didn’t hate it. I really wanted to love this book, and in the beginning I did; it started out so strong. But by the end of the book, I found that while I liked the story, but I was also bored with it—not enough to hate it or even fully dislike it, but enough to feel dissatisfied with my reading experience. It’s not that I need a story to be 100 percent fresh and new and exciting, but I did need this particular story to have a little more originality to it, mostly because I found the story to be entirely predictable, which contributed to my overall dissatisfaction.There were some small things that bugged me. The characters had distinct personalities, and some of them had depth, but at the same time, they still felt like stereotypes, especially Cole. Some of the dialogue was so short and choppy that it became stilted, especially because there was a lot “he said,” “she replied,” “he retorted,” without any idea of what the characters were doing while they were speaking. What were they looking at? Were they fidgeting with anything? In those moments, I really needed more sensory detail about what was going on with and around the characters while they were talking.My biggest disappointment with this book, however, came from all the moments when the book become political, not because it was political, but because it felt like the author was pushing an agenda. As a disclaimer, what I just said, and what I’m about to say, is not a reflection of my political beliefs or whether or not I agree with an author’s political beliefs; instead, it’s reflection of how I’ve felt with many YA books I’ve read recently that feel like authors are pushing agendas, which I’m just not a fan of. A book can talk about politics and have characters discuss their political beliefs without it feeling like an agenda is being pushed on the reader. With You Don’t Live Here, there were moments when that happened: Lily and Sasha talked about the political climate affected their lives, and it was simple and natural and felt like them observing and analyzing the world around them. Then, there were other moments when Sasha would say or think something that didn’t feel like she was just making observations about the world around her, and instead felt like the author telling us what she thinks and what we need to think. Also, because there were times when it felt like the book was pushing an agenda, it also felt like the book wasn’t quite sure what it wanted to be. Is it a look at what it’s like to be LGBTQ right now? Is it a book about #metoo? Because it did both, and one was more successful than the other.What I did really like about this book was the representation and Sasha’s journey toward self-discovery. Her grief is real, and her trying to figure out who she is separate from her relationship with her mother, and who she is versus who people want her to be and try to make her to be, was the best part of the book. Even though parts of it were too predictable, it was authentic and realistic, and I found myself rooting for Sasha up until the very end. This is a book that encourages people to be themselves and live authentically to the best of their abilities, even if it means going against how other people think you should live your life, and I loved that.Because I have mixed feelings about You Don’t Live Here, I’ve struggled with how to rate this book. I don’t think I disliked it enough to only give it two stars, but I’m also not sure I liked it enough to give it three stars. So, I’m settling at 2.5 stars, rounded up to three. I think a lot of people are going to love this book, but for me, it missed the mark, just a little too much.
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  • Isabelle
    January 1, 1970
    Oq dizer desse livro ????? Eu amo histórias que eu consigo me identificar, e recentemente eu to tendo uma hard time finding them. Eu acho que se entender e assumir pra si mesma Oq vc é, é a parte mais difícil.Você passa a sua vida inteira acreditando que as coisas vão ser de um jeito pra vc, que você gosta de uma só coisa e do nada você entende que esteve ignorando sentimentos por muito tempo. Vai ser difícil come out pros meus pais, queria ter coragem que nem a Sasha, mas não tenho. Quem sabe a Oq dizer desse livro ????? Eu amo histórias que eu consigo me identificar, e recentemente eu to tendo uma hard time finding them. Eu acho que se entender e assumir pra si mesma Oq vc é, é a parte mais difícil.Você passa a sua vida inteira acreditando que as coisas vão ser de um jeito pra vc, que você gosta de uma só coisa e do nada você entende que esteve ignorando sentimentos por muito tempo. Vai ser difícil come out pros meus pais, queria ter coragem que nem a Sasha, mas não tenho. Quem sabe algum dia eu finamente conte, mas agora não dá. Não, não é só uma fase. Por mais representatividade. “Lily was beautiful. Was it queer of me to notice, or just normal? Or was the queer part that I kept noticing all the dozens of tiny ways she was beautiful? That I never stopped noticing, because as long as she was around, I couldn’t look away? I could close my eyes and picture her, the smooth, soft expanse of skin, the shape of her eyes, the unevenness of her front teeth when she smiled. The beauty mark above her mouth, the way her hair came to a point at the nape of her neck. The soft mauve of her lips. The woodsy silage of her perfume.I’d never known I could like a girl like this. It was how I liked boys, but it was also completely different. I liked the way boys’ arms felt around me, and how confident they were, how loud and boisterous. How being around them could make me feel like such a girl, instead of such a misfit.It would be so much easier if you just got a letter, like in Harry Potter. You’re a wizard, Harry. You’re bisexual, Sasha.”
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    This just may be the ultimate queer female romance. I sincerely loved each character and thought they were so thoughtfully executed. While I loved these characters and their insightful conversations and witty banter and thought the growth of Sasha was exceptional, the parts that resonated with me the most were the conversations *about* the adult characters. It was important for me to read that teens expect adults to have it together a bit more than we do. That it’s doubly confusing for teens whe This just may be the ultimate queer female romance. I sincerely loved each character and thought they were so thoughtfully executed. While I loved these characters and their insightful conversations and witty banter and thought the growth of Sasha was exceptional, the parts that resonated with me the most were the conversations *about* the adult characters. It was important for me to read that teens expect adults to have it together a bit more than we do. That it’s doubly confusing for teens when the adults in their lives don’t support trans rights or vote for a reality tv star. I was reminded yet again that teens deserve much more than we give them credit for.
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  • Nad
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the story but why do people hate the word "lesbian" so much ? The love interest keeps saying she's "gay" and the word "lesbian" is only used twice in the whole book. Twice by homophobic characters. For real "lesbian" is not a bad word.
  • raphael ✧
    January 1, 1970
    YES!!! CHEESIER!!! GAYER!!!
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Super excited to read Robyn’s new book! 💜
  • Alexa Abee
    January 1, 1970
    You can check out this review and my other reviews at Writing the UniverseTitle: You Don’t Live HereAuthor: Robyn SchneiderPub. Date: June 2, 2020Rating: 3.75This will be a spoiler free review. I’m going to start by saying that I loved this book. I read it in one sitting, went through a range of emotions. I was reminded why I love Robyn’s books and how amazing she is at crafting a story. With that being said, I struggled to figure out what to rate this book, hence the 3.75 rating. I usually don’ You can check out this review and my other reviews at Writing the UniverseTitle: You Don’t Live HereAuthor: Robyn SchneiderPub. Date: June 2, 2020Rating: 3.75This will be a spoiler free review. I’m going to start by saying that I loved this book. I read it in one sitting, went through a range of emotions. I was reminded why I love Robyn’s books and how amazing she is at crafting a story. With that being said, I struggled to figure out what to rate this book, hence the 3.75 rating. I usually don’t break my ratings into quarters, because it can get way too convoluted, but I felt like 4 was too high, but 3.5 wasn’t high enough. Like I said, I struggled. I’m super glad that I got to read Robyn’s next release early, and I’m glad that I get to write this post telling you what I loved about it. I’m so glad that I get to help raise the hype for this book and her other books. Not enough people – in my opinion – read them, and you really should. Robyn is incredible at writing books that connect to you – the reader. Even if you don’t share the same experiences, she crafts these characters and books in such a way that you will connect, you will feel emotions and you will pull something from the book. On some level you will connect, and I think that I absolutely amazing and such a skill at this craft. I’ve shared none of the main experiences any of her characters in any of her books, yet somehow, every time I read one of her YA contemporaries, I feel seen. It’s almost like she’s looked inside my head and put a voice to something that I’ve felt or am feeling. Whether they’re big things or just little things, I find them on the page, in the book, the characters going through them. Her characters feel so normal and real and like someone you’d know in your own life. They’re so ordinary and human (and I mean that in legit the best way possible) that it’s hard to not see yourself, or aspects of yourself in them. You Don’t Live Here is an Ownvoice, queer, coming of age love story about figuring out who you are, how to navigate the world after loss and learning to accept yourself for who you are, and stand up for yourself. No matter what part of that, that you connect with, you’ll connect to something, because everyone is dealing or struggling with something. Robyn does an absolutely incredible job at telling this story, and I’ll definitely be recommending it to everyone – I already am. If this book isn’t on your radar, TBRs, in your Amazon cart, it should be. You should also check out her other YA contemporaries – The Beginning of Everything, Extraordinary Means, and Invisible Ghosts – you don’t want to miss those either.I thought that You Don’t Live Here was going to become my new favorite Robyn Schneider book, simply because that’s been the pattern. Each new book becomes my new favorite. Surprisingly, that didn’t happen, and Invisible Ghosts is still my favorite. I just thoroughly love that book, and I’ve read it a bunch of times. I know I’ll be rereading this newest one, multiple times, because I loved the story, the message, the characters…all of it. But I think what kind of stops me from declaring my undying love for this book is the political commentary. I know I’ve talked about my dislike for political commentary in books on this blog before, but I really don’t like it when I read. I read as an escape, and I can’t do that when modern politics are shoved at me. This is just my preference, the same way I don’t like pregnancies in YA books – yes it happens, and yes both of these things are true to real life, I just don’t care for them in my books. Now, with that being said, the political commentary didn’t break this book for me. It just made me roll my eyes and groan a few times, but I’m sure there are other readers who don’t like, or don’t care for it either. Other than the person preference of political commentary, I found this book to be amazing and I wish I could wipe it from my mind to read it all over again. For a long time, one of my favorite literary quotes has come out of another novel, but there was a line at the end of this book that I just absolutely loved – so much so, I almost want to go get a tattoo of it. “The world shoves into you, but you stand tall anyway.”If you want to talk about a line that summarizes the feeling, I got from reading this book, it’s this one. The last two pages of this book were probably some of my most favorite out of the whole book. I won’t be forgetting this book and its message anytime soon, and I really hope you all fall for this book as hard as I did. This book is going to be so important to so many people who are trying to find their way in the world. Whether you have the same struggles as Sasha, or something else entirely, the way Robyn tells this story, it hits home. You Don’t Live Here comes out June 2, so make sure you preorder, and if you haven’t already, make sure you check out Robyn’s other books and fall in love with them as well!Oh, and as a final comment, hey, Netflix, pick up Robyn’s books and adapt them please! They’d all make fantastic movies, and it’s about time for a YA book-to-movie takeover again!
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  • Vinícius Sgorla
    January 1, 1970
    Que livro gostosinho! É o meu primeiro livro da Robyn Schneider, apesar de ela ser mais conhecida por O Começo de Tudo (que ouvi críticas mistas), mas fiquei curioso por outros livros dela.Aqui conhecemos a história de Sasha, uma garota que mora na Califórnia com sua mãe, vivendo uma vida pacata. Até que tudo acaba quando uma falha geológica é ativada e causa um grande terremoto na área, acabando com o museu que ela trabalha, acabando com a calmaria das ruas - e levando a vida de sua mãe. Com se Que livro gostosinho! É o meu primeiro livro da Robyn Schneider, apesar de ela ser mais conhecida por O Começo de Tudo (que ouvi críticas mistas), mas fiquei curioso por outros livros dela.Aqui conhecemos a história de Sasha, uma garota que mora na Califórnia com sua mãe, vivendo uma vida pacata. Até que tudo acaba quando uma falha geológica é ativada e causa um grande terremoto na área, acabando com o museu que ela trabalha, acabando com a calmaria das ruas - e levando a vida de sua mãe. Com seu pai fora de sua vida, Sasha vai morar com os avós, que tentam moldá-la do jeito que querem - fazendo uma faculdade de direito, emagrecendo, namorando um menino de uma boa família. Mas Sasha não quer nada disso, e enquanto sofre pelo luto da morte da mãe, passa por uma jornada de auto descoberta - tanto em quebrar o molde para o futuro, quanto em sua sexualidade.Eu devo dizer que o livro começou muito bem (até cogitava ser favoritado), e ele me perdeu um pouco no final. A escrita da Robyn te faz voar na leitura, é delicada e com certeza um page-turner. Mas o maior destaque aqui é a construção de personagens, especialmente a protagonista. Sasha é muito real, tem dimensões, sentimentos que conseguem passar pelo leitor. O constante luto dela pela perda da mãe é algo que qualquer um que tenha perdido um ente querido possa se relacionar, e o melhor de tudo, é carismática.Tiro um pouco da nota pela previsibilidade dos eventos, que acho sim que a autora poderia inovar, mas cai na velha fórmula do romance YA contemporâneo, assim como uma situação em específico que acontece no primeiro 1/3 do livro bem desagradável, e que ao terminar a leitura se percebe que se fosse retirada (ou feita de forma diferente) não interferiria muito na história.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Sasha lives with her mother in a small California town, works at a local museum, and hides behind her camera at school where she joined the yearbook so she wouldn't have to make friends. All that changes in an instant when an earthquake tears her world apart- taking Sasha's mother away from her and leaving her to live with her estranged grandparents. Sasha's grandparents didn't agree with many of their daughter's choices in life. Sasha's move to live with them seems to be their opportunity to gr Sasha lives with her mother in a small California town, works at a local museum, and hides behind her camera at school where she joined the yearbook so she wouldn't have to make friends. All that changes in an instant when an earthquake tears her world apart- taking Sasha's mother away from her and leaving her to live with her estranged grandparents. Sasha's grandparents didn't agree with many of their daughter's choices in life. Sasha's move to live with them seems to be their opportunity to groom Sasha into what they wish their own daughter had been. Too scared to upset the balance of things in her new world, Sasha does her best to go along with what they want- until she meets Lily. Lily's friendship allows Sasha to breathe again. But will her grandparents accept her if she isn't who they want her to be?As a reader, I am guilty of picking up a book and diving in without ever reading the summary, which is what I did with You Don't Live Here. As a result, I was pretty mad at Robyn Schneider for, in only a few pages, making me love Sasha's mother and then letting her die. I didn't plan to read this all in one sitting, but I did. It was well-written and I believe it captures the feelings that so many teenagers are processing all the time: Who am I? Who will I love? How do I make friends? How do I please my parents? How do I become "me"?I highly recommend this book for young adult readers. There are a couple of passages that may make it a little too risque for middle grade, but the overall message is so important.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received this as an eARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.After an earthquake shakes Sasha's Californian hometown, she is left parent-less. Sasha moves in with her grandparents. Their style of living is very different from the one Sasha's mother built with her. Sasha's conservative grandparents place high values on the right friendships, degrees, and life-style. Sasha is a talented photographer, but her grandparents have decided that it is better for her to focus on going to I received this as an eARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.After an earthquake shakes Sasha's Californian hometown, she is left parent-less. Sasha moves in with her grandparents. Their style of living is very different from the one Sasha's mother built with her. Sasha's conservative grandparents place high values on the right friendships, degrees, and life-style. Sasha is a talented photographer, but her grandparents have decided that it is better for her to focus on going to college to become a lawyer (or "better" profession). After trying it her grandparents' way, Sasha finds a friendship with artistic Lily and her brother. Soon, Sasha realizes that she may have romantic feelings for Lily, which becomes yet another part of herself she must lie about and hide from her grandparents. Will Sasha find a way to living her truth out loud?I have yet to read a Schneider book I didn't like and this one is just as good. The writing is superb. Schneider takes it to the next level, providing a complex writing style, without alienating her audience. I would love to spend more time with the secondary characters, especially in the beginning. I loved the beginning of the book better than the ending, but it was still a solid, highly-recommendable book. This novel brings in important contemporary issues, while also providing well developed characters.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw4PL...Sasha Bloom lives next to a fault line but she never really thinks about how it may impact her life until the earthquake hits and changes her life. Sasha's mother is killed and she finds herself living in her grandparents' mansion in a wealthy and conservative community. Sasha's grandmother pushes her to try to fit in and Sasha is befriended by a group of popular kids and she is noticed by Cole Edwards, the popular and beau For a more in-depth review watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw4PL...Sasha Bloom lives next to a fault line but she never really thinks about how it may impact her life until the earthquake hits and changes her life. Sasha's mother is killed and she finds herself living in her grandparents' mansion in a wealthy and conservative community. Sasha's grandmother pushes her to try to fit in and Sasha is befriended by a group of popular kids and she is noticed by Cole Edwards, the popular and beautiful star of the soccer team. However, Sasha isn't happy in her new life. She doesn't actually connect with her new friends and instead of Cole, she is drawn to Lily Chen, her beautiful and quirky classmate. I realized very quickly as I read this book that I just really like the way Robyn Schneider writes. Schneider always writes incredible strong main characters that feel original and quirky while also very real and Sasha is one of these characters. She is dealing with the loss of her mother, the abandonment of her father, moving to a new home, and exploring her sexuality. She is complex and realistic and one of the reasons this book works. However, Schneider also created a world that creates discussion of privilege, the control parents put on their children, and toxic masculinity. However, I did have a slight issue with the character of Lily. She was just a little too close for a Manic Pixie Dream Girl for my liking. Yet, even with that issue, this is a strong book that lives up to the author's other work and definitely worth reading.I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Alicia Aldridge
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite parts of Robyn’s books is her ability to perfectly describe a precise Californian location without naming it. I live in the world of her books every single day. These are stories of the people around me. This book has so many layers to it that are so necessary in today’s climate. This is a book that you hand to your parents and grandparents to help them understand not just who Millennials and Gen Zers are, but who the world at large is today. There are so many quotable lines f One of my favorite parts of Robyn’s books is her ability to perfectly describe a precise Californian location without naming it. I live in the world of her books every single day. These are stories of the people around me. This book has so many layers to it that are so necessary in today’s climate. This is a book that you hand to your parents and grandparents to help them understand not just who Millennials and Gen Zers are, but who the world at large is today. There are so many quotable lines from this book, but my favorites are in the closing paragraph. I hope you choose to read this to find those moments of clarity!
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  • Winyen
    January 1, 1970
    Ah, Robyn Schneider books: just like slipping into a cool pool. Trusty reliable read with the expected clever, quick and witty teenagers, chapters feeling like TV episodes. I will say that the voice of all of her protagonists feels the same between her books. Will she ever write a book where the protagonist isn't middle class white though?
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Decent story of a grieving HS junior figuring things out for herself. New house, new caregivers and a sexuality she realizes she needs to embrace create a compelling story. A lot of her inner feelings felt very true to me and were rendered very well. She had struggles which felt real and were well-written, but everything just felt too quickly and easily resolved.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Something. Something was off about this. There were so many instances of subtle and overt abuse (of all sorts) that were barely addressed, many of them not addressed at all. Content warnings for parental loss, verbal abuse, physical abuse, sexual assault, thoughts of self harm, homophobia, and so so much body shaming.
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. It’s a wonderful coming out story of a young girl, and I was rooting for her the whole time. She deals with loss of a parent, and being rehomed with her grandparents who she doesn’t know very well. The young girl deals with figuring out what her life means, and how to approach it. Well written from a high schoolers point of view.
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  • Amanda Blocker
    January 1, 1970
    I reeeeeeeally loved this! It was one of those reading experiences where you just *get* the MC’s POV and feel it in your soul. It had delightful notes of The OC and excellent pop culture references and was witty af. Love.
  • Bickering Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw4PL...Another completely enjoyable book from Robyn Schneider full of complex characters with well-developed backstories. This book will hook you from the first page and you will not be able to put it down.We received eARCs of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. For a more in-depth review watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw4PL...Another completely enjoyable book from Robyn Schneider full of complex characters with well-developed backstories. This book will hook you from the first page and you will not be able to put it down.We received eARCs of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Deanna (A Novel Glimpse)
    January 1, 1970
    Original review: A Novel GlimpseNote: This review is for an ARC and is my unbiased opinion.3.5 StarsYou Don't Live Here was just... sad. There's no other way to describe it. It's about a high school junior whose mother dies and she has to go live with her rich grandparents. Sasha is afraid to admit who she is and wants to be and what she likes. She doesn't want to let her grandparents down. So, basically, it's about grief and self-discovery. It was well written and a good story, but it just made Original review: A Novel GlimpseNote: This review is for an ARC and is my unbiased opinion.3.5 StarsYou Don't Live Here was just... sad. There's no other way to describe it. It's about a high school junior whose mother dies and she has to go live with her rich grandparents. Sasha is afraid to admit who she is and wants to be and what she likes. She doesn't want to let her grandparents down. So, basically, it's about grief and self-discovery. It was well written and a good story, but it just made me sad.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars
  • Elizalulu
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh, I love Robyn Scheider and her books. I still think The Beginning of Everything is the best, though. This and Extraordinary Means aren't too far behind though.
  • Kaci Pelias
    January 1, 1970
    this was fun!! peak summer/beach-type book! my only thing is that there were SO MANY METAPHORS that it was a little exhausting but! very cute relationship momes :)
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Great YA read!
  • Stephanie Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I loved it so much I read it in one day. I gave me all the feels. Sasha is invisible. She doesEverything she can to stay on the background. Then one day her mother dies in an earthquake. She has to go live with her conservative grandparents. Over time and she starts to find herself. I love the relationship with her friends, and how she starts to figure out what she really wants, not just what is expected of her. It basically takes her breaking to actually be put back together again on the r Wow! I loved it so much I read it in one day. I gave me all the feels. Sasha is invisible. She doesEverything she can to stay on the background. Then one day her mother dies in an earthquake. She has to go live with her conservative grandparents. Over time and she starts to find herself. I love the relationship with her friends, and how she starts to figure out what she really wants, not just what is expected of her. It basically takes her breaking to actually be put back together again on the right places. I love how she isn’t the only one growing. She inspires others to become better people. I love that it has a take on our current society. Very wellDone, Will recommend you everyone!
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