The Traitor
Drawing on the true story of the White Rose—the resistance movement of young Germans against the Nazi regime—The Traitor tells of one woman who offers her life in the ultimate battle against tyranny, during one of history’s darkest hours. In the summer of 1942, as war rages across Europe, a series of anonymous leaflets appears around the University of Munich, speaking out against escalating Nazi atrocities. The leaflets are hidden in public places, or mailed to addresses selected at random from the phone book. Natalya Petrovich, a student, knows who is behind the leaflets—a secret group called the White Rose, led by siblings Hans and Sophie Scholl and their friends. As a volunteer nurse on the Russian front, Natalya witnessed the horrors of war first-hand. She willingly enters the White Rose’s circle, where every hushed conversation, every small act of dissent could mean imprisonment or death at the hands of an infuriated Gestapo. Natalya risks everything alongside her friends, hoping the power of words will encourage others to resist. But even among those she trusts most, there is no guarantee of safety—and when danger strikes, she must take an extraordinary gamble in her own personal struggle to survive.

The Traitor Details

TitleThe Traitor
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 25th, 2020
PublisherKensington
ISBN-139781496720399
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II

The Traitor Review

  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    OppositionThe Traitor is a compelling weave of fiction and imaginatively structured fact. A story that relives the harrowing days in Germany under Nazi rule, where young men and women espouse bravery, loyalty and fortitude in their opposition to the Nazi ideology. In 1942 several students at the University of Munich, led by brother and sister, Hans and Sophie Scholl, founded a non-violent, intellectual resistance group to the Nazi regime, called The White Rose (die Weiße Rose). The group OppositionThe Traitor is a compelling weave of fiction and imaginatively structured fact. A story that relives the harrowing days in Germany under Nazi rule, where young men and women espouse bravery, loyalty and fortitude in their opposition to the Nazi ideology. In 1942 several students at the University of Munich, led by brother and sister, Hans and Sophie Scholl, founded a non-violent, intellectual resistance group to the Nazi regime, called The White Rose (die Weiße Rose). The group conducted a leaflet and graffiti campaign to illustrate how Nazi power was destroying freedom and social values, killing millions of innocent people, and conducting an unjust war at the behest of a megalomaniac and his party.The White Rose Group risked their lives to challenge Hitler’s regime and the leaders were finally caught after a caretaker at the University of Munich reported them to the Gestapo. Siblings Sophie and Hans, along with their friend Christoph Probst, were executed by guillotine on 22 February 1943. Not only were the three leaders inspirational and brave but as they each went to their deaths they remained committed to their cause, loyal to their colleagues, and resolute to the end. Hans Scholl’s last words were “Let Freedom Live”, and Sophie stood upright and determined at her trial, constantly challenging the partisan judge. They were tried and executed the same day. Hans and Sophie SchollThe true story struck me deeply, how young men and women can assume the selfless dedication and bravery to a cause, at a time in history where cruel lurking horror was commonplace. This story is truly inspirational. “When you see the world in all its enchanting beauty, you’re sometimes reluctant to concede that the other side of the coin exists. The antithesis exists here, as it does everywhere, if only you open your eyes to it. But here the antithesis is accentuated by war to such an extent that a weak person sometimes can’t endure it.” The fictional aspects of the story place a young Russian-German woman Natalya Irenaovich Petrovich as a member of the White Rose Group. Natalya and her friend Lisa Kolbe undertook various ventures throughout the story, as they stray dangerously close to the authorities and exposure. V.S. Alexander writes a fictional novel through the eyes of Natalya and creates a wonderfully absorbing story with an authentic voice for the real activities of the White Rose Group. The use of the fictional characters enables a plot and dialogue to flow without compromising the true characters and paying them the highest respect by leaving their voices within legitimate historical material. The characters in the novel show the pervasive fear existing in German society at the time and how they struggled to maintain secrecy and caution with everyone that they encountered. The atmosphere of suspicion and the anxiety of what has become normal life is extremely well depicted. After the executions, the ongoing harrowing experiences suffered by Natalya are vivid, ruthless and tragic. What V.S. Alexander has achieved in her work is the blending of factual moments in history with such a compelling fictional narrative that creates an outstanding novel. It is fitting that this book is released in February. I would highly recommend this book and I’d like to thank Harper Collins, One More Chapter and NetGalley for providing me with a free ARC copy of the book in return for an honest review.
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  • Beata
    January 1, 1970
    The White Rose was a group of German anti-Nazi students who showed courage to defy the totalitarian system and who paid the highest price for their beliefs. The plot of The Traitor is based on The White Rose story, however, as the Authoress stresses, Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl and their friends are in the background, the main protagonist, Natalya Petrovich being in the limelight. I think this is an interesting HF, based on true tragic events, however, I expected the Scholls to be more 'visible' The White Rose was a group of German anti-Nazi students who showed courage to defy the totalitarian system and who paid the highest price for their beliefs. The plot of The Traitor is based on The White Rose story, however, as the Authoress stresses, Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl and their friends are in the background, the main protagonist, Natalya Petrovich being in the limelight. I think this is an interesting HF, based on true tragic events, however, I expected the Scholls to be more 'visible' in the novel. Although Natalya is, together with her friend, Lisa, extremely courageous, I cannot say I found everything believable, and the romance theme was the weakest part of the whole story although it may seem crucial to it.I would recommend this novel to anyone who has never heard of the Scholls as it gives a splendid insight into their lives and actions. The day at university when they were arrested is perfectly described. Also, their trials held by abominable Roland Freisler are told with every possible detail.
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  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsIn 1942, Natalya volunteers as a nurse for the German Red Cross and witnesses WWII on the Russian Front. After her time volunteering, she moves back home to Munich where she joins the White Rose resistance group with her close friends. After the group is caught, Natalya must keep resisting but does not know who she can trust.The inspiration for the novel is the White Rose resistance group. The main character, Natalya, does not join the White Rose organization until the very end of 3.5 starsIn 1942, Natalya volunteers as a nurse for the German Red Cross and witnesses WWII on the Russian Front. After her time volunteering, she moves back home to Munich where she joins the White Rose resistance group with her close friends. After the group is caught, Natalya must keep resisting but does not know who she can trust.The inspiration for the novel is the White Rose resistance group. The main character, Natalya, does not join the White Rose organization until the very end of chapter three (or 20% on a Kindle). Admittedly, I was hoping for more from the first half of the novel which is mostly about her involvement in White Rose. It really moved slowly and was passive. (Her involvement in the White Rose ended about around halfway into the story; so about 20-50% is her direct involvement in the White Rose.) On the other hand, several of the characters circulating during this time were real members of the White Rose group. A tribute to the true members of the White Rose resistance group was requited through the characters Alex Schmorell, Hans Scholl, and Sophie Scholl. Her journey after the resistance group was most interesting. This is the second half of the novel and was much more exciting. This includes court drama, a prison sentence, POW camp, and more that leads up to the end of the war.The narrator, Natalya, was hard to connect with. I liked her, I just wanted more depth from her. When reading WWII fiction there is a level of emotion to be expected, but Natalya's character did not evoke those feelings for me because her narration was often listless.Because of the great last half, I enjoyed it. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an advance copy. Opinions are my own. More on this: : Read about the guillotine used for Hans and Sophie Scholl. Hans and Sophie Scholl remain symbols of resistanceStadelheim Prison was widely known to execute its prisoners by guillotine. Main character, Natalya, experiences life in Stadelheim prison in the novel The Traitor.Hans Scholl (left), Sophie Scholl and Christoph Probst, leaders of the White Rose resistance. Photo taken from the Jewish Virtual Library.Weiße Rose Pavement Memorial in Munich Germany. Bronze pamphlets in reverence to Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl, and Christoph Probst. Visit the memorial here. Alex Schmorell, read more about him here.
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    White Rose was a peaceful resistance group in the Third Reich led by a group of students including siblings Hans and Sophie Scholl at the University of Munich. The group mailed leaflets to random people picked from the phone book, appealing to the “blindness of German people” and spreading “words of resistance, struggle, and hope.” They were mailed from different cities to different cities to “allay suspicion from the home city of Munich and to make the group seem much larger than it was.” White Rose was a peaceful resistance group in the Third Reich led by a group of students including siblings Hans and Sophie Scholl at the University of Munich. The group mailed leaflets to random people picked from the phone book, appealing to the “blindness of German people” and spreading “words of resistance, struggle, and hope.” They were mailed from different cities to different cities to “allay suspicion from the home city of Munich and to make the group seem much larger than it was.”Munich, 1938. Sixteen year old Natalya Pertovich notices her Jewish friends disappearing from her life, hiding in their houses to avoid any attention.1942. Numb to the horrors of war and feeling powerless, she then takes a step and heads to the Russian Front as a volunteer nurse for German Red Cross. There she makes friends, who back in Germany introduce her to the White Rose movement. “Everyone in the White Rose was chosen for their intelligence, their convictions, and their politics…” After witnessing horrors of war on the Russian front, she joins the movement.She gets involved in writing the leaflets, expressing about the oppressive government, the strangling of creativity of artists, the disappearance of originality and individuality, the death of the soul of the German People. “The Spirit of Germany has been crushed under a foul dictator’s iron boot.”As Sophie’s and Hans’ behavior become more and more brazen, they put themselves in danger of being discovered. Ultimately leading to their arrest and putting others in danger’s path.The character of Natalya exemplifies a strong woman. A woman who stands behind her convictions. Despite Hitler’s regime and his teachings on Aryan supremacy, she had “an urge to be free, to be my own woman, a nascent rebelliousness.” Drawing atmosphere of the time period by bringing the pressure put on students at university, which wasn’t a place for a woman. She should be by her husband and reproducing Aryan race. “Women should present a child every year to the Fuhrer.” By clashes between students and SS officers. By the restrictions of free movement, which made distribution of leaflets very dangerous.The story of Hans and Sophie is very touching. Sophie was a young student, who was mature beyond her years. “Child, but one of immense maturity and unyielding courage.”This beautifully imagined and poignant story pays honors to those young students and professors whose lives were cut short, who took a stand and fought peacefully for humanity, for what was right.This story doesn’t bring the graphic atrocities of WWII. It is informative and focuses on the lives of those who took part in the White Rose, with profoundly deeply moving characters and surroundings reflecting the time of war-torn places.“We had stood against tyranny when few did and many more should have taken a stand.”P.S. Also by this author, highly recommend The Taster – Hitler’s obsession with being poisoned.Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Based on the true story of the White Rose.Natalya became a member of the underground Resistance group the White Rose, but she got caught. The group took great risks to bring messages to the German people. These brave men and women risked their lives fighting against the enemy. Natalya was a traitor to Hitlers regime. She survives prison ut lost friends.I had never heard of the White Rose, so this alone peaked my interest. The book is well written and the author has researched WWII and the White Based on the true story of the White Rose.Natalya became a member of the underground Resistance group the White Rose, but she got caught. The group took great risks to bring messages to the German people. These brave men and women risked their lives fighting against the enemy. Natalya was a traitor to Hitlers regime. She survives prison ut lost friends.I had never heard of the White Rose, so this alone peaked my interest. The book is well written and the author has researched WWII and the White Rose. This is a story about brave men and women who risked their lives fighting the enemy. These people were traitors to the Nazis. This is a thought provoking read.I would like to thank NetGalley, HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter and the author V.S. Alexander for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    This intriguing new novel by V.S. Alexander gives the reader a look at the horrors of World War II from another perspective - those of Natalya Petrovich. Natalya is a German citizen, lives in Munich and is a student at the University. She was born in Russia but her parents moved to Munich when she was very young to have a better life. She sees the cruelty of the war when she volunteers to work as a nurse at the Russian front. When she returns to Munich, she vows to try to make a difference. When This intriguing new novel by V.S. Alexander gives the reader a look at the horrors of World War II from another perspective - those of Natalya Petrovich. Natalya is a German citizen, lives in Munich and is a student at the University. She was born in Russia but her parents moved to Munich when she was very young to have a better life. She sees the cruelty of the war when she volunteers to work as a nurse at the Russian front. When she returns to Munich, she vows to try to make a difference. When her best friend asks her to join a small resistance group called the White Rose, she knows that being part of the group could lead to her death but she is determined to take the chance if she can make a difference. Natalya risks her life and the lives of her parents hoping that her words and actions will encourage other people to resist what is happening in Germany. Will her gamble pay off and will she be able to make a difference or is the White Rose group destined to failure? As the Nazi hierarchy of Munich searches for the members of the group, Natalya's hopes for survival diminish and she must take an extraordinary gamble in her own personal struggle to survive.The plot of the novel is intriguing and suspenseful. I flew through the pages to find out what would happen to Natalya and the other members of the White Rose. I will admit to some tears during the story but the overwhelming feeling was the strength and resilience of many of the German citizens.Note: Be sure to read the author's notes at the end of the book to find out about the White Rose resistance group in Germany. Many of the characters in the novel are based on real people and the author did extensive research to learn more about the real people in the group and made an effort to 'marry fiction with history'.I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    The Traitor is inspired by the Germany's White Rose, a group of people, mostly in their early twenties, who resisted the Nazis from within Germany. The group was uncovered, and the majority of its members were executed. Rather than writing a fictionalized narrative of one of the White Rose members, V.S. Alexander invents one—Natalya, a Russian who immigrated to Germany as a child with her parents, in order to escape the Stalin regime in the Soviet Union.Natalya begins the novel as a relatively The Traitor is inspired by the Germany's White Rose, a group of people, mostly in their early twenties, who resisted the Nazis from within Germany. The group was uncovered, and the majority of its members were executed. Rather than writing a fictionalized narrative of one of the White Rose members, V.S. Alexander invents one—Natalya, a Russian who immigrated to Germany as a child with her parents, in order to escape the Stalin regime in the Soviet Union.Natalya begins the novel as a relatively naive volunteer, returning for the first time to the Soviet Union as a nurse affiliated with the German Army. While there, she befriends a local woman and her children. At this time, her first questions about the ethics of the Nazi regime arise. When Natalya returns home, she gradually finds herself among others asking similar questions and the novel moves from that point through to the conquest/liberation of Germany by the allied forces.I found the novel to be highly engaging and not, as it might have been, sensationalistic. Natalya is sincere in her opposition the the Nazis, but none of her decision-making is easy. Reading this novel gives some small taste of what it might be like to make such difficult, potentially life-threatening choices and also gives an excellent overview of WWII as it was experienced in Munich. The Traitor offers reading time well-spent.I received an electronic review copy of this title from the publisher via NetGalley. The opinions are my own.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The Traitor by V.S. Alexander is based on a true story regarding the White rose resistance movement. A group of students that attended the University of Munich resisted against the Nazi Regime. Most of the group where executed including Hans and Sophie Scholl, who are real, but the main character is fictionalNatalya Petrovich was born in Russia but came to Germany with her parents to get a better life and away from the Stalin regime. She attends the University of Munich. She also volunteers as a The Traitor by V.S. Alexander is based on a true story regarding the White rose resistance movement. A group of students that attended the University of Munich resisted against the Nazi Regime. Most of the group where executed including Hans and Sophie Scholl, who are real, but the main character is fictionalNatalya Petrovich was born in Russia but came to Germany with her parents to get a better life and away from the Stalin regime. She attends the University of Munich. She also volunteers as a nurse at the front and sees the horrors that take place there. She gets involved with the White Rose movements distributing leaflets. Risking her life going to different towns to spread the word. She also meets Garrick who tries to befriend her and wants to find out more about the movement, but can he be trusted?I have read several books of this period but, I wasn’t aware of White Rose movement until I read this book. This book is not a book to shock you as White rose was a peaceful movement, but it tells you that not all Germans in that time where bad. They were also victims of the war and the part they played to try and stop it. A well written, fictional account of what happened and if you like me like these types of books I highly recommend.
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  • Jena Henry
    January 1, 1970
    “Not all Germans were Nazis” is the subtitle of The Traitor. What impact and power! But most Germans were subjugated by the Nazis and most Germans suffered. This book tells the story of Natalya, as she participates with the White Rose resistance group during World War II in Munich.The real students behind the White Rose movement appear this book. Natalya is fictionalized. The White Rose, the meaning of the name is not known, was a peaceful movement by a small group of university students in 1942 “Not all Germans were Nazis” is the subtitle of The Traitor. What impact and power! But most Germans were subjugated by the Nazis and most Germans suffered. This book tells the story of Natalya, as she participates with the White Rose resistance group during World War II in Munich.The real students behind the White Rose movement appear this book. Natalya is fictionalized. The White Rose, the meaning of the name is not known, was a peaceful movement by a small group of university students in 1942 who secretly produced and disseminated anti-Nazi and Reich leaflets. “We are your conscience.” They also painted resistance messages on buildings at night. “Freedom!” “Down with Hitler” The leaders of the group were guillotined by the Nazis in 1943. They died bravely, without denouncing fellow members. The author tells us in the book notes that copies of the White Rose leaflets were smuggled to the Allies, who copied and dropped them by the millions over Germany.The book follows the life of Natalya, whose family emigrated to Munich, Germany from Russia to escape Stalin. At the Munich university, she meets members of the White Rose resistance. She also is pursued by a man who intrigues her- but can he be trusted? What about her landlady? And her own parents? As the war goes on, her suffering intensifies, but her spirit keeps her going.The topic of this Historical Fiction is gripping and inspiring, but the way it is presented is flat and distant, even though it is told in the first person by Natalya. The second half of the book is exciting, but we never get to really know Natalya or the other White Rose members. We are told about the horrors of living in Munich during World War II.Thanks to NetGalley, HarperCollinsUK, and One More Chapter for an advance review copy. This is my honest review.
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  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely enjoyed reading 'The Traitor' which was based on a true story. I had never heard of the White Rose group, so learned something new. I love reading about this period in history and was so grateful to have the chance to read this book by V S Alexander. I rarely write what a story is about as i prefer one to read the book for themselves, but i do highly recommend. I hope to read more books by this author. My thanks to Netgalley and the Publishers for my copy. This is my honest review I absolutely enjoyed reading 'The Traitor' which was based on a true story. I had never heard of the White Rose group, so learned something new. I love reading about this period in history and was so grateful to have the chance to read this book by V S Alexander. I rarely write what a story is about as i prefer one to read the book for themselves, but i do highly recommend. I hope to read more books by this author. My thanks to Netgalley and the Publishers for my copy. This is my honest review which i have voluntarily given.
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  • Andria Sedig
    January 1, 1970
    I felt like the presentation of Natalya's choices and struggles felt realistic. I really enjoyed the premise of the book and enjoyed reading about the White Rose, a subject that isn't often written about in WW2 books; OVerall, I thought that this book was a decent read but didn't blow my mind or feel particularly surprising or impactful.
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  • Stories Unfolded (aka Danielle Olson)
    January 1, 1970
    (***Please note that this review may contain spoilers***)Before I jump into my thoughts about The Traitor, I wanted to start with a quote from the author's notes. "I can safely say that fewer Europeans outside of Germany, and most Americans, particularly young people, know little of the resistance movements like the White Rose and the Red Orchestra. Their only exposure may be a mention in passing during a history class on World War II. This is another reason I wanted to write The Traitor. We (***Please note that this review may contain spoilers***)Before I jump into my thoughts about The Traitor, I wanted to start with a quote from the author's notes. "I can safely say that fewer Europeans outside of Germany, and most Americans, particularly young people, know little of the resistance movements like the White Rose and the Red Orchestra. Their only exposure may be a mention in passing during a history class on World War II. This is another reason I wanted to write The Traitor. We should never forget". (The Traitor, V.S. Alexander)For almost a year, I've been reading various historical fiction books surrounding WWII because I wanted to continue learning about this time in history. Like the author said, "we should never forget" and books like The Traitor and all the others I've read are making sure we know about the people that resisted Hitler's evil and the horrors of that terrible time in history. We should never forget so that we never see this again in our future.The Traitor is based on a real group called the White Rose who "composed four leaflets, which exposed and denounced Nazi and SS atrocities, including the extermination of Jews and Polish nobility, and called for resistance to the regime" (History).Rather than focus on the real life founders and participants of this group, V.S. Alexander created fictional characters that could have been really part of the group. I thought this was a great path for the author to go because there's more that he could do with the characters and there's less pressure to be historically accurate with real individuals. However, he still included the founders, Hans and Sophie Scholl as well as other prominent members of the group, but made sure to be true to who they were.This book was different from the books I've read recently, as it focused solely on the perspective of one person, Natalya Petrovich. Other books usually include perspectives from several different people. I liked that I was able to follow just one person's thoughts and experiences throughout the entire war. We follow Natalya through seeing her town (Munich) destroy jewish establishments all the way to the American liberation of the POW prison she was working at.V.S. Alexander really captured the horrific circumstances, torture, manipulation, blackmail, and deceitfulness that Natalya faced after she was arrested for being a member of the White Rose. She was consider a traitor to the Reich and every day could have been her last. She spent years in prison, was sent to an asylum, and escaped with the help of others who resisted Hitler's rule. There was a lot of death along the way and Natalya lost a lot of people, but she didn't lose hope and kept on going despite everything she'd been through. She was a very brave woman and I suspect there were many women like her that actually existed during WWII.Overall, this book was amazing. I couldn't put it down and would highly recommend reading it regardless of the genres you do or don't read. It's a great story about resilience in the face of death and uncertainty. It's a look into another piece of history that you may not know enough about. Most importantly, it highlights the evil that plagued its time and how people overcame it and fought against it. I look forward to reading more from this author and happy I discovered him on NetGalley.
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  • Misfit
    January 1, 1970
    Will wait for reviews. My luck with this publisher is not so good.
  • Tristan Munoz
    January 1, 1970
    V.S. Alexander does an excellent job of bringing the lesser known stories of WWII to readers. I absolutely LOVED “The Taster,” and was thrilled to get the chance to read an ARC of “The Traitor.” The Traitor is inspired by The White Rose, a resistance group in Germany led by young adults. The story is told through Natalya, who was born in Russia but lives her life primarily in Germany. She hopes that by joining the resistance group, she can do her part in fighting against the horrors unfolding in V.S. Alexander does an excellent job of bringing the lesser known stories of WWII to readers. I absolutely LOVED “The Taster,” and was thrilled to get the chance to read an ARC of “The Traitor.” The Traitor is inspired by The White Rose, a resistance group in Germany led by young adults. The story is told through Natalya, who was born in Russia but lives her life primarily in Germany. She hopes that by joining the resistance group, she can do her part in fighting against the horrors unfolding in Germany. Two things I love are learning and entertainment. I am thrilled any time I can combine those two passions. V.S. Alexander’s books have become some of my favorites because they shed light on historical topics through likable characters. Thank you, NetGalley, Kensington Books, and V.S. Alexander for the ARC of The Traitor in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    As I have read other books written by this author, I admit to keeping an eye for books by them. Though I have to say it was the book cover that initially caught my eye. I have seen two different covers for this title and do like both. Both covers could easily be taken from scenes within the book. After noticing the cover, I read the blurb and knew it was a book I had to read. I find the World War Two era fascinating and humbling and think it is a period in history that should never, ever be As I have read other books written by this author, I admit to keeping an eye for books by them. Though I have to say it was the book cover that initially caught my eye. I have seen two different covers for this title and do like both. Both covers could easily be taken from scenes within the book. After noticing the cover, I read the blurb and knew it was a book I had to read. I find the World War Two era fascinating and humbling and think it is a period in history that should never, ever be forgotten. The book is historical fiction, though it is based on real events.This book is slightly different to others I have read set in this period of history as it is from the point of view of someone living in Germany. Someone who before Hitler came into power with his different ideas on genetics and the human race would have been considered a German. The more I read from this point of view the more interested in it I become. The book tells of Natalya’s experience of Kristallnacht, which occurred on the night of 9th November, 1938 and translates into English as The Night of Broken Glass. Natalya and her friend go out on a shopping errand for Mary and see the remnants of a burnt synagogue and hear soldiers laughing and joking about the fact that the Rabbi had attempted to rescue the Tora scrolls and other items from the burning building. This is also the first time that Natalya’s life crosses paths with that of a man who will become an important part of her life. He approaches Natalya and Lisa and explains what has happened, the building has been set on fire and that the Rabbi has been sent to Dachau. The girls move on passing the broken glass of a Jewish owned pharmacy where her father works. When Peter notices his daughter and her friend, he tells them the streets are not safe and that they should return home immediately.The main character and just one of my favourite characters in this book is sixteen year old, Natalya Petrovich who lives with her parents, Mary and Peter. They have already fled Russia and now live in Germany. Natalya volunteers to work as a nursing volunteer at the Russian Front with the German Red Cross where the fighting is and soon see’s the human cost of Hitler’s war. It’s whilst caring for soldiers that she meets those that end up introducing her to the White Rose. It is Alex that brings her into his social circle and takes her to see a local woman called Sina, with her children Dimitra and Anna, where they drink, sing and talk of their distrust and displeasure with Hitler. Natalya witnesses Sina, Dimitri and Anna rounded up with other people and see’s what happens to them, a vision which plagues her even after she leaves the area and is back home with her family.This book tells the tale of a very real group of German teenagers and how they reacted to the changing world around them. The way they form a society of like-minded people to resist what is happening around them and become widely known as the White Rose. The White Rose write and distribute letters around Germany using the train system to travel around the area and drop the leaflets at addresses and shops etc, where they hope it will give others courage to make some sort of stand or resist what is happening around them in any way be it in a small or larger way. These missions become riskier, with the members being followed and the invitation to new people to join the group. The main, former members of the group are brother and sister, Hans and Sophie. Natalya becomes braver and more determined to join in any act of resistance she can. She takes part in the leaflet drops with her childhood best friend Lisa Kolbe and then later in the book joins Alex, Hans and others in spraying and writing graffiti on local buildings. The book goes on to reveal how Natalya becomes acquainted with the other members of the White Rose, how she becomes an active member. How the White Rose members are captured, tortured and some killed. Others that the Nazi’s hope to manipulate into revealing more about the resistance movement are sent to German prisons. Herr Garrett Adler, the man she first met the morning after the night of glass turns out to be a Nazi party member and he tells Natalya he was instrumental in her not being sentenced to death, and that he keeps an eye on her parents. He tries to blackmail Natalya into revealing anything she knows about other rebels by threatening her parents and when she doesn’t reveal anything Natalya is sent on to a mental asylum where medical procedures and experiments are done on the patients by one of the Doctors. Initially things seem like they are going to improve for Natalya when she comes across a Doctor there that is also part of the resistance movement and helps her and another patient plan an escape. Unfortunately, someone learns about the Doctor being a resistance member and he and the other patient are arrested and taken away. When the other Doctor taking Natalya to be sterilised as her kind should not be allowed to breed! Natalya knows she has to escape as soon as possible or she may die in this asylum. It’s when she escapes that she meets Greta who helps her disguise herself, create a new person to be and ends up being the one that introduces Natalya to the man who she eventually comes to love. Then just when you think Natalya has gone through the worst life can throw at her and she has a chance at happiness with a man with similar values as hers Herr Garett Adler rears his head again making it known to Natalya that though she now goes by a different name, and has changed her looks that he knows who she really is and can take everything away from her whenever he wants.Then just when you think Natalya has gone through the worst life can throw at her and she has a chance at happiness with a man with similar values as hers Herr Garett Adler rears his head again making it known to Natalya that though she now goes by a different name, and has changed her looks that he knows who she really is and can take everything away from her whenever he wants.It seems odd and wrong to have “favourite” character when the people depicted in this book are not totally fictional. Instead I will share with you the characters who represented real people whom I admired. Firstly, I admired both Natalya and Lisa “normal” everyday girls from normal families taking trips with highly dangerous reading material hidden in their luggage and clothes. Though Greta seemed to lack emotions at time when she was dealing with Natalya you understand that she has to. If she became overly attached to those she is helping and knew their stories and she could inadvertently reveal something endangering themselves and others. Greta treats the risks she is taking in a very business like way. Even telling Natalya she will have to move on quickly if someone more important comes along and needs her help. I went through a whole range of emotions whilst reading this book. I think it was made all the more poignant by the fact it is actually based on actual real events. It shows how, many people taking part in small acts of resistance and defiance can actually come together and eventually make a difference. Some of these characters do represent real people such as the founders of the White Rose, Sophie and Hans. Obviously, there were others in their organisation and the author has used fabricated names. This era of history is a very important one, and should never be forgotten. Many died because of one man and his new ideas of what he thought the future should look like. He sent millions to their death either in gas chambers, or worked to death. There were survivors who are now sadly dying of old age or complications due to what they suffered during this time. People rarely had any sort of happy ending, they lost family and friends. Even after liberation they had to rebuild their lives, search for family and friends and start to rebuild their own lives and what was left of their country all as well as coming to terms with what had happened.At the very end of the book the author lists other books about Sophie, Hans and the White Rose as well as listing a film that was made about Sophie. My immediate thoughts upon finishing this book were that the book was an amazing fictional take on a real organisation the White Rose who existed in Nazi Germany.To sum up this book gives a different point view of World War 2, in that it concentrates on Germans and how they were treated by the Nazi party in their own country. This book deals with another facet of an awful era in history that should never, ever be forgotten.I have to add I didn't think I would ever love a book from this point of view as much as I did The Taster, also by this author but I adored this one just as much.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    As war rages across Europe, a series of anonymous leaflets, criticizing the brutal Nazi regime, appear on the streets of Germany. Their message, written in secret, is a daring act of defiance.Natalya Petrovich, a student, knows more than she should. As a member of the secret resistance group, the White Rose, Natalya is risking everything.But even among those she trusts most, there is no guarantee of safety. The Gestapo are everywhere and Natalya knows that falling into the hands of the secret As war rages across Europe, a series of anonymous leaflets, criticizing the brutal Nazi regime, appear on the streets of Germany. Their message, written in secret, is a daring act of defiance.Natalya Petrovich, a student, knows more than she should. As a member of the secret resistance group, the White Rose, Natalya is risking everything.But even among those she trusts most, there is no guarantee of safety. The Gestapo are everywhere and Natalya knows that falling into the hands of the secret police means torture–and almost certain death.At times harrowing, at times uplifting I found this to be an intriguing, compelling read. It started slowly with Natalya not joining the White Rose until about a fifth of the way through. I didn’t love Natalya but did admire her. I loved the mix of fact & fiction & loved the amount of research that had gone into the book to marry the two. Not a comfortable read but it had me often at the edge of my seatMy honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    The Traitor by V.S. Alexander is a great historical fiction taking place overall in Munich, Germany 1942 and focussing on the real-life resistance group, The White Rose, that comprised of young adult German citizens that tried to do their part in fighting the brutality of the Nazi regime. The book focusses on Natalya, a German citizen that was born in Russia. Through living amongst the changes and atrocities, she is drawn into the resistance group of like-minded individuals in hopes that they The Traitor by V.S. Alexander is a great historical fiction taking place overall in Munich, Germany 1942 and focussing on the real-life resistance group, The White Rose, that comprised of young adult German citizens that tried to do their part in fighting the brutality of the Nazi regime. The book focusses on Natalya, a German citizen that was born in Russia. Through living amongst the changes and atrocities, she is drawn into the resistance group of like-minded individuals in hopes that they can help fight back. I enjoyed the plot, the pace, and the suspense. There were definitely some nail-biting moments that had me glued to my seat, yet antsy to turn the page again and again to find out what would happen next! I love plots that take a bite out of real people, groups, or situations and creates a fantastic and believable tale that enthralls me from beginning to end. As far as characters go, Natalya was ok, but not as intriguing or magnetic as many I have read lately. However, she was still like able and did not detract from the book itself. I have read about the White Rose resistance group a few times, and it was great to dive into a book that shed more light on how it would have felt being part of the group itself. 4/5 starsThank you NetGalley and Kensington for this ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion.I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon and B&N accounts upon publication.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting story. Interesting piece of history. Ultimately though I didn't find myself able to connect to the characters. For some reason I just didn't find them that interesting and was never pulled back into the story after I stopped reading. So while the story was interesting, I just wasn't blown away.
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  • Leslie M.
    January 1, 1970
    I love WWII-era books, so I was excited to have the chance to read this one. I've never read anything by Alexander, but I look forward to reading future books. This book is fiction, but it's based on fact. I only knew a little bit about the White Rose before this book, so I enjoyed learning more about that, as well. I found the author's note at the end very informative, and I suggest reading it.I liked how the book was told solely from Natalya's POV, as many books of this genre use multiple I love WWII-era books, so I was excited to have the chance to read this one. I've never read anything by Alexander, but I look forward to reading future books. This book is fiction, but it's based on fact. I only knew a little bit about the White Rose before this book, so I enjoyed learning more about that, as well. I found the author's note at the end very informative, and I suggest reading it.I liked how the book was told solely from Natalya's POV, as many books of this genre use multiple POVs. It allows the reader to really connect with her and see the world and all the horrors through her eyes. I had a hard time putting this one down, as I was quite curious to learn more and see how everything played out. A key theme is resilience, particularly in the face of evil.Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy, but I wasn't required to leave a positive review.
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  • Sherry Chiger
    January 1, 1970
    "The Traitor" does a fine job of evoking life in Munich during the Nazi regime and of introducing readers to the White Rose, a little-known resistance movement organized by young Germans. The pace was great; there were several times when the suspense built beautifully, to the point I almost missed my subway stop while reading. Unfortunately, the narrator/protagonist was one of the duller characters not just of the book but of first-person narrators I've read during my lifetime. As a result, I "The Traitor" does a fine job of evoking life in Munich during the Nazi regime and of introducing readers to the White Rose, a little-known resistance movement organized by young Germans. The pace was great; there were several times when the suspense built beautifully, to the point I almost missed my subway stop while reading. Unfortunately, the narrator/protagonist was one of the duller characters not just of the book but of first-person narrators I've read during my lifetime. As a result, I was less invested in the story and at times bored by the narrative. What's more, the denouement was a bit melodramatic for my tastes. Thank you, NetGalley and Kensington Books, for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Claudia Doke
    January 1, 1970
    If you have been following my blog for a while (www.theloveofbooks.co.uk), then you know that historical fiction is one of my favourite genres. While I enjoy reading books about all time periods, I tend to favour books set during the Second World War. What can I say, I am fascinated by this period in history. When you read a lot of books that are set during the same time period, you start to notice similarities between the various books. In the case of books set during World War Two, you tend to If you have been following my blog for a while (www.theloveofbooks.co.uk), then you know that historical fiction is one of my favourite genres. While I enjoy reading books about all time periods, I tend to favour books set during the Second World War. What can I say, I am fascinated by this period in history. When you read a lot of books that are set during the same time period, you start to notice similarities between the various books. In the case of books set during World War Two, you tend to see a lot of books set in Nazi-occupied France, concentration camps, or England during the war. There are also a great many books about spy organisations, or other organisations which helped those who were persecuted by the Nazi party. These are some of the more fascinating aspects of this period in history, so it makes sense that they are prevalent in books. By no means is this a bad thing, in fact some of my absolute favourite historical fiction novels fit into these categories. That being said, it is refreshing to find a historical fiction novel that teaches you something new about a period in history that interests you. That is the case with The Traitor by V.S. Alexander, and I think this is partially why I loved this book so much.Considering how many books I have read which are set during the Second World War, I am surprised that I have never heard of the White Rose before picking up this book. The White Rose was a resistance group led by a group of students at the University of Munich during World War Two. The purpose of this group was to create active resistance against the Nazi regime through anonymous leaflets and graffiti. It was a non-violent group. In the authors note, V.S. Alexander says that he has "always found World War II a tragic, terrifying, and humbling subject," and that he was particularly fascinated by the White Rose movement. The White Rose has been extensively covered by academics, historians, and even filmmakers in the past, but I've never seen a fictional novel about this organisation. (I'm sure there are other ones, I am just not aware of them - if you know of any, please comment below and I will look them up!) I am actually surprised that I have not seen more about The White Rose in the past, because it is a fascinating subject.While The Traitor is based around the White Rose, the plot and majority of the characters are entirely fictional. Hans and Sophie Scholl, as well as some other members of the White Rose, do make an appearance, but the protagonist Natalya and her activities within the novel are invented. The story of Natalya is a compelling one. The Traitor is really the story of one woman's determination to survive in Nazi Germany while sticking to her values and beliefs. It is a fascinating story; I did not want to put it down until the very end. I have a tendency to incessantly talk about books that I truly love, and that proved true when I finished this book. It has been added to my mental list of excellent historical fiction novels, and I know that I will be recommending it to people for years to come. My only slight criticism of this book is that I would have liked to see a bit more about the White Rose movement. However, I also understand why the author chose to take the story in the direction that he did, and his decision does make sense for the plot as a whole. I am now even more fascinated by this point in history, and look forward to reading more about the White Rose in the future.I would like to thank V.S. Alexander, One More Chapter, and NetGalley for providing me with an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Shirley
    January 1, 1970
    Resist the only way we canThe Traitor is a fiction novel based on the true story of "The White Rose" a resistance group formed by College Students Hans and Sophia Scholl and their college friends. The main character is a friend and a member of the group Natalya, her friend Lisa and the villain is a boy named Garrick who pretends to like Natalya in order to infiltrate the group. He is really a Gestapo agent.The White Rose group really existed and Hans and Sophia Scholl were the leaders. There Resist the only way we canThe Traitor is a fiction novel based on the true story of "The White Rose" a resistance group formed by College Students Hans and Sophia Scholl and their college friends. The main character is a friend and a member of the group Natalya, her friend Lisa and the villain is a boy named Garrick who pretends to like Natalya in order to infiltrate the group. He is really a Gestapo agent.The White Rose group really existed and Hans and Sophia Scholl were the leaders. There were many members of this group. The group made flyers against Hitler and distributed them throughout Germany telling the people of the horrible things Hitler was doing. They also wrote messages in paint like Down with Hitler and Hitler is a murderer, drew swastikas' on buildings and put a red X through them. Many of the members were caught and murdered with the guillotine by the Nazi's. In the story Natalya's life was spared and she was sent to prison on the word by Garrick that she would spy for them in prison and help them catch other resistance members. She never did.This is the story of Natalya through her association with the White Rose, imprisonment, time in the asylum where Garrick had her sent trying to catch other resistance members to the escape from the asylum and a safe house to her meeting with her future husband Manfred and work at a POW camp. It is the story of how she survived, her family, her cat named Katz and that of her friends. The book is a story of Patriotism, Resistance in the face of death, love of family, a lot of courage and a great ending. The book kept me reading until wee hours in the morning. I would definitely recommend it.Thanks to V.S. Alexander, Harper Collins UK One More Chapter, and NetGalley for allowing me to read an advanced copy of the book for an honest review.
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  • Debbi
    January 1, 1970
    A young woman growing up in Munich as the Nazi's come to power...living in a world where you can trust no one. Natalya Petrovich, or Talya as she is called, is the daughter of Russian emigrés who have become German citizens. But where life was once good for the Petrovich family, it is turning very, very bad. On Kristallnacht Talya sees an enormous fire burning. Slipping out with her best friend Lisa she is horrified to see that a historic synagogue, part of the community for years, has burned to A young woman growing up in Munich as the Nazi's come to power...living in a world where you can trust no one. Natalya Petrovich, or Talya as she is called, is the daughter of Russian emigrés who have become German citizens. But where life was once good for the Petrovich family, it is turning very, very bad. On Kristallnacht Talya sees an enormous fire burning. Slipping out with her best friend Lisa she is horrified to see that a historic synagogue, part of the community for years, has burned to the ground. She meets a young good looking man who seems to be as horrified as she is. Or is he? A few years later she will run into him again, and he will change the course of her life. Growing up Talya rails against the brutality of the Nazis but feels there is little she can do. When she finds that her closest friends are part of the secret resistance group the White Rose, she wants to do her part. But not only Talya will pay a terrible price is discovered, perhaps the ultimate price. The Traitor in the title might be many people in the book; those who resist the Nazis are considered traitors. Those who pervert the laws that change Germany into a fascist state could be considered traitors. People who help other people to survive, or to escape are considered traitors. But who is the real traitor? V.S. Alexander's book is through provoking, suspenseful, and causes us to ask ourselves: what would we do in Talya's situation?The Traitor is a very interesting and thought provoking read, from the point of view of a German woman of Russian descent. Its full of nuance and complex questions, and definitely worth the read.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    Stories about World War II have always fascinated me, especially those that are based in fact and tell the stories of ordinary people forced into extraordinary circumstances. Sometimes it seems like it was all of Europe. The Traitor by V. S. Alexander fits right into that category and I enjoyed it very much.Natalya Petrovich is just a student when things begin to get ominous in Germany. Her family comes from Russia but they have done their best to assimilate themselves into the German culture. Stories about World War II have always fascinated me, especially those that are based in fact and tell the stories of ordinary people forced into extraordinary circumstances. Sometimes it seems like it was all of Europe. The Traitor by V. S. Alexander fits right into that category and I enjoyed it very much.Natalya Petrovich is just a student when things begin to get ominous in Germany. Her family comes from Russia but they have done their best to assimilate themselves into the German culture. However, as Natalya and her family – and many, many others – soon find out, assimilation for all isn’t part of the Master Plan. Purges and concentration camps appear, and many Germans just don’t understand how this can be and resolve to try to do something about it.Natalya joins the White Rose, the resistance movement of young Germans against the Nazi regime. Her job is to participate in writing and distributing a series of anonymous leaflets hidden in public places or mailed to addresses selected at random from the phone book denouncing the Nazi regime. Author Alexander does an excellent job of portraying the fear and danger, the dedication, the loss of friends and the betrayal of others.Thanks to One More Chapter Books Harper Collins for providing an advance copy of The Traitor via NetGalley for my honest review. I enjoyed it and recommend it. All opinions are my own.
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  • Caitlyn Martin
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of this book from netgalley.com. All thoughts are my own. V.S. Alexander charmed me with The Taster, so I was very excited to read The Traitor. I expected a stunning novel with difficult subject matter, characters brought to life, and a historical setting described so vividly and realistically that it made me feel like I was there. I was not disappointed. The book follows Natalya Petrovich and is based on the true story of the White Rose. She is adamantly opposed to I received an advanced copy of this book from netgalley.com. All thoughts are my own. V.S. Alexander charmed me with The Taster, so I was very excited to read The Traitor. I expected a stunning novel with difficult subject matter, characters brought to life, and a historical setting described so vividly and realistically that it made me feel like I was there. I was not disappointed. The book follows Natalya Petrovich and is based on the true story of the White Rose. She is adamantly opposed to the Nazi regime, and does what she can to resist and fight back. She loses friends and lands in prison, but she never gives up. The Traitor has stunning language. The characters are well-developed and easy to relate to. Everything is described vividly without going overboard. Time passes through the course of the book in a natural way; it doesn't feel like too much or too little is written for any given scene. This was a hard read, but I enjoyed it. I would not recommend picking this up for a light read, but would absolutely recommend it to anyone looking for a WWII novel. The overarching theme of holding out hope even when things look hopeless is something that we all need sometimes.
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  • Jeanne Loidolt
    January 1, 1970
    Evil prevails if good people do nothing This is a well written historical fiction about one woman living in a terrifying time. She is profoundly courageous because regardless of her sense of helplessness, she stands on her convictions to risk destruction of everything she values not because she is strong and powerful but is impelled by her personal sense of right and wrong. Natalya’s proud country has already succumbed to evil leaders who promise prosperity and a good life for all in a lie which Evil prevails if good people do nothing This is a well written historical fiction about one woman living in a terrifying time. She is profoundly courageous because regardless of her sense of helplessness, she stands on her convictions to risk destruction of everything she values not because she is strong and powerful but is impelled by her personal sense of right and wrong. Natalya’s proud country has already succumbed to evil leaders who promise prosperity and a good life for all in a lie which sucks resources and comfort for their personal aggrandizement. Fear replaces freedom and normal people are paralyzed. Natalya can only impact her small circumference of daily interaction. Knowing full well the dangers she faces, she does what little she can. Too often we are overwhelmed with how small we are compared to how vast our evil enemies seem. Only when countless small warriors against evil do their part can one person become part of a vast army for good to defeat evil forces. Natalya was faithful to the daily choices within her life and became a part of a larger good to effect change. An inspirational story, well researched with countless nuances that bring fearful times to life and reveals character flaws and strengths throughout.
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  • Bob H
    January 1, 1970
    A re-telling, as a historical-fiction novel, of the White Rose resistance group in wartime Nazi Germany. The group, and the leading figures, among them Sophie Scholl, Hans Scholl, Cristoph Probst, were real, and rightly celebrated for their courage and defiance, printing and strewing anti-Nazi leaflets in the University of Munich and elsewhere. This novel tells their story -- first-person -- through a fictional character, a peripheral figure in the White Rose, Natalya Petrovich, a Russian-German A re-telling, as a historical-fiction novel, of the White Rose resistance group in wartime Nazi Germany. The group, and the leading figures, among them Sophie Scholl, Hans Scholl, Cristoph Probst, were real, and rightly celebrated for their courage and defiance, printing and strewing anti-Nazi leaflets in the University of Munich and elsewhere. This novel tells their story -- first-person -- through a fictional character, a peripheral figure in the White Rose, Natalya Petrovich, a Russian-German student. Natalya had served as a volunteer nurse on the Eastern Front and witnessed a massacre, and becomes a willing participant in the White Rose on her return. The book captures the mood and terrors of the time. The narrative is sensitive, and in a first-person voice, compelling. V.S. Alexander has written other powerful historical novels, notably The Magdalen Girls and does justice to this story.Read in advance-reading copy from Amazon Vine.
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  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    Poignant Read, The Traitor focuses mainly on Natalya Petrovich and her life during the 1940's. Natalya and family moved from Russia to Munich, hoping Germany would be a better life. How Natalya became involved in the White Rose resistance movement, and the devastating events that follow. They show great courage in what would've been a terrifying time, not knowing who you could genuinely trust.Whilst this is a book of fiction, it is inspired by a true story, and blended together. To be honest, Poignant Read, The Traitor focuses mainly on Natalya Petrovich and her life during the 1940's. Natalya and family moved from Russia to Munich, hoping Germany would be a better life. How Natalya became involved in the White Rose resistance movement, and the devastating events that follow. They show great courage in what would've been a terrifying time, not knowing who you could genuinely trust.Whilst this is a book of fiction, it is inspired by a true story, and blended together. To be honest, I'd not really heard a great deal about the White Rose movement previously, which makes it all the more tragic, the author notes that some characters from this resistance, included, he kept them as close to their true selves as he could; notes at the back of the book gives more details on his research before writing it.I've given this book 4⭐️'s , not because it's not good but because for me personally, it took a while to get into it, I'd more likely have put 4.5/5. This isn't my first choice of genre, and because of this I'm much more picky. Having said that I'm glad I had the offer to read it, thank you.
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  • Doreen Prentiss Gabriellini
    January 1, 1970
    The Traitor by V.S. Alexander is based on a true story regarding the White Rose resistance movement. A group of students who attended the University of Munich decided they could not longer sit on the sidelines and watch what the Nazi’s were doing to the Jews and the German people. They decided on creating a resistance group in order to make the change they wanted to see. Four characters in the story were based on real life people. The author created a fictional member of the resistance so as not The Traitor by V.S. Alexander is based on a true story regarding the White Rose resistance movement. A group of students who attended the University of Munich decided they could not longer sit on the sidelines and watch what the Nazi’s were doing to the Jews and the German people. They decided on creating a resistance group in order to make the change they wanted to see. Four characters in the story were based on real life people. The author created a fictional member of the resistance so as not to change or do an injustice to the memory of these four heroes.I have read many, many books of this period but this was the first time I was made aware of a real life movement known as the White Rose. The White Rose was a risky but peaceful movement. V.S. Alexander does an excellent job of bringing the lesser known stories of WWII to readers. I love learning about this time history. It is definitely worth the time to read the author’s notes at the end. V.S. Alexander’s books are wonderful because they shed light on historical topics through likable characters.Thank you, NetGalley, Kensington Books, and V.S. Alexander for the ARC of The Traitor in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Readers of the genre know that there's always something special when fictional characters interact with real historical figures= and this novel of the White Rose movement is no exception. Told through the voice of Natalya, it's the tale of young Germans who tried to fight the regime non-violently, a fight which was, unfortunately, unsuccessful. Natalya is a Russian emigre to Germany, her parents having fled to Munich when things went sideways in Russia. The novel opens with Kristallnacht and Readers of the genre know that there's always something special when fictional characters interact with real historical figures= and this novel of the White Rose movement is no exception. Told through the voice of Natalya, it's the tale of young Germans who tried to fight the regime non-violently, a fight which was, unfortunately, unsuccessful. Natalya is a Russian emigre to Germany, her parents having fled to Munich when things went sideways in Russia. The novel opens with Kristallnacht and then jumps (disconcertingly) to Natalya traveling via train to serve as a nurse at the front. It brings her back to Munich where she connects with the network and, sadly, discovers that trust is a fragile thing. I was unfamiliar with the White Rose network; recommend reading the afterward for additional information. My quibble is that Natalya is not the most engaging character. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. For fans of historical fiction.
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