The Land Beneath Us (Sunrise at Normandy, #3)
In 1943, Private Clay Paxton trains hard with the U.S. Army Rangers at Camp Forrest, Tennessee, determined to do his best in the upcoming Allied invasion of France. With his future stolen by his brothers' betrayal, Clay has only one thing to live for—fulfilling the recurring dream of his death.Leah Jones works as a librarian at Camp Forrest, longing to rise above her orphanage upbringing and belong to the community, even as she uses her spare time to search for her real family—the baby sisters she was separated from so long ago.After Clay saves Leah's life from a brutal attack, he saves her virtue with a marriage of convenience. When he ships out to train in England for D-Day, their letters bind them together over the distance. But can a love strong enough to overcome death grow between them before Clay's recurring dream comes true?

The Land Beneath Us (Sunrise at Normandy, #3) Details

TitleThe Land Beneath Us (Sunrise at Normandy, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherFleming H. Revell Company / Baker Publishing Group
ISBN-139780800727994
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Romance, Fiction, War, World War II

The Land Beneath Us (Sunrise at Normandy, #3) Review

  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    Unparalleled in her research and exposition of American World War II history, Sundin draws on the Biblical tale of Rachel and Leah in this deftly woven treatise on two people yearning to belong amidst a time of tragedy and loss. Clay Paxton is certain of death. He dreams it every night over and over again, seeing the same minutiae of detail that will signal his untimely end. Leah Jones is desperate to belong after living as an orphan: ridiculed and judged.Both meet at a training center in Unparalleled in her research and exposition of American World War II history, Sundin draws on the Biblical tale of Rachel and Leah in this deftly woven treatise on two people yearning to belong amidst a time of tragedy and loss. Clay Paxton is certain of death. He dreams it every night over and over again, seeing the same minutiae of detail that will signal his untimely end. Leah Jones is desperate to belong after living as an orphan: ridiculed and judged.Both meet at a training center in Tennessee where Clay is soon bound for war and Leah is a librarian. Amidst their warm, believable friendship, a brutal attack forces Clay to act. If he is to die anyways, why not enter into a marriage of convenience to secure a future for a young woman who has no one?Sundin balances Clay's time in the European theatre with Leah's adjustment to life building a home-- his home--- even though she believes his morbid destiny.It is achingly romantic to see two genuine good people find each other despite the tragedies of their past. Readers of the previous two books in the trilogy are familiar with Clay's brothers Adler and Wyatt and will understand how their actions have so wounded the youngest sibling.An exploration of the battle of forgiveness and redemption is at the crux of each character's emotional journey even as their nation is at war. I really liked Clay. I loved his Southern American charm, the polite way he handled himself and the way he talked to Leah. Great hero.Exceptional researchand dialogue that reads so perfectly structured that if you took it out of the book and threw it up on stage it would feel theatrically natural. That's hard to pull off. But so is Sundin's astonishing amount of knowledge on her country's involvement in WWII.
    more
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    *This book was provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group/Revell, through Interviews & Reviews.*A story captured with encouraging lessons and characters portrayed with authenticity in a setting of a war that affected the world. I adored Clay and Leah from the start. I knew before I began this one that it would be a completion of the trilogy that was necessary and beautiful. But as I read, I soon realized it very quickly reached my favorite by this author. Clay needed something to live for. *This book was provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group/Revell, through Interviews & Reviews.*A story captured with encouraging lessons and characters portrayed with authenticity in a setting of a war that affected the world. I adored Clay and Leah from the start. I knew before I began this one that it would be a completion of the trilogy that was necessary and beautiful. But as I read, I soon realized it very quickly reached my favorite by this author. Clay needed something to live for. Leah needed a family to love her. Their struggles and trials and the beauty of their relationship were woven so well. I adored the romance and how it played out. I felt this story so deeply, and the stunning cover matches the book perfectly. What I especially loved about Clay and Leah's story is that there's a strong message of joy amid difficulties. This is a topic that has been much on my heart over the years. And it was written so well.This is a story that will affect your heart and bring smiles and tears. Be sure to read the series in order, so that when you pick this one up, you will be even more taken in by the war, love, family, and trials that come Clay and Leah's way.
    more
  • Paula Shreckhise
    January 1, 1970
    The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin is the third book of the series Sunrise at Normandy. Ms. Sundin has given us another gripping glimpse into a pivotal time in WWII history. A horrific personal incident and war have torn three brothers from their home in Kerville, Texas. Can forgiveness and God’s love bring them back together? This story is primarily about Clay, the youngest of three Paxton brothers and his journey to D-Day in Normandy but also about reconciliation from an event that ripped The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin is the third book of the series Sunrise at Normandy. Ms. Sundin has given us another gripping glimpse into a pivotal time in WWII history. A horrific personal incident and war have torn three brothers from their home in Kerville, Texas. Can forgiveness and God’s love bring them back together? This story is primarily about Clay, the youngest of three Paxton brothers and his journey to D-Day in Normandy but also about reconciliation from an event that ripped their family apart. Clay has been brought up in a wonderful Christian family so he likens his situation to that of the patriarch Joseph in the pit before his brothers sold him. My favorite character is Leah Jones who works in the library at Camp Forrest, Tennessee where Clay is stationed. She is an orphan with a very tender heart for the downtrodden because of her background. She loves books because they were her only friends growing up. “Words make delightful playthings. They cost nothing, they never wear out, and no one can take them away from you.” Her goal is to find information about her younger twin sisters who were adopted separately from her and discover her true identity which was hidden from her. Clay meets Leah at the library at Camp Forrest where he is in Ranger school preparing to join the war in Europe. After an attack, he saves Leah’s life and offers a marriage of convenience. Though separated, they get to know each other through letters.Can war possibly bring healing to the brothers? Has Clay truly forgiven his brothers? Ms. Sundin has a firm grasp on how to convey faith and human nature and pours this knowledge into her characters, making them come alive. Her extensive research shines in the scenes about training and the invasion of Normandy, as well as the everyday hardships of the folks left behind at home. Faith in God is portrayed as the backbone of the Paxton family and forgiveness is seen as a struggle but so worth the outcome. The underlying theme of the series is The Prodigal Son. An excellent wrap up to a remarkable series. It is no wonder that it is one of my very favorites. *A complimentary copy of this book was provided by Revell through Interviews and Reviews. I was not required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own.*
    more
  • Kellyn Roth
    January 1, 1970
    *mumbles under my breath* I really need to get more Sarah Sundin control. I decided to just read the first couple chapters last night to give myself a taste, and I ended up reading all the book before *yawns* 4 AM?? Something like that. 3:40 anyways.But wow. Great book! I already want to reread it (and the rest of the series). Review to come when published!
    more
  • Mayda
    January 1, 1970
    A tragic accident forever changed Leah’s life when she was just a toddler. Her parents were killed and she and her younger twin sisters were thrown into an orphanage. Her adoption doesn’t work out well, and she again is dumped at an orphanage for the rest of her growing up years, having no idea what became of her sisters. Now, she is hoping to find them, and is working at a library, researching when she has time. Again, tragedy stuck when she is brutally attacked after hours in the library, A tragic accident forever changed Leah’s life when she was just a toddler. Her parents were killed and she and her younger twin sisters were thrown into an orphanage. Her adoption doesn’t work out well, and she again is dumped at an orphanage for the rest of her growing up years, having no idea what became of her sisters. Now, she is hoping to find them, and is working at a library, researching when she has time. Again, tragedy stuck when she is brutally attacked after hours in the library, saved only when a soldier hears her screams and intervenes. Clay also had his share of troubles, ones that left him estranged from his brothers and resentful of what they had done to him. Perhaps it is this shared unhappiness that drew them together, or maybe they felt they could help each other. Regardless, the bond of friendship is there, and together they become stronger. This lovely tale is one of forgiveness, redemption, and hope. The characters are well written and the story is compelling. Though it is the third part of a trilogy, it works well as a stand-alone. Although it does take place during World War II, and is a romance, it is so much more than just a romantic tale of two people thrown together during a time of strife. These two main characters show growth and strength, make decisions that are right but not necessarily what they wanted, and learn to put others and their welfare before their own needs and wants. This is an intriguing tale that will please readers of historical fiction as well those who enjoy inspirational stories.
    more
  • Rachelle Cobb
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin. Sarah is a gifted author whose talent for weaving WWII novels that put you right into the thick of the historical setting while also crafting a love story that keeps you turning pages! I stayed up way too late one night to read this book and highly, highly recommend it. I'm convinced this is Sarah’s best, most epic novel yet.
    more
  • Danielle Urban
    January 1, 1970
    The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin is about sacrifices, bravery, and forgiveness. Love develops between two characters but it does not solidify until much later. A man whose family never made him feel proud of being a part of them, leaves for the military. He works his butt off and proves to be a wonderful soldier. But he battles with his sorrow, loss, and anger daily. Until, little by little it dissolves. A young woman works her way up in life and searches for her family. She too, is battling The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin is about sacrifices, bravery, and forgiveness. Love develops between two characters but it does not solidify until much later. A man whose family never made him feel proud of being a part of them, leaves for the military. He works his butt off and proves to be a wonderful soldier. But he battles with his sorrow, loss, and anger daily. Until, little by little it dissolves. A young woman works her way up in life and searches for her family. She too, is battling some of the same demons as her lover. She also fears that her love for a man isn't returned. Only time, will tell. I found this novel, heartbreaking. It was sweet and engaging from the start. This is one historical novel I recommend to all readers.I received this copy from the publisher. This is my voluntary review.
    more
  • Reeds
    January 1, 1970
    Ever since I discovered Sarah Sundin's books in the spring of 2015, with "With Every Letter" I've looked forward to her newest book every spring, this one is no different. I'll read it as soon as I can get my hands on it.
  • Erin Laramore
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my - what a satsifying conclusion to this series! I loved both of the other books, but I believe this one was my favorite. This is book 3 in the Sunrise at Normandy series, and while the story-line itself could stand alone, I'd definitely recommend reading the other books first so you can get the overall family dynamics of the Paxtons, as well as get the full effect of the epilogue. Fans of the series will be glad to see the youngest brother, Clay, finally get his story. I know I've been Oh my - what a satsifying conclusion to this series! I loved both of the other books, but I believe this one was my favorite. This is book 3 in the Sunrise at Normandy series, and while the story-line itself could stand alone, I'd definitely recommend reading the other books first so you can get the overall family dynamics of the Paxtons, as well as get the full effect of the epilogue. Fans of the series will be glad to see the youngest brother, Clay, finally get his story. I know I've been anxiously awaiting this final installment. Clay Paxton is the youngest of the 3 Paxton brothers and was greatly wronged by both of his older brothers before they left home. After working for the family business for a couple of years, he was drafted into the Army and joined the Rangers, thus bringing in the "land" of the land, air and sea raid at Normandy. While in training, he meets Leah Jones, a young girl working at the base library. Leah grew up as an orphan and didn't even remember her birth name, but she has found the good in all of her circumstance, and the 2 of them help each other to heal from past wounds.While being rich in historical details of D-Day, this story was a beautiful tale of love and forgiveness. This book had wonderful characters and was so well written. The action had me on the edge of my seat, and the romance was so sweet - Clay and Leah are a couple worth rooting for. The faith thread was strong as they both learned to give up their dreams into the arms of their Savior and seek out healing and forgiveness. There were even some good mystery elements as Clay tried to find out who the "villain" of the story was and Leah sought the details of her past. This book had a little bit of something for everyone and I absolutely adored it! I would strongly recommend this book to fans of historical fiction.Speical thanks to NetGalley for an advanced e-copy of this book. I was under no obligation to provide a review and the thoughts contained herein are my own.
    more
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    This was a beautiful conclusion to the Sunrise at Normandy series. It brought us to the end of WWII and gave us a lovely finish to the Paxton brothers’ story. Clay and Leah were probably the finest characters I’ve read in a Sundin novel. She has upped her game. But what I really give her kudos for, is the quality messaging that is jam packed in this novel. Forgiveness, repentance, faith, trust, unconditional love, and more were all incorporated without sounding forced or preachy. I also liked This was a beautiful conclusion to the Sunrise at Normandy series. It brought us to the end of WWII and gave us a lovely finish to the Paxton brothers’ story. Clay and Leah were probably the finest characters I’ve read in a Sundin novel. She has upped her game. But what I really give her kudos for, is the quality messaging that is jam packed in this novel. Forgiveness, repentance, faith, trust, unconditional love, and more were all incorporated without sounding forced or preachy. I also liked reading about different forms of battle in each of these books (sea, air & land). As for my star rating, I really enjoyed the first and last quarter of the book. Through the middle section, however, I did find myself skimming sections. Hence I deducted one star. But it looks like most readers so far have not had this reaction, and I’m glad. I recommend this series be read in order. It’s a good one and I’m glad I had the opportunity to read it.
    more
  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book, and the only thing I didn’t like was that it ended! The whole series was wonderful, and loved how it all tied in together, and each son did his own part on D-Day.This is the third son of the Paxton family’s story, Clay, we have previously met Wyatt and Adler, and if you haven’t read them, their books are just as good!We also met a girl who has grown up in an orphanage, and is searching for her identity, she wants to know who she is, and the world has tried its hardest to put I loved this book, and the only thing I didn’t like was that it ended! The whole series was wonderful, and loved how it all tied in together, and each son did his own part on D-Day.This is the third son of the Paxton family’s story, Clay, we have previously met Wyatt and Adler, and if you haven’t read them, their books are just as good!We also met a girl who has grown up in an orphanage, and is searching for her identity, she wants to know who she is, and the world has tried its hardest to put her down. As you can see from the description Clay comes to her rescue, and how he helps her is endearing, but what of the future?The author made this book more special for me personally as she had Clay taken to the USS Texas, my Dad’s ship during the war.Don’t miss the ending, or the author’s notes!I received this book through Library Thing and the Publisher Revell, and was not required to give a positive review.
    more
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    When Clay and Leah first meet at Camp Forrest, Tennessee, they are both lost and confused in their lives. Clay is estranged from his brothers and wants to go to war to fulfill his dream and Leah is a librarian who has had a tough life. She was adopted as a young girl when her parents were killed in an accident. After a few years, her new parents got tired of her and dropped her off at another orphanage. When she has free time, she does research to try to find out more about her earlier life and When Clay and Leah first meet at Camp Forrest, Tennessee, they are both lost and confused in their lives. Clay is estranged from his brothers and wants to go to war to fulfill his dream and Leah is a librarian who has had a tough life. She was adopted as a young girl when her parents were killed in an accident. After a few years, her new parents got tired of her and dropped her off at another orphanage. When she has free time, she does research to try to find out more about her earlier life and to try to find her younger sisters who were also adopted but she had no idea where they were. When Clay saves Leah from a brutal attack their friendship grows and they decide on a marriage of convenience so that Leah has money to live on from his allotment. As they write letters, their feelings for each other begin to change but will they ever see each other again or will Clay become a causality of the war?This is a story about love and friendship, family and forgiveness. Both characters are looking for their path in life and they can only find it by looking forward instead of back to their pasts. This is more than just a romance - it's the story of two people who have to accept who they are to be able to move forward and find love.Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This book y'all!! This author!! She sure knows how to tell a story!! Blew me away!This story hit too close to home for me.The only difference is Leah was able to accomplish her goal where I wasn't.I mean I sat down and bawled right along with Leah. I love the gentle reminder that was in the book. I really didn't like how Clay kept repeating the same thing all the time. It did get on my nerves after awhile but he is a good man. I loved how he took his responsibility seriously and I really enjoyed This book y'all!! This author!! She sure knows how to tell a story!! Blew me away!This story hit too close to home for me.The only difference is Leah was able to accomplish her goal where I wasn't.I mean I sat down and bawled right along with Leah. I love the gentle reminder that was in the book. I really didn't like how Clay kept repeating the same thing all the time. It did get on my nerves after awhile but he is a good man. I loved how he took his responsibility seriously and I really enjoyed how he carried his weight through the war. He's my hero minus the theory he had set for himself. No one knows their future. Only God knows. He is the one who knows when our time is up.The other reason I enjoyed this book so much was because my grandfather fought the Germans in this war. This is what got me started loving ww2 stories! Of course over the years his stories changed up a bit as he got older. some were funny and others well, let's just say sad. As he told them I could picture him over there fighting. He brought all kinds of German stuff home! I didn't know this until after my grandma passed away. .Sundin has gone above and beyond in this book! I couldn't put the book down because it was so good!! I highly recommend this book! My thanks to Netgalley and Revell for a copy of this book. All opinions are my own. NO compensations were received.
    more
  • Nancee
    January 1, 1970
    The Land Beneath Us is the third in this series, and I had not read the first or second books. There was only one reference to a person that I did not recognize, so in my opinion this book can easily stand on its own. The cast of characters is diverse and well described, and the settings throughout were very well documented. It is obvious that a lot of research went into this book, particularly of D-Day, and the preparation that went into it.This book evoked a wealth of emotions that at times The Land Beneath Us is the third in this series, and I had not read the first or second books. There was only one reference to a person that I did not recognize, so in my opinion this book can easily stand on its own. The cast of characters is diverse and well described, and the settings throughout were very well documented. It is obvious that a lot of research went into this book, particularly of D-Day, and the preparation that went into it.This book evoked a wealth of emotions that at times brought me to tears, and other times I rejoiced. Prejudice, empathy and forgiveness are highlights through this touching story. I have read several of this author's books, and find that she weaves deep human emotions into her characters that have a major impact on the reader. Family issues are at the core of both main characters, and overcoming those obstacles is an important part of healing and reconciliation. I enjoyed this book very much, and will more than likely pick up copies of the prequels to it. I highly recommend this book.Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through a LibraryThing giveaway. All expressed opinions are honest and my own.
    more
  • Linda Klager
    January 1, 1970
    Review of "The Land Beneath Us" by Sarah SundinThe cover of the book showed a beautiful woman's concern as she thought of her sweetheart climbing the dangerous cliffs at Normandy!I can't imagine the immense grief Leah felt to have lost her parents and her two younger sisters! The loneliness and despair of being an orphan must have been just so terrible. And then to have been treated so badly by others, too! Leah related her unloved life to Leah in the Bible. Clay Paxton was mistreated by his Review of "The Land Beneath Us" by Sarah SundinThe cover of the book showed a beautiful woman's concern as she thought of her sweetheart climbing the dangerous cliffs at Normandy!I can't imagine the immense grief Leah felt to have lost her parents and her two younger sisters! The loneliness and despair of being an orphan must have been just so terrible. And then to have been treated so badly by others, too! Leah related her unloved life to Leah in the Bible. Clay Paxton was mistreated by his brothers. Clay related his life to Joseph's life in the pit. I thought this was a wonderful way to depict the Old Testament Bible story with his life in the 1940's. I also admired the way the author seamlessly included Scripture while Leah and Clay were living their lives. Later on Clay realized he was really living the life of the older brother of the New Testament story of "The Prodigal Son". Wow, what a God moment Clay had! That made me stop and think about my own life! Do I need to ask for forgiveness?The author's research of military life and weaponry was astounding. I could picture the areas of service both in America and overseas.I thought it very interesting Clay's outlook on life. He had a true servant attitude. I wonder if many others have gone into the military with the same attitude that Clay had.I give this wonderful story a 5 star rating. This book was provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group/Revell, through Interviews and Reviews.
    more
  • MJSH
    January 1, 1970
    "There are even more blessings I can't yet see. But I will. I only have to watch."I've loved every book by Sarah Sundin that I've read so far. I've also been a huge fan of the Paxton brothers from this Sunrise at Normandy series and have been anxiously waiting for the youngest brother's story to unfold. And, boy, the book was totally worth the wait. Though it's the third and last book of the series, it can definitely be read as a stand-alone. I really enjoyed the details of the Army Ranger "There are even more blessings I can't yet see. But I will. I only have to watch."I've loved every book by Sarah Sundin that I've read so far. I've also been a huge fan of the Paxton brothers from this Sunrise at Normandy series and have been anxiously waiting for the youngest brother's story to unfold. And, boy, the book was totally worth the wait. Though it's the third and last book of the series, it can definitely be read as a stand-alone. I really enjoyed the details of the Army Ranger training Clay goes through as well as the close-up and emotional look at D-Day from the ground. The series focuses on true forgiveness, mercy, grace, reconciliation, and recognizing and embracing their place in the world but each book and set of hero/heroine are so different and unforgettable. If you enjoy historical fiction, especially set during WWII, you will love this book and the series.I have to confess that Clay is indeed my favorite Paxton brother. As the youngest and the one to whom most wrong has been done, he feels that he has the right to be angry, disillusioned, and hopeless yet God tugs at his heart to be kind and sacrificial and he obeys. His tender spirit that wants to heal and encourage totally swept me off my feet. And Leah.... man, her story is heart-breaking and she's had as much wrong done to her as Clay but her hopeful heart and soul cling to God and a brighter tomorrow. How she loves books and children made us instant friends. We also get to meet the Paxton parents in this book, which was so delightful. What a beautiful conclusion to a fantastic series!I received a copy of the book from Baker Publishing Group via Interviews and Reviews and was under no obligation to post a positive review. All comments and opinions are solely my own.
    more
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    It's not often a book exceeds my expectations, especially one that has a trope that can tend to have objectionable content, but this book did exactly that. The character development is a defining element here. Clay was harshly treated because of his ethnicity and betrayed and robbed by his brothers, who were supposed to back him up and support him, but he never became angry at the world or turned his back on God. I was bracing myself for the impact that never came, because pleasantly Clay turned It's not often a book exceeds my expectations, especially one that has a trope that can tend to have objectionable content, but this book did exactly that. The character development is a defining element here. Clay was harshly treated because of his ethnicity and betrayed and robbed by his brothers, who were supposed to back him up and support him, but he never became angry at the world or turned his back on God. I was bracing myself for the impact that never came, because pleasantly Clay turned out to be strong and steady, instead of angry and reckless. Both main characters were realistic through their struggles and responses. Leah couldn't have gone through being treated like a shabby, worthless orphan most of her life without feeling the pain of rejection and inadequacy, or this deeply affecting her, intensified by the fact that she had no support system, no one to back her against those who mistreated her. That's why when I was introduced to this sweet, selfless, and hopeful orphan, I couldn't help wanting to hug her. Both Clay and Leah grow in character, overcome obstacles, and support each other. Their relationship was based on a selfless, sacrificial decision, and I love how they offered encouragement to each other in whatever ways they could. Since this is a marriage of convenience story, I was concerned that it might have steamy scenes, but the author kept the relationship on a platonic level for most of the book (all but (view spoiler)[ 20 pages (hide spoiler)] in fact) because she is skilled at subtly growing a relationship through correspondence. And because of that, I've found a new favorite. Also, I highly recommend reading this with a two-pound bag of Brookside chocolate, like I did. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin is not only a good story but it is a book that I found spiritually stimulating. Sundin surprised me with this plot initially. Clay was looking for something to live for and Leah was looking for a place to belong. I wasn't expecting some of the challenges that these characters faced early in this book--although I did expect the happy ending and I was glad for it. This cover grabbed me right away. I purchased the first two books in this series (The Sea Before Us The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin is not only a good story but it is a book that I found spiritually stimulating. Sundin surprised me with this plot initially. Clay was looking for something to live for and Leah was looking for a place to belong. I wasn't expecting some of the challenges that these characters faced early in this book--although I did expect the happy ending and I was glad for it. This cover grabbed me right away. I purchased the first two books in this series (The Sea Before Us and The Sky Above Us) and I honestly intended to read them first, but I must admit I did not. However, while I may have recognized some of the characters from previous books in this one if I had read them first, I was still drawn in by this plot and read The Land Beneath Us within a couple of days. There was a couple of places Sundin made me giggle at things that were said but she also touched me deeply as I shed tears in other places. Of course, I would recommend this book to anyone who has read the series, but I also feel the book stands on its own merit. This book is a real inspiration for those who are struggling with forgiveness. In several places, both Clay and Leah made me think about what forgiveness really means. Sundin's characters also inspired me to think further about how we judge people based on what we see and not what we know. For me, this book challenged both my heart and my soul and yet it wasn't preachy. This spiritual elements felt like a natural part of the story.I received this book courtesy of Baker Publishing Group, Revell Division, through Interviews and Reviews. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Callie
    January 1, 1970
    Sarah Sundin’s final novel in the “Sunrise at Normandy” trilogy ties up the stories of the Paxton brothers during WWII–one by plane, one by sea, one by land, each fighting for freedom. I have read each book in this series, but I think it would work fine as a stand-alone if you haven’t read the previous two books. There is a lot of tie-in to the other books, but there is also a good bit of recap of what happened.The Land Beneath Us picks up with the story of the youngest Paxton brother, Clay. Sarah Sundin’s final novel in the “Sunrise at Normandy” trilogy ties up the stories of the Paxton brothers during WWII–one by plane, one by sea, one by land, each fighting for freedom. I have read each book in this series, but I think it would work fine as a stand-alone if you haven’t read the previous two books. There is a lot of tie-in to the other books, but there is also a good bit of recap of what happened.The Land Beneath Us picks up with the story of the youngest Paxton brother, Clay. Having joined the army in WWII, we get to see the war from the perspective of being on land. One of the reasons I love Sundin’s books is because they seem so well-researched and authentic, and I feel as if I walk away from reading it more educated than when I started, but still thoroughly entertained.I really enjoyed this final installment in the trilogy, but I would like to put a content warning that there is a rape scene–well written, implied more than it said, but could still be a trigger for some. The themes of forgiveness and reconciliation were strongly present throughout the book, which was inspiring. I appreciated that they were woven in, not in a bright and cheery Hallmark movie type of way, but in a real, hard, gritty situation where it would be easier to hold a grudge. I felt it made it more relatable and real. I would recommend this book to older readers, particularly if you read the first two books prior, as it brings a fullness to the story when you do.Thank you to Net Galley and Revell publishers for sending me an electronic copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own and were not required to be positive.*Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention/review it on my blog. I was not required to give a positive review, only my honest opinion – which I’ve done. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own and I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.*
    more
  • Lisa Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Title: The Land Beneath Us (Sunrise at Normandy #3)Author: Sarah SundinPages: 384Year: 2020Publisher: RevellMy rating: 5 out of 5 starsSarah Sundin has succeeded once again in telling a story that captivates the imagination during the WWII era. The series has two previous novels in it that might help readers fully appreciate the concluding story in The Land Beneath Us; they are The Sea Before Us & The Sky Above Us. The series begins by introducing us to three brothers who enjoy a close Title: The Land Beneath Us (Sunrise at Normandy #3)Author: Sarah SundinPages: 384Year: 2020Publisher: RevellMy rating: 5 out of 5 starsSarah Sundin has succeeded once again in telling a story that captivates the imagination during the WWII era. The series has two previous novels in it that might help readers fully appreciate the concluding story in The Land Beneath Us; they are The Sea Before Us & The Sky Above Us. The series begins by introducing us to three brothers who enjoy a close relationship with each other and a tightly knit family. Those threads are about to come loose when tragedy strikes in the first book, sending the brothers in three different directions. Wyatt, Adler and Clay are unceremoniously caught up in WWII, serving in different branches of the armed services as well as a war within the family. In the final installment, we enjoy Clay’s story. Sarah Sundin crafts a heart-gripping tale that helps reveal more of who Clay is, what he likes, his dreams and his attempt at outrunning God. While in Ranger school at base in the states, he meets a woman of small stature who has a big heart and faith. When Clay least expects it, he is drawn to Leah. In a twist of plot, he ends up saving her life, then she may just be saving his too!The plot thickens when the brothers might just end up running into each other on D-Day. The bigger plot is can they overcome mistakes made, find forgiveness with God and then forgive each other? Leah is a woman many have looked down on as she became an orphan and had many experiences where people thought less of her because of her past. However, those very experiences cause Leah to become a woman who sees the best in people, lifts others up and dares to hope for a better future.The ending to this story as well as the series is a work of a master storyteller. I can tell Sarah Sundin did more than just read about the war; she really did her homework! The details of scenes are impacting. I hope you read all three books and enjoy the tales that are filled with hope and faith.Note: The opinions shared in this review are solely my responsibility.
    more
  • A. Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    My Review Of The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin: Five stars.I was not prepared for this book. I knew I needed to read it, I knew I would enjoy it, yet I did not know how much The Land Beneath Us would touch my heart. After reading the first two books in the series, The Sea Before Us and The Sky Above Us, -- both of which I loved and even plan to reread in order -- I was waiting in suspense for my copy of The Land Beneath Us.What had me unprepared for this book was not the first books, rather My Review Of The Land Beneath Us by Sarah Sundin: Five stars.I was not prepared for this book. I knew I needed to read it, I knew I would enjoy it, yet I did not know how much The Land Beneath Us would touch my heart. After reading the first two books in the series, The Sea Before Us and The Sky Above Us, -- both of which I loved and even plan to reread in order -- I was waiting in suspense for my copy of The Land Beneath Us.What had me unprepared for this book was not the first books, rather the depth of The Land Beneath Us, the realness of the characters, reading about all that had happened to Clay at his brothers’ hands in the first books was sad, much like Joseph's brothers treated him, made me think that Clay would have a simple and perhaps boring story of forgiveness where I would see forgiveness in the last pages but no true fruits, I could not have been more wrong. I am still unsure of what to say after a few days waiting to write my review and I just want to sigh in pleasure with the feelings I'm still reeling from caused by this book.Sarah Sundin's skill in weaving this breathtaking conclusion to the Sunrise At Normandy series shows that her works only get better and that readers should be on the lookout for her next book, read this one, and check to see if they have read her previous books.I fell in love with Clay and Leah's romance that was not the normal trope you would find in War World Two fiction rather westerns, Regencys, or such that quite commonly have marriages of convenience, the slow love, first of friends, until it softly grows into something much more.Both of the lead characters are wonderful to read about and it's sad to leave them especially after seeing them through such tragedy and into a Biblical growth of character.The ending brings to mind Genesis 50:20 which I love, seeing as Joseph is something of a favorite in the Old Testament, and I love finding stories that have the same lessons and are their own story without being too close to the true story of Joseph, his brothers, and God's goodness.This book was provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group/Revell, through Interviews & Reviews.
    more
  • Rachel Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Sarah Sundin wrote a Marriage of Convenience story!! Repeat - Sarah Sundin wrote a Marriage of Convenience story!!!! And folks, it’s amazing! I can’t gush enough over her brilliant storytelling! I’ve been not-so-patiently waiting for this last installment to the Sunrise At Normandy series, and so when I finally got my hot little hands on The Land Beneath Us, I devoured the book! I confess to staying up past one o’clock because that ending was just…wow! This author has proven again and again that Sarah Sundin wrote a Marriage of Convenience story!! Repeat - Sarah Sundin wrote a Marriage of Convenience story!!!! And folks, it’s amazing! I can’t gush enough over her brilliant storytelling! I’ve been not-so-patiently waiting for this last installment to the Sunrise At Normandy series, and so when I finally got my hot little hands on The Land Beneath Us, I devoured the book! I confess to staying up past one o’clock because that ending was just…wow! This author has proven again and again that she knows her stuff concerning the World War II era, and this time she takes us into the trenches with the Rangers of the U.S. Army. There are portions that are intense, filled with combat, and then there are places when the romance steps forward and you find yourself sighing. There’s such an artful balance to it all! The heroine, Leah Jones, has faced a series of heartbreaks since her childhood. I found myself rooting for her to see herself as God sees her—valued, cherished, and loved. Then there’s the youngest Paxton brother, Clay, who had born the brunt of injustice and yet maintains that honorable spirit. His tenderness with Leah undid me several times throughout the story. This book is the perfect finale to a phenomenal series. I am going to miss those Paxton brothers, but a visit is only a bookshelf away.**I received a copy from the author/publisher. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a while since I have read a book from this author. Every book that I have read has been a four or five star read. Fans of historical fiction stories who have never tried a book from this author, need to pick up a book. You are in for a real treat. Clay and Leah may have come from different walks of life but they had on thing in common. They were both broken. With each other's support and God's strength, Leah and Clay were able to gain mended hearts filled with love.Both of their It has been a while since I have read a book from this author. Every book that I have read has been a four or five star read. Fans of historical fiction stories who have never tried a book from this author, need to pick up a book. You are in for a real treat. Clay and Leah may have come from different walks of life but they had on thing in common. They were both broken. With each other's support and God's strength, Leah and Clay were able to gain mended hearts filled with love.Both of their stories were great. The heart does grow fonder with distance. You could feel the love that Clay had for Leah with his letters. As I was reading this book, I was transported back in time. I could see everything that Clay and Leah experienced as if I was there with them. I have discovered a renewed love again for author, Sarah Sundin with this book.
    more
  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    What a great series based upon the three different ways the U.S. fought at Normandy (air, land and sea). In The Land Beneath Us, the youngest Paxton brother becomes a U.S. Army Ranger while holding at bay his prior dream to become a doctor.Leah Jones is a young adult that grew up from the age of four as an orphanage. Leah and Clay's paths cross at the Camp Forrest library where she is a librarian assistant.Both of their stories were engaging. And the ending wraps up all three novels beautifully. What a great series based upon the three different ways the U.S. fought at Normandy (air, land and sea). In The Land Beneath Us, the youngest Paxton brother becomes a U.S. Army Ranger while holding at bay his prior dream to become a doctor.Leah Jones is a young adult that grew up from the age of four as an orphanage. Leah and Clay's paths cross at the Camp Forrest library where she is a librarian assistant.Both of their stories were engaging. And the ending wraps up all three novels beautifully. This is my new favorite Sarah Sundin series.
    more
  • Christine Roberts
    January 1, 1970
    Leah is on her own for the first time in her life. Leaving the orphanage that has been her home, she volunteers to help run the Camp Forrest Army library. Surrounded by her beloved books, she meets Private Clay Paxton and is impressed by his kindness. Leah is also intrigued by Clay’s interest in medicine, when he states he just wants to be an Army Ranger, not a medic because his destiny is to die in battle. When Leah’s life is threatened, Clay steps forward to help her...but might she be the one Leah is on her own for the first time in her life. Leaving the orphanage that has been her home, she volunteers to help run the Camp Forrest Army library. Surrounded by her beloved books, she meets Private Clay Paxton and is impressed by his kindness. Leah is also intrigued by Clay’s interest in medicine, when he states he just wants to be an Army Ranger, not a medic because his destiny is to die in battle. When Leah’s life is threatened, Clay steps forward to help her...but might she be the one to save him?An excellent book and a great ending to the Sunrise at Normandy series. Thank you LibraryThing for the advanced reader copies of all 3 books in this series! It has been a great journey with the characters, all through LT.
    more
  • Raechel
    January 1, 1970
    Goodness do I love Sarah Sundin’s novels! Each and every one of them have become favorites and I always eagerly await the next. It was such a treat to be able to read The Land Beneath Us – it is such a beautiful conclusion to this wonderful series. That epilogue pulled everything together so nicely, and just filled me with all the warm feelings.The characters are so beloved – I immediately took to main character Leah (Thalia!) in this book, and Clay was a perfect hero. Their relationship was Goodness do I love Sarah Sundin’s novels! Each and every one of them have become favorites and I always eagerly await the next. It was such a treat to be able to read The Land Beneath Us – it is such a beautiful conclusion to this wonderful series. That epilogue pulled everything together so nicely, and just filled me with all the warm feelings.The characters are so beloved – I immediately took to main character Leah (Thalia!) in this book, and Clay was a perfect hero. Their relationship was amazing, and I so dearly loved reading their story. They each went through wonderful journeys, and the faith message was lovely. I don’t have one bad thing to say about this book, it was so good. So, so good. I’m a bit sad to finish this series, but glad it is one I can revisit time and time again!Excellent WWII fiction. <3 *This book was provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group/Revell, through Interviews & Reviews.
    more
  • Phyllis
    January 1, 1970
    A stunning conclusion to the series!I've been looking forward to reading The Land Beneath Us, but now that I've finished, I'm a little sad this wonderful series has concluded. So now that I know how things worked out – I'm so glad!! It was the perfect conclusion. I even got teary at the end.I could easily fill this review about all the things I loved about Clay. His innate need to heal. His compassion. His protectiveness. His kindness. The way he didn't question whether to do the right thing. A stunning conclusion to the series!I've been looking forward to reading The Land Beneath Us, but now that I've finished, I'm a little sad this wonderful series has concluded. So now that I know how things worked out – I'm so glad!! It was the perfect conclusion. I even got teary at the end.I could easily fill this review about all the things I loved about Clay. His innate need to heal. His compassion. His protectiveness. His kindness. The way he didn't question whether to do the right thing. The way he wanted to play by the rules - even in a time of war. His insecurity caused by being a "half-breed". His brokenness. His need to forgive from his heart, which he longed to do - he just didn't know how.Clay's struggle to forgive his brothers had him realizing his role in the prodigal story of his family. And he didn't like it one bit! He struggled with pride, hurt and unforgiveness, as many of us do. Thankfully, he had a much stronger desire to have a right relationship with God. It was humbling and convicting to watch his spiritual journey.The recurring dream Clay had of how he would die allowed him to display a bravery he might not have had otherwise. "This isn't how I'm going to die". It allowed him to not second-guess his choice to marry Leah when she discovered the rape had resulted in a pregnancy. After all, she would be able to get his pay and his benefits and he wouldn't be losing a thing. Poor Clay hadn't realized that this marriage would make him want to live and question his resolve.Instead, I could fill the review about Leah and why she tore at my heart. An orphan who had been separated from her twin baby sisters when she was only four. Who had been treated with contempt because of her Greek heritage. Who had grown up knowing little but want. Who still understood love and forgiveness in a way many never will. Who was full of kindness and grace. Who exemplified such strength after being treated abominably.Leah's longtime desire was to be a librarian. She had an incredible love for books and words and sharing them with the world. Though her I learned so much about wartime efforts to bring books to the soldiers through book drives.She also had a heart for orphans, understanding personally what it was like to be cast aside. I was so surprised to see the attitudes of people towards orphans – as if the very fact of them not having parents was a reflection on them. She had been questing her entire life to discover who she was, where her sisters were, and to finally belong.But if I only told you of the way I loved Clay and Leah, I would be negligent in telling you many other wonderful things about this story!I loved the way Clay and Leah's relationship was mostly established through their letters. And how they struggled to navigate their marriage of convenience with an expiration date.I don't remember loving Clay's mom in the other books in this series as much as I loved her here. Her mother's heart and the way she so quickly embraced Leah and cared for her in such a beautiful way touched my heart.As with the other books in the Sunrise at Normandy series, I learned so much about the preparations for the D-Day invasion and the events that ensued. I was fascinated to learn the ways the Rangers trained and their role on the ground. Keeping the focus on the action and away from gore, Sarah Sundin made history come to life.While I could gush on, I'll spare you and simply recommend you read The Land Beneath Us and read it. After you've read the first two books of the Sunrise at Normandy series, of course. You could easily read this as a stand-alone; however, the author does not reiterate the details she has already covered in the first two books here so you will miss out on so much if you skip the others.Read my full review at Among the ReadsI was given a copy of this book. I was not required to give a favorable review nor was any money received for this review. All comments and opinions are my own.
    more
  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you in advance to Revell Books for providing a complimentary review copy through Interviews and Reviews. A positive review was not required. All words and thoughts are my own. This is the third and final book in the “Sunrise at Normandy” series. I was not able to read the previous two, but this could be a solid stand-alone read. Though I would HIGHLY encourage reading the previous two to get the full impact of this emotional saga.This, much-anticipated release; is also one of the first to Thank you in advance to Revell Books for providing a complimentary review copy through Interviews and Reviews. A positive review was not required. All words and thoughts are my own. This is the third and final book in the “Sunrise at Normandy” series. I was not able to read the previous two, but this could be a solid stand-alone read. Though I would HIGHLY encourage reading the previous two to get the full impact of this emotional saga.This, much-anticipated release; is also one of the first to be featured on Revell’s Facebook page – “Beyond the Book” for the first “read-a-long”. It took me about 12 hours over three (3) days to finish.As someone who isn’t into historical fiction, let alone “war stories”, I was drawn to this novel. The striking and stunning cover balances the love stories of the time with the brutality of World War II. Not only was the war itself brutal, but a brutal attack on Leah is also present. In fact, it sets the stage for what happens. I was also drawn to it because of the fact that my grandfather served in the Navy during World War II. He was on an escort carrier that had been hit by a Kamikaze. The ship miraculously stayed afloat, and there was no loss of life. Sadly, he would pass in 1980 before I would get to hear his stories. While he told my mom some, there were others he never told. Right off this story is going to have a sad undertone due to the setting. This was a time that changed everything for the United States. Yet, despite knowing what was going to happen (at least on the war front), this was a novel I couldn’t put down. Nor, did I want to. I could barely take notes for the read-along and my review. This story had messages of hope and inspiration throughout it despite the overwhelming sadness and despair. The author’s writing was so vivid that I felt pulled back into the time. So much so that I could almost hear the “big band music” while reading it. For those who don’t quite know what that is, think The Andrews Sisters “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree”, or Glen Miller. I immediately fell in love with Leah and Clay. As in chapter two (2) “immediately”. Clay came off as such a sweetheart, and I found myself praying for him and hoping his “dream” wouldn’t come true. I kept praying he’d take the route he was being offered during his training.Leah’s background tore at my heart. She was such a pure and innocent soul. I passionately despised a certain couple from her past. And, like her, I have found myself wondering why things happened to me.As I didn’t read Sundin’s prior two books; which I will definitely purchase (as soon as I can afford them); I don’t know if the other two novels contained this intense story-telling, but this was intense. Sundin doesn’t back down from sensitive issues either.There was one character I had a bad feeling about right off. At times it is heart-breaking, hopeless, and sad. Yet, there was overwhelming redemption, hope, and charity throughout. Other themes were those of one’s past being held against them, false accusations, and prejudices. Sundin also delves into the different societal roles, particularly with orphan children and people’s perception of them.The marriage of convenience is more in line with “biblical, charitable” love. Both Leah and Clay begin to care for each other throughout the novel.There are a lot of Christian references. They are not overwhelming, nor preachy in tone. But, context due to the time the story takes place in, it is completely understandable. What really grabbed me was how one character came to their epiphany. And, in reading it, I was moved to tears. It is an emotionally moving end to the saga.It is no wonder that the men and women of that time are called “the greatest generation”.There was a recurring theme of sexual assault and murder of young women though.This is absolute perfection! 5/5 stars. It will be high on the re-read list.
    more
  • Ferne
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive a pre-publication copy of this title as an “Early Reviewer” from Library Thing.I was first drawn to request this novel because as a retired librarian and WWII veteran’s daughter I was very interested to learn Leah’s story. I read many stories highlighting librarians but mostly in the genre of cozy mysteries. I sensed that this story would have more depth and I was hopeful to receive a pre-publication copy but knew that even if I wasn’t selected I would order the I was lucky enough to receive a pre-publication copy of this title as an “Early Reviewer” from Library Thing.I was first drawn to request this novel because as a retired librarian and WWII veteran’s daughter I was very interested to learn Leah’s story. I read many stories highlighting librarians but mostly in the genre of cozy mysteries. I sensed that this story would have more depth and I was hopeful to receive a pre-publication copy but knew that even if I wasn’t selected I would order the novel to read. From reading the opening page and meeting Private Clay Paxton at Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Friday, June 11, 1943, I knew I was about to immerse myself in an extraordinary story. As I turned the pages to meet Leah Jones through the beginning lines of her poem I could not wait to read more. Watching the film “Saving Private Ryan” is my first memory of learning details of the Allied assault on the beaches of Normandy, France, to begin the liberation of Europe and the turning of the Nazi tide in World War II. Now the visuals were brought to the forefront of my mind as I began reading of Clay’s training for the Rangers at Camp Forrest, the overseas voyage in a cramped ship, continued training before D-Day and ultimately the mission itself. In meeting Leah at Camp Forrest the author seamlessly transitions the reader between Clay and Leah’s experiences. As I absorbed their stories I was captivated by Sarah Sundin’s writing of this fictional story told against the backdrop of unforgettable world history.The story is beautifully written and shares the Christian faith in a meaningful way by introducing us to the character of Leah living a daily life that “walks the talk.” It is not that Leah is a flawless character or a character that has had a perfect childhood or has a perfect life but through her faith we can remember many teachings from our own Christian backgrounds that we may have forgotten about loving others as ourselves, humility, and especially forgiveness.Reading a variety of novels I have felt deeply and with heartfelt emotion for many characters over the years but rarely do I cry or laugh out loud as I do when watching movies. As I read “The Land Beneath Us” there were several pages where I had to dry my eyes before I could continue reading. Leah’s poetry showed not only her talent but the love of her younger sisters. With Leah’s deep and abiding faith she was able to find strength not only for herself in tough situations but to share it through her actions and words to everyone that she met on her life journey. In turn, as Clay questioned whether forgiveness was possible to give brothers Wyatt and Adler, Clay never wavers in friendship to his buddies nor to whatever training exercise or mission assigned.I cannot comment on this novel as described as the third novel in the Sunrise at Normandy series. However, I am always delighted when opportunity presents itself to not necessarily read a series in order nor to have needed to read earlier novels to understand the current story. It is also pleasing that the current story doesn't pause in limbo as the author presents a segment of earlier character description of the Paxton brothers. That said, I have already ordered copies of the first two (2) books in the series – “The Sea Before Us” (primarily Wyatt’s story) and “The Sky Above Us” (primarily Adler’s story) and eagerly await arrival of the titles. Although I rarely read novels again as there are so many novels that I wish to read and await my attention in the tbr corner of our home I know without doubt that after reading the first two (2) novels in this series, I’ll re-read “The Land Beneath Us.”
    more
  • Kristi Drillien
    January 1, 1970
    Clay Paxton is training to be a U.S. Army Ranger in advance of the Allied invasion of France in WWII. Leah Jones is a librarian on the military base where he’s training. He has no future, due to a recurring dream that he sees as a premonition of his death during the invasion. She has no past, orphaned at the age of 4 and torn away from her baby sisters, with no familial connections. A marriage as friends gives them both something they need, and shortly thereafter, Clay ships off for further Clay Paxton is training to be a U.S. Army Ranger in advance of the Allied invasion of France in WWII. Leah Jones is a librarian on the military base where he’s training. He has no future, due to a recurring dream that he sees as a premonition of his death during the invasion. She has no past, orphaned at the age of 4 and torn away from her baby sisters, with no familial connections. A marriage as friends gives them both something they need, and shortly thereafter, Clay ships off for further training, expecting never to return. Neither can anticipate what will happen in the months leading up to D-Day.This book is just so beautiful in so many ways. The main characters are both so kind and compassionate, so often willing to put others before themselves, and yet both have flaws to try to overcome. The events throughout the book meld together so well, and yet, not everything turns out perfectly. And the writing itself is clear, with a style that I found I particularly enjoyed.I am not a history buff at all, so understand I have very little basis to say this, but I felt that the book was very well researched. With real events, real locations, and even some real people from history who were participants in this part of the invasion, it all felt very real for me.As far as the romance goes, I know everyone has their preferences–what they like and don’t like in romance. This one hit all of the right buttons for me. I requested the ARC specifically because of 3 words in the synopsis: “marriage of convenience”. I have always loved stories where a romance develops between two people who married because they felt they had to. And it absolutely did not disappoint. There was something in the last quarter of the book that started to bug me a bit (being vague to avoid spoilers), but it paid off in the best scene ever!I also love the fact that the romance isn’t right there in your face the whole time. It’s not the main plot, while a few other things happen as a vehicle for it. The rest of the story is full in its own right, and the romance is interweaved into that so wonderfully. I also love how both characters are so incredibly faith-driven and turn to God for help and strength constantly. Both of these characters are paralleled with Biblical characters–Leah with her namesake who was unloved by her husband. And Clay even more strongly with Joseph, who was cast into a pit by his brothers, which is how Clay feels about his own situation.When I first requested this ARC to read & review, I saw that it was #3 in a series, but it looked to me (with a quick glance) that the novels were stand-alones. While reading, I quickly realized that they aren’t really. The three books in this series are about 3 brothers, and the other two appear in this book in some form too. This book ties up a storyline that I’m sure must thread through the first two books in some way. I’m a little sad that I read the last one first, but I loved this one so much, I’m going to have to read the others very soon! And then I’ll probably go on to try a different series by this author. This book will be the standard by which I measure all Christian romances in the future, and I don’t see it getting much better than this.In case it’s not clear from my review, I absolutely recommend this book to all who enjoy Christian romance, Christian historical novels, and/or books with a strong focus on forgiveness and finding a place to belong.Thank you so much to Netgalley and Barbour Publishing, Inc. for providing me a copy of this book to review!
    more
Write a review