Worthy
From beginning to end, the Bible affirms women, who have intrinsic value because they are—just as men are—created in the image and likeness of God. Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women offers insights for both women and men as they more fully grasp that truth through the study of Scripture. Bestselling author Elyse Fitzpatrick and pastor Eric Schumacher explore how women fit into the storyline of the Bible, offering a transformative view of women, their Maker, and their essential role in the plan of redemption. Readers will be informed and encouraged as Worthy uncovers how God values, empowers, and works through women.Study questions and a "Digging Deeper" section will help men and women alike discover how to cherish, value, and honor one another for God's glory.

Worthy Details

TitleWorthy
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherBethany House Publishers
ISBN-139780764234361
Rating
GenreChristian, Christian Living, Womens, Nonfiction, Religion, Theology, Christianity

Worthy Review

  • Rose Elliott
    January 1, 1970
    Just.... Beautiful. Full review to come.
  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent corrective for traditions who have abused complementarianism or doubled down on hyper-complementarianism. There's wisdom and humility here, and (to my delight) the book is pleasantly readable and has a smooth tone not always pulled off by co-authors. Personally, as a single woman heavily involved in ministry, I was pleased to see women like me highlighted and appropriately valued.
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    Just want to amplify that the need for this book speaks volumes to the fact that modern Christianity has not followed Christ’s example in deeming women “worthy”...
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I had the privilege of reading this book soon after completing a class at Dallas Theological Seminary on the Role of Women in Ministry. After reading the Introduction, I turned ahead to the chapter "The Worth of Women in the Church," eager to get the authors' interpretation of 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 and 1 Timothy 2:11-15. I appreciated the chapter so much, as it echoed much of what I had learned in seminary about Phoebe, Lydia, and other women leaders in the New Testament. I got to the end of I had the privilege of reading this book soon after completing a class at Dallas Theological Seminary on the Role of Women in Ministry. After reading the Introduction, I turned ahead to the chapter "The Worth of Women in the Church," eager to get the authors' interpretation of 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 and 1 Timothy 2:11-15. I appreciated the chapter so much, as it echoed much of what I had learned in seminary about Phoebe, Lydia, and other women leaders in the New Testament. I got to the end of the chapter, where they assert (I think rightly) that when read in context, 1 Corinthians 14 does not mean that women are to be absolutely silent in the church. Then I turned the page and ... wait, what? The chapter was over. They never talked about what 1 Corinthians 14 does mean, and 1 Timothy 2 was never addressed at all.I was a little disappointed, since I think these passages are often used against women and are important to interpret well, but I kept reading the rest of the book, and ultimately, I love it enough to give it 5 stars and to wish every ministry leader I know would read it. Elyse and Eric are unfailingly Bibical as they trace the presence of women throughout God's redemptive history. They emphasize again and again the worth that God gives to women, and that to despise women is to despise their Creator. They argue that the stereo setting of the conservative complementarian church has been turned to "M"--focusing on men--for too long, and though we shouldn't overreact with an overemphasis on women, we need to find a correct balance in order to "hear the music" as God intended.The authors are conservative and complementarian, and I hope that gives them an audience with those who need the message of this book the most. They assert (without providing an argument) that women should not have the office of pastor (page 210)--I learned in my seminary class that pastor is not actually a biblical office and therefore not restricted by gender, but that elder is, so I would just substitute that word and then I would agree with them.In conclusion, I think perhaps the authors intentionally avoided 1 Timothy 2 and stated (without argument) that women should not be pastors, since the focus of this book was not ultimately on what roles women should and should not have in the church, but instead on what is arguably a greater focus--that women should be valued, included, and respected. Specific policies may not matter as much if there is a wider church culture of treating women as worthy, recognizing them as important characters both in the Bible and in the 21st century church.Elyse and Eric perhaps rightly predict that they will get criticism from all sides--both from the secular feminist culture and from the Church--for writing this book. But I for one am tremendously grateful for their courage in speaking truth on this important topic.
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  • Cat Caird
    January 1, 1970
    I am so greatful for this book being written. Its biblically rich & deep, showing the worth & value women have in the bible. It taught me things I've not noticed before & it makes me yearn to see women & their gifts valued more in church.It's a book for men & women, constantly challenging the reader on their view of women in the church & if it aligns with the bible. It's complementarian but different in the way I've seen complentarinism theology displayed before. It's I am so greatful for this book being written. Its biblically rich & deep, showing the worth & value women have in the bible. It taught me things I've not noticed before & it makes me yearn to see women & their gifts valued more in church.It's a book for men & women, constantly challenging the reader on their view of women in the church & if it aligns with the bible. It's complementarian but different in the way I've seen complentarinism theology displayed before. It's freshing.There are of course some unanswered questions, parts of the Bible I would love to see them delve into more, particularly the 1 Timothy passages. But that means we eagerly await a second book right? Seriously though, thank you Elyse & Eric for writing the book!
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  • Michelle Bates
    January 1, 1970
    I have grown up in the church and my husband and I have been faithful attendees as well. My father and my husband have never made me feel "less than," because I was a woman. With that said, I did not begin reading the book with the feeling of being hushed or abused. However, I have had friends who have been hushed and the church has blamed them for failures in their own marriages, or for the way they have been treated. I respected this book's preface, to not lean too far to the left or too far I have grown up in the church and my husband and I have been faithful attendees as well. My father and my husband have never made me feel "less than," because I was a woman. With that said, I did not begin reading the book with the feeling of being hushed or abused. However, I have had friends who have been hushed and the church has blamed them for failures in their own marriages, or for the way they have been treated. I respected this book's preface, to not lean too far to the left or too far to the right, but to line up with the Bible and what it says. I have read a number of books on women and their roles, but this one, this one points to the Savior that men and women need. This one points to the God who created both genders in his image and he values both equally. It was refreshing to hear the celebration of what our Savior has done since the beginning of time to show the value of what he created and loves.
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  • Brian Whittaker
    January 1, 1970
    This is really good. It gives an excellent overview of the worth and contribution women played throughout the Bible. It was eye opening in places to see the central role women played at various points in the Bible, roles which are often overlooked when the stories are preached. Written from a complementarian perspective, it was very useful in thinking through where women can be used in the church. I didn’t agree with everything (is there any book you agree with EVERYTHING?) but it was very This is really good. It gives an excellent overview of the worth and contribution women played throughout the Bible. It was eye opening in places to see the central role women played at various points in the Bible, roles which are often overlooked when the stories are preached. Written from a complementarian perspective, it was very useful in thinking through where women can be used in the church. I didn’t agree with everything (is there any book you agree with EVERYTHING?) but it was very thought provoking and timely.
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  • Mercy Lyman
    January 1, 1970
    If I was to ask who all struggled with feelings of not being worthy I doubt one person wouldn't admit to it, at least to themselves. I mean, we've all struggled with it at one time or another. Are we really worthy of this? Do I really deserve this? Someone else would be better at it, why me? Elyse and Eric take us through scripture from Creation all the way to the end of the Bible and use scripture to teach us our worth. There is also a section on Women In The 21st Century and then my personal If I was to ask who all struggled with feelings of not being worthy I doubt one person wouldn't admit to it, at least to themselves. I mean, we've all struggled with it at one time or another. Are we really worthy of this? Do I really deserve this? Someone else would be better at it, why me? Elyse and Eric take us through scripture from Creation all the way to the end of the Bible and use scripture to teach us our worth. There is also a section on Women In The 21st Century and then my personal favorite- A Call To Hope-Driven, Courageous, Compassionate Conviction. This is the perfect book for a woman to either read on her own or I, personally like the idea of bringing together a group of some friends and reading it together. Whichever you decide to do, go buy yourself a copy of this book.Disclosure: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Christine Carter
    January 1, 1970
    A must-read for every Christian—male and femaleMany Christians (male and female) approach the value of women with preconceived thoughts and traditions. But do you know what the Bible says about a woman’s worth? In the book, Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women, co-authors Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher, peel back the layers of the Bible as they guide us through a biblical understanding of the value of women. Written for men and women, both authors affirm God’s love for women while A must-read for every Christian—male and femaleMany Christians (male and female) approach the value of women with preconceived thoughts and traditions. But do you know what the Bible says about a woman’s worth? In the book, Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women, co-authors Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher, peel back the layers of the Bible as they guide us through a biblical understanding of the value of women. Written for men and women, both authors affirm God’s love for women while imparting a healing and biblically sound voice in a deeply needed conversation. I received an advanced readers copy from the publisher.
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  • Tamara Hedrick
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. In a loving but bold voice firmly grounded in scripture, the authors challenge the excesses of the complementarian theology that has gripped evangelicalism for the past 40 years. As a single woman who has never been able to find a place within complementarianism as it is currently practiced, this book validated and encouraged me in ways I never thought conservative complementarian authors could. A must-read for men and women, and ESPECIALLY This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. In a loving but bold voice firmly grounded in scripture, the authors challenge the excesses of the complementarian theology that has gripped evangelicalism for the past 40 years. As a single woman who has never been able to find a place within complementarianism as it is currently practiced, this book validated and encouraged me in ways I never thought conservative complementarian authors could. A must-read for men and women, and ESPECIALLY pastors!
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to grow up in complementarian contexts that valued women. I’m happy to report that I agreed with most of this book, especially the second half.I do have some concerns about the first half, particularly some of the interpretations of Eve. I sincerely don’t know if I’m uncomfortable with the fact that they were new interpretations to me or if I actively disagree with them; I’ll definitely be mulling on them for a while, which is not a bad thing.As one example, there’s a I was fortunate enough to grow up in complementarian contexts that valued women. I’m happy to report that I agreed with most of this book, especially the second half.I do have some concerns about the first half, particularly some of the interpretations of Eve. I sincerely don’t know if I’m uncomfortable with the fact that they were new interpretations to me or if I actively disagree with them; I’ll definitely be mulling on them for a while, which is not a bad thing.As one example, there’s a repeated theme that a woman’s worth pre-Christ was tied to her ability to give birth to the promised redeemer (with the implication that this was directly on the mind of several women). By the end of the book the statement made sense from an Old Covenant perspective, with baptism for all replacing circumcision for men; I wish some of those connections had been drawn more clearly earlier in the book, instead of making it a personal desire of all Old Testament women.Despite some issues like that, I do recommend this book, especially if you’re just beginning to explore the role of women beyond motherhood. I look forward to discussing it with some friends, both men and women.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    I have strong mixed feelings about this book. First the good news. The authors do a good job of showing how God used women in Israel's history. They do a great job of showing the redemptive nature of Jesus in how He treated women. A good example is comparing the Old Testament law regarding women being unclean and untouchable to the way Jesus treated the bleeding and therefore unclean woman, healing her.The authors are good at calling men to task for their attitudes toward women. Schumacher I have strong mixed feelings about this book. First the good news. The authors do a good job of showing how God used women in Israel's history. They do a great job of showing the redemptive nature of Jesus in how He treated women. A good example is comparing the Old Testament law regarding women being unclean and untouchable to the way Jesus treated the bleeding and therefore unclean woman, healing her.The authors are good at calling men to task for their attitudes toward women. Schumacher encourages men to be open to training and equipping women. “We ought not to be resistant when a woman corrects our theology or practice.” (148) Women are called to proclaim the gospel, he notes. (148) Preach it, brother.The authors also do a pretty good job of relating how women have felt through the years, that the church identified women as of less value than men and limited their use in the Kingdom. They encourage women to remember how Jesus dignified women. They do a good job of encouraging churches to invite “worthy women into the non-authoritative speaking ministry of the congregation.” (204) They do a good job encouraging churches to support women who have painful concerns, such as those of their husband's abuse or sexual sin. They do a good job of calling the body to unity, regardless of their position on women in ministry.What is contained in the book is very good. However, what's missing is, well, lots.Now the bad news. The authors totally ignore some of the most pesky and women devaluing passages in the Bible. The passages absent from commentary in this book are some of the ones that most troubled me as a young female Christian.Here is what is not covered in this book. Only males had the sign of the covenant God made with Abraham and his descendants. Only males participated in Israel's feasts. (Ex. 23:17) Only males were included in Israel's census. (Num. 1:2) In the Ten Commandments, a wife is described as a man's possession. (Ex. 20:17) An unmarried woman could be forced to marry her rapist. (Deut. 22:28-29) A woman was unclean twice as long when birthing a daughter as opposed to birthing a son. (Lev. 12:2-5) A woman's vows could be nullified by her father or her husband. (Numb. 30) Only a man could initiate divorce. (Deut. 24:1) Perhaps the most disturbing passage is Lev. 27:1-7 where women of various ages are “valued” consistently a little over half the value of men of the same age. The authors include a reference to this passage in one of their discussion questions. They ask, “Does this strike you as denigrating to a woman's worth? Why or why not?” (106) Readers get no help in coming to grips with this or the other devaluing passages.Those passages troubled me as a female Christian teen and they still trouble me as a female Christian senior citizen. This book offered no help on them.There was also an area where I thought the authors were being nice but perhaps not sincere. The authors, knowing women in the military and working for the FBI, write, “Women, you are free to discern what kind of vocation the Lord is calling you to and he will use you as you work in wisdom for his glory.” (135) That might sound nice but is not true from what the authors wrote previously. “Elyse and I both believe that the Bible limits the office of pastor/elder to men who are called and qualified by the Scripture.” (87) Women called to pastoral ministry, and I believe some are, are not so free to discern the vocation to which the Lord has called them. The authors assure women “a wealth of other avenues are available for sisters to exercise their gifts...” (87) Right. The authors also quote a commentary on Matthew, the author declaring God “as an equal opportunity dispenser of both his grace and of contexts to serve him.” (167) Not really, if the pastor/elder context is forbidden for women. (87) The authors reaffirm their male only pastor/elder role near the end of the book. (210) That is tragic, considering the number of stories they relate about male elders not holding men accountable for sexual sin, often blaming the wife instead. Women elders bring a sensitivity to such issues men do not have.So that's the good news and the bad news about this book. The authors note that they hope to transform the ways men and women think about and relate to women. (23) They also hope this book convinces women God cherishes and values them. (23) They've done a good job of giving examples where God used women and valued women. They just ignored too many examples of where it seems God devalues women for me to be satisfied with the book.Food for thought: “I wonder where the church would be if women were allowed to work according to their gifting and if their skill, intelligence, wisdom, and piety were taken as seriously as men's.” (227) I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    I really appreciate Fitzpatrick and Schumacher's work in showing the role women have played in redemptive history. They've broken some new ground, at least for many, in showing that women have played significant roles in warring against the serpent. This is something that rarely gets voiced by those in Reformed circles. So inasmuch as this gets read in those circles, it will serve its readers to view the Bible--especially the Old Testament in a new light.The first eleven chapters of the book I really appreciate Fitzpatrick and Schumacher's work in showing the role women have played in redemptive history. They've broken some new ground, at least for many, in showing that women have played significant roles in warring against the serpent. This is something that rarely gets voiced by those in Reformed circles. So inasmuch as this gets read in those circles, it will serve its readers to view the Bible--especially the Old Testament in a new light.The first eleven chapters of the book explore the role of women in different eras of redemptive history, from the Garden of Eden to the early church. There is much in those chapters to agree with and affirm. The woman has warred against the serpent since God cursed the serpent, putting enmity between it and the woman, its offspring and hers. This is a huge theme in Scripture and we see the two at war throughout the Bible. This is by far the most valuable part of the book. There are particular things in the book, however, that make it difficult to recommend without qualification. For example, they argue that David raped Bathsheba, using language that is more driven by the #MeToo movement than Scripture. Now I do think we need to be careful to not call it mere adultery since there is more going on than a consensual affair. See James Jordan's article "Bathsheba: The Real Story". Calling this rape introduces an unbiblical standard, which we must all labor to avoid. God's Word is the standard, not the language of "secular justice."The book is a helpful corrective for some, though I'm not sure the extent to which this is a problem in the church. It is helpful to hear a different perspective on church life and to read of some awful stories about ways in which women were marginalized and hurt in the church.
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  • Jolene -
    January 1, 1970
    In Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women authors Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher step boldly into the fray to defend women against stereotypes, assumptions, misogyny, and abuses in today’s Christian culture. I did not agree with everything in this book, but I thoroughly appreciate their work.As someone who has been deeply wounded by some of the evangelical church’s teachings to and about women, I’m questioning many beliefs I once held tightly. Worthy gave me hope as it breathed a new, In Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women authors Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher step boldly into the fray to defend women against stereotypes, assumptions, misogyny, and abuses in today’s Christian culture. I did not agree with everything in this book, but I thoroughly appreciate their work.As someone who has been deeply wounded by some of the evangelical church’s teachings to and about women, I’m questioning many beliefs I once held tightly. Worthy gave me hope as it breathed a new, healthier perspective into the old, damaging teachings I’ve been taught since childhood. It clearly demonstrates that Biblical interpretation can easily be skewed by one’s worldview, social environment, or church culture. Worthy frequently demonstrated that simply shifting how a passage is perceived can completely change its effect and message. I do think at times they presented ideal situations and skipped over challenging passages. Still, the bottom-line message of the book is that God values women as much as He values men. No more, no less. And I can definitely get on board with that message.I think Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women by Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher is a step in the right direction and I wish all pastors, especially those on the more conservative side would read it. Given all the SBC endorsements, I wasn’t terribly surprised to read that they consider themselves complementarians and deny that women can hold the office of pastor. However, I appreciated their call for respectful interaction with others of different opinions. They acknowledge that Christians can love God deeply, serve him with devotion, yet still hold different convictions. Disclosure of Material Connection: I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher. All opinions in this review are my own.
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  • Joshua Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher have teamed up to write with refreshing clarity and pristine perspective that is faithful to orthodoxy yet challenging to many of our blind presuppositions and inherent biases. You will have many of your beliefs reinforced and made stronger. You will also have many of them challenged and even revealed as weak or founded more on cultural mores rather than scriptural truth. Together, Fitzpatrick and Schumacher enlighten points of view to familiar biblical Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher have teamed up to write with refreshing clarity and pristine perspective that is faithful to orthodoxy yet challenging to many of our blind presuppositions and inherent biases. You will have many of your beliefs reinforced and made stronger. You will also have many of them challenged and even revealed as weak or founded more on cultural mores rather than scriptural truth. Together, Fitzpatrick and Schumacher enlighten points of view to familiar biblical narratives that have been overlooked and underrepresented in much of Christian teaching. Whether it be the righteousness of Tamar (as admitted by Judah) or the biblical acumen of Phoebe, there are neglected stories, examples, and truths necessary for women and men alike. They also bring back into focus the fact that it is crucial to recognize the value of women in order to see the full representation of the imago Dei. Read this book. Prepare to soak it in and be challenged. Be ready to make adjustments where necessary. Anticipate conversations you will need to have as well as repentance for past actions and attitudes. All of this and more, not because of Fitzpatrick and Schumacher’s writing compentence, but because they point us back to Scripture, and call us to recalibrate how we live by aligning our actions with its truth and the testimony of how God and His Son treated women with honor and dignity.
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  • Eric Schumacher
    January 1, 1970
    Hey! I'm one of the co-authors of "Worthy." Thanks for your interest in the book. Let me tell you a little bit about it:1) What is "Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women"?It is a biblical theology of women, tracing their place in redemptive history, seeing and celebrating how God has used them in the storyline of the Bible.2) Who is it for?"Worthy" is for everyone—Christian or not, man or woman. We especially hope that men will read it, as the value of women is an issue that men should care Hey! I'm one of the co-authors of "Worthy." Thanks for your interest in the book. Let me tell you a little bit about it:1) What is "Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women"?It is a biblical theology of women, tracing their place in redemptive history, seeing and celebrating how God has used them in the storyline of the Bible.2) Who is it for?"Worthy" is for everyone—Christian or not, man or woman. We especially hope that men will read it, as the value of women is an issue that men should care about deeply. We hope that non-Christians (who may be skeptical of how the Bible treats women) will come to see that the Bible (rightly interpreted) values and celebrates women.3) Why did we write it?We wrote "Worthy" to demonstrate that a conservative reading of the Bible (one that treats the Bible as God's inspired and authoritative Word, reading it on its own terms) results in a high view of women. We wanted to demonstrate that, from beginning to end, women are integral and indispensable in God's plan of redemption. We believe that valuing women is essential to ending their mistreatment in the world, church, workplace, and home.4) What do we hope results?We hope that "Worthy" leaves readers with a high view of the value of women in the world, church, and home. We pray that it drives readers back to the Bible to see for themselves what God has to say about women. If it sends you back into the Word to see the value of women in God's redemptive plan, we will be happy (even if you disagree with us on a few details).
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  • Oak
    January 1, 1970
    Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women by Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher is a thoughtful book that celebrates the gift and calling of women. Fitzpatrick and Schumacher talk about the significance and importance of various women in the Bible; I especially liked reading the authors’ commentary about Abigail and the risks she bravely took to prevent evil from happening. One of my favorite chapters was “The Worth of Women in the Church,” especially the section that talked about the women who Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women by Elyse Fitzpatrick and Eric Schumacher is a thoughtful book that celebrates the gift and calling of women. Fitzpatrick and Schumacher talk about the significance and importance of various women in the Bible; I especially liked reading the authors’ commentary about Abigail and the risks she bravely took to prevent evil from happening. One of my favorite chapters was “The Worth of Women in the Church,” especially the section that talked about the women who worked alongside Paul. Another favorite chapter was “The Worth of Women in Israel’s History.” This would be a great book to read in a women’s Bible study.I received this book for review.
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  • Caitlin Allen
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Bethany House for the free review copy. All opinions are my own.The topic of women in the church is debated in lots of different ways, and there can be a lot of dissent about the roles of women when it comes to Christianity. I so appreciated how these authors decided to tackle this topic and talk about all of the different ways that women are worthy: from the beginning in Genesis to roles in the New Testament and in the church today.I was challenged in my thinking during some of the Thank you to Bethany House for the free review copy. All opinions are my own. The topic of women in the church is debated in lots of different ways, and there can be a lot of dissent about the roles of women when it comes to Christianity. I so appreciated how these authors decided to tackle this topic and talk about all of the different ways that women are worthy: from the beginning in Genesis to roles in the New Testament and in the church today. I was challenged in my thinking during some of the chapters. I also was presented with ideas and concepts of women that I had never thought about and considered before. This book is one that I will continue to come back to. I also hope that it gets in the hands of those that lead churches and helps create dialogue about women in the church. I feel that this book is so important and that the authors did a great job of writing a book that can help lead into conversations.
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